Edzna | Transportista y Tour Operador en Campeche

Tours, Tranportación y Paquetes

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Edzná Diurno: La Casa de los Itzaes

Visita guiada a la zona arqueológica de Edzná, situada a 45 min al sureste de la ciudad capital, la Antigua ciudad maya presente desde 600 a.c. aproximadamente se mantuvo presente a lo largo de casi 1800 años. Antigua Ciudad maya, coronada por su templo pirámide de los cinco pisos

tour edzna campeche

City Tour Diurno

Adéntrate para conocer los principales atractivos de nuestra ciudad.

tour edzna campeche

Paquete Relajes

HOTEL POR 3 DIAS 2 NOCHES PLAN EUROPEO, PRECIO POR PERSONA SEGÚN HAB. MENORES ACOMPAÑADOS DE DOS ADULTOS.

Paquete Artesanía y Cultura

HOTEL POR 4 DÍAS 3 NOCHES PLAN EUROPEO, EN BASE DOBLE

tour edzna campeche

Paquete Arqueología, Historia, Tradición y Aventura

HOTEL POR 5 DÍAS 4 NOCHES PLAN EUROPEO, PRECIO POR PERSONA SEGÚN LA BASE Y COSTO MENOR ACOMPAÑADO DE DOS ADULTOS.

tour edzna campeche

Paquete Agua, Tierra y Pasión

HOTEL POR 4 DÍAS 3 NOCHES PLAN EUROPEO, PRECIO POR PERSONA SEGÚN LA BASE Y COSTO MENOR ACOMPAÑADO DE DOS ADULTOS.

tour edzna campeche

Edzná y Santa Rosa Xtampak

Visita a dos grandes capitales regionales del occidente. Edzná con su diversidad de estilos arquitectónicos con su impresionante panorámica; y Santa Rosa Xtampak.

Disfruta de Edzná y Santa Rosa construida sobre una colina y abrazada por la selva en la región de los Chenes.

tour edzna campeche

Calakmul y Balamkú

Una inmersión a la selva de reyes. Visita a Calakmul, el centro político más importante del Clásico Maya; y Balamkú con su hermosa muestra de monumentos con decoración a base de estuco aun en perfecto estado de conservación.

tour edzna campeche

Carmen y Laguna de Terminos

Visita a la Laguna de Términos para recorrer en embarcación menor sus atractivos naturales como son aves y delfines. Paseo por el centro histórico de Ciudad del Carmen y comida. Retorno por la tarde a la Ciudad de Campeche.

tour edzna campeche

Laguna de Terminos – Playa Tortugas

Recorrido en embarcación menor por la costa de la laguna de Términos, antiguo refugio de piratas que es hoy un hermoso santuario natural donde se pueden admirar los delfines boca de botella y diversas especies de aves. Visitaremos el faro del poblado y comeremos en Bahía Tortugas donde comeremos ricos platos de la región costera.

tour edzna campeche

Camino Real Artesanal

Tour Artesanal, Gastronómico y Arqueológico. Recorrido guiado por los principales atractivos del llamado Camino Real o Ruta Artesanal. Veremos el tejido de sombreros en cuevas, y tendrá la posibilidad de degustar el pan tradicional hecho en hornos de piedra de Pomuch

tour edzna campeche

City Tour Nocturno

Tour por la ciudad admirando la arquitectura de la ciudad en su aspecto nocturno. Disfrutando su puesta de sol desde algunos monumentos del malecón de la ciudad y terminar degustando los antojitos típicos de la región.

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Home » Travel » A day trip from Campeche to the Edzna Mayan ruins

A day trip from Campeche to the Edzna Mayan ruins

the Edzna Mayan ruins near Campeche main plaza

I love a good Mayan ruin. If they’re of the lesser-visited variety like Edzná, so much the better. With a few days in the colourful Mexican city of Campeche on the western side of the Yucatán peninsula, a day trip to the Edzná ruins was too big a draw to resist.

Getting from Campeche to Edzná

Being fans of independent travel and public transport, a tour wasn’t an option for us. However, our outdated Lonely Planet guidebook (note to self: buy the new one – details in the box below) sent us in the direction of a bus stop that clearly hadn’t seen a bus for quite some time. Plan B came into force …

Don't make the mistake we did: Get the up-to-date Lonely Planet Guide to Mexico before you go. Help the site by buying the guide through this link, at no extra cost to you.

Undeterred, and with the knowledge that Mexico is a country that DOES public transport and that there would be SOME way of getting to Edzná from Campeche, we did the only sensible thing possible: followed the collectivos (combi vans) . A short bout of out-of-breath-ness later, this led us to a collective of collectivos all painted in red and white, parked up on Calle Chihuahua near Campeche’s market.

Collectivos are a wonder of Mexican transport, and for me, one of my top tips for travelling in Mexico.

Collectivo drivers are pretty helpful, and a few words of Spanish to explain we were going to the Edzná ruins saw us directed to a Bonfil-bound collectivo for the 55km (approx. 1 hr) journey, departing at 11am.

The ruins are a few hundred metres from the main road, but our driver detoured to drop us right at the entrance once we’d conveyed that’s where we were heading. The journey cost 45 peso per person each way (less than £2).

The Mayan ruins of Edzná

Safely dropped off, we paid the 60 peso per person entrance fee  (about £2.50) and began our explorations.

The Mayan city of Edzná was a big deal in its day, particularly between 400 and 1000 AD, when it was the powerful regional capital of the western Yucatán . It was eventually abandoned around 1450 AD.

Its buildings reflect its former grandeur , and we happily hauled ourselves up and down the steep steps to towering platforms for a view over what used to be the main plaza .

Edzná's main plaza, Campeche, Mexico

The highest structure is out of bounds for climbing, but the rest were fair game, so we gave our hamstrings a good workout as we posed for photos.

main pyramid, Edzna, Campeche

The early buildings at Edzná are typical of the Petén architectural style (Petén nowadays is a region of northern Guatemala), with later structures showing influences of the Tardíos, Chenes and Puuc. Back in the day, the main limestone structures were often painted dark red . Others had facades adorned with the faces of gods and the mythical animals of the Mayan world . You can read more here on Edzná’s history and architecture here .

The Old Sorceress at Edzná

After the main plaza, we ventured off to the Old Sorceress around a ten-minute walk along a grassy track . But not before having acquired impromptu new hairstyles from the surrounding flora!

Vines at the Edzna Mayan ruins, Campeche

Reaching the Old Sorceress was Andrew’s excuse to go full-on Indiana Jones , as he scrambled off up the steep and jungle-covered un-restored pyramid.

Overall, we spent about 2 hours at Edzná, although if you’re less photo-happy than us then an hour-and-a-half would be plenty. Although not completely untouristed, most visitors to Edzná were Mexican, and we spotted a grand total of zero tour groups 🙂

Getting from Edzná back to Campeche

For public transport back from Edzná to Campeche we headed to the main road , and hung out under this road junction sign to flag down a collectivo.

how to get from Edzna to Campeche

The road isn’t too busy and waiting here meant transport options coming from two directions. We had to wait about 15 minutes for a collectivo coming from Bonfil back to Campeche but you may get an offer of a lift whilst you wait.

In our case, a guy in a pick-up truck stopped and offered us a lift back from Edzná to Campeche before the collectivo arrived. From prior research, coupled with my previous experience in this part of Mexico, this didn’t seem out of the ordinary. However, I politely declined as I wanted to make sure the public transport option worked so I could write this article 🙂 On a previous trip to Mexico , after a public transport fail at Uxmal caused by my then sub-par Spanish skills, I gladly accepted the offer of a lift to Mérida, resulting in a very entertaining journey with some delightful Venezuelan puppeteers!

I’m not recommending hitching with strangers. On the rare occasions I have accepted a lift (typically due to a public transport fail!) my hitching safety factors include: travelling with someone, being confident that accepting lifts is fairly “normal” wherever I am, and having a “this is ok” vibe when a vehicle stops for me. Obviously the latter is subjective, but I have turned down lifts when it hasn’t felt right. This is entirely my personal take on hitching. You’ll have your own view as to what’s right for you. If you do take up a lift in this part of Mexico, it’s customary to offer to pay the equivalent of the public transport price.

Practicalities of visiting the Edzná Mayan ruins

column at Edzna, Campeche, Mexico

Location:  Around 55km from Campeche

Transport to Edzná:  45 peso collectivo from Calle Chihuahua in Campeche, tour or drive

Entrance fee:  60 peso

Food and drink:   There’s no food at Edzná, although there is a vending machine for soft drinks. You can pick up cheap eats at Campeche’s market before or after your journey – we had yummy pork rolls for the grand sum of 20 peso each.

Take with you:   Water, sunscreen, insect repellant in the rainy season, change or small notes for the collectivo and entrance fee (avoid 500 notes if you can).

To learn more about Edzná:  Check out the museum under the Baluarte de la Soledad and also at the Fuerte de San Miguel in Campeche. Both have archaeological exhibits.

Where to stay:  We bedded down at the  Hotel Socaire in Campeche , in a room so large you could’ve had a football game in there (we didn’t). It was a fabulous place to stay.

Where else to go:   Make Campeche and Edzna part of a longer Mexico itinerary. Check out my suggestions for  spending a month in the south of Mexico , from teh Yucátan peninsula to Mexico City.

Prices, info and exchange rates researched in January 2018. Some links in this post are affiliate links, including this one for accommodation options in Campeche , which means I get a small commission and a big smile if you use them to make a purchase. There's no extra cost to you for doing so 🙂

If you’re in this part of the world, I’d highly recommend the Edzná Mayan ruins as a day trip from Campeche. Have you been, or are you going? Share your experiences below.

Julie Sykes of The Gap Year Edit

Hi, I'm Julie, a York (UK)-based travel blogger and comfort-zone pusher. Join me as I bring you pics and musings from my mildly adventurous travels around the globe. My mission is to hear you say, "I"m so glad I did it!" instead of, "I wish I could, BUT ..."

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tour edzna campeche

4 Responses

We missed this when we were in Mexico, but I’m starting to think that was a mistake. They look fantastic, much more authentic than Chichén Itzá – although they were good too. Will have to go back one day.

Hi Paul, yeah they were a very cool day out. Chichén Itzá isn’t to be missed, but it’s nice to escape the crowds somewhere like Edzna 🙂 Hey ho, you’ve got the perfect excuse to go back now 🙂

Interesting article.

Getting around without being part of a tour bus time limited/restricted group, on public transport, is far more preferable and fun.

Thanks Andy. I am partial to a bit of public transport adventure – my parents have never driven, so a desire to find my own way from A to B must be in my genes! I avoid transport-only tours unless there really is no other transport choice, but I am quite partial to the occasional city walking tour – you get insights (and bar/restaurant recommendations) that are way beyond what a guidebook covers.

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A day trip from Campeche to the Edzna Mayan ruins

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Edzna (Campeche): The Definitive Guide + My best tips

The ultimate guide to visiting edzna in 2024.

Edzná is a Mayan archaeological site in the state of Campeche , Mexico. It’s only an hour away from the city of San Francisco de Campeche.

Edzná was founded in 600 BC and was a major regional capital until the 15th century. It had up to 25,000 people living there and strong ties with other great Mayan cities like Calakmul and Piedras Negras in Guatemala.

But over time, the city lost its power and influence until it was abandoned around 1450.

I didn’t know much about Edzná before I visited it and I was amazed by its beauty and history!

In this guide, I’ll show you why Edzná is a must-see in Campeche , the buildings you can’t miss, and some practical tips to plan your visit.

Why you should visit Edzná on your trip to Mexico

What to see in edzná, map of edzná, how to get to edzná, what to bring when visiting edzna.

  • ¿Where to stay to visit Edzna?

Rent a car for a trip to Mexico

Video of edzna, how to find your plane tickets at the best price, you’re traveling in mexico these articles will help you.

The archaeological site of Edzna may not be as big as Calakmul or Chichen Itza , but it has a unique charm for several reasons.

First of all, its main pyramid has 4 vaulted floors, which is very unusual for the Maya, who usually built stepped pyramids.

In addition, Edzná has a certain wild beauty , as not all the structures are perfectly clean, which has resulted in the natural invasion of plants among the stones.

Finally, it’s a hidden gem , where you won’t see many tourists . When I was there, there were only 7 of us, and more lizards than people! 😆

Edzná is one of the most fascinating Maya cities because of its technological innovation . Its people developed a sophisticated hydraulic system of pipes that they used to water the crops all year round, as well as for transportation and, sometimes, for defense.

sitio arqueológico Edzná

Edzná had many buildings for religious, administrative and residential purposes, covering an area of about 25 km². It had a mix of Puuc, Peten and Chenes architectural styles.

Today, only a small part is open to the public. These are the main structures of Edzná :

  • The Big House : the “ Nohochná” is a large platform that separates us from the Great Acropolis when we enter the site. It may have been an administrative building, or maybe a stand for events held in the main plaza.
  • Great Acropolis : this is the main complex of Edzná . It has a central plaza surrounded by several buildings. The most impressive is the Five-Story Building , a 5-story pyramid with 4 floors that have vaulted rooms, which is rare for a Maya site. You can’t climb the building anymore, but you can get a view from the top of the nearby buildings, like the House of the Moon or the Northwest Temple .

Gran Acrópolis Edzná

  • The Small Acropolis : this is next to the Great Acropolis and has 4 buildings that contain some of the oldest remains of Edzná .
  • The stelae: these are 32 stone slabs that depict the rulers who came to power, or the famous ball game, the conquest of a region, a political alliance, etc. They are from different periods (4 of them were carved between 41 and 435 AD, 11 between 633 and 830 AD, and the rest between the 9th and 10th centuries).
  • Temple of the Masks: you can easily spot this because it’s covered by a roof. There you can see the amazing stucco masks on both sides of the stairs.

Here is a map of Edzná , made by INAH , the National Institute of Anthropology and History of Mexico, to help you find the main structures.

mapa edzna

Visiting Edzná: practical information

Here is everything you need to know to visit Edzná :

  • Entrance fee: 90 pesos
  • Optional guide: 500 pesos per group
  • Open Monday to Saturday from 9:00 am to 3:00 pm
  • Sound and light show at 7pm or 8pm, depending on the season (canceled due to the pandemic)

The site is only an hour away from Campeche . If you don’t have a car, the simplest way to get there is to take a Tour from Campeche .

I paid 350 pesos for a local agency, but that price only covers transportation (not the entrance fee or the guide).

If you’re on a tight budget, you can take one of the colectivos (45 pesos) that leave near the Puerta de Tierra and go to Bonfil. They will drop you off 330 yds from the entrance (a 5-minute walk).

Edzná is very hot and humid, so you should bring mosquito repellent (there are many of them!), sunscreen and a hat or cap.

My visit to Edzná was unforgettable: I battled with swarms of mosquitoes and got a nasty sunburn as a souvenir. 🤣

¿ Where to stay to visit Edzna?

The closest city is Campeche , so it is the ideal place to spend the night before visiting Edzna. Here are my three suggestions for hotels for all budgets :

  • Melisa Hostal : very well located hostel in a beautiful typical house in the center of Campeche , friendly staff, with a small pool, access to a kitchen, and very clean and comfortable mattresses. Bed in shared room, from only 20 $usd per night
  • Casa Serena Beautiful Colonial Loft : a spacious apartment in the center of Campeche that offers excellent value for money . With air conditioning, a living room, kitchen, terrace, good wifi with breakfast included. Sleeps 2 to 4 people , starting at 125 $usd per night
  • Boutique Hotel Casa Don Gustavo : an elegant 18th century manor house completely restored on a pedestrian street in downtown Campeche. A beautiful blend of modernity and colonial decor, with comfortable air-conditioned rooms. Wifi, outdoor pool, jacuzzi and a very tasty à la carte breakfast await guests . Starting at 65 $usd!

Renting a car is for sure the best way to explore Yucatan and make the most of your stay!

To rent a car, personally, I always use Booking.com Cars, for a few reasons:

  • You can easily compare the rental cars prices between all the agencies: for sure the easiest way to find the best rate!
  • Cancellation is often offered free of charge: no need to worry if you change your mind
  • Booking Cars offers full insurance coverage at a lower price than the rental companies , so it’s an instant saving with no effort

Simply click on the green button to find your rental car at the best price:

If you want to know a little more about Edzná, I suggest you watch this interesting report from INAH.

For the best deal on your flight to Campeche or Cancun , use our Mexico flight comparison tool, powered by Skyscanner: it’s the smart way to save money on your international and domestic flights!

Discover all my articles about Mexico : All my articles to help you plan your trip to Mexico are listed there.

  • The 35 Best Things to Do in Mexico
  • Campeche : The 20 Best Places to Visit
  • Calakmul (Campeche) : How to Explore the Hidden Maya City in the Jungle
  • Itinerary : 10 days in Mexico – Mexico City , Chiapas and Yucatan
  • Itinerary : 2 weeks in Mexico   – Best itinerary to discover the Yucatan Peninsula and Chiapas!
  • Itinerary : 3 weeks in Mexico – Mexico City, Puebla , Oaxaca , Chiapas, Campeche, Yucatán and Riviera Maya
  • Itinerary : 1 month in Mexico – My Epic 30-31 Days Itinerary from Mexico City to Cancun
  • Road trip in Mexico : The best itineraries for 10, 15, 21 days and a month
  • Itinerary : 1 week in Yucatan – The Ultimate 6, 7 or 8 days Itinerary
  • Itinerary : 10 days in Yucatan – Best Itinerary for 9, 10 or 11 Days in Yucatan
  • Itinerary : 2 weeks in Yucatan – Epic Itinerary + All my Best Tips!
  • Itinerary : 3 weeks in Yucatan – Best things to do in 20-21 days
  • Itinerary : 1 month in Yucatan – Yucatan Peninsula in 29, 30 or 31 days from Cancun
  • Road trip in Yucatan : The best itineraries for 7, 10, 15, 21 days and 1 month

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I have created this blog to give you all my best tips to plan your next trip to Mexico, regardless of your budget. I share detailed itineraries, advice about places to visit as well as recommendations for transportation, hotels and restaurants. I hope I will also help you to discover amazing off the beaten path destinations in Mexico!

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Exploring Edzná—the Perfect Day Trip from Campeche

Ancient Mayan stone pyramids surrounding a grassy plaza, with blue skies and puffy clouds above

This post may contain affiliate links, which means I’ll receive a commission if you purchase through my links, at no extra cost to you. Please read  full disclosure  for more information.

If you are in or around the city of Campeche you should definitely consider exploring the nearby Edzná Archaeological Site. It makes for a perfect day trip, or even half-day trip, from Campeche.

The first reason to visit Edzná is for its unique and impressive Mayan architecture. I mean, really, Edzná has it all: a large central plaza, several pyramids and temples, a ball court, and a complex system of water management and drainage.

Ruins of stone temples surround a grassy plaza, with a blue sky and puffy clouds above

The site also offers a peaceful and less crowded experience than other sites in the area (I’m looking at you Chichen Itzá!).

You can also climb up almost all of the pyramids, which is becoming increasingly difficult at Mayan archaeological sites (and for good reason).

Overall, if you are interested in Mayan history or simply enjoy exploring archaeological sites, then a visit to Edzná is definitely worth it.

Read on for information on the site and practical tips for how to make the most of your visit to Edzná.

If you want to skip the history and go straight to the practical tips for visiting Edzná, click here .

About Edzna

Edzná is a Mayan archaeological site on the Yucatán peninsula, located in the small Mexican state of Campeche.

The site is managed and maintained by El Instituto Nacional de Antropología e Historia (INAH), Mexico’s National Institute of Anthropology and History. INAH is responsible for 193 archaeological sites across the country, and they do a pretty amazing job.  

If you want to learn about Edzná before you visit, stop by the official INAH site for Edzná . You can find a site map, some cool drone shots, and a detailed overview of the site’s history and importance.

A site map of ruins with drawings of pyramids on a green background, a brick-colored drawing of a pyramid on the lower left corner, a scale on the lower right corner, a north arrow on the upper right corner, and a title INAH Edzna at the middle top

But I will give you the highlights here!

The history of Edzná is closely tied to that of broader Maya civilization. Like many other Mayan cities, Edzná experienced a period of rapid growth and development between 400 and 1000 CE. During this time it served as an important political and cultural center for the Mayans. The city also thrived as a regional center of trade and commerce until its eventual decline in the 15 th century.

Let’s get into a few more details.

The name Edzná comes from “Ytzná”, which means “house of the Itzaes” in Maya. “Ytzná” gradually evolved into “Etzná” and eventually became Edzná.

Growth and development

The first evidence of humans at this site dates back to 600 BCE.

Over time the small community grew and eventually formed a centralized government. They developed an efficient system of canals and reservoirs for rainwater collection, storage, and disposal. The system provided them with a steady supply of water for agriculture and general use.

The city continued to grow, and they constructed the large temples and infrastructure we see today. As they grew they also absorbed surrounding villages and made alliances with other strong cities like Calakmul.

The population peaked at 25,000 around 1000 CE.

Decline and abandonment

Like many other Mayan cities, Edzná experienced a period of decline and abandonment in the four centuries that followed.

The decline was likely the result of a combination of factors such as drought, overpopulation, and environmental degradation. As the local environment became less viable to support the population, people may have been forced to move elsewhere in search of better living conditions.

A stone stepped wall in the foreground with jungle and blue skies in the background

Political instability may also have played a role in the site’s decline. Edzná was part of a larger network of Mayan city-states, and it is possible that conflicts or power struggles between these groups may have destabilized the region and contributed to the city’s abandonment.

The question of “discovery” is always a delicate one, especially for a place that locals have known about all along.

The first recorded reference to discovery of the site was in the 1860s when Austrian explorer Teobert Maler heard about the site. He was going to check it out but ultimately decided it wasn’t worth going because he heard that there wasn’t much left to see. Joke’s on him!

In the early 1900s, locals from a nearby town told Porfirio Diaz’s government about the ruins. But that news got lost in the shuffle that was the Mexican revolution.

So it wasn’t until 1927 that the government officially recognized the site and began excavations.

In another bit of interesting history, in the 1980s Edzná was the beneficiary of a job creation program for workers displaced by the civil war in Guatemala. These workers did a lot to excavate, renovate, and restore the site we can visit today.

Architecture

Those savvy archaeologists say that the structures at Edzná are primarily built in the Petén style, influenced by neighboring Guatemala. Characteristics of this style are steep walls and staircases, large limestone blocks covered in plaster and painted, and façades adorned with faces of gods, mythical creatures and symbols.

You can find similar Petén-style architecture in Uxmal, Kabah, Chichen Itza, Koba, and Tikal (Guatemala).

Site Layout and Structures

At its peak, the ancient city of Edzná covered an area of 25 km², or about 10 square miles (6400 acres). The excavated site you can visit today is only around 1 km², or 22 acres.

White map with green images and writing, rippled with shadows

Still today Edzná is nestled in a dense jungle area. The excavated site’s layout is centered around a large plaza, which is traversed by a sacbe, a raised paved Mayan road.

A number of impressive buildings and structures surround the grand plaza. The largest structure is a complex of buildings known as the Great Acropolis , with pyramids on top of pyramids.

A man stands on a steep stone stairway with trees in the background

The Temple of the Five Stories is the main event at Edzná. It sits on top of another large pyramid and, as its name implies, has five stories. You cannot climb this pyramid but it is enough to admire it from below. Don’t miss the hieroglyphics at the base.

Ancient stone pyramid with five levels, with  a grassy plaza in the foreground and a blue sky with puffy clouds

The Temple of the Moon is located on the same high pyramid as the Temple of the Five Stories. It is a large-stepped pyramid that was likely used for astronomical observations and religious ceremonies. It’s worth a quick climb up. (Also, I somehow did not get a good picture of the Temple of the Moon!)

Ancient stone ruins of temples surround a grassy plaza, with a blue sky and puffy clouds

The Southwest Temple anchors one corner of the Grand Acropolis. It is a good steep climb up, but you will be rewarded with amazing views of just about the whole site.

Ancient stone pyramid with people on top, against a backdrop of trees and a bright blue sky with puffy clouds.

The Temple of the Masks has one of the best-preserved examples of stucco masks representing the sun at sunrise and sunset, flanked by other astronomical symbols.

Ancient stucco face masks with other symbols on either side

Tucked away next to the Temple of the Masks is the Small Acropolis , another case of temples built on top of a pyramid base. This is the oldest area of the site, and not in as good shape. Look for the hieroglyphs at the base of the larger temple.

A man with his hands in the air stands on top of an ancient stone pyramid surrounded by trees

The South Temple is another five-tiered pyramid, though much smaller. It has an adjacent Ballcourt that will look familiar if you have visited other Mayan sites.

A man in a hat looks at ancient Mayan ruins of a temple

Casa Grande (Nohochná) is basically a long thin platform facing the plaza and Acropolis. It has hallways and a bunch of what were once rooms on top. It makes a great place to sit and admire the site (although it is hot up there with no shade).

Ancient stone structures on a grassy plaza, against a blue sky with puffy clouds

There are plenty of other smaller structures—go have a look for yourself!

Tips for Visiting Edzná

I recommend you always check the official INAH site for Edzná for the latest information on price and opening hours. But here is a quick summary of key information to help you plan your visit.

The site is open every day from 9am until 5pm, last entry at 4:30pm ( but it wouldn’t be worth it go for just 30 minutes).

The entrance fee is MX$90, making it one of the more affordable archaeological sites. The price has been increasingly steadily in the past few years, so get there while it’s still a bargain!

There is a very new looking toilet facility at the entrance to the site. This is the only toilet! Don’t worry, though, you will probably be sweating so much you won’t need a toilet while you are wandering the site.

There are a few vending machines with drinks and maybe some snacks. When we were there they were mostly empty and in questionable working order, so don’t count on it.

Two blue vending machines with blue awnings

Entrance to Edzná is free for Mexican citizens on Sundays, so expect it to be more crowded. Perhaps choose a different day to visit if you want it to yourself. So try to avoid Sundays and major holidays.

The official website says there is a maximum capacity of 50 people but there were way more people than that when we were there, so I don’t think anyone is counting

I loved that Edzná has all the greatest hits of a Mayan archaeological site: the tall pyramid, the ball court, the stucco masks, and a nice wide plaza. And it’s all laid out in a pretty compact area that’s easy to get around.

One cool aspect is that you don’t really see the main Temple of the Five Stories until you climb up the first part of the pyramid, so it emerges as a bit of a surprise. And it’s impressive.

Also, there are tons of iguanas! I swear my camera is full of iguana pictures from that day; I can’t help myself.

An iguana sits on a stone wall, with jungle in the background

For many people, the lack of other tourists was a main plus of visiting Edzná compared to other site. We, however, unwittingly visited Edzná on Benito Juarez’s birthday (a major Mexican holiday weekend) and certainly did not have the ruin to ourselves! Even so, it didn’t feel crowded—it just wasn’t the ghost town that others have experienced.

I was disappointed (as an urban planner nerd) that with all the talk of a sophisticated water systems, there wasn’t really anything related to see.

Should I hire a guide?

I am always torn between wanting to wander freely through an archaeological site and wanting to hire a guide.

I always learn so much from a guide (which I then proceed to immediately forget, haha). But the best part is that they have a way of pointing out subtle things that you probably would not notice on your own.

Hiring a guide can be a great way to enhance your visit to Edzná, but it is not absolutely necessary. The site is well-marked and there are plenty of informational signs in English, Spanish, and Maya (which I love to see!) throughout the site that can provide you with basic information about the different buildings and structures.

Information panel made of 9 tiles with the title (Edificio de los Cincos Pisos) and information in three languages, with a drawing of a pyramid at the bottom

That said, a knowledgeable guide can provide you with a wealth of information about the site, its architecture, and its history, and can help you to appreciate its significance in a deeper way.

Guides are available around the entrance to the site and will typically approach you as you enter. Generally speaking, you can expect to pay around MX$500 for a guide at Edzná, although fees are sometimes negotiable. The guide fee is usually for the group, not per person.

What to Bring to Edzná

Any time of year it is hot and humid in the jungles of the Yucatán. So you need to pack accordingly.

Comfortable shoes

Edzná is a fairly large site, and you will likely be doing a lot of walking and some climbing, so comfortable shoes are a must. Since it is hot, a sturdy hiking sandal is probably best.

Sun protection

Most of the site is out in the open with little shade. The Mexican sun can be intense, especially during the midday hours. Be sure to bring a hat, sunglasses, and sunscreen to protect yourself from the sun’s rays.

Rain protection

If you go in rainy season (June to October), or the forecast calls for rain, you should come prepared with an umbrella or rain jacket. There is not a lot of shelter.

It’s the jungle, my friends! You are likely to encounter mosquitoes and other insects, and you don’t want the dengue fever.

There will be more mosquitos between April and November, with the most during rainy season July to September. Bring insect repellent to keep these pests away especially if traveling during peak mosquito season.

I always travel with a bite stick as well, since they seem to get me anyway.

Water and snacks

There are no restaurants or shops at Edzná. The closest thing to offering drinks and snacks are those questionable vending machines. So it’s a good idea to bring your own drinks and snacks to keep you hydrated and energized throughout your visit. Bring more water than you think you need.

Cash and small change

It’s a good idea to bring some cash and a variety of small bills and coins with you. You will have pay for your ticket in cash, and they might not have change, especially earlier in the day. If you hire a guide, you will also have to pay them in cash. There are a few vending machines at the site, which is where coins will come in handy.

Inside of a vending machine, with mostly empty spaces and a few bags of donuts and chips

Pack light and bring only the essentials, as you’ll be doing a lot of walking in the heat and won’t want to carry too much stuff with you. If you have a car, you can bring extra drinks and snacks and leave them in the car while you walk around the site.

How to Get to Edzná

Edzná is located 55 kms southeast of Campeche and is easy to get to for a day trip, either by car, colectivo, taxi, or guided tour.

If you have a car, driving is the most convenient way to get to Edzná. The site can be reached by following Highway 180 or 261—just ask Google. There is a large parking area near the entrance to the site. It should only take 45 minutes to 1 hour from Campeche, depending on where you start and the time of day.

We had a car and it made the trip super easy.

By public transportation

If you’re staying in Campeche and don’t have access to a car, it’s easy to hop on a colectivo, or shared transport. These red and white minivans leave every 30 minutes or so from the corner of Calle Nicaragua and Calle Chihuahua, just outside the city walls. You can find the spot by searching for “Cooperativa colectivos Valle de Edzna” on Google maps.

You will want to get on a colectivo headed towards Bonfil. Just make sure when you get on the bus to confirm with the driver that they are going to Edzná and that you want to get off at the ruins. If your Spanish is rusty, just asking “Edzná?” should do the trick.  

The ticket should cost around MX$45 and the ride takes about one hour.

You will have to walk a few hundred meters from the main road to the site entrance.

Taking a taxi is probably not your best option, but it’s certainly possible. Since it is a long way to drive, it might be hard to find a driver willing to take you, and it will definitely be pricier than a colectivo. You would probably want the driver to wait for you while you explore the site, as odds are slim that you would be able to find a taxi back to Campeche.

Your hotel or accommodation might be able to recommend a driver to take you there for the day. You could also try using the Didi app, the Mexican version of Uber.  

I would guess that you would spend at least MX$500 for a taxi or driver for the day.

By guided tour

If you prefer a more organized and guided experience, there are tour companies in Campeche that offer day trips to Edzná. These tours typically include transportation, a guide, and sometimes even food and drinks. Honestly, a guided tour is probably overkill. You would be spending way more money than you need to by taking a tour, but it might be what works best for you!

Regardless of how you choose to get to Edzná, be sure to plan ahead and leave plenty of time to explore the site at your own pace.

Final Thoughts

Edzná offers a unique and less touristy experience than some of the other Mayan sites in the region.

It is well worth a visit if you are interested in Mayan history and culture, or if you simply enjoy exploring archaeological sites. Best of all, you might just have the place almost all to yourself.

And it’s an easy day trip from Campeche!

Want to learn about other beautiful but less well-known places to discover in the Yucatán? Check out this 12 Amazing Places to Visit in the Yucatán (That Aren’t Cancun) post.

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EDZNÁ - A MAYAN RUINS GUIDE

19 Jun 2023   ||    MEXICO

Located in the western Yucatan Peninsula, the Edzná Mayan ruins are an ideal excursion if you are staying in the colonial city of Campeche. Surprisingly, this spectacular archaeological site is one of the much lesser-visited ancient ruins across Mexico and makes for an outstanding day out. It was up there in our favourite experiences across the entire region! 

Our guide has everything you need to help plan your trip to Edzná independently, with all the transport, costs, and logistics information necessary to experience these exceptionally well-preserved ruins!

IN THIS GUIDE //

Edzná Mayan Ruins

About Edzná Mayan Ruins

WHAT WE LOVED ABOUT Edzná

HOW TO GET TO Edzná Ruins

– DRIVING TO Edzná

– taking a collectivo to Edzná

FAcilities and what to bring

Maps and signs around Edzná

Final Thoughts

ABOUT EDZNÁ MAYAN RUINS

Edzná is a Mayan archaeological site located in the Campeche region of Mexico, about a 45-minute drive, 55 km southeast from the city of Campeche. It dates to around 400 B.C. and features religious and residential buildings in a roughly 25 square kilometre area, housing 25,000 people at its peak. This Mayan centre was inhabited until around 1400 A.D. and has various features such as a ball court and unique glyphs. 

The Temple of the Five Floors, a 50-meter-high building, originally a residence and shrine, is the focal point of the site. It is probably, to this day, our favourite Mayan pyramid/temple (maybe joint favourite with the Pyramid of the Magician at Uxmal !). For lots more information on the history of Edzná and where the name ‘Edzná’ originated, check out the official website.

EDZNÁ Quick facts

OPENING TIMES – 9am – 5pm every day (remember Campeche is a different time zone to Quintana Roo)

NEAREST TOWN – Campeche City, Campeche

COST – MX$85

BEST SEASON – any, but avoid the rainy season between June and October if possible

MAX CAPACITY – up to 50 people at a time

TIME NEEDED – about 1.5-2 hours

CLIMBABLE – all but the largest structure

AVOID – visiting on Sundays – it is free for Mexican nationals so is generally busier

11 less touristy things to do around the yucatan    |    EXPLORING CALAKMUL

WHAT WE LOVED ABOUT EDZNÁ

Cheap day out – including transport and entry fee this cost us 310 pesos for two people

It was easy – even with our abysmal Spanish abilities it was easy to get to Edzná

Iguanas love Edzná more than any other ruin we have been to – they were everywhere!

No tourists – it was a stunning silence as we walked around 

No hawkers/vendors at the entrance or inside the park

Unique architecture makes Edzná ruins well worth the visit – the Gran Acropolis features a five-story building called the Edificio de los Cinco Pisos which is very distinctive.

One of the many cold-blooded inhabitants of Edzná

HOW TO GET TO EDZNÁ MAYAN RUINS

There is no dedicated bus service to the ruins which means you will have to drive, get a private taxi or use a collectivo. There is a free car park which was empty when we arrived at opening time for our visit.

DRIVING TO THE EDZNÁ RUINS

Car hire is easy and driving is so simple in the Yucatan! If you are thinking of renting a car, consider doing it through Discover Cars , our favourite/cheapest site that we use exclusively (heads up, we get a small commission if you book through this link at no cost to yourselves). 

If you have your own transport   then you can take the 261 East of Campeche before going South on the 188. The other option is to head south of Campeche onto the Campeche-China Hool and then turn onto the 188 towards Edzná. Either way you are looking for the area marked by the red circle on the map below. You can then follow the signs on the paved road to the car park at the site. Google Maps works well for directions.

Google street view of the junction for Edzná

TAKING A COLLECTIVO TO THE EDZNÁ RUINS

This is the cheapest way to reach the ruins. It is also pretty easy.

To find the collectivos that go towards Edzná, head to the corner of Calle Nicaragua and Calle Chihuahua near the market in Campeche City. Red and white minivans wait here along the side of the street. Confirm with the driver which vehicle is headed for Edzná – it will be on a vehicle heading for Bonfil. These buses appeared to wait until nearly full (this was our experience). The bus drivers do not speak much English however if you look like a tourist they will ask if you are heading to Edzná! It was a very easy process.

We were dropped off directly at the gate because our collectivo had a bunch of Edzná staff members arriving on it to open up (good timing by us!), but the collectivo might stop on the main road, a few hundred metres from the entrance.

To return, wait out on the road after the entrance to the ruins (on the opposite side to ensure you get the collectivo back towards Campeche). There should be a sign at a junction which says Campeche – we waited here. Collectivos pass by regularly and will stop for you if you signal. Keep an eye out for the red and white vans.

You might be offered a lift back to Campeche – this is really normal! Go for it if you feel comfortable hitchhiking – it is a very common way to travel across Mexico. Trust your instincts if you’re not sure.

We paid 45 pesos per person each way.

Red and white coloured Colectivos for Edzná

Edzná FACILITIES AND WHAT TO BRING

There are minimal facilities at the Edzná Mayan ruins. We would suggest bringing all the food and drink you need for the trip and plenty of water. There are bathrooms at the entrance and a guide can also be acquired here. We also saw a vending machine but could not confirm if this works!

There is not a lot of shade – it is quite an open site, so bring clothes to cover up, a hat and sunblock. All the usual items for hot, exposed weather. It is super-warm though, be advised! We found this to be one of the hottest Mayan ruins we visited.

The trails/paths are not particularly uneven or muddy but bring decent footwear. You could get away with flipflops here, but I wouldn’t advise it! There are quite a few snakes and larger lizards, we could hear them all scuttling away as we walked through the structures. This made me glad to have shoes with covered toes!

Insect repellent is recommended, although during our August visit we did not need it (nor did it rain).

During the rainy season (June to October) you will want to consider a waterproof jacket and bag covering.

Avoid Sundays – Mexican nationals get free entry and it can be busy with families having picnics (not Chichén Itzá busy, but still, I’d avoid it!).

One of the many cold-blooded inhabitants of Edzná, a Mayan Ruin in Mexico

MAP AND SIGNS AROUND EDZNÁ MAYAN RUINS

Below is a map provided by the official website . There are also signs written in English and Spanish around the site. 

Map of the historical site of Edzná

FINAL THOUGHTS ON EDZNÁ RUINS

The archaeological ruins at Edzná were one of our favourites across the many that we have visited throughout Mexico and Central America.  If you are looking for a site with some solitude (maybe Chichén Itzá drove you a little crazy like it did us!), consider checking out Edzn á, and spend  a weekend in Campeche. You can enjoy this beautiful oceanfront walled city too.

Are you are spending some time travelling across in the Yucatan ? If so, consider checking out the list of all of our favourite Mayan ruins , with pros and cons to help you decide which might be best.

Have a fantastic visit!

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Edzna Ruins Mexico: The Mayan City You Forgot

The Edzná ruins in the southeastern Mexican state of Campeche are what remains of an impressive ancient city that thrived during the days of the Ancient Mayans. In its heyday, more than 25,000 people called Edzná their home, and the settlement sprawled across a whopping 25 square kilometres, making the city larger than Chichen Itza. Sadly, like many cities, Edzna began to decline following the Spanish colonisation of Mexico and was eventually abandoned. 

Today, few international travellers have even heard of Edzna, nor do they take the time to travel there. The ancient city is nestled in the heart of the dense Yucatan jungle in the southern part of Campeche state and is not the easiest place in the world to get to without a car. 

As someone who has been living in the Yucatan for the last few years , I have travelled to every single Mayan city in the peninsula (and there are a lot!). Among these, Edzna stands out as one of my favourites, and I have created this guide to help you discover its highlights too. 

Table of Contents

Visiting the Edzná  Ruins in Mexico

The City of Edzná, known as the “House of the Itzas” dates back to around 600 BC. It became a major commercial and political hub for the Maya and was eventually abandoned in 1500 AD.

The name “Itza”, as in “Chichén Itzá ” was most likely the pre-Columbian name of the family that governed the city between 800 and 1000AD. It was also the name that was given to the people living in the city so, despite the fact that they all had their own distinctive surnames, other civilisations knew them as “Itzaes”. 

Despite the size and grandeur of the city, the Edzna ruins were not discovered until 1907, and the site remained largely unexcavated until the 1980s. The various pyramids and structures at Edzna are centred around a main square known as “the Great Plaza of Edzna”. 

Some of the most notable buildings to look out for here are the Great Pyramid, the Grand Acropolis, and “The Temple of the Masks” which is home to two incredibly well-preserved large stucco masks of the Mayan sun god Kinich Ahau. 

The great thing about visiting the Edzna ruins is that the site’s out-of-the-way location means that for now at least, the site is pretty off the beaten path. My partner and I visited on a Sunday, and there were only a couple of other people at the archaeological site.

Many people who have been on a weekday have said that they got the whole place to themselves!

Visiting the Edzna archaeological site, Mexico

Most Important Buildings at Edzna

There are a couple of notable buildings to keep your eyes peeled for at Edzna which we will look at here. 

Most of these structures have been designed in the “Puuc” style of architecture similar to the Uxmal ruins and the cities of Kabah, Labna and Sayil. (Even though Edzna is a long way away from the Ruta Puuc ). 

The Puuc style of building is very different from the style used in creating structures at Chichen Itza, for instance, and usually consists of smooth limestone walls decorated with intricate stucco friezes. The walls are often decorated with masks of Mayan deities such as the rain god Chaac. 

The Piramide de Los Cinco Pisos

The Piramide de Los Cinco Pisos (The pyramid of five floors), also known as “The Palace” is arguably the most impressive structure in the Edzna site. It reaches a height of 165 feet and, as the name suggests, consists of 27 rooms spread across five levels which were likely the living quarters for the city’s leaders. 

As you approach the base of the pyramid, you will note some interesting, weather-worn Maya hieroglyphics on the lower part of the staircase.

Glancing across the Grand Plaza, Edzna

The Great Acropolis 

The Great Acropolis is a huge man-made structure that was likely created as a place for the nobles and elites of Edzna to give speeches and presentations. This area was likely a major hubbub of activity when Edzna thrived between 600 and 900 AD and consists of no fewer than 10 sprawling platforms.

The Small Acropolis

The small Acropolis is a modest, stepped structure which sits opposite the Gran Acropolis. It has a 24-foot high base and overlooks the Great Plaza and the Temple of the Masks. 

This little building is one of the oldest surviving structures in the complex and is believed to date back to the Early Classic period (300-600 AD), when it was built in a similar construction style to that found in Peten, Guatemala.

Faded red stucco masks at the Temple of the Masks, Edzna

The Temple of the Masks 

The Temple of the Masks (Templo de Mascarones) takes its name from the two stucco masks of Kinich Ahau that were found here. One represents him as an old man, and one represents him in his youth, two images which are believed to reflect sunrise and sunset. 

It is remarkable how well-preserved they are considering their age. Archaeologists believe that the masks were once painted in shades of red, blue-green and black, but this colouring has faded with time and the elements. 

The masks were not discovered until 1988 so who knows what other artifacts and treasures may await beneath the surface here?

The Pok-ta-Pok Ball Court 

The sunbleached remains of an old Pok-ta-Pok ball court also await at Edzna. Pok ta Pok was an Ancient Mayan ball game that was often used as a way to settle debates and arguments. 

Sometimes, the losing team was sacrificed! Two teams would play against each other and would have to hit a hard rubber ball through a stone hoop mounted high on the walls using their hips.

Visiting the Edzna archaeological site, Mexico

An ancient plumbing network 

The residents of Edzna are also known for a water collection and distribution network and a series of canals that they built around the city which were very advanced for the time. The Itzaes would collect rainwater, since there was not a water source nearby, and retain it in underground wells. These tunnels and storage systems can still be found around the city today. 

How to Get to Edzna

I think that the main deterrent for people visiting the Edzna ruins (aside from the fact that the site is not well-advertised) is that the archaeological site is a little tricky to get to. It sits 52km away from Campeche city and the drive takes approximately 45 minutes.

Renting a car in Mexico is the best way to explore Campeche independently. From Edzna, you can also visit the lesser-known ruins of Calakmul and Becán.

Driving in Mexico is not as intimidating as it may sound and the roads between Campeche and Edzna archaeological zone are very good and well-maintained. 

Alternatively, you can take the bus from Campeche City or seek out a local tour company

Take the bus from Campeche to Edzna

There is a shuttle bus that runs between the City of Campeche and the Edzna ruins throughout the day. It departs every 30 minutes from Calle Chihuahua and you can buy a ticket directly from the driver on board for just 45 pesos.

You won’t miss the bus – it is bright red and white and displays the words “Colectivos del Valle de Edzna” on the side.

When you head back to Campeche from the Edzna ruins, you will need to wait in the same place where the bus dropped you off. There is no wifi or phone signal in the area and it’s quite remote and quiet so waiting here can be unnerving, but services are relatively frequent.

Sometimes the buses can be a little late on account of all the other stops they make along the way. 

Organise a tour

Opting to do an organised tour can take a lot of the stress out of trying to get from A to B and is a great choice for visiting a more remote site like Edzna. Most tours include pick-up and drop-off at your Campeche hotel , not to mention that touring with a local provides you with more insight and information than you would obtain independently.

Until recently, there really weren’t very many Edzna tours available at all, but a couple have popped up on Viator over the last year. Some of the best Edzna tours are summarised below.

Book your place online in advance to avoid disappointment!

  • Edzna – The House of the Itzaes tour
  • Edzna archeological zone and Campeche Farms tour
  • Full-day private tour in Campeche, Becal and Edzná

Travel Writer Melissa Douglas walking through the Edzna ruins in a red dress

FAQs about Visiting the Edzna Ruins in 2023 and Beyond 

Do you have any further questions or queries about visiting the Ednza ruins? The answers to some frequently asked questions are detailed below so hopefully you will find the information you are looking for there.

If not, you are more than welcome to reach out to me and I will do my best to get back to you as soon as I can. 

Edzna is well worth the effort to get to and you can easily spend an entire afternoon here. The city was the most important pre-Columbian city in western Campeche. It is as large and well-preserved as more famous sites like Chichen Itza or Coba, but it has the added benefit of never being crowded, which makes for a more magical ambience when you explore. 

Admission to Edzna is just 60 pesos per person and the site is free for domestic Mexican travellers on Sundays. There is a sound and light show here every Thursday through Sunday that starts at 8 pm each night which costs an extra 41 pesos per person and sees the various pyramids and structures illuminated in different colours, as loudspeakers tell the story of the city’s history.

Edzna was once occupied by more than 25,000 Yucatec Mayans known as “Itzaes” after the governing family, the Itzas. Today the site is abandoned. 

Final thoughts on visiting the Edzna ruins

The Edzna ruins are among the best-preserved and most rewarding Mayan ruins to explore in the Yucatan peninsula. They are well worth the effort to get to and are usually devoid of tourists.

As of November 2023 some parts of the Edzna ruins, like the Vieja Hechicera (Old Sorceress), are closed due to preservation work.

If you decide to visit Edzna and wider Campeche, I am sure you will have a fabulous time! If this is your first trip to Mexico, you may be interested in reviewing this list of Mexico travel tips to know before you go.

Safe travels! Buen Viaje! Melissa xo

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Melissa Douglas

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Visiting Edzná: The House of the Itzaes

Last Updated on: 28th July 2023, 11:03 pm

Deep in the jungle, about 50 km southeast of Campeche , lies the once-mighty city of Edzná, one of Mexico’s most under-appreciated Mayan ruins. Known for its unique five-story pyramid, the site is not only well-preserved, but it gets just a fraction of the tourists of places like Uxmal . Those visiting Edzná in the early morning, in fact, can expect to have these fascinating ruins all to themselves.

For more information on visiting Edzná from Campeche and where to stay in the city, be sure to check the very end of the article.

Edzná: A Brief History

Edzná was settled as early as 600 BC, likely thanks to easy water access. Beginning as a small agricultural community, locals started building a series of canals and reservoirs from around 250 BC, and the city quickly thrived.

But after centuries of exponential growth, Edzná began to mysteriously shrink from around the year 150 AD. Things would then remain relatively quiet for centuries.

Throughout much of the Late Classic period (600-900), Edzná was under the dominion of Calakmul , a former powerful capital located in southern Campeche. And it was during this time that work would take place on the Great Acropolis and the ‘Building of the Five Stories’ for which the site is known today.

Interestingly, despite the quality of the monumental architecture from this time, the city would never again reach the size or population it had peaked at centuries prior.

From roughly 800-1000 AD, Edzná would be ruled by the Itzá family (best known for their glorious capital Chichén Itzá ). But all local residents at the time were referred to as ‘Itzaes’ by outsiders, giving the city its name Edzná, or ‘House of the Itzaes.’

Notably, the structures from this period represent the Puuc style of architecture (best represented by sites like Uxmal), making this the southernmost of all the Puuc sites in Mexico.

Based on radiocarbon dating, Edzná is believed to have fallen in the 10th century, though archaeologists aren’t quite sure why. In any case, like many Mayan cities past their prime, Edzná would continue to function as a religious pilgrimage destination for many years.

Visiting Edzná Ruins

Visiting Edzná: The Western Ruins

Arriving at the site, you’ll encounter a small hut featuring numerous stelae discovered throughout the ancient city. But as you’ll also pass through on the way back, let’s focus on the main site for now. (Check the end of the article for more information on the stelae.) 

It’s also near the entrance that you’ll encounter a fork in the road, with one path leading to a distant temple known as the Vieja Hechicera, or the ‘Old Sorceress.’ But as this path was closed at the time of my visit, we won’t be covering that section of the ruins.

Visiting Edzná Ruins

The first section of the city visitors encounter is known as the Courtyard of the Ambassadors . And it was likely here that foreign dignitaries were first welcomed by the Edzná elite.

The courtyard consists of numerous structures – including one with columns – surrounding a circular platform in the center.

Visiting Edzná Ruins

Further east is the Platform of the Knives , a residential complex named after flint knives that archaeologists discovered here. It was built in the Late Classic period (600-900 AD) and is just one of many structures around Edzná to have been built in the Puuc style.

While hardly evident at first glance, it once contained no less than 20 rooms.

Visiting Edzná Ruins

Nearby, you’ll see the spacious main plaza, along which runs a massive structure known as Nohoch Na, or the ‘Large House.’  The structure is a staggering 135 m long and consists of 15 steps along its side that reach up to 9 m off the ground.

Interestingly, it’s reminiscent of the Petén (current-day Guatemala) style of architecture, a region which Edzná had frequent contact with during its early boom period.

But instead of walking across the main plaza, return to the Courtyard of the Ambassadors area and head south, walking along Nohoch Na’s opposite side.

Visiting Edzná Ruins

It’s here that you’ll find numerous interesting structures, including a large circular building . While the landmark is unlabelled, the Mayans tended to build circular buildings for astronomical observations.

Walking along the back of Nohoch Na, you’ll see how it once contained multiple rooms at the top, likely used for administrative purposes.

tour edzna campeche

Heading further south, you’ll arrive at a small pyramid, appropriately dubbed by archaeologists as the Temple of the South . And it stands right next to Edzná’s ball court, something few Mesoamerican cities lack.

The Mesoamerican ball game was highly ritualistic and symbolic, though it was also competitive. While rules varied from region to region, teams generally tried to get a heavy rubber ball through small stone hoops without using their hands. 

Part of one of the original rings remains here, though much of it is missing.

Visiting Edzná Ruins

Further south still is a fascinating structure called the Temple of the Masks . Along its lower wall, you’ll spot two plaster faces representing the Mayan sun god, albeit at two distinct phases: sunrise and sunset.

The faces were originally painted red, though green was used for their jade earplugs. Notably, the masks here are similar to those at the Temple of the Masks at the site of Kohunlich , Quintana Roo – not far from Calakmul. 

tour edzna campeche

Further east is the Little Acropolis , an artificial platform which reaches five meters off the ground. Measuring 70 m on each side, it contains four temples precisely oriented to the cardinal directions.

Considered one of the oldest surviving parts of Edzná, it dates to the Early Classic period (300-600 AD) and was originally built in the Petén style of Guatemela.

Visiting Edzná Ruins

Some of the oldest stones were then reused during later reconstructions. And somewhat mysteriously, during the Postclassic period (1200-1530 AD), well after the city’s fall, religious pilgrims placed numerous stelae found all around the city at this acropolis.

While most are now gone, as mentioned above, they can be seen within the hut near the site entrance (more below).

Visiting Edzná Ruins

Finished with Edzná’s minor structures, it’s time to move on to the main event: the Great Acropolis. Returning to the main plaza and ascending its central staircase, be sure to turn around to take in the view of the Nohoc Na in all its glory.

Visiting Edzná Ruins

The Great Acropolis

Unlike the ancient Greek acropolises that were built atop natural hills, the term ‘acropolis’ here refers to an entirely manmade platform. And its truly massive, measuring out to around 170 m on each side and containing no less than ten structures.

The buildings here have also been aligned to the cardinal points, with the main pyramid facing west.

For those who’ve arrived early in the morning to beat the crowds, you’ll have to point your camera toward the sun to photograph the pyramid straight on. But if you have the patience to wait a few more hours, the lighting should eventually improve significantly.

Visiting Edzná Ruins

Commonly known as the Building of the Five Stories , or simply the ‘Palace,’ there’s nothing quite like this pyramid elsewhere in the Mayan world. The Mayans built other stepped pyramids at places like Chichén Itzá, of course, but this one uniquely features rooms at every level, adding up to 27 in total.

The closest thing to it in Mexico would probably be the Pyramid of the Niches at El Tajín , Veracruz. But that was built by a different civilization in a distant part of the country.

tour edzna campeche

The Building of the Five Stores reaches up to 31.5 meters at its highest point. And in addition to simply facing west, it was aligned so that all its rooms would be illuminated by the light of the setting sun each year on May 1 and August 13. 

While we’re not completely sure why, the dates may have had some important agricultural significance. 

Visiting Edzná Ruins

As you’ll notice, there are numerous other structures around the acropolis from which to view the pyramid. In the morning, the best views are from atop the southern buildings known as the House of the Moon and the Southwest Temple .

On the northern side of the acropolis, meanwhile, is the  Temple of the North . Established as early as the 4th century AD, it was built over a few centuries later. The upper temple was then added to during yet another construction phase before being remodeled sometime after 1100.

Visiting Edzná Ruins

At the time of my visit, those visiting Edzná could climb atop all of the structures – except for the House of the Five Stories itself, that is. While I did see a couple of people ascend to the top, they appeared to be either archaeologists or maybe a tourist and private guide with special permission.

Visiting Edzná Ruins

At the time of writing, the average visitor will only be able to get as close as the base of the staircase. But it’s here that one can observe an interesting series of well-preserved Mayan hieroglyphs.

While the last date inscribed here is 731 AD, the pyramid likely saw later renovations. Taking a look at the top, the upper temple resembles structures found at Becan and in the Puuc region, suggesting multiple stages of development.

Visiting Edzná Ruins

Having seen all the permitted areas, I considered calling it a day. But after the pair who’d climbed to the top of the pyramid went on their way, the Great Acropolis and Edzná as a whole remained completely empty for quite some time.

Eventually, curiosity got the better of me, and I couldn’t resist checking out the pyramid from its opposite side.

Visiting Edzná Ruins

From the other sides, the Building of the Five Stories looks like an entirely different structure. Instead of neatly lined rooms at every level, you’ll instead find interesting curved shapes protruding from its multiple tiers.

Visiting Edzná Ruins

The structure features three additional main staircases in addition to a couple of smaller ones. As clean and modern as the pyramid appears from the front, its backside is a chaotic and seemingly random mix of shapes. But this only add to its intrigue.

Visiting Edzná Ruins

Leaving the Great Acropolis, visitors can exit through the Northwest corner via a building known as the  Puuc Patio . As the name suggests, it contains Puuc-style geometric motifs.

For those doing further travels throughout the region, the Puuc style is best appreciated at sites like Uxmal and Kabah . 

Visiting Edzná Ruins

This patio, which almost feels like its own small acropolis, is likely where high-ranking officials of Edzná lived. And heading back toward the entrance, you’ll once again pass by another former residence, the Palace of the Knives, before coming full-circle.

All in all, the archaeological site could be considered medium in size, and visiting Edzná shouldn’t take more than a couple of hours. But the rare treat of being able to enjoy the ruins in silence will make many visitors want to linger for longer.

Visiting Edzná Ruins

Edzná's Stelae

As mentioned above, numerous stelae were uncovered at Edzná – as many as 32 in total. But while they were originally placed all over the site, religious pilgrims would later move most of them to the Little Acropolis.

tour edzna campeche

Today, you can find many of them on display in a small hut near the ruins entrance. They depict former rulers of the city as well as a ceremony related to the sacred ball game.

Additionally, you can also find a serpent head, much like those discovered throughout Chichén Itzá.

The San Miguel Fort & Archaeology Museum

Those staying in Campeche shouldn’t miss a visit to the San Miguel Fort, which houses one of the finest Mayan museums in the country. While most of the artifacts here come from sites like Calakmul and Becan, you’ll find a few Edzná items as well.

Artifacts include a small altar depicting a former female ruler from the 7th century in the company of a dwarf. A large stele, meanwhile, depicts another powerful 7th-century ruler – this time a king.

tour edzna campeche

Additional Info

Getting to Edzná from central Campeche is easy. Regular colectivos run from the city center directly to the entrance of the ruins and the ride lasts a little under an hour.

The colectivo stop is located southeast of the walled city, a block south of the Baluarte de San Pedro and just east of the main market. You’ll find it on a side street off of Calle Nicaragua (the stop is clearly marked on the Maps.me app).

For those who want to arrive at the ruins at opening time at 8:00 in the morning, the first colectivo conveniently departs around 7:00. The ride costs $40 MXN at the time of writing.

Getting back is a bit trickier – or at least it was in my case. Arriving at the ruins, the driver assured me that I could just wait by the ruins entrance and a Campeche-bound bus would appear each hour.

But after I was finished with visiting Edzná, I waited and waited by the entrance and nothing came. Finally one did, but it turned out to be heading in the opposite direction. After an hour had passed, I began to doubt whether all the Campeche-bound buses really made the slight detour to stop here.

And so, despite the sweltering heat, I decided to walk a little while to the nearest point along the highway, where I’d be able to see all Campeche-bound vehicles passing by.

Luckily, one appeared just five minutes after I got there. I can’t be certain, though, whether or not it had actually stopped at the ruins entrance just prior.

I stayed at Hotel Maya Becan , which I’d recommend to those looking for an affordable private room in a convenient area. While not located within the walled city, it was just five minutes or so from the entrance, making it easy to reach most sites of the main sites in Campeche on foot.

With tax included, I paid about $420 MXN ($20 USD) per night, and my room included a private bathroom with air conditioning.

It was just a couple minutes on foot from the colectivo stop for visiting Edzná, and it was also a fairly easy walk to the Sur bus terminal to travel onward to Xpujil.

As the capital of the state of the same name, Campeche is well-connected by bus with many other cities throughout the region.

Buses depart regularly from Mérida , with the journey taking just a few hours. You can also find direct buses from Cancún and Ciudad del Carmen (not to be confused with Playa del Carmen).

Campeche has two main bus stations: ADO and Sur. The ADO station is too far from the center to walk, though a taxi should only cost you $50 MXN.

The Sur terminal is located about 15 minutes on foot east of the center, and this is the station you’ll want to go to for direct buses to Xpujil, the nearest town to Calakmul.

Note that you can find Mérida-bound buses at both bus stations.

Campeche also has a small airport with connections to Mexico City.

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Yucatán Magazine

In Mexico, Trey Speegle Built a Home that Flows Naturally

Five lots join together for one giant slice of paradise, is this the most luxurious mansion in mérida, should i restore or build new the age-old question, edzná, the great second city of the itzá.

Archaeology Monday provides historical background, photos and practical information about these ancient marvels and how to get out and enjoy them for yourself. This week we set our sights on Campeche’s great Itzá capital, Edzná.

Carlos Rosado van der Gracht

Edzná is a large archaeological site located 52 kilometers southeast of the city of Campeche. In the Yucatec-Maya language, Edzná means the home of the Itzá. Although not nearly as famous as Chichén Itzá, Edzná is extremely impressive and feels nothing short of a great imperial capital.

From the late classic period, Edzná seems to have been in league with the powerful city of Calakmul. The eventual fall of Calakmul to Tikal caused a large power shift in southern Meso-America. As a result, many of the existing dynasties and power structures were toppled and created an opening for groups such as the Itzá. 

tour edzna campeche

Much like Chichén Itzá, Edzná had already been occupied for well over a millennia before the arrival of the Itzá from the south. The city became a powerful regional capital sometime in the 6th century CE but appears to have been abandoned in the 1450s. 

At the entrance to the site, you will find a little museum with several stelae and some interesting information about the site. Much of what is known about Ednzá and its chronology has been extrapolated from the engravings on these stelae.

tour edzna campeche

The site covers 25 square kilometers and features dozens of impressive structures including religious temples, administrative buildings, and habitational areas. Although not as dense as archaeological sites more to the south, the vegetation surrounding Edzná is quite beautiful. It is also possible to spot a great many species of birds, as well as monkeys and peccaries — a species of small wild pig endemic to the peninsula. 

tour edzna campeche

The site is an interesting mix of architectural styles which include Puuc, Peten, and Chenes. The size of the structures really makes the city feel quite grand, particularly in the main quadrant or plaza. 

tour edzna campeche

The most well famous structure in Edzná — and arguably its most grand — is the fairly self-descriptive Five-Story Temple. In antiquity, the temple was painted bright red, and its crest pierced the canopy and likely served as a marker for travelers. Although it is sometimes referred to as a pyramid, this is not accurate as it is more of a palatial ceremonial complex.

tour edzna campeche

The great temple is flanked on all sides by other large temples and ceremonial platforms which make up the city’s grand acropolis.

tour edzna campeche

On the outside of this Acropolis, the entire area is framed by a large 135-meter elongated platform that spans the core of the site. The structure shows evidence of several large rooms which were likely used for administrative purposes. It is also likely that the structure and its surrounding area served as an important marketplace. 

tour edzna campeche

Adjacent to the main Acropolis lay another large structure known as the southern temple. This temple is a great example of Teotihuacan-inspired Talud-tablero inspired architecture. It was likely a fairly late addition to the site built sometime in the 6th century. Like most of the largest structures at the site, it would have been painted red and been adorned with stucco figures such as masks representing solar and rain deities. 

tour edzna campeche

Directly next to the southern temple lay one of Edzná’s main ballcourts or Pok ta Pok. Several other ballcourts have been found at the site but have not been restored. 

tour edzna campeche

The Temple of the Masks features stucco depictions of the Maya Kinich Ahausolar deity Kinich Ahau.

tour edzna campeche

These kinds of masks seem to have been fairly typical of most structures at Edzná, but only a handful survive to this day. Many of the masks contain zoomorphic elements, as well as lavish jewelry.

tour edzna campeche

As with all archaeological sites in Mexico, it is prohibited to bring in food or drink other than water. The entrance fee is 65 pesos Monday through Saturday. And on Sunday admittance is free for Mexican nationals and foreign residents (with ID).

There is not much in the way of services at the site other than a bathroom, so make sure to bring some water, sunblock, a hat, and a sturdy pair of comfortable walking shoes. 

Signage to the site is fairly good from Campeche and the Puuc route in Yucatán. Driving to the site is quite easy and many tour companies operating in Campeche offer day trips at competitive prices. During holidays and on long weekends, the site can get busy, so make sure to arrive good and early to get the most out of your visit. 

Carlos Rosado van der Gracht

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Take A Road Trip to Campeche To See This Influential Mayan City

The word Edzná comes from “House of the Itzás”, which has led Archaeologists to believe that this Mayan city was influenced by the family Itzá long before they founded Chichen Itzá. It has also been documented that the layout of Edzná mimicked that of Teotihuacán near Mexico City. This Mayan site is as intriguing as it sounds and is a great trip through the Yucatan Peninsula. Adventure awaits at Edzná.

The history of the Edzná ruins is fascinating, the archaeological site a marvel. When we decided to make the trip to the Edzná ruins, admittedly we were kicking ourselves for not coming sooner. The list of interesting facts about Edzna starts with the following: there were influences from the Itzá Family, the size of the settlement at 25 km², the population at one point reached 25,000 people, half the size of Coba. Our visit to Edzná took us deeper into Mayan history and raised yet more questions about this incredibly intelligent community. When we read that Edzná mimicked aspects of Teotihuacán, the icing was on the cake. Edzná is a must-see ruin that will further your appreciation for the Maya and increase your desire to learn more.

Edzna ruins

Fast Facts About Ednza Ruins

  • Could have been inhabited as early as 600 BC
  • In the late classic period, Edzná was part of the Calakmul political system , a settlement to the southeast of Edzná
  • It took until 200 AD before Edzná developed into a major city.
  • The city is 25 km² with up to 25,000 inhabitants
  • Edzná was an influential city from 400 y 1000 AD
  • Edzná was finally abandoned in 1450, a unexplained abandonment that is still a mystery to this day
  • The city has elaborate underground systems to capture and retain rain water as the location lacked a local water source.
  • Edzná was discovered in 1907. The first organized excavations started in 1958 with additional excavations continuing in 1986.
  • An Evening Light Show is open to the public year round and is worth seeing. In the winter months the show is at 7 pm and in the summer months at 8 pm. Transportation and tours can be found in the City of Campeche.

Noteworthy Structures Within the Edzná Ruins

Gran Acropolis – The Sun Point The Grand Acropolis is the central platform that supports 5 structures. It is located in the eastern section of the site, a significant cardinal point for the Maya. The Gran Acropolis faces the horizon and looks upon the Palace located directly in front.

The main castillo named Cinco Pisos (5 levels) is what defines the Gran Acropolis. This unique castillo has five levels and reaches 40 meters. The structure provides a wide overview of the surroundings from the top, which was thought to be used by spiritual and religious leaders. Each stair had intricate glyph carvings with remnants of the stucco details still seen today.

Small Acropolis Beside the Gran Acropolis is the Small Acropolis, a 8 m/24ft high base and three buildings located on the top. These structures have a view of the city, and overlook the Temple of the Masks.

Temple of the Masks The Temple of the Masks was uncovered in 1988, much later in the excavation period. This building has two small but distinct masks on the base of the temple, one located to the east and one located to the west. . One mask represents and honors the Sunrise God and the other the Sunset God. The masks are made of stucco not plaster, a delicate material that makes the preservation of these masks truly a miracle. Remnants of the red and blue paint used to decorate the masks are intact, artisanal features that would have covered these masks during the occupation of the city.

The Palace – It is hard to miss this structure that faces the Gran Acropolis. This residential building runs north to south for 135 meters/ 442 feet. Take note of the four large rooms at the top of the staircase.

Edzna ruins

What We Love About the Edzná Ruins

We always love a road trip and Edzná provides a great road from both the Riviera Maya and Costa Maya. The building Cinco Pesos on the Gran Acropolis is something to be remembered. To this day, the photo we took at our visit sits on my desk. I just love this ruin site and all the wonders it holds. Side note: At the entrance to the ruins there is a vending machine, yup, a true vending machine with cold drinks and snacks. Now that is a first for us! It was the only ‘store’ near the ruin site.

How to Get To the Edzná Ruins

The fastest way to get to the Edzná ruins from Playa del Carmen is using the new toll road that links to the Cancun-Merida toll road. Once you hit Merida head south on Hwy 180. All highways are in great shape, are multi-lane roads and make this trip less than 7 hours from the Riviera Maya coast. Once you hit the City of Campeche you have two ways to get to the ruins. Either continue on Hwy 180 and follow the signs or you can take Hwy 261 to the south of the City of Campeche. If you are already exploring the Ruta de Puuc in the Yucatan via Hwy 261, you will come across Edzná . The 261 is a very slow highway which will take about 7 hours from Merida to Campeche. This is a great route, but slower than some may want and turns your adventure into a few days, not a quick road trip.

If you are staying in the City of Campeche, there is public transportation that will take you close to the ruins entrance, about 500 meters from the ruins entrance.

If staying in the Costa Maya, Take Hwy 307 to the south, travel west on Hwy 186 then up Hwy 180 to Campeche City. We have not driven this route but suspect that again this is 6 to 7 hours.

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tour edzna campeche

Edzna Ruins (Campeche): Complete guide 2023

Edzna ruins.

Edzna ruins is a Mayan archaeological site, located in the state of Campeche in Mexico, which is 1 hour from the city of the city of Campeche.

Founded in the year 600 BC and occupied until the fifteenth century; Edzná was, in its heyday, an important regional capital, having up to 25,000 inhabitants. The site established an important relationship with the great cities of Calakmul and Piedras Negras (or Yo’ki’b in Mayan) in Guatemala. But little by little, over the centuries, the city lost its political and economic power until it was completely abandoned around the year 1450.

Edzna Ruins is a site out of the beaten tracks and will enchant you. This is our guide to Edzná, where you will discover why it is a must-see in Campeche.

Edzna Ruins

Mayan Ruins Mexico

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Although the Edzna archaeological site is not as large as Calakmul or Chichen Itza, it has a unique charm for several reasons.

To begin with, the main pyramid has 4 vaulted floors, an architectural style very rare among the Mayans, who used to build stepped pyramids. Furthermore, Edzná has a certain wild beauty, as not all the structures are perfectly clean, which has led to the natural invasion of plants between the stones.

What to see in Edzna?

Edzna ruins is a little known place, where you will hardly find any tourist. This is considered to be one of the most interesting Mayan cities due to its technological advancement since its inhabitants developed a complex hydraulic system of pipes that are used to irrigate the land throughout the year, as transport routes and, in some cases, as a means of defense.

In its time, Edzná housed several religious, administrative and residential buildings distributed over an area of about 25 km², with a mixture of Puuc, Petén and Chenes styles.

Currently, only a small part is accessible to the public. These are the main buildings of Edzná ruins:

  • The Big House: the Nohochná It is a large platform that is easy to recognize since it separates us from the Great Acropolis when we arrive at the place. They think that it had an administrative function, or that perhaps it was used as a grandstand for the events that were held in the main square.
  • Great Acropolis : Donkey main complex of Edzná. It consists of a central square surrounded by several buildings. The most important is the Edificio de Cinco Pisos, a 5-story pyramid, 4 of which contain vaulted rooms, which is unusual for a Mayan site. It is no longer possible to climb the building, but you can get a view from the top of adjacent buildings, such as the House of the Moon or the Northwest Temple.

Gran Acrópolis Edzná

  • The Small Acropolis : it is next to the Great Acropolis, it has 4 buildings that contain some elements that are the oldest traces of Edzná.
  • The stelae : there are a total of 32 stelae that represent the rulers who accede to the throne, or the famous ball game, the conquest of a region, a political alliance, etc. 435, 11 between 633 and 830, and the rest between the 9th and 10th centuries).
  • Temple of the Masks : It is easy to discover because it is protected under a roof. There you can see the magnificent stucco masks on both sides of the stairs.
  • The knife platform
  • The ball court

Here you can see a map of Edzna ruins, made by INAH, the National Institute of Anthropology and History of Mexico to locate the main buildings.

mapa-edzna

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Edzná entrance prices

Here you have all the information you need to visit Edzna Campeche:

  • Entrance ticket: 65 pesos
  • Optional guide 500 pesos per group
  • Open Monday to Saturday from 9am to 3pm
  • Light and sound show at 7pm or 8pm, depending on the season of the year

How to get to Edzna ?

The site is only 1 hour away from Campeche. Unless you have a vehicle, the easiest way to get there is to take a tour from Campeche.

In general, a tour costs around 350 pesos in a local agency, but this price only includes transportation (no entrance fee, no guide).

If you have a tight budget, you can take one of the buses (vans) that leave near the Puerta de Tierra in the direction of Bonfil and leaves you 300 meters from the entrance (5 minutes walking).

Arrange with the driver for the return trip, otherwise it can be difficult to return because there is nothing nearby. The round trip costs 80 pesos.

Hotel near Edzna

The closest city is Campeche, making it the ideal place to spend the night before visiting Edzna. Here I share my three hotel suggestions for all budgets:

  • Hotel Rath : it is in front of a park, near La Pigua Restaurant and the botanical garden. The hotel is simple, but the room is nice, with TV and Air Conditioning (a luxury!), And the staff is very friendly. From only 25 euros per night
  • Casa Colonial Casacadencia : it is a spacious apartment in the center of Campeche that offers excellent value for money. With air conditioning, living room, kitchen, terrace, good wifi and breakfast included. Capacity for 2 to 4 people, from 85 euros per night
  • Casa Don Gustavo Boutique Hotel : An elegant, fully restored 18th-century manor house on a pedestrian street in downtown Campeche. A clever mix of modernity and period decoration, comfortable rooms with air conditioning. Wifi, outdoor pool, jacuzzi and a very tasty a la carte breakfast await guests. From 139 euros!

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Are you ready to book your trip?  .Here are the websites you can use to book your trip, get inspired with the best things to do in your destinations and travel smarter.

  • Kiwi.com – A great website to book your flights. It has good airfares but you need to search regulaly as the prices are constantly changing
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  • Hotel.com – Huge choice of hotels with  free cancellation up until a certain point. It’s easy to use and has one of the widest selections. 
  • Agoda – Agoda is very good if you are searching hotels, resorts, houses. They always have attractive promotions.  
  • Xcaret Group – Xcaret Group is the most famous theme park in the Riviera Maya. If you visit Cancun, check their prices here to get good discounts.
  • Viator – If you need to find inspiration about things to do in Cozumel, check on Viator to see the tours they offer for diving and other activities
  • Rental Cars – Looking to rent a. car while you are away? I always book through Rental Cars as they do a search of all of the big sites and find the best deals. 
  • Yacht Rental – If you are thinking of spending time in a paradise beach destination with friends or family, this is a good option to enjoy the beach life.
  • Sailing Trip – For cruising holidays, book a sailing trip, they have many trip destinations, lehghts and standing.
  • Dive the World – If you are a diver, book a diving trip with them. They have dive packages everywhere in the world with very attractive prices.

Travel Agency in Mexico

Mexplor. Travel Agency.

Javier rojo gomez 9, 77580 puerto morelos, q.r..

Diving in Puerto Morelos

Diving in Puerto Morelos

Things to do in Puerto Morelos

Things to do in Puerto Morelos

Snorkeling in Puerto Morelos

Snorkeling in Puerto Morelos

Puerto Morelos Rentals

Puerto Morelos Rentals

Jolis group.

Amazing Temples

  • Campeche / México

Edzná – Campeche – The House of the Itzá

by Christian Schoen · Published 2019/03/17 · Updated 2020/05/25

Have you ever visited the ruins of Edzná in Campeche? The answer should be “no” because only a few people find their way to this superbly preserved site of the Maya. The city is about an hour’s drive from Campeche, the capital of the Mexican state of the same name. From Mérida, you can reach Edzná in about three hours. The Maya ruins of Edzná are located inland, about 40 kilometers from the Gulf coast in the west of theYucatán Peninsula.

The House of the Itzá

The name Edzná (Itzná) comes derives from a Mayan language, called Chontal. It means the house of the Itzá, which would point to a possible connection between Edzná and Chichén Itzá. The city was once the capital of a relatively large state area.

Their influence extended in the north to the Puuc region, in the south-west, it bordered on the sphere of influence of Calakmul. The town area recognized to date has a size of approximately 25 square kilometers. 25,000 people could have lived here.

The Temple of the Five Stories - Frontal View - El Édificio de los Cinco Pisos - Edzná - Campeche

Several huge buildings have been erected during the classic period of Maya history. But the beginning of Edzná dates back to the pre-classical period. About 400 BC to 1450 AD, the area was inhabited over a period of nearly 1800 years.

During the excavations in Edzná, 32 steles and 2 hieroglyphic stairways have been discovered. Thanks to the inscriptions, it was possible to create a list of ten dynastic rulers that reaches from 633 AD to

869 AD. A close relationship to Calakmul seems to have existed. It is assumed that in the seventh century, Yuknoom Cheen II, also known as “the Great,” who was a prominent ruler of the Kaan kingdom based in Calakmul, was simultaneously the ruler of Edzná.

Edzná Map

A remarkable event, worth to be noted in the inscriptions, was the arrival of a female ruler or princess from the Maya city of Petexbatun in the southern lowland in today’s Guatemala, also in the 7th century.

During this time the influence of Edzná grew far north to the Puuc region.

Towards the end of the 7th century, the forces of Calakmul were defeated in the war against Tikal. Calakmul did not recover from the defeat and lost his pre-eminence in the Maya world.

After a series of wars, presumably against Cobá on the east coast of the peninsula and his allies, Edzná had to accept a temporary loss of its power and influence.

In the 8th century, the city experienced the arrival of a group of people from today’s Tabasco, which was probably the Itzá group.

The last “Long Count” inscription dates from the year 810 AD. Edzná was not abandoned at the end of the classic period as it happened to the classical cities of the South. It was still inhabited in the post-classic era and was an essential center of the region. It was only at the end of the postclassical period between 1450 and 1500 that Edzná was left by its inhabitants.

The ancient ruins were rediscovered in 1907. Organized excavations began in 1958. Since the 1980’s, considerable efforts have been made to restore the buildings.

The entrance, through which one enters the site, is located in the north of the area.

THE BIG SQUARE

In the center of Edzná, you will reach “the big square,” to the east of which is the Acropolis located. In the north, the square is bordered by the platform of knives, to the east is “The Big House,”” Nohochná,” which is thought to have served administrative purposes. To the south of the square are the South Temple, a ball court and the Temple of Masks. From the stairs to the great Acropolis, two “sacred streets” – Sacbeob – lead to the two corners of the Great House “Nohochná.”

THE GREAT ACROPOLIS

There are numerous temples and palace buildings on a square platform, which can be reached via the west-facing long straight stair. The whole complex is called “The great Acropolis.”

The Temple of the Five Stories - El Édificio de los Cinco Pisos - Sideview - Edzná - Campeche

The Temple of the Five Stories

The largest of the buildings is the temple of the five stories with its central staircase. It raises about 40 meters above the environment using five steps. This pyramid has very unusual door openings on its front that lead to rooms with cobbled vault. It is, therefore, to be assumed that the monument not only had a ceremonial character, but also served as a palace, and thus a place of residence.

The Northern Temple

On the north side of the Great Acropolis, you will find the Northern Temple. The last structural change of this building is from the postclassical era. Just beside is a structure named “Patio Puuc” with a limited inner courtyard, which initially contained a steam bath. The name derives from the design elements of the Puuc style found in this structure.

The Temple of the Moon

At the southern end of the Great Acropolis, just opposite the northern temple, stands the Temple of the Moon, which, with its front stairs, faces the Northern Temple.

THE SMALL ACROPOLIS

The Small Acropolis is another platform that is located south of the Great Acropolis. On it is the Temple of the Steps situated.

One of the masks of the sun god Kinich Ahau - from the Temple of the Masks - El Templo de los Mascarones - Detail, colors enhanced - Edzná - Campeche

THE TEMPLE OF THE MASKS

The Temple of the Masks is rather small but nevertheless interesting. It is located west of the small Acropolis. There you will find two big stone masks, which presumably represent the sun god of the Maya. They are in a perfect state of preservation.

THE OLD WITCH – LA VIEJA HECHICERA

About 800 meters from the center, in the north-western direction, is another significant structure, the OldWitch – La Vieja Hechicera.

Stele 21 - Edzná - Die Stele aus dem 8. Jahrhundert zeigt einen der Herrscher von Edzná. Das Datum in der linken oberen Ecke der Stele benennt das Datum 17. September 726

WATER MANAGEMENT

The area around Campeche is the least rainy in the Maya area during the dry winter months. Accordingly, the vegetation on the north-eastern Gulf coast is also characterized by dry forests that change to shrubland or savanna further north.

But during the rainy season, from July to September, the daily average rainfall reaches 180mm per day, making the area the wettest region in the northern lowlands. The relatively impermeable subsoil can quickly lead to flooding.

This was a big problem for the Maya in classical times, but they have solved it masterfully. Remains of a complex system for water management can be seen at various points on the site. The primary purpose of this water system could have been the rapid drainage of the municipal area after heavy rainfall.

The length of the channels used for this purpose was up to 6 kilometers. Several of them lead to a nearby lake. In addition to the outflow, canals were also used as transport routes and, of course, for irrigation of the fields. Additionally, they might have been served as a defense facility. Also, they helped to enrich the selection of food using fish farming.

Wall and cathedral of Campeche

TRAVEL ADVICE

To visit Edzná, it is recommended to stay in Campeche. Around Edzná there are no significant options for accommodation. The public bus runs from Campeche only once or twice a day. That is why I rented a taxi for a day to visit Edzná. It is more favorable if you join with others or book an organized tour. In the central square in Campeche, you will find local travel agents that will arrange this trip. The hotels can also help you with the organization of such an excursion.

Since 1999, Campeche has been a UNESCO World Heritage Site. The city of 250,000 inhabitants was founded in 1540 by the Spanish conquerors.

Over the centuries Campeche was attacked by pirates several times, sometimes even conquered and all its inhabitants sold into slavery. A museum devoted to the theme of “pirates,” as well as the nightly performances on the old city walls, keep up the memory of these events. The mighty fortifications with their rusted cannons are well preserved and can be visited.

The city center has been able to preserve the old style of the colonial period, with much less tourism than the smaller San Cristobal de las Casas in Chiapas.

Colorful Colonial Houses in Campeche

Although numerous travel guides especially highlight the fresh seafood offer right here on the Gulf Coast, I would strongly advise to only eat cooked food.

After the visit of Campeche, I recommend continuing to Palenque. The bus takes about four hours for the route.

Selection of Sea Food - Campeche

Find Edzná and Campeche on Google Maps

>>> Rea d more about the Maya sites in Chiapas and Campeche

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Christian Schoen

Christian Schoen is a globetrotter, travel writer and author of the very successful travel guide "The Maya Sites - Hidden Treasures of the Rain Forest". He loves to visit temples, pyramids and any kind of ancient ruins. The SLR in his hand, he can be met on adventurous hiking tours in tropical jungle landscapes - sometimes - or just somewhere in his neighbourhood, the Black Forest Mountains in Germany.

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Privacy Overview

tour edzna campeche

EDZNÁ - TOUR DE 4 HORAS

tour edzna campeche

La antigua ciudad de Edzná es toda una maravilla cultural e histórica; conocerás el templo de los mascarones , la gran acrópolis , templo de la luna y muchas más edificaciones que te llenarán de respeto al conocer la fascinante proeza de nuestros antepasados mayas.

  • Salida todos los dias  
  • Colectivo:                                                                        9am y 2 pm
  • Tour privado:                                                                salida a cada hora de 7am  a  2pm.
  • Lugar de salida: Su hotel o lugar de hospedaje.
  • Duracion: 4 horas
  • Tiempo para visitar Edzná:  2 horas 
  • Servicio : Transportación clase ejecutivo
  • Servicio adicionales  : guia , entradas.

Recomendaciones :  Ropa cómoda,sombrero, tenis, repelente de mosquitos, protector solar, impermeable o paraguas en epoca de lluvia, cámara fotográfica, no olvide sus medicamentos .

Informacion sobre el sitio:    https://lugares.inah.gob.mx/es/zonas-arqueologicas/zonas/1667-edzn%C3%A1.html

Reserva tu lugar con antIcipacion :

whatssap  (+52) 9817501063 / 9811578445 las 24 hrs

EDZNA- FUERTES

tour edzna campeche

Edzná es toda una maravilla cultural e histórica.

Conocerás la ciudad maya mas cercana a campeche 

De regreso a la ciudad de Campeche visite los 2  Fuertes que vigilan celosamente la ciudad el museo de San jose en don de se guardan los tesoros sub acauticos tanto de la epoca maya  comodel comercio maritimo entre europa y la nueva  españa , y el Fuerte de San miguel museo de arqueologuia maya.

itinerario :

  • Salida de martes a domingo
  • Horario:                                                          de las 7:00 am a12 del dia a cada hora.
  • Lugar de salida:                                              su hotel o lugar de hospedaje en la ciudad.
  • Tiempo de visita de la zona arqueológica de Edzná  2 hr.
  • Tiempo para visitar Edzná de 2 horas 
  • Fuerte san José  el alto y visita 40 min.
  • Fuerte san migue l y visita 1 hora.
  • Duración :  6 horas aprox.
  • Servicio de Transportación
  • Servicio adicional:                                 G uia, entradas, alimentación.

Recomendaciones:  Ropa cómoda, tenis, repelente para mosquitos, protector solar, sombrero, agua, cámara fotográfica.

Informacion sobre el sitio:    https://lugares.inah.gob.mx/es/zonas-arqueologicas/zonas/1667-edzn%C3%A1.html

EDZNA ECOAVENTURA

tour edzna campeche

Edzná .  el edificio de los 5 pisos y muchas otras edificaciones que te llenarán de respeto al visitar esta antigua ciudad maya.

Posteriormente haremos una visita a un ojo de agua llamado Ich ha lol xaan para nadar y disfrutar de una refrescante mañana.

Salida: a partir de las 7:00 am de su hotel o lugar de hospedaje en  Campeche

  • visita la zona arqueológica de Edzná 2 hrs.  
  • visita el ojo de agua ich ha lol xaan  2 hrs
  • retorno a su hotel en Campeche 1:00 pm
  • Duración :  7 horas aprox.
  • servicio de  : Transportación
  • servicio adicional:                                                        G uias ,  entradas, alimentación.

Recomendaciones:  Ropa cómoda, tenis, toalla, chancla. traje de baño, repelente para mosquitos, protector solar, sombrero, agua, cámara fotográfica.

EDZNA Y PLAYA - TOUR DE UN DÍA

tour edzna campeche

Visitar y descubrir Edzná   es una gran experiencia

Posteriormente, disfrutarás de una tarde agradable en una playa semi virgen, disfrutando de la piscina, los camastros y un restaurante cuya especialidad son los exquisitos mariscos.

  itinerario :

  • Salida a las 7, 8 o 9:00 am
  • de la puerta de su hotel o lugar de hospedaje
  • llegada a la playa a las 12:30 pm 
  • Tiempo libre en la playa de 5 horas
  • Retorno a su hotel en Campec he a las 19:00 horas 

  Duración :  11 horas aprox.

incluye : Transportación  

(no incluye guía y alimentación)

  Recomendaciones : llevar ropa cómoda, tenis, agua, repelente para mosquitos, sombrero

Informacion sobre el sitio:    https://lugares.inah.gob.mx/es/zonas-arqueologicas/zonas/1667-edzn%C3%A1.html  

EDZNA Y RUTA CHENES

tour edzna campeche

la Ruta CHENES   ( el lugar de los Posos)Para los aventureros que desean explorar antiguas ciudades mayas muy poco visitada por los turistas.

La arquitectura  chenes cuentan con las fachadas y grandes mascarones zoomorfos y en varias entradas de éstos hay talladas fauces de sepientes , jaguares , dioces mayas . Ven a  Conocer este  recorrido y déjate enamorar por las edificaciones, la naturaleza y el legado antiguo de la civilización maya

Itinerario :

  • Salida a las  7, 8 o 9:00 am desde la puerta de su hotel o lugar de hospedaje.
  • Tiempo para visitar Edzná de 1 hora y media
  • Llegada a Hochob a las 12:00 pm 
  • Parada para almuerzo en Dzibalchén de 1 hora
  • Llegada a Dzibilnocac 3:00 pm
  • Retorno a   Campeche a las 17:00 horas.

        Duración :  9 horas aprox.     

  Salidas : todo los dias

incluye : transportación (no incluye guía y alimentación)  

  Recomendaciones : llevar ropa cómoda, tenis, agua, repelente para mosquitos, protector solar, sombrero

https://lugares.inah.gob.mx/es/zonas-arqueologicas/zonas/1669-hochob.html?lugar_id=1669

https://lugares.inah.gob.mx/es/zonas-arqueologicas/zonas/1664-dzibilnocac.html?lugar_id=1664

EDZNÁ Y HACIENDA UAYAMÓN

tour edzna campeche

Edzná es  Conocida por la c asa de los ecos o itzaes ,

De regreso a la ciudad pasaremos a conocer unas de las haciendas más populares y emblemáticas de Campeche , la hacienda Uayamón , donde la naturaleza y la belleza arquitectónica hacen una unión para ofrecerle a usted una visita agradable.

  • Salida de  7 am a 1:00 pm    cada hora                 .
  • tiempo de visita en Edzna de 2 horas
  • Tiempo de visita huayamon 1 hora

Duración :  5 horas aprox.

Salidas : todos los días a partir de las 7:00 am                       lugar de salida su hotel en  Campeche

incluye : Transportación

Recomendaciones:  Ropa cómoda, tenis, repelente de mosquitos, protector solar, cámara fotográfica

EDZNÁ Y CENOTE

tour edzna campeche

Visita la Casa de los Itzaes y conoce su historia, arquitectura.  Muchas fachadas fueron decoradas con rostros de dioses, con animales mitícos y símbolos, eran pintados de varios colores.

Posteriormente pasaras una tarde de diversión en el Cenote Miguel Colorado, en donde encontraras diferentes actividades como: tirolesa, kayak, nado, senderismo, observación de vida silvestre, ciclismo de aventura.

Itinerario:

  • Salida a las 8:00 a.m. desde la puerta de su hotel o lugar de hospedaje
  • Visita la Zona Arqueológica de Edzná
  • Estancia en el Cenote Miguel Colorado

Duración: 11 hrs aproximadamente

Incluye: transporte terrestre y chófer coordinador.

(No incluye guía ni alimentación)

Salidas todos los días a partir de las 8:00 a.m.

Recomendaciones: Llevar ropa comoda, traje de baño, sombrero, repelente de moscos, protector solar .

Informacion sobre el sitio:   

https://lugares.inah.gob.mx/es/zonas-arqueologicas/zonas/1667-edzn%C3%A1.html  

whatssap:  (+52) 9817501063  las 24 hrs

  • Volver arriba

tour edzna campeche

Edzna, Campeche

Mayan ruins of edzná in campeche..

Edzna Campeche, Zona Arqueológica Edzna, Edzna

Edzna  means “House of the Itzaes”,  Edzna Mayan Ruins  are located to 61 kilometres to the south-east of  Campeche’s   City. The access fulfils for the federal road 180; in the km 45 a diversion takes towards the road 261 that he leads to the archaeological zone.

Edzna  was possessing numerous religious, administrative buildings and habitacionales distributed in a surface of approximately 25 square kilometres. His architecture possesses influence of the style Puuc, Peten and Chenes. In that we can stand out between others:

Principal Plaza . Wide quadrangular space where one agrees the major number of monumental constructions of the site, in his sectors north and south two exist sacbés or causeways that were used for the internal traffic. The buildings include the platform of the knives and the court of the ambassadors that is delimited to the west one by 2 buildings, each one by four columns that correspond to 1000-1200 A.D.

Nohochná  (The Mansion). Structure that possibly was used to exercise administrative functions, though also it could work as a species of graderío to attend events celebrated in the Principal Plaza. This structure possesses four long galleries in his top part, to which access was had by means of vain formed as thick pilasters.

Temple of the South . He understands 5 bodies with demolished moldings and reclose corners that converge, in his later part, in a broad bank, on which there gets up the temple that dates back of between 600 and 900 A.D.

Edzna Campeche, Zona Arqueológica Edzna, Edzna

Game of ball . It is composed by two parallel structures in whose top part there get up some rooms that possibly were used to place in them the images of the deities associated with the event and the own attachments of the game and his participants

Great Acropolis.  It is a wide space of quadrangular plant on which several monumental structures get up, as the Building of Five Floors, formed by a pyramidal basamentos staggered of five bodies that have towards the exterior numerous rooms, and a construction in the top part that constitutes the temple in strict sense. The plant of the sanctuary has form of cross and his ceiling preserves auctions of crestería, at some time decorated with figures molded in stucco.

Temple of the north.  It was consisting of a long basement of wide perron which principal axis was leading one or two you were squeaking elongated, the same that were covered later, reclose panels, some sets to be added with tamborcillos and broad banks. The sanctuary that was crowning it had at least four modifications. Opposite to this temple there locates a platform in the shape of C correspondent to the Edzná’s most late occupation: 1200-1400 A.D.

Edzna Campeche, Zona Arqueologica Edzna, Edzna

It is delimited by several constructions covered with quadrangular, rectangular and cylindrical very well carved ashlars. In the north building also they appreciate ashlars with triangles and circles in relief that big frames shape. From the construction with curved banks a sculpture comes in the shape of quadrangular frame, with Chaac’s representations and glifos, between that celestial bands are observed, the day Imix and the month Yax. Rightly at the entry of the principal court the Temazcal, name of origin locates náhuatl whose translation to the Maya yucateco is chokó without tumbilhá, that refers to a bath of steam, which access was restricted by his religious relevancy.

The old witch.  It is another major Edzná structures, is located 800 m northwest of the five-story building. On its eastern side has a stairway, basement bodies have rounded corners and tucked, and the top of the structure is a small shrine.

Edzna Campeche, Zona Arqueologica Edzna, Edzna

Temple of the Large masks . Structure that relies on two representations of the solar god that they have anthropomorphous characteristics with aesthetic own attributes of the elite, such as strabismus, dental mutilation, narigueras, earflaps and big haidos zoomorfos.

Small Acropolis.  It is a basement that in whose top is existed by 4 buildings that shape a central court. Some of the Edzná’s most ancient elements come from this place: a great large mask of stucco of the Preclassic Superior, three stelas of the eighth baktún and ceramics dated between 400 and 250 B.C.

Hotels in Campeche

  • The Best of Yucatan

The Best + Calakmul

  • The Best + Free Day Merida
  • The Best + Ria Lagartos
  • Becal and Campeche
  • Edzna and Calakmul
  • Ek-Balam and Lagartos
  • Izamal and Chichen-Itza
  • Ring of Cenotes
  • Uxmal and Cenotes
  • Personalized
  • Chichen Itza
  • Lagartos Estuary
  • Travel Tips

BECAL – EDZNA – CAMPECHE – BALAM-KU – CALAKMUL – UXMAL – KANKIRIXCHE CENOTE – YAXCOPOIL

Edzna and calakmul....

Edzna Archaeological Site

Estimated budget

Pick up & drop off, included services, we will visit:.

Fort of San Jose el Alto, Campeche

DAY 1: BECAL – EDZNA – CAMPECHE

Stucco sculptures at Edzna Archaeological Site

DAY 2: BALAM-KU – BAT CAVE – CONHUAS

Calakmul Archaeological Site, Campeche

DAY 3: CALAKMUL – CAMPECHE

Chaac sculptures at Uxmal Archaeological Site

DAY 4: UXMAL – KANKIRIXCHE CENOTE – YAXCOPOIL HACIENDA

Our recommended tours.

Edzna, Calakmul and Campeche

The Best + Merida

Ria Lagartos and Las Coloradas

The Best + Lagartos

Are you ready to discover the Best of Yucatan?

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tour edzna campeche

27 Best Things to Do in Campeche, Mexico in 2024

A re you looking for the best things to do in Campeche, Mexico? Campeche is an amazing city full of incredible things to do. With so much to choose from, it’s hard to know where to start.

I lived in Campeche and explored the city extensively. I’ve rounded up the top things to do (many are even free!) so you can make the most of your time in this beautiful city.

To make the most of your time in Campeche, book a half-day private tour . You’ll see many of the sites on this list and learn all about the city’s history. Learn more .

Best Things to Do in Campeche, Mexico

Many of the best things to do in Campeche are in el Centro – the walled city, a UNESCO World Heritage Site.

The old city wall was built to protect the city from pirates and invaders, and today it serves as a beautiful historical landmark. Within the walls, visitors can explore colonial architecture and enjoy the multi-colored buildings.

Campeche has an abundance of activities and attractions. From ancient ruins to modern-day amenities, this city has something for everyone. Here is a list of the many possibilities awaiting you in Campeche.

Note: All prices are in Mexican pesos. Times and prices may change.

1. Walk the Walls

Where: Baluarte de San Francisco or Baluarte de Soledad

Hours: 9:00 a.m. – 5:00 p.m.

This is my absolute favorite thing I did while I was in Campeche. You can walk on two long portions of the walls surrounding El Centro.

I loved seeing behind the facades of the buildings. From the street, the city looks tidy and orderly. But once you can see inside, you’ll find that a lot of the buildings are gone. There are large areas of trees and bushes.

There are also big, ugly warehouses hidden behind the pretty walls. You’ll also see lovely courtyards and rooftop terraces. There is even a palapa hidden in there.

Walking on the walls is a unique experience. Many original cannons are still there (or more likely returned there) and it’s an interesting glimpse into Campeche’s past.

You can access the walls through the museums at the Land Gate or the Sea Gate. Prices for both are very reasonable and worth every penny.

2. Take a Tour

Where: Varies but most tours start at the Cathedral

Hours: Vary

Cost: Varies

With so much history, I found taking a couple of tours to be a good decision. You get the benefit of a local who knows all the stories. Also, many of the sites only have information in Spanish so it’s difficult to get all the information.

A walking tour of El Centro is a great place to start. You can take a half-day private tour and visit many of the top sites in Campeche. Plus you’ll learn about the city’s history and hear some of its stories.

3. Have a Photo Op at the Campeche Sign

Where: Malecón near Calle 57 (look for the tall angel statue – El Ángel Maya)

Hours: 24/7

As you travel through Mexico , you’ll undoubtedly see colorful signs with the names of the country’s many cities. These signs are iconic and instantly recognizable, and they provide a great opportunity for a photo op.

Be sure to visit Campeche’s sign on the malecón for a photo shoot. It’s a great way to commemorate your visit to this charming city.

4. See the Miniature Model of Old Campeche (Escalera de la Muralla)

Where: Calles 8 and 55 (next to the Palace Museum)

The Escalera de la Muralla is a miniature model of the walled city of Campeche, located next to the Palace Museum. The model was created in 1976 by José Luis Zárate Pacheco and shows all the important landmarks of the walled city.

The model is very detailed, and visitors can see how the city has changed over time, and how its architecture has developed. This is a must-see for anyone interested in Campeche’s history.

5. Take the Tram Tours

Where: Calle 10 in front of Independence Plaza. Tickets are sold at the gazebo.

Hours: 10:00 a.m. – 9:00 p.m.

One of the best things to do in Campeche is to take a tram tour. I recommend doing it early in your stay to get the lay of the land.

Three charming trams board on Calle 10 at Independence Plaza. Each tram takes you on a different route, so if you have time, take all three. Tours are in English and Spanish and will give you a great overview of the city.

6. Visit Puerta de Mar (the Sea Gate)

Where: Calle 8 & Calle 59

Puerta de Mar is another great place for photos. At one time the city ended at the gate; the sea was just beyond. Over the years, the city expanded the land for a few more blocks.

As you enter the city through the gate you’ll feel transported back hundreds of years.

7. Visit Puerta de Tierra (the Land Gate)

Where: Calle 18 & Calle 59

On the opposite end of Calle 59 is Puerta de Tierra. This gate has been made into a museum so you can’t actually exit the city here. Still, it’s a lovely sight with its large bell and cannons. This portion of the wall contains the longest original section.

See below for information on the museum, Museo de sitio en Baluarte.

8. Visit the Beautiful Cathedrals and Churches

There are a number of beautiful cathedrals and churches in Campeche. They were designed to be plain on the outside to avoid tempting pirates. Inside, however, they are stunningly beautiful.

Catedral de Nuestra Señora de la Inmaculada Concepción

Where: Calle 10 & Calle 55

Hours: 7:00 a.m. – 9:00 p.m.

One of the most popular is the Catedral de Nuestra Señora de la Inmaculada Concepción, which was built in the 1700s. The cathedral is richly decorated with gold leaf and marble, and its bell towers are a notable landmark in the city.

The cathedral contains a peaceful courtyard surrounded by crypts dating back hundreds of years. There’s also a small museum here.

Iglesia de San Francisco

Where: Outside el Centro on Calle 10 & Vincent Guerrero

Another popular church is the Iglesia de San Francisco. This church, located just outside Centro in the barrio of San Roman, is noted for its intricate interior design. But one of the most notable features of this church is the black Jesus statue that stands in the main chapel.

This statue is a replica of the famous Christ of San Juan de la Cruz, and it’s considered to be one of the most important Black Jesus statues in Mexico. The statue is said to have miraculous powers, and many visitors come to pray before it.

Iglesia de San Roque y San Francisquito

Where: Calle 12 & Calle 59

Hours: Not published

The Iglesia de San Roque y San Francisquito is a tiny but beautiful church located in the heart of Campeche. The church is home to a number of beautiful statues, including a statue of the Virgin Mary that visitors come from all over to see.

9. See All The Bulwarks of Campeche

One of the best things to do in Campeche is to visit all the baluartes (bulwarks) of Campeche. These are a series of fortifications that were constructed in the 16th century to protect the city from invaders.

The baluartes are considered to be some of the most important fortifications in all of Mexico.

Seven of the eight original baluartes are still standing. They have been restored and renovated over the years, and they are now open to the public for tours.

Baluarte de la Soledad

Where: Between the Sea Gate and the Government Palace

Hours: 9:00 a.m. – 3:00 p.m.

Baluarte de Nuestra Señora de la Soledad contains the Museo de Arquitectura Maya with a collection of Mayan artifacts.

This is one of the places you can access the ramparts for a walk on the old city walls.

Baluarte de Santiago

Where: Calle 49 & Av. 16 de Septiembre

Hours: 9:00 a.m. – 6:00 p.m.

Baluarte de Santiago has been converted into a botanical garden, Jardin Botanico Xmuch Haltun.

Baluarte de San Pedro

Where: Calle 18 & Calle 49

Hours: 8:00 a.m. – 3:00 p.m.

Baluarte de San Pedro contains a small museum about the pirate history in Campeche.

Baluarte de San Francisco

Where: At the Land Gate

Baluarte de San Francisco has a small museum (Museo de Sitio en Baluarte) as well as a large outdoor area. This is the other place where you can access the wall.

Baluarte de San Juan

Where: Calle 18 & Calle 63

Baluarte de San Juan is at the end of the wall facing the city. There’s a courtyard with a well, but as far as I’ve been able to discover, there isn’t anything else to see there.

Baluarte de Santa Rosa

Where: Calle 67 & Calle 14

Hours: 6:00 p.m. – 10:00 p.m.

Cost: $120 MXN for pirate show

Baluarte de Santa Rosa currently houses a theater with pirate shows called “Lorencillo… Una historia de piratas.”

Baluarte de San Carlos

Where: Calle 8 & Calle 65

Hours: 9:00 a.m. – 11:00 p.m.

Baluarte de San Carlos houses the city museum (Museo de la Ciudad).

10. Learn About History at the Museums

If there’s one thing Campeche has, it’s history. It also has many museums so you can learn all about the history of Campeche and the Mayans who lived here before.

Museo de Arquitectura Maya

The Mayan Architecture Museum is located in Baluarte de la Soledad. It’s a very nice museum and a cool retreat on a hot day. You can see samples of architectural styles from different Mayan cities.

The highlight of the museum is the jade mask recovered from Calakmul which dates from 660 to 750 AD.

This is where you can access the wall on the sea-side of the city. You’ll get great views from the wall and I highly recommend it.

Museo El Palacio

Where: Calle 8 across from Plaza Independencia

Hours: 10:00 a.m. – 5:00 p.m.

The Palace Museum in the Government Palace (Palacio de Gobierno), is a great place to learn about the colonization of Campeche. There are also archeological artifacts and some interesting pirate displays.

Cathedral Museum

Where: Inside the Cathedral

Hours: 9:00 a.m. – 2:00 p.m.

The Cathedral Museum in Campeche is a great place to learn about the city’s history. The museum is located inside the Cathedral, and it contains a number of exhibits on the history of the cathedral and the city.

The museum also contains a number of religious relics, including statues, paintings, and liturgical objects. It’s a great place for anyone interested in Campeche’s history or religion.

Museo de la Ciudad (City Museum)

The city museum (Museo de la Ciudad) is inside the Baluarte de San Carlos. Here you’ll find another scale model of the old city as well as great information about the city’s history. Be sure to visit the roof for amazing city and sea views.

Also go down to the basement which was used as a prison.

Fort San Miguel Archaeological Museum

Where: Carr. Escénica

Hours: 8:00 a.m. – 5:00 p.m.

The Fort San Miguel Archaeological Museum is a great place to learn about the history of Campeche. The museum is located in the fort of the same name, and it contains a number of exhibits on the history of the fort and the city.

The museum also contains a number of archaeological artifacts, including statues, paintings, and pottery.

Museo de Arqueología Subacuática Fuerte de San José

Where: Av Francisco Morazán

Take a 30-minute cab ride to learn about Campeche’s history including shipwrecks and trading. You’ll also learn about the pirates and their impact on the city.

Museo de Sitio en Baluarte

Where: At the Land Gate (Baluarte de San Francisco )

The Museo de Sitio is inside the Baluarte de San Francisco. The museum itself is very small. The best part about it is being able to walk on the longest portion of original wall surrounding the city. The admission is only approximately $2 USD and worth it just for the wall.

The best part is when you are ready to leave the wall, you have to ring the bell to be let out since they lock you in.

University Museum of Life

Where: 24097 Avenida Lázaro Cárdenas 65

The University Museum of Life in Campeche is a museum dedicated to natural sciences. It contains exhibits on the flora and fauna of the Yucatan Peninsula, as well as on the history and culture of the Maya.

The museum also has a research center that conducts studies on the ecology and conservation of the region’s natural resources.

11. See How the Colonists Lived

In the 17th century, Campeche was a bustling port town in Mexico. It was a popular stop for ships traveling between Spain and the Americas. Life was not always easy, but the colonists managed to make a comfortable living.

Due to the threat of pirate attacks, there’s a network of tunnels under the city. The churches were places of refuge, so the tunnels all led to the cathedral. Unfortunately, people aren’t able to tour the tunnels (I asked).

I was told by a tour guide that some priests still use the tunnels to access the cathedral. One of the tunnels opens up right behind the cathedral’s altar. (I couldn’t verify this, but it’s a good story!)

Take a peek into the lives of the colonists when you visit these houses.

Centro Cultural Casa No. 6

Where: Calle 10 & Calle 57

Hours: 9:00 a.m. – 10:30 p.m.

Casa 6 is just across from Plaza Independencia. It’s been set up to accurately depict a home during the colonial period. You can see the furnishings and decor typical of the time.

Homes generally had a front courtyard for entertaining. This is my favorite thing about Campeche houses. It’s like a secret oasis within the home.

Houses also usually had a back courtyard that was more functional. Here they had a well and would keep animals such as chickens.

An interesting fact about the old homes in Campeche is that many people buried their deceased relatives in the back courtyard because tombs and burials were too expensive.

Casa Guerrero, Campeche

Where: Calle 12 & Calle 61

Hours: They don’t seem to have regular hours

Cost: Free (but donations are accepted)

Casa Guerrero is a beautiful colonial-era house located in the heart of Campeche. The house was built in the 18th century, and it contains a number of interesting features, including a carved wooden door and a beautiful tile roof.

The house is open to the public, and visitors can walk through the rooms and gardens. It’s a great place to see how the people lived in Campeche.

12. Relax in Plaza de la Independencia (Independence Plaza)

Where: Between Calle 8 & 10 and Calle 55 & 57

Another of the best things to do in Campeche is visiting Independence Plaza. This plalze is the main park in El Centro. It’s also sometimes called the Zocalo.

The park is shaded all day by the many large trees. There are benches surrounding the park, as well as in the interior so there’s always a great place to rest.

The plaza is good for meeting up with friends, having lunch, or just people-watching.

13. Watch a Movie in Independence Plaza

Hours: 8:00 p.m.

One thing not to miss is the movie shown at night on the side of the Palace. The movie is a beautiful story of Campeche’s history. It starts every evening at 8:00 and runs for about 30 minutes. Best of all, it’s free!

Grab a snack from one of the street vendors and enjoy the show.

14. Enjoy Cultural Festivals at Plaza de La República

Where: Just outside the Sea Gate

Cost: Free (although some events may charge)

Plaza de la Republica is a large open space where the city hosts many different festivals and concerts.

I was there for Mexico’s Independence Day celebration and saw traditional dancing and concerts. All the Independence Day festivities were free.

In the evenings you’ll find people playing loteria, which is Mexico’s version of bingo.

15. See the Sunken Ship, Barco Hundido

Where: Av. Resurgimiento 2

The sunken ship Barco Hundido is a popular tourist attraction in Campeche. The ship is located in the harbor near the fort, and it’s possible to walk out close to it on the pier.

The ship was sunk in a storm in the 18th century, and it has been slowly deteriorating ever since. It’s an interesting sight to see, and it’s a popular place for tourists to take photos and enjoy the waterfront.

16. Take the Family to Parque Acuático Malecón Campeche

Where: Av. Resurgimiento 22

Hours: Saturday & Sunday 10:00 a.m. – 4:00 p.m.

There’s no better way to cool off in the summer than by spending a day at the Parque Acuático Malecón Campeche. The park is located right on the waterfront, and it features a number of different attractions, including water slides, splash park, beach volleyball courts, and a picnic area.

Like all of Campeche, the park is very clean. You’ll also find public restrooms.

17. Visit the Edzna Archeological Site

Where: Google Map

Edzna is one of the most important archeological sites in the state of Campeche. The site was occupied by the Maya for more than 1,000 years, and it contains a number of impressive structures, including a large pyramid.

The site is open to the public, and visitors can walk through the ruins and learn about the history and culture of the Maya.

You can take a public bus to the Edzna ruins on your own. However, I recommend booking a guided tour so you can get the most out of your visit.

18. Visit Calakmul Archaeological Zone

Calakmul is one of the largest and most important (and underrated) Mayan sites. Portions are still being uncovered. The site is usually not crowded unless you count monkeys and coati. You may even be lucky enough to spot a jaguar.

Best of all (in my opinion) you can actually climb up some of the pyramids.

Calakmul is several hours from Campeche so taking a tour is definitely the way to go. I highly recommend the Calakmul Ancient Maya City Tour. You’ll be transported in a comfortable, air-conditioned bus, provided with lunch and water, and receive an excellent tour.

19. Enjoy a Quiet Afternoon at the Botanical Gardens

Within Baluarte de Santiago is a small but lovely botanical garden called Jardin Botanico Xmuch Haltun. You’ll find swings hanging from the trees and a lot of quiet shade to relax in.

20. Do Some Shopping

Campeche is a great place for shopping. You’ll find a lot of unique souvenirs and handicrafts that you can’t find anywhere else.

Some of the best places to shop are in El Centro. There are a number of small shops and boutiques, as well as markets where you can find great deals on traditional Mexican crafts.

Casa de Artesanias Tukulna

Where: Calle 10 & Calle 61

Hours: 9:00 a.m. – 8:00 p.m.

Casa de Artesanias Tukulna is a great place to shop for traditional Mexican crafts. The store is located in the heart of the historic center and it features a wide selection of handcrafted items, including pottery, textiles, and jewelry.

The owners of Casa de Artesanias Tukulna are passionate about Mexican culture and art, and they travel to remote villages throughout Mexico to find the best craftsmen and artists. You’ll find some of the most unique and authentic Mexican crafts here.

Galerías Campeche

Where: Av Pedro Sainz De Baranda Área, 139

Hours: 11:00 a.m. – 9:00 p.m.

If you’re looking for high-end brands, you’ll want to head to the Galeria. It’s a bit out of the way, but it has all the major stores, including Zara, Lacoste, and Nike. It’s a beautiful mall and a great place to enjoy some air conditioning on a hot day.

Mercado Central

Where: Outside the Land Gate

Hours: 6:00 a.m. – 8:00 p.m.

Cost: Depends on how well you haggle

The large market just outside El Centro is especially fun to explore, and you can find some fun and unique items there. The vendors sell everything from fruits and vegetables to cell phones.

Even if you aren’t there to buy, wandering through the maze-like market will give you a feel for the real Mexico.

Be sure to try some of the food for sale. You won’t find more authentic Mexican food anywhere.

21. Walk the Malecón de Campeche

Where: All along the oceanfront

My favorite part of any ocean-front Mexican city is the malecón. Campeche’s malecón is particulary nice. There is a separate path for bicycles so you won’t get run down. Locals and tourists alike enjoy strolling on the malecón and enjoying the sea breeze.

Don’t miss the sunsets from the malecón. Even though Campeche is on Mexico’s east coast, its position on the Yucatan Peninsula means the ocean is in the west.

You’ll find food vendors out in the evenings in case you need a snack.

22. Watch the Light and Water Show at Fuentes Marinas Poesía del Mar

Where: On the malecón near Calle 61

Hours: 8:00 p.m. – 9:00 p.m.

Along the malecón you’ll find the fountains. Every night there is an amazing light and water show. Admission is free and there is plenty of seating.

23. Visit Parque de Moch Couoh

Where: Across from the Fountains

Parque de Moch Couoh is a beautiful park in the heart of Campeche. It’s a great place to spend an afternoon, and it’s free to visit.

The park is named for the Mayan god of the moon, and it’s home to a number of beautiful sculptures and fountains. There are also a few small ponds, and it’s a great place to go for a walk or just relax in the shade.

24. Have a Beach Day at Playa Bonita

Where: Near Lerma

Hours: 9:00 a.m. – 7:00 p.m.

Playa Bonita is the closest beach to Campeche. The beach is a great place to swim, sunbathe, and relax. There are also a few restaurants and bars nearby, so you can enjoy a cold drink or bite to eat while you’re there.

You’ll also find changing rooms and showers so you can rinse off the sand and salt water.

Playa Bonita is about a 20-minute cab ride from El Centro.

While Playa Bonita is a nice beach now, it has a funny story. A local told me it used to be called, “The Beach of Two Lies” because it was neither a beach nor beautiful.

25. Enjoy a Concert at Teatro de la Ciudad Francisco de Paula Toro

Where: Calle 12 & Calle 51

Cost: Varies, but many concerts are free

The Teatro de la Ciudad Francisco de Paula Toro is a beautiful theater in the heart of Campeche. It’s a great place to see a concert or watch a play.

The theater was originally built in the 1800s, and it has been restored and renovated a number of times over the years. It’s now a beautiful example of colonial architecture. The theater hosts a variety of performances, including concerts, plays, and dance recitals. It’s also home to the Campeche Symphony Orchestra.

26. Get a Harry Potter Fix at 9 3/4

Where: Calle 65 & Calle 12

I stumbled across 9 3/4 while I was out walking one day and, as a Harry Potter fan, I had to check it out. The cafe is completely decorated in a Harry Potter theme.

It’s not just fun to look at. Their food is amazing. I had the most delicious waffle.

27. Dine on Calle 59

Where: Calle 59 of course

Hours: All day

Calle 59 is home to several blocks of restaurants with outdoor seating. You’ll find everything from sushi to pizza here. And, of course, tacos.

The street is lit up at night for a very festive atmosphere.

There are so many great choices that it can be hard to decide where to eat. My method was to walk down the street and stop at the first place a waiter with a menu tried to flag me in. The only rule was that it had to be a place I hadn’t eaten at yet.

I never had a bad meal, although there were many times I got something completely unexpected. Most menus aren’t very descriptive. I once ordered a hamburguesa con queso expecting, well, a cheeseburger.

Instead, I got what was essentially a steak fajita on a bun. It was huge and full of pieces of steak, onions, and bell peppers. It was absolutely fantastic.

About Campeche

Campeche is located on Mexico’s Yucatan Peninsula and is known for its rich history and culture. Its full name is San Francisco de Campeche and is the capital of the State of Campeche.

The city was founded in 1540 by the Spanish and has many well-preserved colonial-era buildings. Campeche also played a significant role in the Mexican Revolution.

I was lucky enough to live in Campeche for two months at the beginning of my digital nomad journey . I loved (almost) everything about it. Campeche is super safe. As a solo female traveler, I never felt afraid walking around, even at night.

It’s also the cleanest city I’ve ever visited in any country.

The numbered streets in Centro (the walled portion of the city) make it very easy to get around. The even-numbered streets run (somewhat) parallel to the ocean. Odd-numbered streets are perpendicular to the ocean.

The streets are narrow and most are one-way. Luckily Campeche drivers are very courteous. Still, be very careful crossing the streets.

The city itself is just charming. From the colorful buildings to the sunset views on the malecón, Campeche is an enjoyable place to just be .

I had my dog with me while I was in Campeche. It’s a somewhat dog-friendly city , but not near as much as other places I’ve lived in Mexico. One of the good things is that there are very few street dogs which made walking my dog less stressful.

How to Get to Campeche

Fly to campeche.

Campeche has a small airport, however, there are no international flights. You’ll need to change planes in Mexico City. Or fly into Merida and rent a car .

Drive to Campeche

If you’re in Mexico with a rental car, you can easily drive to Campeche.

It’s about a two-hour drive from Merida, or five and a half hours from Cancun . I made both of these drives and the highway was well-maintained and easy to drive on.

Both routes have toll roads so carry some pesos with you. There is often a free option, but unless you want an adventure, stick to the toll roads. I did take the free road from Campmeche to Cuidad del Carmen just for fun. Unfortunately, the free roads are usually not in great shape so it wasn’t as much fun as I hoped.

The very best option for renting a car in Mexico is Discover Cars . You’ll save a ton on insurance (which is required to purchase in Mexico).

Take the Bus to Campeche

Mexico has the best bus system called ADO. The buses are comfortable, air-conditioned, and inexpensive. They even have restrooms, although using one on a moving bus is a bit of a challenge!

ADO goes all over Mexico. I took one from Campeche to Merida to pick up my rental car and it was very enjoyable. Just take a sweater because the air conditioning works a little too well.

You can see the schedules and book a ticket on Busbud . This is the easiest way to buy your ticket using an American credit card.

Frequently Asked Questions: Things to Do in Campeche, Mexico

What is campeche known for.

Campeche Mexico is known for its beautiful colonial architecture, its rich history, and its delicious seafood.

What is the best time of year to visit Campeche?

The best time to visit Campeche is from November to April when the weather is dry and mild.

What are some popular tourist attractions in Campeche?

Some popular tourist attractions in Campeche include the Mayan ruins of Edzna, the historic city center of Campeche, and the San Francisco de Campeche Cathedral.

What is the currency used in Campeche?

The currency used in Campeche is the Mexican peso.

What language is spoken in Campeche?

The official language of Campeche (and all of Mexico) is Spanish. While many people also speak English it’s not as widely used as in more touristy parts of Mexico.

What is the climate like in Campeche?

The climate in Campeche is tropical, with hot and humid summers and mild winters.

What is the cuisine like in Campeche?

The cuisine in Campeche is known for its fresh seafood, including ceviche and shrimp dishes, as well as traditional Mexican dishes like tacos and tamales.

Is Campeche safe?

Yes, Campeche is generally considered a safe place to visit. However, as with any destination, it is important to take precautions and be aware of your surroundings.

How do I get to Campeche?

Campeche can be reached by plane, with flights arriving at the Campeche International Airport. Many people fly into Merida and take the bus or rent a car.

Is Campeche worth visiting?

Yes! Campeche is definitely worth visiting. It’s one of Mexico’s most underrated cities. But that means there aren’t big crowds. There is so much to do and see in Campeche. Don’t miss it!

Wrap-Up: Things to Do in Campeche

Campeche is one of the most underrated vacation destinations in Mexico. Not only is it beautiful, safe, and clean, but there is so much history to explore.

Most of these things to see in Campeche are centered around El Centro. Be sure to venture out into the other neighborhoods to get a real feel for the city. You won’t be sorry.

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The post 27 Best Things to Do in Campeche, Mexico in 2024 appeared first on Digital Nomad and a Dog .

Campeche is a great place to visit - or live in like I did. But what is there to do? Here is a list of all the best things to do in Campeche.

IMAGES

  1. Tour Desde Campeche: Zona Arqueológica Edzná

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  2. Tour Desde Campeche: Zona Arqueológica Edzná y Playa

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  3. Tour Desde Campeche: Zona Arqueológica Edzná

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  4. A Guide to Edzna Ruins: Best Day Trip from Campeche

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  5. Tour Desde Campeche: Zona Arqueológica Edzná y Playa

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  6. Tour zona arqueologica de Edzná y Campeche 19 de Septiembre 2021

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VIDEO

  1. Air One Maxxx (KMG / SICKO) Prop. Mr Dominique LERENDU

  2. TREN MAYA TR LLEVARÁ A CONOCERLO EDZNÁ CAMPECHE MÉXICO #mexico #mayantrain #djimini3 #trenmaya

  3. TRIVIAJERO CAMPECHE EDZNA FRANCES

  4. zona arqueológica de Edzna 2023

  5. Sommer im Engadin

  6. Acompáñame a la zona arqueológica de #Edzna en #Campeche 🏕️

COMMENTS

  1. Edzna Campeche

    Desde $ 1,186.00. Visita guiada a la zona arqueológica de Edzná, situada a 45 min al sureste de la ciudad capital, la Antigua ciudad maya presente desde 600 a.c. aproximadamente se mantuvo presente a lo largo de casi 1800 años. Antigua Ciudad maya, coronada por su templo pirámide de los cinco pisos. Reserve ahora.

  2. A Guide to Edzna Ruins: Best Day Trip from Campeche

    Getting to Edzna Ruins independently is absolutely hassle-free, and you do not need to take a taxi or tour as it is as simple as it can be in Mexico. In Campeche, you need to get to the corner of Calle Nicaragua and Calle Chihuahua from where frequent colectivos leave approximately every 30 minutes.

  3. Edzná, the house of the Itzaes 2024

    Product code: 260141P1. Half-day Tours in Campeche: Check out 29 reviews and photos of Viator's Edzná, the house of the Itzaes.

  4. A day trip from Campeche to the Edzna Mayan ruins

    Practicalities of visiting the Edzná Mayan ruins. Location: Around 55km from Campeche. Transport to Edzná: 45 peso collectivo from Calle Chihuahua in Campeche, tour or drive. Entrance fee: 60 peso. Food and drink: There's no food at Edzná, although there is a vending machine for soft drinks.

  5. Tour to Edzná and La Casa de los Itzaes from Campeche

    The answers provided below are based on answers previously given by the tour provider to customers' questions. Q: What is the policy on face masks and attendee health during Tour to Edzná and La Casa de los Itzaes from Campeche? A:The policies on face masks and attendee health are: Face masks required for travelers in public areas.

  6. Edzná in Colectivo, a Voyage Through History with a Local Guide

    Embark on this exhilarating expedition to the heart of the Mayan world with our tour to Edzná, led by the charismatic Hector, your local guide and storyteller. ... Half Day Private Tour of Campeche, the Walled City. 5. Historical Tours. from . $85.00. per adult. Full Day Excursion to Calakmul and Balamkú From Campeche. 2. Historical Tours ...

  7. Edzna (Mexico): Everything You Need to Know [+ My Tips]

    The Ultimate Guide to Visiting Edzna in 2024. Edzná is a Mayan archaeological site in the state of Campeche, Mexico.It's only an hour away from the city of San Francisco de Campeche.. Edzná was founded in 600 BC and was a major regional capital until the 15th century. It had up to 25,000 people living there and strong ties with other great Mayan cities like Calakmul and Piedras Negras in ...

  8. Exploring Edzná—the Perfect Day Trip from Campeche

    Edzná is located 55 kms southeast of Campeche and is easy to get to for a day trip, either by car, colectivo, taxi, or guided tour. By car. If you have a car, driving is the most convenient way to get to Edzná. The site can be reached by following Highway 180 or 261—just ask Google. There is a large parking area near the entrance to the site.

  9. Zona Arquelogica Edzna, Campeche

    Full Day Private Tour in Campeche Becal and Edzná. 4WD Tours. from . $377.07. per adult. 5 Days Mayan Heritage History Tour. 22. Recommended. 100% of reviewers gave this product a bubble rating of 4 or higher. Historical Tours. from . $922.29. per adult. Edzná in Colectivo, a Voyage Through History with a Local Guide. Historical Tours.

  10. Edzná Mayan Ruins

    Edzná is a Mayan archaeological site located in the Campeche region of Mexico, about a 45-minute drive, 55 km southeast from the city of Campeche. It dates to around 400 B.C. and features religious and residential buildings in a roughly 25 square kilometre area, housing 25,000 people at its peak. This Mayan centre was inhabited until around ...

  11. Tour Campeche-Edzna-Campeche 2024

    Transfer from your Hotel in Campeche to Campeche Airport. from $16.11. Campeche, Campeche. Visit to the Archaeological Zone of Edzná and the Ex Hacienda Uayamón. 1. from $100.28. Campeche, Campeche. Tour to Calakmul and Balamkú. From Campeche.

  12. Edzna Ruins Mexico: The Mayan City You Forgot

    Alternatively, you can take the bus from Campeche City or seek out a local tour company. Take the bus from Campeche to Edzna. There is a shuttle bus that runs between the City of Campeche and the Edzna ruins throughout the day. It departs every 30 minutes from Calle Chihuahua and you can buy a ticket directly from the driver on board for just ...

  13. Privately Guided Excursion to Edzna & Campeche City Tour

    Built on a 40 meter-high platform, Edzna's major temple, the Edificio de los Cinco Pisos (Five-Story Building) provides a great view of the plazas below as well as a panorama of the countryside. Return to Campeche in the afternoon for a guided visit of the walled city center.

  14. Visiting Edzná: The House of the Itzaes

    Deep in the jungle, about 50 km southeast of Campeche, lies the once-mighty city of Edzná, one of Mexico's most under-appreciated Mayan ruins.Known for its unique five-story pyramid, the site is not only well-preserved, but it gets just a fraction of the tourists of places like Uxmal.Those visiting Edzná in the early morning, in fact, can expect to have these fascinating ruins all to ...

  15. Edzná, the great second city of the Itzá

    Edzná is a large archaeological site located 52 kilometers southeast of the city of Campeche. In the Yucatec-Maya language, Edzná means the home of the Itzá. ... Driving to the site is quite easy and many tour companies operating in Campeche offer day trips at competitive prices. During holidays and on long weekends, the site can get busy ...

  16. Edzná Ruins

    Edzná was an influential city from 400 y 1000 AD. Edzná was finally abandoned in 1450, a unexplained abandonment that is still a mystery to this day. The city has elaborate underground systems to capture and retain rain water as the location lacked a local water source. Edzná was discovered in 1907. The first organized excavations started in ...

  17. Edzna Ruins (Campeche): Complete guide 2023

    Edzna Ruins. Edzna ruins is a Mayan archaeological site, located in the state of Campeche in Mexico, which is 1 hour from the city of the city of Campeche. Founded in the year 600 BC and occupied until the fifteenth century; Edzná was, in its heyday, an important regional capital, having up to 25,000 inhabitants.

  18. Edzna Ruins (Campeche, Mexico) Tour & History

    A tour & history of the impressive Mayan ruins of Edzna. Probably the best day trip you can do from the city of Campeche. This ancient archaeological site of...

  19. Edzná

    It means the house of the Itzá, which would point to a possible connection between Edzná and Chichén Itzá. The city was once the capital of a relatively large state area. Their influence extended in the north to the Puuc region, in the south-west, it bordered on the sphere of influence of Calakmul. The town area recognized to date has a ...

  20. Zona arqueológica de Edzná

    Edzná es toda una maravilla cultural e histórica.. Conocerás la ciudad maya mas cercana a campeche . De regreso a la ciudad de Campeche visite los 2 Fuertes que vigilan celosamente la ciudad el museo de San jose en don de se guardan los tesoros sub acauticos tanto de la epoca maya comodel comercio maritimo entre europa y la nueva españa, y el Fuerte de San miguel museo de arqueologuia maya.

  21. Edzna Archaeological Zone in Campeche

    Campeche. Edzna means "House of the Itzaes", Edzna Mayan Ruins are located to 61 kilometres to the south-east of Campeche's City. The access fulfils for the federal road 180; in the km 45 a diversion takes towards the road 261 that he leads to the archaeological zone. Edzna was possessing numerous religious, administrative buildings and ...

  22. Edzna, Campeche and Calakmul. Private Tour. MAYANTOURS

    DAY 1: BECAL - EDZNA - CAMPECHE. 9:00 a. m. : We leave the city of Merida for the town of Becal in Campeche, a place where the elegant "jipijapa" hats have been finely made for many years, that is the name of the palm with which they are woven by artisans in the shade of small natural caves.

  23. Campeche to Edzna Ruins

    Wayak operates a shuttle from Campeche to Edzna Ruins on demand. Tickets cost $55-210 and the journey takes 55 min. Colectivos del Valle de Edzna also services this route every 3 hours. Bus operators.

  24. 27 Best Things to Do in Campeche, Mexico in 2024

    Hours: 10:00 a.m. - 9:00 p.m. Cost: $100. MXN. One of the best things to do in Campeche is to take a tram tour. I recommend doing it early in your stay to get the lay of the land. Three charming ...