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TSA Knife Rules: Can You Take a Knife on a Plane?

TSA Knife Rules: Can You Take a Knife on a Plane?

  • Put knives in checked baggage when flying.
  • Don’t bring anything you would miss if it were lost or stolen.
  • What knife is legal everywhere? Small, non-locking knives that open with two hands are almost always legal.
  • Research knife laws of your destination.

Despite a failed  attempt in 2013 at allowing certain kinds of knives on airplanes , blades remain restricted when traveling on airplanes. Here are some tips for traveling with knives.

TSA Knife Rules

The following are the current rules for knives on airplanes from the Transportation Security Administration (TSA) .

What knives are allowed on airplanes?

That said, there are still other considerations even if you decide to bring knives in your luggage.

Put Inexpensive Knives in Your Checked Baggage

Knives you can bring on a plane

The kinds of people who walk into Dan and Pam Delavan’s Plaza Cutlery retail knife store in Costa Mesa, California, go for all kinds of knives, from classic folders to KA-BARs. But when they walk through Plaza Cutlery’s doors to buy a knife for vacation, most buy inexpensive models to slip into their checked baggage—inexpensive in case the knives get lost, stolen or confiscated.

“When they fly, that’s when the knife changes,” Delavan said.

He shows them budget models by Spyderco, CRKT and Kershaw, knives ranging from about $30 to $75. If customers are into Spyderco knives they might buy one from the Byrd line, folders from Spyderco with cost-friendly materials. If the customers like higher-end models, they might buy a Benchmade.

“It’s all relative to what you can afford,” Delavan said.

Plaza Cutlery is in South Coast Plaza, a mall that bills itself as “a luxury shopping experience”—a vacation destination in and of itself. Nearby Disneyland is an international draw. Hollywood and its attractions are close, too.

When Delavan heads to Disneyland with Pam and the grandchildren, he often carries the Victorinox Swiss Army Classic, which can slip on a keychain. He said it’s small enough that the park allows him to carry it. Of course, always research the knife laws of the areas you will be visiting. For most places in the USA, a small, non-locking knife should be OK, “but you’ve got to check” to be sure, Delavan noted.

What Knife is Legal Everywhere? Best Bet: Small, Non-Locking Knife that Opens with Two Hands

What knife is legal everywhere

Joe Tarbell’s retail store, JT’s Knife Shop , sits in a small building in Port Jervis, New York. The family-owned business began as an army surplus store near the Delaware River, which, during the summer, fills with kayakers and rafters.

“People ask me about knife laws quite often and it’s a pretty complicated subject,” he said. “ Knife laws can be very vague and misunderstood. I have even had police tell me a lot of it is up to the discretion of the officer. I tell people to research the best they can and check out AKTI [American Knife & Tool Institute] . I can’t tell you how many people think that the law states that a blade can’t be larger than the palm of your hand, which is ridiculous.”

If a customer is traveling overseas, he suggests a small, non-locking knife such as a multi-tool or an Opinel .

What Happens If TSA Confiscates Your Knife?

You’ll likely have to buy it back, if you can find it. Start with GovDeals.com , where government-seized property is often sold.

Know Your Knife Laws with This Book

Knife Laws of the United States

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Rules on Bringing a Pocket Knife on a Plane: Cutting Through the Confusion

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Whether you’re traveling domestically or internationally, a pocket knife can be an invaluable tool to have with you at your destination.

Fortunately, you can bring a pocket knife on a plane – but only in your checked baggage, not your carry on bags.

This comes direct from the TSA.

However, note that the TSA also state that “TSA officers have the discretion to prohibit any item through the screening checkpoint if they believe it poses a security threat.”

There are a few other important things you should be aware of, though, before you think about flying with your pocket knife to ensure that everything goes as smoothly as possible.

Table of Contents

  • 1 Bringing a Pocket Knife in Your Checked Bag
  • 2 Bringing a Pocket Knife in Your Carry On Bag
  • 3 Airline Regulations
  • 4 The Rules Change When Flying Internationally
  • 5 You Can’t Bring All Types of Knives On a Plane
  • 6 TSA-Approved Pocket Knifes is Just Marketing
  • 7 You Don’t Have to Declare You Are Traveling With a Pocket Knife
  • 8 You Can Bring Other Sharp Items on a Plane
  • 9 Self-Defense Items Are Also Allowed

Bringing a Pocket Knife in Your Checked Bag

Passengers are allowed to pack a pocket knife in their checked baggage. This applies to standard pocket knives, kitchen knives, Swiss army knives, and surprisingly, even swords.

TSA does not have a limit on the length or type of blade either – i.e. curved blades, for example, are allowed.

You just have to make sure that you safely secure the blade to avoid any accidents in the event that your baggage needs to be opened and inspected.

Bringing a Pocket Knife in Your Carry On Bag

Under no circumstances are passengers allowed to pack a pocket knife in their carry on bags.

However, if you want to bring a plastic or round-bladed butter knife in your carry on bags, this is allowed.

Interestingly, in 2013 , the TSA changed their rules to allow passengers to bring a pocket knife onboard in their carry on bags.

But the public, airlines , and the Association of Flight Attendants pushed back, making this repeal very short-lived.

Airline Regulations

All airlines, including American Airlines, Delta, Southwest, and JetBlue, follow TSA guidelines when it comes to bringing a pocket knife on a plane.

This means that pocket knifes are forbidden in your carry on bags, but allowed in your checked bags.

The Rules Change When Flying Internationally

Bringing a pocket knife on a plane isn’t like determining how many ounces you can take on a plane , which all countries are aligned on.

A pocket knife is considered to be a dangerous item that can be used as a weapon, which means international destinations have their own rules and regulations in place.

  • EU: Knives with blades no longer than 6 cm (2.36 inches) are allowed in your carry on bags
  • UK: Knives with blades no longer than 6 cm (2.36 inches) are allowed in your carry on bags
  • Canada: Knives with blades no longer than 6 cm (2.36 inches) are allowed in your carry on bags
  • Australia: Pocket knifes are forbidden in your carry on bags
  • China: Pocket knifes are forbidden in your carry on bags

Having said this, there’s still a possibility that your pocket knife will be confiscated because the final decision will rest with the security officer at the checkpoint.

If they think your pocket knife poses a threat, they won’t allow you to pass through with it.

To be on the safe side, pack your pocket knife in your checked bag when flying domestically and internationally.

You Can’t Bring All Types of Knives On a Plane

While you are allowed to bring a wide range of knives on a plane in your checked baggage, there are several restrictions.

Generally, the restrictions only apply if the knife is illegal in the first place.

While states may have different laws, it’s a safe bet to avoid packing the following in either your carry on or checked bags.

  • Flick knives
  • Butterfly knives
  • Knives that resemble other objects
  • Throwing stars, death stars, throwing knives
  • Push daggers

TSA-Approved Pocket Knifes is Just Marketing

There isn’t such a thing as a TSA-approved pocket knife.

TSA state that pocket knifes are allowed in your checked bags and forbidden in your carry on bags.

They do not give any more information than this, such as the type or length of the blade.

However, the TSA also state that “TSA officers have the discretion to prohibit any item through the screening checkpoint if they believe it poses a security threat.”

So if a TSA agent doesn’t like the look of your pocket knife, it may be confiscated.

You Don’t Have to Declare You Are Traveling With a Pocket Knife

In the USA, you are not required that you are traveling with a pocket knife.

This is because a pocket knife is classified as a sharp object – and as with other sharp objects, there is no need to declare them.

You Can Bring Other Sharp Items on a Plane

Many passengers want to know if they can take other sharp items on a plane – thankfully, the answer is yes to a wide array of items.

  • Box Cutters: Only in your checked bags
  • Disposable Razor: Only in your checked bags
  • Electric Razor : Yes, in both your carry on and checked bags
  • Ice Axes/Ice Picks: Only in your checked bags
  • Razor-Type Blades : Only in your checked bags
  • Sabers : Only in your checked bags
  • Saws : Only in your checked bags
  • Scissors : You can bring scissors on a plane in both your carry on bags and checked bags. But if packed in your carry-on, the blade must be less than 4 inches from the pivot point
  • Sewing Needles : Yes, in both your carry on and checked bags
  • Swiss Army Knife : Only in your checked bags
  • Swords : Only in your checked bags

Self-Defense Items Are Also Allowed

You are allowed to bring one 4 fl. oz. (118 ml) container of pepper spray on a plane in your checked baggage, but are not allowed to bring pepper spray in your carry on.

You can bring a taser on a plane in your checked baggage (along with stun guns and electro-shock weapons), but they are not allowed in your carry on bags.

You can bring bear spray on a plane in your checked bags, as long as the volume of the spray is less than 4oz and the active ingredient is less than 2%.

Keep in mind that tasers are either banned, require a background check, or permit for civilian ownership depending on the state.

According to the TSA , only if you bring any of the following sharp objects are you subject to a fine, which can be between $390 – $2,250:

Axes and hatchets; bows and/or arrows; ice axes and ice picks; knives with blades that open automatically (such as switchblades); knives with blades that open via gravity (such as butterfly knives); any double-edge knives or daggers; meat cleavers; sabers; swords; fencing foils;machetes; throwing stars.

Ella Dunham

Ella Dunham, a Freelance Travel Journalist and Marketing Manager, boasts an impressive career spanning eight years in the travel and tourism sectors.

Honored as one of "30 Under 30" by TTG Media (the world’s very first weekly travel trade newspaper), a "Tour Operator Travel Guru" and "Legend Award" winner, Ella is also a Fellow of the Institute of Travel, a Member of the Association of Women Travel Executives, has completed over 250 travel modules, and hosts travel-focused segments on national radio shows where she provides insights on travel regulations and destinations.

Ella has visited over 40 countries (with 10 more planned this year).

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How to Pack Knives & Sharp Objects in Your Checked Luggage

Last Updated: December 17, 2023 Fact Checked

  • Packing Knives Safely
  • Can knives go through TSA?

TSA Rules for Sharp Objects

This article was co-authored by wikiHow staff writer, Hunter Rising . Hunter Rising is a wikiHow Staff Writer based in Los Angeles. He has more than three years of experience writing for and working with wikiHow. Hunter holds a BFA in Entertainment Design from the University of Wisconsin - Stout and a Minor in English Writing. There are 10 references cited in this article, which can be found at the bottom of the page. This article has been fact-checked, ensuring the accuracy of any cited facts and confirming the authority of its sources. This article has been viewed 16,318 times. Learn more...

If you want to bring a knife with you on your next trip, you can easily pack it in a checked bag on your flight. You’re allowed to travel with knives in a checked bag, but it’s important to store them properly to prevent injuries and keep the blade safe. Keep reading, and we’ll walk you through all the security precautions to take, plus what other sharp items you can and can’t travel with.

Things You Should Know

  • Knives are allowed on checked bags. Just put the knife in its sheath or wrap it in bubble wrap and packing paper before putting it in your bag.
  • You cannot bring any knives through TSA in a carry-on unless they have blunt, non-serrated edges or are made of plastic.
  • Pocket knives, Swiss army knives, and utility knives must be packed in checked baggage.

Safely Packing Knives in Checked Luggage

Step 1 Sheathe or wrap your knife securely.

  • There isn’t a restriction on blade length when you pack a knife in a checked bag.
  • While the TSA allows any type of knife in a checked bag, make sure to check customs restrictions for countries you’re traveling to internationally.
  • Label the knife’s package so any airline security immediately recognizes what’s inside. That way, they’ll be more careful handling the package as well.

Step 2 Declare the knives to the airline when you check your bag.

Can knives go through TSA in a carry-on bag?

No, all sharp knives are prohibited from carry-on bags.

  • Blades that have blunt, non-serrated edges or are made from plastic are allowed on your carry-on bag.

Step 1 Utensils

  • If you have scissors in a carry-on, let TSA officers know before you go through security.
  • Sheathe or wrap scissors in a checked bag to prevent any injuries.

Step 3 Multi-tools

  • Inform the airline attendant when you check your bag that it contains a sword so any handlers stay safe.
  • Even foam toy swords are not allowed on planes unless they’re in a checked bag. [9] X Trustworthy Source U.S. Transportation Security Administration U.S. government agency responsible for ensuring safety by setting and enforcing travel protocols Go to source

Step 6 Tools

Expert Q&A

  • TSA agents have the final say on what’s allowed through security checkpoints, so they may prohibit any items that could be considered dangerous. [11] X Trustworthy Source U.S. Transportation Security Administration U.S. government agency responsible for ensuring safety by setting and enforcing travel protocols Go to source Thanks Helpful 0 Not Helpful 1

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  • ↑ https://www.tsa.gov/travel/security-screening/whatcanibring/items/knives
  • ↑ https://youtu.be/HzMqOtg7bik?t=9
  • ↑ https://www.tsa.gov/travel/security-screening/whatcanibring/items/utensils
  • ↑ https://www.tsa.gov/travel/security-screening/whatcanibring/items/scissors
  • ↑ https://www.tsa.gov/travel/security-screening/whatcanibring/items/multi-tools
  • ↑ https://www.tsa.gov/travel/security-screening/whatcanibring/items/disposable-razor
  • ↑ https://www.tsa.gov/travel/security-screening/whatcanibring/items/swords
  • ↑ https://www.tsa.gov/travel/security-screening/whatcanibring/items/foam-toy-sword
  • ↑ https://www.tsa.gov/travel/security-screening/whatcanibring/all-list

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TSA Approved Pocket Knives – Ultimate Buyers Guide

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You’ve planned your trip, packed your bags, and you’re ready to go. But wait, what about your trusted pocket knife, you know, the one you never part with? Is it TSA approved?

I know TSA rules are confusing, and there are so many of them to weed through. Not to worry, I am here to help.

Over the years of travel and dealing with TSA, I gained a tremendous degree of knowledge about TSA, sharp objects, and, yes, pocket knives. If you want to take your pocket knife with you when you fly, this information is invaluable.

Together, let’s unpack the TSA’s rules on pocket knives, explore what makes a pocket knife TSA approved, and look at some of the best TSA approved pocket knives available.

Quick Overview Of TSA Approved Pocket Knives (Updated List)

Is the term “tsa approved pocket knives” an oxymoron.

Before we move forward with our TSA approved pocket knives buyer’s guide, it’s necessary to explain what “TSA approved” means . The term might seem like an oxymoron, given that the TSA generally prohibits knives in carry-on luggage. However, “TSA approved” in this context refers to pocket knives that meet specific criteria set by the TSA for checked luggage .

It’s important to note that even if a pocket knife is deemed “TSA approved,” it still needs to be packed in your checked luggage. Carrying a pocket knife in your carry-on bag can lead TSA taking it at the security checkpoint and may even result in fines or other penalties.

So, when we talk about “TSA approved pocket knives,” we’re referring to knives that won’t violate TSA rules or regulations. Now that we’ve cleared that up, let’s dive into our buyer’s guide for the best TSA approved pocket knives on the market.

Top 5 TSA Approved Pocket Knives Product Reviews

Now that we understand what makes a pocket knife TSA approved, let’s look at some of the best options available. Each of these knives meets the TSA’s guidelines and offers unique features that make them a great choice for travelers.

Case Cutlery Yellow Handle Peanut

tsa approved pocket knives 5 white

The Case Cutlery Yellow Handle Peanut is a classic and reliable tool that combines functionality with a touch of vintage charm. Its compact size makes it a great travel companion, especially for those who appreciate traditional craftsmanship.

Product Overview

The Case Cutlery Yellow Handle Peanut features a high-quality stainless steel blade that’s designed for durability and precision. The handle, with its distinctive yellow color, is made from a durable synthetic material that provides a comfortable grip.

One of the standout features of this knife is its traditional peanut design, which includes two blades of different sizes. This offers versatility for various tasks, from opening packages to peeling fruit.

  • Compact and lightweight, making it easy to carry
  • High-quality stainless steel blades
  • Comfortable and distinctive yellow handle
  • Traditional peanut design with two blades for versatility
  • Made by Case Cutlery, a well-known brand with a long history in the knife industry
  • The traditional design may not appeal to everyone
  • The small size, while great for travel, might limit its functionality for larger tasks.

Why It’s TSA Approved

The Case Cutlery Yellow Handle Peanut meets the TSA guidelines for knives in checked luggage due to its small blade size. Remember, even though it’s TSA compliant, it still needs to be packed in your checked luggage.

In conclusion, the Case Cutlery Yellow Handle Peanut is an excellent choice for those who appreciate traditional design and craftsmanship. Whether you’re a frequent traveler or just need a handy tool for everyday tasks, this knife is a solid choice.

Spyderco Grasshopper Black Non-Locking Knife With 2.30″

tsa approved pocket knives 1 grey

The Spyderco Grasshopper Black Non-Locking Knife is a compact and reliable tool that’s perfect for everyday carry. Its 2.30″ blade is small enough to be TSA compliant, yet it can handle the tasks at hand.

This knife features a sleek, black design that you can easily have engraved. The stainless steel 3Cr13 blade resists rust and corrosion, ensuring longevity. The handle is made from durable materials that provide a comfortable grip, making it easy to use even for extended periods.

One of the standout features of this knife is its non-locking mechanism. This means the blade doesn’t lock when it’s open, which is a requirement for TSA approved pocket knives.

  • Lightweight and compact, making it easy to carry
  • Durable stainless steel blade
  • Comfortable grip
  • Non-locking mechanism for added safety and compliance
  • Made by Spyderco, a reputable brand known for quality knives
  • The non-locking mechanism may not be suitable for all tasks
  • The small size, while great for travel, might limit its functionality for larger tasks

The Spyderco Grasshopper Black Non-Locking Knife meets the TSA guidelines for knives in checked luggage due to its small blade size and non-locking mechanism. Remember, even though it’s one of the TSA approved pocket knives, it still needs to be packed in your checked luggage.

Overall, the Spyderco Grasshopper is a great choice for those in need of a compact, reliable, and TSA compliant knife. Whether you’re a frequent traveler or just need a handy tool for everyday tasks, this knife is a solid choice.

Kizer Mini Bay Pocket Knife, 1.9 Inch, Non-Locking

tsa approved pocket knives 2

The Kizer Mini Bay Pocket Knife is a compact and versatile tool that’s perfect for those who need a reliable knife on the go. With a blade length of just 1.9 inches, it’s small enough to be TSA compliant, yet robust enough to handle a variety of tasks.

The Kizer Mini Bay features a high-quality stainless steel blade that’s designed for durability and precision. The handle is made from lightweight materials that provide a comfortable grip, making it easy to handle even for extended periods.

One of the standout features of this knife is its non-locking mechanism. This means the blade doesn’t lock when it’s open, which is a requirement for many jurisdictions, including being TSA compliant for checked luggage.

  • Traditional design
  • High-quality stainless steel blade
  • Made by Kizer, a well-known brand in the knife industry

The Kizer Mini Bay Pocket Knife is one of our top picks as TSA approved pocket knives as long as you place it in your checked luggage. It meets the TSA guidelines due to its small blade size and non-locking mechanism.

In conclusion, the Kizer Mini Bay is an excellent choice for those in need of a compact, reliable, and TSA compliant knife. Whether you’re a frequent traveler or just need a handy tool for everyday tasks, this knife is a solid choice.

Spyderco Bug Non-Locking Knife With 1.27″

tsa approved pocket knives 32

The Spyderco Bug Non-Locking Knife is a testament to the saying, “good things come in small packages.” With a blade length of just 1.27 inches, this compact knife is perfect for those who need a reliable tool that’s also travel-friendly.

The Spyderco Bug features a high-quality stainless steel blade for durability and precision. Despite its small size, this knife doesn’t compromise on functionality. The handle, while compact, provides a comfortable grip, making it easy to handle for various tasks.

  • Extremely compact and lightweight, perfect for travel
  • Comfortable grip despite its small size
  • The extremely small size, while great for travel, might limit its functionality for larger tasks

The Spyderco Bug Non-Locking Knife meets the TSA guidelines for knives in checked luggage due to its small blade size and non-locking mechanism. Remember, even though it’s TSA compliant, it still needs to be packed in your checked luggage.

In conclusion, the Spyderco Bug is an excellent choice for those in need of a super compact, reliable, and TSA approved pocket knives. Whether you’re a frequent traveler or just need a handy tool for everyday tasks, this knife is a solid choice.

Spyderco Roadie Non-Locking Lightweight Knife With 2.09″ Blade

tsa approved pocket knives 4

The Spyderco Roadie Non-Locking Lightweight Knife is a compact yet versatile tool that’s perfect for those who value functionality and portability. With a blade length of 2.09 inches, it’s small enough to make the list of TSA approved pocket knives. Put it to the test to see well it handles many small tasks.

The Spyderco Roadie features a high-quality stainless steel blade that’s designed for durability and precision. The handle is made from lightweight materials that provide a comfortable grip, making it easy to handle even for extended periods.

  • Made by Spyderco, a well-known brand in the knife industry

The Spyderco Roadie Non-Locking Lightweight Knife meets the TSA guidelines for knives in checked luggage due to its small blade size and non-locking mechanism. Remember, even though it’s TSA compliant, it still needs to be packed in your checked luggage.

In conclusion, the Spyderco Roadie is an excellent choice for those in need of a compact and reliable, knife that meets the requirements of TSA approved pocket knives. Whether you’re a frequent traveler or just need a handy tool for everyday tasks, this knife is a solid choice.

What Makes a Pocket Knife TSA Approved?

TSA approved pocket knives are those that meet specific criteria set by the TSA. These criteria mainly revolve around the design and functionality of the knife.

Blade Length And Sharpness

The length of the blade is a critical factor for TSA approved pocket knives. TSA regulations stipulate that the blade of a pocket knife should not exceed 2.36 inches . The sharpness of the blade is also considered – certain types of blades may be deemed too dangerous for travel.

Knife Design

The design of the knife also plays a role. Some designs are considered safer and more suitable as TSA approved pocket knives than others. For instance, knives that feature a locking mechanism may not be allowed as they can be used more effectively as a weapon.

Other Factors

Other factors that can affect whether a pocket knife is TSA approved include the material the knife is made from and its overall purpose. For instance, utility knives may be allowed while combat knives are not.

How To Travel Safely With Your TSA Approved Pocket Knives

Even when you have experience with TSA approved pocket knives, it’s essential to follow certain guidelines to ensure a smooth travel experience.

Packing Your Knife Properly

Your pocket knife should be securely wrapped and placed in your checked luggage. This not only adheres to TSA guidelines but also ensures the safety of baggage handlers.

Checking In Your Knife

When checking in your luggage, it may be a good idea to declare that you have a pocket knife in your bag. This can prevent any potential issues or delays.

Handling TSA Inspections

If your bag is selected for inspection, cooperate fully with the TSA officers. Remember, they are just doing their job to ensure everyone’s safety.

tsa approved pocket knives 16

Frequently Asked Questions – TSA Approved Pocket Knives

Navigating the world of TSA regulations can often lead to questions, especially when it comes to items like pocket knives. To help you better understand these rules and make your travel experience smoother, we’ve compiled answers to some of the most frequently asked questions about TSA approved pocket knives. Let’s dive in.

Are pocket knives TSA approved?

Technically speaking, no, they are not. The term TSA approved means an item can go in a carry on bag on a plane. Pocket knives can go in your checked luggage only, but no knives are allowed in the cabin of an airplane in any bag.

What size pocket knife will TSA allow?

TSA regulations say that a pocket knife with a blade 2.36 inches or less may be in your checked luggage only. No knives are permitted in a carry on bag. In addition, the knife cannot have a locking open mechanism.

What happens if TSA finds a pocket knife?

When it comes to knives in carry on luggage, TSA is not playing around. They strictly adhere to the rules regarding knives and will confiscate them when they show up on the security scanners.

Additional Resources

If you are looking for more tutorials, walkthroughs, and troubleshooting on TSA, here are some additional posts about TSA:

Can You Bring Deodorant On A Plane? TSA Rules To Avoid A Sticky Situation

TSA Trekking Poles – Best For Airline Travel

Glue In Hand Luggage: Navigating TSA Rules

Navigating the world of travel regulations can be a daunting task, especially when it comes to items like TSA approved pocket knives. However, with the right knowledge, it doesn’t have to be. The key is understanding what makes a pocket knife TSA approved and choosing a knife that meets these criteria.

Finding TSA approved pocket knives is a challenge in itself. Most pocket knives have blades greater than 2.36 inches and a locking handle. We’ve explored several options for you, such as the traditional peanut, Spyderco Grasshopper, the Kizer Mini Bay, the Spyderco Bug, and the Spyderco Roadie. Each of these knives offers unique features and benefits, making them excellent choices for travelers.

Remember, even though these are TSA approved pocket knives, they still need to be packed in your checked luggage. Always follow TSA guidelines and cooperate with TSA officers at the airport to ensure a smooth and hassle-free travel experience.

Happy travels, my friends.

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Laura Fuller

Hello, I am a luggage and travel fanatic. With a vast knowledge of TSA regulations, I am here to assist you on your journey. Please join me, and together, we will navigate the world of travel. From TSA and air to cruising the high seas, we will explore the best accessories and tips for smooth travel.

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American Knife and Tool Institute

Keeping Knives in American Lives Since 1998

Traveling With a Knife

Exercise caution when traveling with a knife.

(Follow the American Knife & Tool Institute’s efforts to protect knife users traveling from state to state by introducing the federal Interstate Transport Act .  The burden on knife users of trying to know, understand and comply with complex, overlapping laws and legal authorities will be replaced by reasonable protections.)

There is simply no way to guarantee that you will be able to legally carry your knife when traveling because of the patchwork of state and local laws.  A bit of preparation can help, but given the state knife laws, it is often wise to ship knives instead of traveling with them.

This is not legal advice.  It can’t be because of the vast number of legal considerations.  These are tips for knife-carrying travelers.  If you have legal questions, ask a lawyer.

Legal Authorities

Imagine a trip from one city in one state to another.  Boston, Massachusetts, to Providence, Rhode Island, for example.  In this single trip of about 50 miles, a knife owner will be subject to no fewer than six different sets of laws regarding knife carry: 1) Massachusetts laws; 2) Boston ordinances; 3) ordinances of cities and towns passed through on the trip; 4) Rhode Island laws; 5) Providence ordinances; and 6) federal laws.  As such, before you travel, you should check all of the laws and ordinances of the departure state and city, any pass-through states and cities, and the arrival state and city, as well as federal laws regarding knife carry.

If you travel between states or into federal facilities (such as a federal court, post office, or military base), you subject yourself to federal jurisdiction.  Committing a crime while subject to federal laws and carrying a knife can have extremely severe consequences.  Federal crimes are punished according to sentencing regulations, and those regulations treat carrying a knife very disfavorably.  You may receive extra punishment for carrying a knife while committing a federal crime.  Additionally, you may be ineligible for sentence reductions and other safety valve reductions for first-time or minor offenses.

AKTI and others have been instrumental in reforming knife laws on the state level, and a growing number of states now have “preemption” laws.  In a state with preemption laws, the state law automatically replaces all local ordinances.  So if a knife is legal to carry in one part of a state, it is legal in every part of the state regardless of the local town or city ordinances that have not been revoked.  Check out our list of states with preemption laws .

Legal Regulations

In addition to the multiple and sometimes conflicting legal authorities, there are five primary forms of restrictions.  Be aware that in some locations, whether the knife is concealed or not is also important.  Be aware that some knives are legal to own but not to carry.  Here are the primary forms of regulation:

  • Blade Deployment : some locations regulate laws based on how the blade is deployed. Automatic knives and balisongs, for example, are more regulated than other kinds of folders.
  • Blade length : many places restrict larger blades.
  • Locks : in some locations locking knives are restricted.
  • Concealed carry : in many states whether the knife is concealed or not impacts its legality.
  • Per se limitations : some states have regulations banning specifically named knives like daggers, push knives, and dirk knives.

Traveling by Air

blade length for travel

Never try to “slip” a knife through a security checkpoint.  This is very severely and regularly punished.  If you have a knife and forget about it until the security checkpoint, TSA policy will let you: 1) return it to your vehicle; 2) return to the counter and check the knife in your luggage; 3) forfeit it to TSA; or 4) mail it.  It may be worthwhile to include a padded self-addressed mailer in your carry-on travel gear just for this occasion.  Most airports have mailboxes near the security checkpoint for this very reason.

Traveling by Rail and Bus

blade length for travel

Traveling by Personal Vehicle

Traveling by Car with a knife AKTI

Even in your own vehicle, there can be some peril in traveling with a knife.  In addition to all of the legal authorities mentioned above, in many states, cars can be more easily searched by the police than your home or person.  Furthermore, traveling from state to state can expose you to federal legal authority.  Finally, if stopped or arrested, it is possible that your car could be searched without a warrant, depending on the state.

Shipping Knives

USPS has very restrictive laws and regulations about shipping knives.  Shipping banned knives can be a federal offense (see above Legal Authorities for more).  The Federal Switchblade Act and related laws and regulations limit which knives can be shipped by the United States Postal Service.

FedEx has no specific prohibition on knife carry, but its corporate policies ban shipping items that are illegal in the arrival location.  UPS and DHL have no restrictions.  Remember that dealing with corporate policies is different than legal authorities.  Private companies have virtually no limitations on their ability to search your packages.  Check their websites for their current policies.  It is their company, and they can make the policies.

If you decide to ship a knife, make sure that the knife is secure.  Use a knife roll or padded case, if possible, and secure the blade in the handle if it is a folder and secure the sheath to the knife if it is a fixed blade.  Also, think about insurance for the knife as well as a signed receipt required if the knife is very expensive.

BOTTOM LINE:

  •  Research knife laws when you are traveling, checking the departure, travel-through, and arrival location laws
  •  Be aware of states with preemption laws
  •  Plan ahead depending on your mode of travel
  •  Consider shipping knives instead of traveling with them
  •  Be very careful traveling through federal facilities or shipping knives via USPS
  •  If you are confronted by law enforcement, see here for more tips

This article was written by Anthony Sculimbrene, Esq., a New Hampshire criminal defense attorney who worked for 12 years for the New Hampshire Public Defender and has extensive trial experience.  He is an avid outdoorsman, and blogger and contributes legal expertise to the American Knife & Tool Institute compliments of Microtech.

To remind you to put your knife in your checked bag,  Purchase an AKTI Luggage Tag Article – Traveling with Knives Presents Challenges Airline Permitted/Prohibited Items – Knives are allowed in your checked baggage. Amtrak Permitted/Prohibited Items

As a nonprofit association, AKTI’s role is to be the reasonable and responsible advocate for the knife-making and knife-using community; educating, promoting and informing that knives are important tools.

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Can You Bring Knives On A Plane?

JustTravo » Blog » Can You Bring Knives On A Plane?

Can You Bring Knives On A Plane?

Can you bring knives on a plane? This common travel query raises crucial safety concerns and is subject to stringent aviation regulations. There are potential risks associated with sharp objects like sewing needle on a plane in your carry-on or checked luggage .

The TSA and international aviation authorities strictly prohibit certain types of knives on planes. Small non-locking folding knives with blades under a specific length may be allowed in checked baggage but not in carry-on luggage.

It is vital to research & understand the specific rules of the airline & the country you are travelling. To and from to avoid any inconvenience or legal issues. Safety remains the top priority in air travel, & complying with these regulations ensures a secure and smooth journey for all passengers.

Table of Contents

TSA Regulations On Can You Bring Knives On A Plane?

Navigating the TSA regulations regarding knives on planes is essential for any traveller. Many people want to bring knives on the plane to use for cutting fruit on a plane carried in the luggage . The TSA has stringent guidelines to ensure the safety and security of all passengers.

Understanding the rules for carrying knives in both carry-on and checked luggage is crucial to avoid any inconvenience or potential legal issues during air travel. Get overview of the TSA’s regulations regarding knives, outlining what is permitted and what is prohibited in both types of luggage.

Staying informed about these guidelines ensures a smooth journey while maintaining the highest standards of safety in the skies.

Can You Take Knives On A Plane In Carry-On Luggage?

In general, the TSA prohibits passengers from carrying sharp objects, including knives, in their carry-on luggage. This includes pocket knives, utility knives, and any blade that extends beyond a certain length.

  • There are some exceptions for query, can you bring knives on a plane?
  • Non-locking knives may be allowed in carry-on bags.
  • Note that TSA officers have the final discretion to determine if an item is allowed through security.

Can I Bring Knives On A Plane In Checked Luggage?

In checked luggage, knives are generally permitted, with some restrictions. Non-locking folding knives, fixed-blade knives, and other bladed tools are typically allowed in checked bags.

  • Blades should be properly sheathed or securely wrapped to prevent injury to baggage handlers and TSA officers.
  • Knife on a plane in your checked luggage used in kitchen & other sharp objects must be securely wrapped or placed in a dedicated knife case to prevent injuries during baggage handling.
  • Switchblades, butterfly knives, and other concealed or disguised knives are strictly prohibited. Regardless of whether they are in carry-on or checked luggage.

Can You Bring A Knife In A Checked Bag Internationally?

When travelling internationally, there is a question, can you bring knives on a plane in a checked bag internationally? You are allowed to include a knife in your checked bag. However, it is crucial to prioritize the safety of baggage handlers and inspectors.

Can You Bring A Knife In A Checked Bag Internationally

In case you want to bring a sharp object like a razor on a plane in your luggage , consider the rules. To achieve this, please make sure to properly sheathe or securely wrap any sharp objects before packing them.

Taking this precautionary measure will minimize the risk of injuries during the handling and inspection process. Ensuring a smooth and safe travel experience for everyone involved. So, if you plan to bring a knife along for your journey, follow the guidelines to maintain a secure travel environment for all passengers and staff.

Pocket Knife In Checked Bag

Carrying a pocket knife in checked bag for domestic flights in the United States was generally allowed. However, there were some specific guidelines to follow to ensure compliance with TSA regulations.

  • Pocket knives with blades less than 2.36 inches (6 cm) in length were typically permitted in checked luggage.
  • It’s important to note that rules and regulations regarding air travel can change, check the latest guidelines provided by the TSA.

How To Pack A Knife In Checked Baggage?

When packing a knife in checked baggage, ensure it is securely stored to prevent damage or injury.

  • Place the knife inside a sturdy sheath or protective covering, then wrap it with clothes or towels for extra cushioning.
  • Make sure the blade is completely covered and unable to shift during transport.
  • To further prevent mishaps, consider using a dedicated knife case or box.
  • Always check with airline and TSA regulations before packing.
  • It ensures compliance with specific guidelines regarding knife length and type allowed in checked baggage.

Can I Take My Chef Knives On A Plane?

Chef knives & sharp objects like gillette razor on a plane in the luggage are generally not allowed in carry-on luggage for flights in the US& many other countries. This restriction is in place for security reasons to prevent potential threats during the flight.

  • Pack your chef knives in your checked baggage.
  • Properly secure them to prevent any damage to the baggage or injury to baggage handlers.
  • You can use a dedicated knife case or wrap the knives securely in clothing or other protective materials.
  • Check with the specific airline and the relevant transportation authorities for the latest guidelines and regulations.

Can You Bring Knives On A Plane: Prohibited Knives

Certain types of knives are strictly prohibited on planes by the TSA due to their potential risk and threat to aviation safety. The following are examples of knives that are not allowed in carry-on or checked luggage:

  • Pocket Knives with Locking Blades: According to TSA pocket knife with blades that lock into place are not permitted, regardless of the blade length.
  • Switchblades & Automatic Knives: Any knife with a blade that opens automatically by pressing a button, spring, or other mechanism is prohibited.
  • Butterfly Knives: These knives, which have folding blades that rotate around the handle, are not allowed on planes.
  • Concealed & Disguised Knives: Any knife designed to be hidden within everyday items or disguised as innocuous objects. Like belt buckle knives or credit card knives, are strictly prohibited.
  • Multi-Tools with Blades: Multi-tools that feature knives with locking blades are not allowed in carry-on luggage.
  • Throwing Knives and Stars: Any sharp objects designed for throwing, such as throwing knives or shurikens, are not permitted on planes.
  • Daggers and Stilettos: Knives with double-edged blades or blades designed for thrusting are prohibited.

Can I Take Knives On A Plane: Rules In Other Countries

Rules for the question, can you bring knives on a plane in other countries can vary significantly from one country to another. Each country’s aviation authority may have its own regulations for carrying sharp objects like knives on commercial flights.

While I can provide some general information, it’s essential to verify the specific rules for each country you plan to travel to or from. Here are some considerations:

European Union Countries

The regulations for carrying knives on planes within EU countries generally follow guidelines set by the European Aviation Safety Agency. Non-locking folding knives with blades under a specific length are usually allowed in carry-on luggage. However, individual countries may have additional restrictions, so it’s advisable to check with each country’s aviation authority.

United Kingdom (UK)

The UK’s Civil Aviation Authority (CAA) has rules similar to those of the EU. Small non-locking folding knives with blades under a certain length may be allowed in carry-on luggage. But other types of knives are generally prohibited.

In Australia, for the question, can you bring knives on a plane, the rules are strict, and all types of knives are typically prohibited in carry-on luggage. Knives are generally allowed in checked baggage, but there might be specific length and safety requirements.

Transport Canada typically follows similar guidelines to the TSA in the United States. Small non-locking folding knives with blades under a certain length might be allowed in carry-on luggage. But other types of knives are generally prohibited.

Can you bring knives on a plane? This question’s answer for Japan has stringent regulations concerning knives on planes. In general, all knives, including pocket knives, are not allowed in carry-on luggage. Knives might be permitted in checked baggage but with specific safety requirements.

United Arab Emirates (UAE)

The UAE’s General Civil Aviation Authority (GCAA) has regulations similar to those of other countries. Non-locking folding knives with blades under a certain length may be allowed in carry-on luggage. While other types of knives are typically prohibited.

In conclusion for the question, can you bring knives on a plane, bringing knives on a plane is generally prohibited in carry-on luggage due to security regulations. However, small pocket knives may be allowed in checked baggage.

Other sharp objects like fishing hooks in a carry-on or checked bag in a plane must be cross-checked with rules too. Provided they comply with specific length restrictions set by the TSA. Always check current guidelines before travelling.

Frequently Asked Questions – Can You Bring Knives On A Plane?

Find quick answers to your questions regarding carrying knives during air travel. Learn about TSA regulations, permitted knife types, and how to pack them properly for a smooth journey. Stay informed and travel with confidence.

No, knives are not allowed in carry-on luggage. They must be packed in checked baggage to comply with TSA regulations.

Swiss Army knives with blades under 2.36 inches (6 cm) can be placed in checked baggage, not in your carry-on.

Yes, certain knife types like switchblades, butterfly knives, and concealed blades are strictly prohibited both in carry-on and checked baggage.

Yes, kitchen knives can be packed in checked baggage, but ensure they are safely wrapped or secured to prevent damage.

No, carrying a knife for self-defence on a plane is not allowed, regardless of its size or type.

Yes, knife regulations are typically consistent for domestic and international flights, but it’s essential to check with each country’s specific guidelines.

If you accidentally bring a prohibited knife to the security checkpoint, you’ll have the option to surrender it or return to the ticket counter to place it in checked baggage.

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Can You Bring Knives On Planes: Airline Rules You Need to Know

If you're planning to travel by aeroplane, you may wonder: Can you bring knives on planes ? The answer is not as simple as a "Yes" or "No", as there are specific regulations and restrictions you need to be aware of.

In this article, our team at CabinZero will explore the TSA regulations on carrying knives in your luggage when flying. We'll also cover what types of knives are allowed on planes, the specific exceptions to the Prohibited Items List, and recommend valuable tips for safely packing knives in your checked luggage. 

Whether you're a chef travelling with your kitchen knives or a hobbyist with a pocket knife, you should have a deep insight into the matter. By following these rules, you can enjoy a smooth and hassle-free flight while keeping yourself and other passengers safe.

Can You Bring Knives On Planes?

Yes, you can bring knives on planes , but with a few restrictions on types and packing. In the United States and European nations, TSA prohibits knives in carry-on luggage, except for plastic or round-bladed butter knives. However, blades can be packed in checked baggage if they are sheathed or securely wrapped to deter injury during air travel. 

Current UK law states: “carrying knives or any weapons in public without a ‘good reason’ is illegal”. So it’s understandable that airlines enforce strict rules on bringing such items on flights.

Sharp or pointed blades over 6 cm are not allowed in hand luggage in the UK. But you can pack them in hold luggage after consulting with the airline. 

Additionally, bladed tools such as box cutters in carry-on luggage are banned. However, certain items like straight razors are still allowed if packed in a specific way.

blade length for travel

TSA Guidelines for Packing Sharp Objects in Checked Luggage

The TSA (Transportation Security Administration in the USA) has the following regulations on its website with regard to the limitations on sharp objects in carry-on luggage: 

“TSA officers have the discretion to prohibit any item through the screening checkpoint if they believe it poses a security threat. Any sharp objects in checked bags should be sheathed or securely wrapped to prevent injury to baggage handlers and inspectors.”

TSA guidelines for packing sharp items in checked luggage include:

  • Use a sturdy container or protective sheath to prevent the sharp object from damaging other items in your luggage or injuring baggage handlers.
  • Wrap the sharp item in a soft material, such as clothing or bubble wrap, to prevent it from shifting or jostling during transport.
  • Declare any sharp items or potential weapons, including tools or sporting equipment, to the airline and TSA agent at the security checkpoint.
  • Failure to declare sharp items or other prohibited items could result in fines, delays, or even criminal charges.

blade length for travel

TSA guidelines for packing sharp items in checked luggage - Photo by Dental Pro Content - stock.adobe.com

TSA also imposes civil penalties on individuals who bring sharp items, including knives, through airport security checkpoints, sterile areas or onboard aircraft. The amount of the fine can vary from $390 to $2,250. In addition to the civil penalty, the TSA may refer the matter to law enforcement for possible criminal prosecution.

Note: Always check the TSA website or mobile app for the most up-to-date information on prohibited items and restrictions on sharp objects. Regulations may vary based on airline, destination, or other factors.

Types of Knives Allowed in Checked Luggage

You're a traveller who enjoys outdoor activities such as camping or hunting . You may want to bring along a knife for such purposes. While knives are generally illegal to bring in carry-on luggage, certain types are permitted in checked baggage.  

  • Fixed Blade Knives: These knives have a blade permanently attached to the handle. They are allowed as long as the blade is within 7 inches. They are allowed because they are considered tools and used for various purposes, such as camping, hunting, and fishing.
  • Folding Knives: These knives have a blade that folds into the handle. Folding knives are allowed, providing the blade is no longer than 4 inches.
  • Pocket Knives : These knives are commonly utilised as tools for outdoor activities like camping, fishing, and hunting, as well as for day-to-day tasks such as opening boxes or cutting loose threads. For this reason, they are not inherently hazardous and are not perceived as a risk to airline security.
  • Kitchen Knives: These knives are essential tools for cooking and are commonly used in households and professional kitchens. While they can be dangerous if not used properly, they are not inherently a security threat and are unlikely to be used as weapons on board an aeroplane.  However, certain kitchen knives, such as those with serrated or curved blades, may be subject to additional scrutiny by some airlines or destinations. 
  • Multi-tools: These tools have numerous functions, including knives, and are permitted provided that the blade’s length does not exceed 2.36 inches. 
  • Note: Remember that any knife with a blade longer than the specified lengths above is strictly banned in checked luggage. Additionally, any knife that is deemed to be a weapon, such as switchblades or daggers, is prohibited in both carry-on and checked luggage.

Types Of Knives Prohibited On Planes

Certain knives can be deemed unfit depending on their blade size, structure, and other factors. If you were to carry one of these knives in your checked luggage during air travel, the airport security officer would probably contact the relevant authorities. You could face legal consequences. 

The regulations can be intricate and vary from country to country. We have gathered a list of knives that are generally considered outlawed by most governing bodies.

blade length for travel

Certain knives can be deemed against the law - Photo by avtorpainter - stock.adobe.com

  • Switchblades: These knives have a blade that can be quickly released with the push of a button. They are banned on planes because they are considered to be weapons and can be used to harm others.
  • Balisongs or butterfly knives: The blade of these knives can swing out from the handle. You must not bring these on planes because sometimes they are believed to pose a security threat.
  • Disguised knives: These knives are designed to look like other objects, such as a pen or a belt buckle. They are not permitted on planes because they can be easily concealed and used to injure others.
  • Throwing stars or ninja stars: These throwing weapons are prohibited from being carried on planes due to their potential to harm others.
  • Straight razors: Their non-retractable long sharp blades can be used as weapons.
  • Swords or sabres: Most countries prohibit sharp weapons such as swords, sabres, and even spears.

Tips for Safely Packing Knives in Checked Luggage

According to airline security regulations, all travellers must securely pack knives in their checked baggage. You must shield the blade to prevent unintended harm when people handle or inspect the luggage.

If you fail to safely pack a knife and a security officer sustains injuries as a result, you may potentially encounter legal action.

blade length for travel

How to Pack Knives in Checked Baggage - Photo by vzwer - stock.adobe.com

Therefore, we have recommended various tips for safely packing knives in checked luggage, which are:

Choose The Right Luggage

When packing knives, choose sturdy and durable luggage with a hard shell. This will help protect your knives from damage during transit and will also help prevent them from being lost or stolen.

Pack The Knives Separately

When packing multiple knives, pack them separately in their own protective covers or sheaths. This will help reduce the possibility of scratching or damaging them during transit. To take it further, you may want to put it in a separate bag for additional safety measures. 

Use Tape To Secure The Sharp Edge

Tightly encircle the blade with paper or napkins to create a barrier between the knife and the adhesive portion of the tape. This will ensure that the blade remains free of any sticky residue. The next step is to cover the knife with duct or masking tape to secure everything in position.

Pack The Knife In The Middle Of Your Luggage

Place the knife in the centre of your baggage, enveloped by gentle objects like clothes or towels. This will offer additional padding and also prevent the knife from moving around while being transported.

Keep Your Luggage Locked

Use a TSA-approved lock to secure your luggage, especially if it contains knives or other sharp objects. This will help hinder theft and will also allow TSA agents to inspect your luggage without damaging it.

Place The Knife In A Hard-Sided Container

This will offer supplementary protection for the knife and will also ensure the safety of your baggage in case the knife accidentally pierces through something.

1. What Is The Maximum Size Knife I Can Carry In Hand Luggage?

It's difficult to give a definitive answer on the maximum size knife you can carry, as it varies depending on the airline and country you are travelling to and from.  TSA used to allows knives with blades that are 2.36 inches (6 cm) or less in length in carry-on. However, that is a thing of the past. Now they ban all knives in hand luggage and on your body. You can only check them in.

2. Can I Take A Metal Knife On A Plane?

As a general rule, metal knives are not allowed in carry-on baggage on aeroplanes. This includes both sharp and blunt knives, regardless of size.

However, metal knives may be packed in checked baggage, provided that they are securely wrapped or placed in a sheath to prevent injury to baggage handlers and inspectors.

3. What Other Sharp Items Am I Prohibited From Taking With Me When Travelling By Air?

In addition to knives, there are other sharp items that are prohibited or restricted when travelling by air to the UK. These include:

  • Razor blades, including safety razor blades and disposable razors with blades.
  • Scissors with blades exceeding 6 cm in length.
  • Hypodermic needles (unless required for medical reasons and accompanied by a prescription).
  • Tools with blades or shafts capable of being used as weapons, such as screwdrivers, chisels, and drills.
  • Sporting equipment with sharp edges or points, such as ice axes, crampons, and archery equipment.

Note: Apart from sharp items, there are several objects you can’t bring on a plane according to TSA regulations. 

4. What Should I Do If I Accidentally Pack A Prohibited Knife In My Luggage?

In case you mistakenly pack a knife that is not allowed in your luggage, it is essential to notify the airport security or airline promptly. Do not try to hide or sneak the knife from security. There could be repercussions, such as the confiscation of the knife or additional screening.

However, being honest and cooperative can help resolve the situation with minimal disruption. In some circumstances, you may be able to check the knife as a separate item or arrange for it to be shipped to your destination separately.

5. What Is The Fine For Bringing A Knife Through Airport Security?

The penalty for carrying a knife through airport security can differ based on factors such as the knife type, location, and intention of the person carrying it. In the US, fines may range from a few hundred dollars to thousands of dollars for repeated violations. The amount of the fine may be determined by either the TSA or a court. Moreover, bringing a prohibited knife through airport security could result in legal action, including arrest.

Can You Bring Knives on Planes: The Final Answer

After reading this article, we hope you have gained a better understanding of whether or not you can bring knives on planes. It's crucial to remember that knives are only permitted in your checked luggage on all airlines. Additionally, be aware that certain destinations may have restrictions on specific types of knives.

Ultimately, whether you're a seasoned outdoorsman or a handy DIY enthusiast, follow the rules to bring your favourite knife with you on your next flight. So, pack smartly, stay informed, and have happy travels!

In the US, they have the experience of over 3000 deaths caused by hijackers armed with very small blades on box cutters. Smaller than a pocket knife. The US also gets far more traffic than any individual European country. it’s no wonder they are more strict when it comes to the type of blades that can be brought on board.

I discovered by accident that standard size penknives are permitted or flights to and from Canada to Ireland. I found that my 91mm Swiss Army knife with a 60mm blade was allowed. Security measured the blade and dropped it back in the tray. I was told that it would have been seized if I was going to the USA.

Prohibition of carrying small pocket knives, say blades less that 2 inches, on an aircraft is absolutely ridiculous. When a lady wants to knit she can take the needles, a ball point pin can be used to kill or injure, the list could go on and on, but NO, not a small knife. I traveled recently through 3 different airports in Europe and was allowed to carry onboard a small Swiss Army knife. That being the case I presume they just have more common sense than those who make the rules in the US.

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Tsa rules: can you take knives on a plane.

Are you planning a trip and unsure about the Transportation Security Administration’s (TSA) rules for carrying knives on a plane? If so, you’ve come to the right place. In this post, we’ll take a look at the TSA’s rules and regulations regarding bringing knives on a plane. We’ll also provide some tips and advice on how to travel with a knife while still following the rules and ensuring your safety. Keep reading to learn more about taking knives on a plane.

Table of Contents

TSA Rules For Flying With Knives

If you’re planning to travel with a knife, it’s essential to know the TSA rules for flying with knives. The Transportation Security Administration (TSA) is responsible for security screening at all airports in the United States. They have strict rules about what you can and cannot bring with you on a flight, and knives are no exception.

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According to TSA rules, knives are only allowed in checked baggage. They are not allowed in carry-on bags under any circumstances. The reason for this is that knives are considered a dangerous weapon and can cause serious harm if used improperly. However, there are some restrictions on the types of knives that are allowed in checked baggage. For example, pocket knives are allowed as long as the blade is less than 2.36 inches long. However, larger knives and other sharp objects may be confiscated by TSA officials.

blade length for travel

If you need to travel with a knife, it’s important to pack it correctly. You should wrap the knife securely in a cloth or bubble wrap to prevent it from moving around inside your luggage. You should also put the knife in a sturdy box or container that will prevent it from being damaged during transport.

blade length for travel

It’s also important to declare any knives or other sharp objects to TSA officials when you go through security screening. Failure to declare these items can result in confiscation or even legal action. Overall, it’s essential to know the TSA rules for flying with knives if you plan to travel with one. By following these guidelines, you can ensure that you stay safe and compliant with all regulations.

Rules For Flights In The USA

If you’re flying within the United States, the TSA allows certain types of knives in checked luggage but not in carry-on bags. The reason for this is to prevent potential hijackers from easily accessing sharp objects during a flight.

According to TSA regulations, folding knives with blades that are less than 2.36 inches in length are allowed in checked baggage. These knives must be securely wrapped and stored so they won’t injure baggage handlers or other travelers. However, it’s important to note that the TSA has prohibited many other types of knives, including switchblades, butterfly knives, and ballistic knives. Additionally, all razor blades, box cutters, and other types of cutting tools are strictly prohibited in carry-on luggage.

If you’re unsure about whether a particular type of knife or blade is allowed on your flight, it’s best to leave it at home or check it in your luggage. The TSA also offers a helpful tool called the “What Can I Bring?” feature on their website where you can search for specific items and see if they are permitted on flights. Remember, if you do try to bring a prohibited item through security, it will be confiscated, and you could face fines or other legal consequences. Play it safe and stick to the TSA’s rules for flying with knives.

Rules For Flights In Other Countries

When traveling internationally, it’s important to note that different countries may have different rules when it comes to bringing knives or firearms on a plane. While the TSA rules apply when traveling within the United States, other countries may have stricter regulations.

For example, in some countries, even small pocket knives are prohibited. In others, certain types of knives may be allowed in checked baggage but not in carry-on bags. It’s always a good idea to check with the specific airline and the country’s customs and immigration agency for the most up-to-date information on their knife policy.

It’s also important to note that even if you are allowed to bring a knife into another country, you may not be allowed to bring it back into the United States. This is because the TSA has its own set of rules that must be followed when returning to the country.

If you plan on traveling with a knife internationally, it’s always a good idea to declare it and be honest with customs officials. Failure to declare a prohibited item can result in serious consequences, including fines and even imprisonment. In short, it’s essential to research and understand the rules for flying with knives or flying with tobacco in other countries before you travel. Be sure to pack any knives in checked baggage if possible and follow the guidelines set forth by the TSA and the country you are visiting. By being prepared and informed, you can avoid any unnecessary complications and enjoy a smooth travel experience.

Bringing Knives In Your Carry-On

When it comes to knives and air travel, most people assume that knives are prohibited on planes altogether. However, this isn’t entirely true. In fact, it’s possible to bring some knives on a plane, as long as they meet specific criteria.

Firstly, let’s look at the types of knives that are strictly prohibited on a plane. These include all types of knives with a blade longer than 4 inches, as well as any fixed or locking blades. Any type of throwing knives or ninja stars are also strictly prohibited.

On the other hand, small pocket knives that have blades measuring less than 2.36 inches can be taken on board, as long as they don’t have a locking mechanism or a fixed blade. However, it’s essential to remember that the final decision lies with the TSA agent. So, even if your knife meets the specified criteria, it’s still possible that it might not be allowed on the plane.

In case you’re still wondering if you should take your knife with you on the plane, it’s recommended that you don’t. Even if your knife falls within the allowed size limits, there’s still a possibility that the TSA agent might confiscate it. Also, it’s crucial to remember that knives, whether they’re permitted or not, must always be packed in your checked baggage. If you’re found to be carrying a knife in your carry-on luggage, it will almost certainly be confiscated.

So, to avoid any unnecessary stress and hassle, it’s best to leave your knives or certain lighters at home or pack them in your checked baggage if you need to travel with them. By doing this, you can ensure that your travel experience is smooth and stress-free.

Bringing Knives In Checked Baggage

If you need to travel with knives, the safest option is to pack them in your checked baggage. However, you must follow specific TSA rules for doing so. Firstly, ensure that you pack your knives securely in a hard-sided container. You don’t want them moving around and causing damage to your belongings or other people’s luggage.

Next, consider the type of knife you’re traveling with. You can bring most knives in your checked luggage, but there are a few exceptions. For example, throwing stars, samurai swords, and switchblades are prohibited. In addition, any knife with a blade longer than 4 inches is not allowed in your carry-on, even if it’s packed in your checked luggage.

You should also remember that you can’t pack your checked baggage with hazardous items. This includes flammable materials, firearms, and any item that is potentially explosive or dangerous. When you arrive at the airport, it’s essential to declare any sharp objects to the TSA agents. If you’re unsure about the regulations, you can always double-check the TSA’s website before traveling.

In summary, if you want to travel with knives, you should pack them in your checked luggage, follow the TSA’s rules, and make sure they’re stored securely in a hard-sided container. By doing so, you’ll reduce the risk of having your knife confiscated and ensure a smooth and stress-free trip.

The Types of Knives That Are Allowed in Checked Luggage

If you are planning to travel with a knife, it is important to know which types are allowed in checked luggage. The TSA has a strict set of rules in place regarding what types of knives are allowed in checked bags. Below, we’ve listed the types of knives that are permitted:

  • Kitchen Knives : Knives that are used for cooking purposes, such as chef knives, bread knives, and paring knives, are allowed in checked baggage.
  • Folding Knives : Folding knives with blades that are less than 4 inches in length are permitted in checked luggage. These knives must be securely wrapped in a sheath or other protective covering to prevent injury.
  • Scissors : Scissors with blades that are less than 4 inches in length are also allowed in checked bags. These must also be wrapped in a protective covering.
  • Fishing Knives : Fishing knives are permitted in checked baggage as long as they are securely wrapped in a sheath or protective covering.

It is important to note that these types of knives are only permitted in checked luggage, and not in carry-on bags. Additionally, it is recommended that you check with your airline for any additional restrictions or rules regarding traveling with knives in checked bags. For example, Delta Airlines may have different restrictions than American Airlines .

While these types of knives are allowed in checked luggage, it is important to exercise caution when packing them. Always make sure they are securely wrapped and stowed away from any other items that could be damaged or cause injury. By following the TSA’s rules and taking the necessary precautions, you can travel with your knife safely and securely.

The Types of Knives That Are Illegal to Travel With

While the TSA does allow certain types of knives to be brought onto a plane in checked luggage, there are still some types of knives that are illegal to travel with. It’s important to familiarize yourself with these prohibited items before you pack for your next flight.

  • Switchblades : It is illegal to travel with switchblades or any other type of knife that has an automatic opening mechanism. These types of knives are considered dangerous and are strictly prohibited.
  • Butterfly Knives : Also known as “balisongs,” butterfly knives are illegal to travel with. They are typically associated with martial arts and can be easily concealed, making them a potential danger to others on the plane.
  • Credit Card Knives : While credit card knives may seem like a clever way to save space in your luggage, they are illegal to travel with. These knives are designed to look like credit cards , but can be folded into a sharp blade, making them a potential danger.
  • Belt Buckle Knives : Similarly, belt buckle knives may seem like a discreet way to carry a knife, but they are also illegal to travel with. These knives are designed to look like belt buckles, but can easily be transformed into sharp weapons.
  • Disguised Knives : Any type of knife that is disguised as another object, such as a pen or a comb, is illegal to travel with. These types of knives are designed to be easily concealed, making them a potential danger.

In summary, it’s important to note that not all knives are created equal when it comes to air travel. Be sure to review the TSA’s list of prohibited items before packing for your next flight, and always double-check to ensure that you’re not accidentally bringing a prohibited knife onto the plane.

What Size Knife Is Legal To Carry On Planes?

The answer to this question may surprise you. In the United States, the TSA allows certain knives to be carried on planes, but only if they are less than 2.36 inches in length. These are known as “hobby knives” or “folding knives” and are allowed in your carry-on luggage.

However, it is important to note that just because a knife is under this size limit does not guarantee that it will be allowed on the plane. The TSA still has the authority to confiscate any item that they believe poses a threat to other passengers.

When traveling with a small knife, it is important to take extra care to pack it securely . Keep it in a sheath or wrap it in a piece of cloth to prevent accidental injury. If you are unsure whether your knife meets the size requirements, it is best to leave it at home. It is also important to note that the rules for carrying knives on planes vary from country to country. In some places, even small folding knives may be illegal to bring on a plane. Before you travel, make sure to research the laws in your destination country.

In general, it is always best to err on the side of caution when it comes to bringing sharp objects on a plane. While small hobby knives may be allowed, larger or more dangerous items such as hunting knives, box cutters, and razor blades are strictly prohibited. It is never worth risking your safety or the safety of others for the convenience of bringing a certain item on board.

What About Other Sharp Items?

While knives are the most commonly debated item when it comes to airline travel, there are many other sharp objects that also come into question. Here are some examples of other sharp items that you may wonder if you can bring on a plane:

  • Scissors : TSA rules permit scissors with a blade less than 4 inches to be carried in your carry-on luggage, but they must be the rounded-tip kind you find in most classrooms.
  • Box Cutters : These are prohibited from both carry-on and checked luggage.
  • Darts : Darts are allowed in checked baggage, but not in your carry-on.
  • Razor Blades : Razor blades are allowed in checked baggage, but not in your carry-on.
  • Sporting Goods : If you’re an athlete, you may want to bring your sporting gear with you on your travels. But, certain items such as baseball bats, ski poles, and hockey sticks will need to be checked in as baggage.
  • Other Items : Any item that can be used as a weapon may not be allowed in your carry-on luggage. These include things like screwdrivers, tools, and crowbars .

It’s always best to check the TSA website for the latest information and to check with your airline before you pack any potentially sharp items. Remember, it’s better to be safe than sorry, and ultimately, it’s up to the discretion of TSA agents to determine whether an item is allowed on board.

How To Pack Knives In Checked Baggage

If you’re traveling with knives, it’s important to follow the rules for packing them in checked baggage. Here are some tips to help you pack your knives properly:

  • Place Your Knives In A Secure Container : Make sure that your knives are securely stored in a sturdy container or sturdy packing cube . A knife block or sheath is a good option.
  • Wrap The Knives : Wrap each knife individually in a cloth or paper towel to prevent them from bumping against each other and damaging their blades.
  • Label The Container : It’s important to label the container with the contents, especially if it’s a large knife collection. This will help TSA agents easily identify the knives during security checks.
  • Put The Container In Your Checked Luggage : Your knives must be packed in your checked luggage and not in your carry-on bag. If TSA agents find knives in your carry-on, they will confiscate them.
  • Follow The Airline’s Specific Rules : Different airlines may have specific rules on how knives should be packed. Make sure to check with your airline to ensure you’re following their specific guidelines.

By following these tips, you can ensure that your knives are packed properly in your checked luggage, making the security screening process smoother and faster. Remember, if you have any questions about the rules and regulations regarding knives on planes, don’t hesitate to ask TSA agents or check their website for updated information.

What To Do If Your Knife Is Confiscated

If your knife is confiscated by TSA agents, it’s important to know what to do next. Here are the steps you can take:

  • Remain Calm : First and foremost, don’t argue or cause a scene. Keep in mind that the TSA agents are just doing their job to keep everyone safe. If you remain calm and respectful, the process will be much smoother.
  • Ask For A Supervisor : If you feel that the confiscation was unfair or unjust, ask to speak with a supervisor. They will review the situation and determine if the knife should be returned to you or not.
  • Check Your Options : If the knife is not allowed on the plane, you have a few options. You can either surrender the knife, mail it to your destination, or leave it with someone who is not flying. TSA also provides a list of mailers that will safely transport your knife for you.
  • Be Prepared : To avoid having your knife confiscated, do your research ahead of time to ensure it’s allowed on the plane. Pack it properly in your checked luggage and always check with the airline beforehand to make sure their policies haven’t changed.

Remember, the TSA is there to keep everyone safe. Be respectful and understanding, and the process will be much smoother for everyone involved.

The Bottom Line

So, can you bring knives on a plane? The answer is yes, but with a few caveats. If you’re traveling within the United States, you can bring knives in your checked baggage as long as they are properly secured. However, you cannot bring knives in your carry-on baggage. It’s important to note that the TSA has strict rules about the types of knives that are allowed in checked baggage. You cannot bring any knives that are designed to look like weapons, such as switchblades or gravity knives. You also cannot bring knives that are longer than 4 inches in length.

If you’re traveling internationally, the rules may be different. Some countries have very strict laws about traveling with knives, and you could face serious consequences if you’re caught with one. Make sure to research the laws of the country you’re visiting before you pack your bags. In the event that your knife is confiscated by TSA agents, there isn’t much you can do. You can try to appeal the decision, but it’s unlikely that you’ll get your knife back. It’s better to simply follow the rules and pack your knives properly to avoid any problems. The bottom line is that you can bring knives on a plane, but only in your checked baggage and as long as they meet TSA guidelines. It’s always a good idea to double-check the rules before you travel to avoid any issues at the airport. Happy travels!

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Can You Bring Knives on Planes? 1

Carry-on bags

Checked luggage

Rules for Flights in the USA

On flights within the United States, all types of knives are allowed in checked luggage without restrictions. In hand luggage all knives are banned , except for plastic knives and round-bladed butter knives.

When packed in checked luggage, knives should be securely wrapped, put into a box, or in a knife holster – the sharp edge shouldn’t be exposed. They ask this because security officers often do additional inspections in checked bags, and they must be protected from accidental injuries. In fact, if you’d put a bare knife into your checked bag and the security officer would accidentally get injured, you could get sued. So always remember to properly protect your knives in checked baggage.

The TSA officers aren’t responsible for determining whether a knife is legal or illegal, but if they suspect that your knife classifies as illegal (a too-long blade, concealed blade, etc.), they might get in touch with the local authorities. So make sure to know the local state knife laws before your trip.

Lastly, there aren’t any limits to how many knives each passenger can bring.

Rules for Flights in Other Countries

On Canadian flights, knives with a blade length of 6 cm (2.36 inches) or shorter are allowed both in hand and checked luggage. Usually, small scissors, nail clippers, multi-tools, and pocket knives fall within this category. Knives with blades over 6 cm are also allowed, but only in checked baggage.

Furthermore, switchblades, push-button knives, concealed knives, and knives resembling different objects are completely banned from Canadian flights, as they’re considered illegal under federal law.

The United Kingdom

The UK flight authorities allow only knives with blunt ends and with a blade length of 6 cm (2.36 inches) or less in hand luggage. If the knife has a sharp end or the blade is over 6 cm, then it can travel only in checked luggage. In reality, only small scissors with round ends are allowed in hand luggage. In checked baggage, all knives are allowed.

Europe, Australia, China, and India

European , Australian , Chinese , and Indian rules are similar to the US – all knives are banned from hand luggage, regardless of the blade length and whether the end is pointy or blunt. Knives are only allowed in checked baggage.

New Zealand

On New Zealand flights, only knives with blades shorter than 6 cm (2.36 inches) are allowed in hand luggage. Longer knives can only be packed in checked luggage. Pocket knives and multi-tools aren’t opened – instead, they measure the tool itself to estimate roughly how long the knife may be. If a pocket knife or multi-tool measures over 9.5 cm (3.74 inches) in length, it won’t be allowed in hand luggage.

Sources : For writing this article, we took information only from official sources, like airline regulators, government websites, and major airlines. If you want to confirm that our information is accurate and up to date, click on any of the links mentioned above. We linked out to where we found this information for each country.

Disclaimer : The final decision of whether you can bring knives on planes always rests on the security officer. Some airlines also have additional rules that may be different. Also, this is not legal advice. We only find relevant information online, which we base this article on, but some of it may become outdated or incorrect. That’s why you should always do your own research.

The Types of Knives That Are Allowed in Checked Luggage

Which knives are legal to travel with

Knife rules can get messy, because each state, region, and country has different rules on which types of knives are legal and which aren’t. And obviously, you can’t pack illegal knives in your checked luggage because you could get into legal trouble. That’s why down below, we covered which types of knives are usually legal to carry and own across the world, although some of them might be banned in certain regions.

  • Pocket knives. These include Swiss Army Knives, multi-tools, and other small knives, where the knife folds into a protective shell. These don’t include knives that open quickly with a button, spring, or any other mechanism, which are banned in most countries.
  • Kitchen knives. Most kitchen knife sets, including large meat cleavers and long meat knives, are allowed in checked baggage.
  • Blunt, antique, decorative knives. Most antique knives, even with blade length above the limit, are considered legal if they’re blunt and meant for decorative purposes. That said, curved knives, even blunt ones, are considered illegal in some regions.
  • Fixed-blade knives with a short blade. The rules are different for each country and state, but usually, fixed-blade knives with a blade below 4-6 inches (10-15 cm) are legal and can be packed in checked luggage when traveling.
  • Damascus knives. Most Damascus kitchen knives or short fixed-blade knives are also legal to pack in checked luggage.
  • Plastic toy knives and swords. Toy knives and swords are banned from hand luggage, but they’re allowed in checked baggage.
  • Balisong trainer squiddy knives. Real butterfly knives are usually considered illegal, but ones without sharp blades are fine to bring even in hand luggage.

The Types of Knives That Are Illegal to Travel With

Which knives are illegal to travel with

Some knives are considered illegal, based on their design, blade length, and other factors. If you’d travel with one of these knives in your checked luggage, the airport security agent would most likely get in touch with the local authorities and you would get into trouble. The rules can be incredibly complicated and are different for each country and state, but down below, we’ve compiled which knives are considered illegal by most authorities.

  • Switchblades, flick knives, and spring-loaded knives. Although some states and countries will allow small switchblades, most commonly they’re banned. This includes all knives that have some kind of mechanism that quickly releases the blade, or the blade can be opened with one hand using the weight of the blade.
  • Daggers and push daggers. Historical daggers and push daggers are banned in most countries and states.
  • Swords, machetes, and spears. Sharp swords, machetes, and even spears are also considered dangerous weapons and are banned in most countries and states.
  • Throwing stars, death stars, and throwing knives. Although throwing stars and knives are mainly meant for hobby purposes, they can also be used as weapons, which is why they’re banned in most places around the world.
  • Knives resembling different objects. Most everyday objects that have a hidden knife inside them (for example, pens, combs, etc.) are considered illegal.
  • Butterfly knives . Although butterfly knives are mostly used for training as a hobby, they’re considered illegal almost everywhere in the world. Only butterfly knives without sharp blades are allowed in checked baggage.
  • Fixed-blade knives with long blades. This depends on the state and country, but most fixed-blade knives over 4-6 inches (10-15 cm) are considered illegal. There are certain exceptions for people with fishing and hunting licenses in some states and countries.

How to Pack Knives in Checked Baggage

Airport security requires all passengers to safely secure knives packed in checked baggage. The sharp edge must be covered to avoid accidental injuries when performing inspections on the bag. If you wouldn’t safely secure a knife and the security agent would get injured, you could theoretically get sued.

There are many ways you can safely pack knives in checked luggage, including:

  • Secure the blade between two cardboard pieces. If you don’t have any safe place to put your knife in, putting it inside a sock won’t cut it – the end will still poke through, and may even damage your suitcase. The best thing that you can do in this situation is to make a holster out of cardboard. Simply cut a cardboard piece that’s 1 inch longer than the blade, wrap it around the sharp end of the blade, and secure it all with some duct tape. This should be enough to keep the sharp part of the blade from being exposed.
  • Use paper and tape to secure the sharp edge. First, tightly wrap some paper or napkins around the blade, to create a layer between the knife and the sticky part of the tape, which will ensure that the blade stays clean of any glue residue. Then wrap it all in duct or masking tape, which should hold everything in place.
  • Use a knife holster. A leather or fabric knife holster will also be enough to pack your knife safely in your luggage.
  • Pack it inside a box. The most secure option would be to pack your knives in a dedicated box or a fabric roll bag .

Frequently Asked Questions About Bringing Knives on Planes

Can i bring a knife in checked luggage when traveling internationally.

First of all, the knife has to be packed securely in your checked bag, with the sharp edge protected. This is a requirement by the airline security to avoid accidental injuries when performing inspections of the bag.

And secondly, you should avoid packing knives that are illegal in the countries/states you’re flying through. This includes flick knives, push-button knives, butterfly knives, knives resembling different objects, and knives with long blades. Knives that are legal in most countries include pocket knives, multitools, short fixed-blade knives, and kitchen knives.

Do you have to declare knives in checked luggage?

What size knife is legal to carry on planes.

In hand luggage, usually, no knives are allowed, except for a few countries that have restrictions for the blade length. For example, in the US, all knives are banned in hand luggage, regardless of the blade length. But in Canada and New Zealand, knives with a blade length below 6 cm (2.36 inches) are allowed onboard. The UK also enforces the 6 cm (2.36 inches) blade length limit, but they prohibit all sharp items in hand luggage, which disqualifies most knives.

What are the TSA knife rules for 2023?

In checked baggage, TSA allows pretty much any knife. TSA isn’t responsible for determining which knives are legal or not, so sometimes, they’ll let even illegal knives be packed in checked bags. However, if the security agent thinks that a certain knife might be illegal in that state, he will most likely get in touch with the local authorities.

What are some TSA-approved knives?

Are pocket knives allowed on planes, can i bring cutlery (silverware) on planes.

In checked luggage, there aren’t any restrictions for bringing cutlery – even sharp knives are allowed. However, packing expensive cutlery in checked baggage isn’t really safe because sometimes, checked bags get lost, or stuff gets stolen from them during baggage handling. So we would advise packing expensive cutlery sets with round-bladed butter knives in hand baggage.

How do I prevent my knife from getting stolen in checked luggage?

In conclusion

The rules for carrying knives on flights vary from country to country. In the United States, knives are allowed in checked luggage with some precautions, while they are strictly prohibited in hand luggage except for plastic and round-bladed butter knives. Passengers should ensure proper packaging to avoid accidents.

Local state laws should be considered, as the TSA may involve local authorities if a knife is suspected to be illegal. Other countries like Canada, the United Kingdom, Europe, Australia, China, India, and New Zealand have their own specific regulations regarding knives on flights, with restrictions based on blade length and design.

Travel safely and always check and adhere to the specific rules of the country you are flying to or from. 

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Can You Bring Scissors On A Plane? The TSA Rules Explained

Last Updated on April 15, 2020

Scissors are sharp and pointy and they could potentially be used as a weapon.

So it’s sensible to ask yourself… can you bring scissors on a plane in your carry on or checked baggage?

This post is all about flying with scissors. Read on to find out if scissors are allowed on planes.

TSA Scissors Rules

Here is a screengrab from the TSA website:

It seems pretty straightforward…

Scissors In Checked Luggage

You can pack any scissors you want in checked luggage, just make sure that they are wrapped up well and no baggage handlers will injure themselves if they are inspecting your suitcase.

As an example here is a passenger asking about taking veterinarian scissors in checked bags on Twitter.

The TSA answer is quite clear that all types of scissors should be allowed in hold luggage.

It’s scissors in hand luggage that is a little more complicated.

Scissors In Carry-On Luggage

Scissors in hand luggage cannot have blades that are longer than 4 inches. You can take scissors in your carry on if the blades are smaller than 4 inches as measured from the pivot point.

So it’s all about blade length.

This means that Christina was able to take her small thread cutting scissors:

Christine was allowed to take her cuticle trimmers and brow tweezers:

Bernie discovered that multitools with scissors are only allowed if the multitool has no blade:

Bran would have been happy to discover he could take his medical scissors:

These child safety scissors were given the green light:

Mellisa wanted to know if haircutting scissors were ok to take in her carry on:

Hmm… those hair cutting scissors seem quite big. Better get the measuring tape out Melissa!

The Verdict

You get the idea.

There are no officially TSA approved scissors. It’s all about blade length.

Small scissors are fine to take in your hand luggage, scissors with long blades are not.

If you turn up at the security checkpoint and your scissors are too big they will be confiscated by the TSA officer.

Sometimes you just need to measure your scissors before you fly and see if they are going to be allowed past security.

That’s all there is to it! Have a safe flight!

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State-by-State Guide To Knife Length Laws In The US

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In today’s world, where pocket knives and other types of blades are commonly used for various purposes, it’s important to be aware of the legal restrictions surrounding their length. Knife length laws dictate the maximum blade length allowed for possession and use in different states. Understanding these laws is crucial to avoid potential legal consequences and ensure responsible knife ownership.

Each state in the US is permitted to create its own laws, regulations, and limitations on knives and other items that can be construed as weapons. Knife blades are restricted to certain lengths in some states for legal carry or possession. Knife owners must be aware of these regional laws.

Exploring the variations in these laws will shed light on the legal framework surrounding knife lengths and empower knife owners to navigate the regulations effectively. The knife laws vary from state to state, so you must be aware of the laws regarding maximum knife lengths, especially when crossing state lines.

What Are The Knife Length Laws In Each State In The US?

Knife Length Laws By State

Knife length laws play a vital role in regulating the possession, carry, and use of knives across different jurisdictions. It is essential to understand what knife length refers to and the reasons behind the regulations imposed to navigate these laws effectively.

Knife length typically refers to the measurement of the blade from the tip to the point where it meets the handle or tang, expressed in inches or centimeters. Different states may have varying definitions of what constitutes the length of a knife, so it’s important to refer to the specific legal definitions within each jurisdiction.

What is the intended purpose of imposing laws regarding maximum blade lengths on knives you can carry or possess?

  • Public safety . One of the primary reasons for knife length regulations is to ensure public safety. Longer blades can potentially pose a greater threat in certain situations, leading to stricter restrictions on their possession and carry. Legislators aim to strike a balance between individual rights to carry knives for utility purposes and the need to maintain public safety. Laws may be crafted to prevent carrying certain types of knives that are perceived as more dangerous, especially in densely populated areas.
  • Intent : A knife with a shorter blade that is less likely to cause potentially life-threatening injuries is more likely to be used for personal purposes than for criminal activities.
  • Differentiation from weapons . Authorities aim to distinguish between ordinary tools and weapons by defining legal limits on knife lengths. This differentiation helps maintain order and reduces the risk of knives being used as offensive weapons.

Knife length laws can vary significantly from state to state. Some states may have specific statutory limits on blade length, while others may provide more general guidelines or rely on case law interpretations.

Factors that contribute to these variations include the following.

  • Historical context . Historical events and societal norms often play a role in shaping knife-length laws. For example, some states may have inherited knife length restrictions from outdated laws that were initially enacted to address specific concerns, such as preventing duels or curbing violence during specific periods.
  • State legislation . Each US state has the authority to establish its own knife-length laws. This leads to variations based on the unique legislative decisions made within each jurisdiction.
  • Local customs and culture . Historical and cultural factors can influence the attitude towards knives and impact the establishment of knife length laws. Regions with strong outdoor or hunting traditions may have different perspectives and regulations compared to urban areas.
  • Knife advocacy groups . Knife advocacy organizations play a role in shaping knife legislation. They may lobby for changes in knife length laws based on factors such as utility, safety, or personal freedom. The influence of these groups can contribute to variations in knife length laws from one state to another.
  • Recent changes or proposed legislation . Knife length laws are not static and can evolve over time. Changes in societal perceptions, court decisions, or proposed legislative actions can lead to updates or modifications in knife-length laws.
  • Local jurisdictional variances . While state laws provide a baseline, local jurisdictions, including cities and counties, may have their own knife-length regulations. These variations can be influenced by specific concerns, crime rates, or cultural attitudes toward knives within those communities.
  • Court precedents . Legal precedents set by court decisions can also shape knife-length laws. Landmark cases or interpretations of the law by higher courts may establish guidelines or restrictions that other states follow or use as a reference when formulating their own regulations.
  • Law Enforcement Perspectives . Input from law enforcement agencies and organizations can play a role in shaping knife-length laws. Their expertise and insights regarding public safety and the enforcement of such laws are often considered during the legislative process.

It’s important to note that knife length laws can change over time, so verifying the most up-to-date information is crucial. While we strive to provide accurate and current information, consulting official sources or legal documents for your state’s most reliable and recent knife-length laws is always recommended.

Ultimately, our goal is to equip knife owners with the knowledge and understanding necessary to comply with knife-length laws in their respective states.

By doing so, we can promote responsible knife ownership, prioritize public safety, and foster a better understanding of the legal landscape surrounding these essential tools.

TIP: Did you know that there are different rules for carrying knives on public transport? Find out the regulations for carrying a knife on a train in this article! Complete Guide: Taking Knife On A Train In The United States

State Knife Length Laws

State Knife Length Laws

Knife length laws vary across the United States, with each state having its own regulations regarding the maximum allowable blade length for possession and carry.

We will provide an overview of knife-length laws in each state, highlighting the legal limits, any exceptions or special considerations, and the penalties associated with violating these laws.

Remember, this data provides general information and should not be considered legal advice. If you have specific questions, doubts, or concerns regarding knife-length laws, it is recommended to consult legal professionals who specialize in the laws of your jurisdiction.

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TIP: If you are looking for a new pocket knife be sure to investigate the steel the blade is made from as this will influence the quality and durability of the pocket knife! Pocket Knives Blade Steel: The Best One & How To Choose

Practical Tips For Complying With Knife Length Laws

Knife Laws By State

Understanding and complying with knife length laws is essential to avoid legal issues and ensure the safe and responsible use of knives.

While knife length laws can vary by state and even within local jurisdictions, some practical tips can help individuals navigate these regulations. We will provide some useful tips to help you comply with knife length laws effectively.

  • Research and familiarize yourself with the laws . Start by researching and understanding the specific knife-length laws in your state and local jurisdiction. Consult official sources, legal documents, or local law enforcement agencies to obtain accurate and up-to-date information on the regulations that apply to you.
  • Measure the blade length of your knives . Use a reliable measuring tool to determine the precise blade length of your knife. Measure from the blade’s tip to where it meets the handle or tang. This measurement will help you determine if your knife complies with the legal limits imposed by the applicable knife length laws. Don’t estimate whether your knife is a legal length; measure it and be sure.
  • Be aware of local variations . Remember that local jurisdictions like cities, boroughs, or counties may have additional or stricter regulations than state-level laws. Ensure you know any local variations or restrictions that may apply to the area where you intend to carry or use your knife.
  • Choose legal knife options . When purchasing a knife, consider selecting models within the legal limits of blade length for your jurisdiction. Many reputable knife manufacturers offer models specifically designed to comply with various state and local knife length laws.
  • Secure the proper documentation . If your state requires permits or licenses for carrying certain types of knives, ensure you obtain the necessary documentation. Familiarize yourself with the application process and any training or background check requirements that may be involved.
  • Exercise caution when traveling . If you plan to travel across states with your knife, research the knife length laws of the states you will be visiting or passing through. Different states may have different regulations, and what is legal to carry in one state may be illegal in another. Comply with the strictest applicable regulations to avoid legal complications.
  • Store your knives properly . When not in use, store your knives safely and securely. Use appropriate storage containers or sheaths to prevent accidental exposure or accessibility, especially if you live in an area with strict regulations regarding knife length or carry.
  • Stay informed about changes in knife regulations . Stay up to date with any modifications or amendments to knife-length laws in your state and local jurisdiction. Laws can evolve, so periodically check for new legislation or modifications that may impact the legal requirements for knife length.

Remember, these practical tips are meant to provide general guidance, but it is crucial to consult official sources or legal professionals to obtain the most accurate and specific information for your situation.

By understanding and adhering to the knife length laws in your area, you can ensure responsible and compliant use of knives while respecting public safety and legal regulations.

Knife length laws vary across the United States, with each state and local jurisdiction setting its own regulations and restrictions. Understanding these laws is crucial for individuals who own, carry, or use knives to ensure compliance and avoid legal complications. It is crucial to note that knife-length laws can change over time, and local jurisdictions may have additional restrictions or regulations.

Therefore, it is always recommended to consult official sources, legal documents, or local law enforcement agencies to obtain the most accurate and up-to-date regulations regarding knife-length laws in your specific area.

By familiarizing yourself with the knife length laws applicable to your jurisdiction and responsibly adhering to them, you can ensure the safe and legal use of knives while respecting public safety concerns and the legal framework established by your state and local authorities.

TIP: Different laws, rules and regulations restrict the carrying of knives on public busses in the US. Find out all the regulations here! Complete Guide: Taking Knife on a Bus in the United States

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Knives with a blade over 6 cm

A knife with a blade over 6 cm must be placed in checked baggage and are permitted when flying within Canada or to an international (non-U.S.) destination. Knives of any type or length are not permitted in your carry-on on flights to the U.S.

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California Knife Laws – What You Can & Cannot Carry Legally

California Knife Laws (a former D.A. explains)

California knife laws are among the strictest in the U.S., and several cities and counties have even stricter local knife laws you are expected to follow. Many knives such as switchblades meet the statutory definition of “dangerous weapons,” which means possession, manufacturing, and sales are tightly regulated.

Below our California criminal defense attorneys provide a general overview of what knives you may carry openly, concealed, or not at all. We also discuss location restrictions, the penalties for violating the law, and how to fight criminal charges.

California laws by knife

Folding knives.

California Penal Code 17235 permits both the open- and concealed carry of folding knives provided that they are in a folded or closed position. Permissible folding knives include:

  • pocket knives,
  • Swiss-army knives,
  • non-locking folding knives,
  • certain utility knives, and
  • spring-assisted knives ( not switchblades). 1

Note that if a folding knife is extended and locked into position, then it becomes a “dirk” or “dagger,” which has different rules (discussed next).

Fixed-blade knives

California Penal Code 21310 PC makes it a crime to carry a concealed fixed-blade knife, also called dirks or daggers . You may openly carry a fixed-blade knife provided that:

  • the knife is contained within a sheath, and
  • the sheath is worn suspended from your waist.

(A “pocket clip” carry of a knife is probably considered concealed, though the law is ambiguous.)

Examples of fixed-blade knives include:

  • chef’s knives,
  • ice picks, and
  • bowie knives.

Carrying a concealed fixed-blade knife is a wobbler in California. This means it can be charged as either a misdemeanor or a felony . 2

The state of California has stringent open carry and conceal carry laws.

Switchblades

California Penal Code 21510 prohibits switchblades, which are defined as:

  • knives with the appearance of a pocketknife,
  • with a blade length of 2 or more inches, and
  • which can be released by a flick of a button, pressure on the handle, flip of the wrist, or another mechanical device.

Switchblades also go by the names:

  • automatic knives,
  • spring-blade knives,
  • spring-loaded knives,
  • snap-blade knives,
  • ejector knives, and
  • pushbutton knives.

In California, switchblades also include:

  • butterfly knives ,
  • balisongs, and
  • gravity knives.

Possessing, carrying, or selling a switchblade is a misdemeanor in California, carrying up to six months in county jail and/or $1,000 in fines. 3

Other prohibited knives

As with switchblades, the following knives are prohibited in California:

  • air gauge knives ( PC 20310 ),
  • ballistic knives ( PC 21110 ),
  • belt-buckle knives ( PC 20410 ),
  • cane swords/cane knives ( PC 20510 ),
  • lipstick case knives ( PC 20610 ),
  • shobi-zues ( PC 20710 ),
  • shurikens, ninja stars and throwing stars ( PC 22410 ),
  • undetectable knives that metal detectors miss (PC 20810), and
  • writing pen knives ( PC 20910 ).

The possession, sale, manufacture, or import of undetectable knives is a California misdemeanor carrying up to six months of jail time and/or $1,000. For any other type of prohibited knife, prosecutors can bring misdemeanor or felony charges. Felony penalties include:

  • 16 months, 2 years, or 3 years in jail and/or
  • up to $10,000. 4

Knife-free zones in California

Public buildings.

Penal Code 171b makes it a crime to bring or possess certain knives into California state or local public buildings or at meetings required to be open to the public. 12  Prohibited knives under this statute include:

  • any knife with a blade over 4 inches, and it has a fixed blade (or one that can be fixed), and
  • any prohibited knife under the law.

Violations can be prosecuted as either:

  • misdemeanors carrying up to 1 year in jail and/or $1,000, or
  • felonies carrying 16 months, 2 years, or 3 years in prison and/or up to $10,000.

Schools and on school grounds

Penal Code 626.10 a1 bans certain knives on the grounds of:

  • any K-12 public or private school,
  • California community colleges,
  • The University of California ,
  • California State University ,
  • any private university, and
  • certain state colleges.

The prohibited knives include:

  • dirks or daggers,
  • knives with blades longer than 2.5 inches,
  • a folding knife with a fixed blade that can lock into place (“locking blade”),
  • a razor blade with an unguarded blade.

Additionally, Penal Code 626.10a2 makes it a misdemeanor to bring a razor blade or box cutter to the grounds of a K-12 school. Penalties include up to one year in jail. 5

Federal property

15 USC 1241-44 make it a federal crime carrying up to five years in prison to:

  • introduce or transport a switchblade in interstate commerce , or
  • possess a switchblade on federal or Indian lands, or lands subject to federal jurisdiction.

This law does not apply to if you have only one arm and if the switchblade’s blade is three inches or less in length. 6

Local knife laws

Many California counties and municipalities have knife ordinances that are more restrictive than state laws. For example:

  • Los Angeles prohibits openly carrying in public any knife with a 3-inch or longer blade . ( Section 55.10 )
  • Oakland bans carrying knives with a blade of 3 inches or longer. ( Section 9-36.010 ).
  • Sacramento County prohibits knives on any county property. ( Section 9.42.010 )
  • San Diego County bans the possession of “throwing knives” at county parks. ( Section 41.117 )
  • San Francisco bans loitering while carrying concealed knives with a 3-inch or longer blade. ( Section 1291 )

What is legal in one city may be illegal in the next, so you are strongly advised to check all local ordinances before carrying or transporting any knives there.

Occupational exceptions

Hunters, construction workers, cooks, gardeners, and other people for whom knives are “tools of the trade” may have relaxed knife restrictions. Just be sure to check California state and local regulations with regard to your particular job or activity. Plus, when you are not “on the job,” you must follow the same knife laws as everyone else.

Self-defense with knives

California law permits you to use legal knives in self-defense or defense of others as long as:

  • you reasonably fear immediate bodily harm, and
  • you use proportional force to deflect the threat.

If you use a knife in self-defense when it is not reasonably necessary, you could face criminal charges such as for the following:

If you wish to carry a knife for self-defense, make sure it is legal under both state and local law. Also, you should not use it unless you are facing a serious threat; in some cases, merely brandishing a knife – and not using it to stab – would be sufficient to ward off any danger. 7

In any case, you are advised to carry pepper spray or a stun gun instead of a knife – they immobilize your assailant without lethal consequences.

Fighting knife charges

Here at Shouse Law Group, we have represented literally thousands of people charged with crimes involving weapons, including knives. In our experience, the following five defenses have proven very effective with prosecutors, judges, and juries.

  • Law enforcement conducted an unlawful search and seizure . If police found the knife by violating your Fourth Amendment rights, we would ask the judge to suppress the knife as evidence. If the court complies, the D.A. may be forced to drop your case for lack of proof.
  • Your knife was legal . Illegal knives have precise legal definitions. If we can show your knife’s blade length or operating mechanism falls outside of that definition, you should not be convicted of possessing an illegal knife.
  • You did not know you had a switchblade . If you did not realize your switchblade was illegal or had the characteristics of a switchblade, you should not be convicted of possessing it. This is an effective defense because prosecutors have no way of getting inside of your head and knowing your intent. 8
  • The knife was not concealed . We have had cases where clients were carrying legal knives openly, but the police mistakenly thought they were concealed. In these cases, the police’s own bodycam footage can help get a concealed carry charge dismissed.
  • You acted in lawful self-defense . As discussed above, you may use a legal knife in self-defense as long you believe it is reasonably necessary and you use reasonable force. Valuable evidence in these cases to show you acted within the bounds of self-defense are surveillance video, eyewitness accounts, and medical records.

Additional reading

For more in-depth information, refer to these scholarly articles:

  • Criminal Use of Switchblades: Will the Recent Trend towards Legalization Lead to Bloodshed? – Connecticut Public Interest Law Journal .
  • Eradicating ‘This Dreadful Knife Problem’: Legislative and Judicial Initiatives against Knife Possession – Youth Justice .
  • Man finds 2nd Amendment protects his use of banned switchblade – Wisconsin Law Journal .
  • Knives and the Second Amendment – University of Michigan Journal of Law Reform .
  • The Knife Crime Problem: Further Developments – Youth Justice .

Legal References:

  • California Penal Code section 17235 and PC 21510 . See also People v. Castillolopez (2016) 3 Cal. 4th 322 (Swiss Army-style knives are never locking daggers/dirks). See, for example, CALCRIM No. 2502 .
  • PC 21310 . See also People v. Hester (Cal. App. 2020) 58 Cal. App. 5th 630 . PC 20200 . See also In re: Luke W (2001) 88 Cal. App. 4th 650 (credit card multi-tool knives are not concealed daggers/dirks). See also CALCRIM No. 2501 (“substantially concealed test” may be used). PC 16470 . See People v. Picket (Cal. App., 2013) B241373 (no clear applicability between Second Amendment and dirks/daggers). See same. See also PC 1170 h.
  • PC 21510 . PC 17235 ; see also People ex rel. Mautner v. Quattrone, (1989) 211 Cal. App. 3d 1389 . See also In re: Gilbert R. (2012) 211 Cal. App. 4th 514 (“”Switchblade knife” does not include a knife that opens with one hand utilizing thumb pressure applied solely to the blade of the knife or a thumb stud attached to the blade, provided that the knife has a detent or other mechanism that provides resistance that must be overcome in opening the blade, or that biases the blade back toward its closed position.”).
  • See also PC 16590 , which is California’s statute on generally prohibited weapons.
  • See also State v Hester, (2020) 58 Cal.App.5th 630 (there is no allowable blade length for concealed dirks/daggers).
  • 15 USC 1242 . 15 USC 1243 . 15 USC 1244 .
  • CALCRIM 3470 .
  • CALCRIM No. 2502 . See also People v. Mitchell (2012) 209 Cal.App.4th 1364 (intent to conceal or cause harm is not an element of the crime). See also People v. Bermudez (2020) 45 Cal. App. 5th 358 . See, for example, People v. Rubalcava, (2000) 23 Cal.4th 322 (carrying a concealed dirk or dagger is a general intent crime, which does not require an intent to break the law). See, for example, People v. Gonzales (1995) 32 Cal.App.4th 229 .

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Best Scuba Fins for Travel of 2024

Have you ever been on a dive holiday stuck wearing rental fins that just didn’t fit right? If you have, you know it isn’t much fun. Blisters and bruises can detract from your time underwater, and even ruin a dive trip. That’s why the best SCUBA fins for travel are one of the first pieces of gear that traveling divers buy!

No matter where in the world you’re planning to dive next, you’ll want to bring your own fins along. The best fins for dive travel are lightweight and compact but don’t sacrifice power or comfort. Unfortunately, that’s not always an easy combination to find. Rather than searching aimlessly for your perfect match, read on for the best models on the market, handpicked by The Adventure Junkies.

For more of our top scuba gear recommendations, check out the Best Scuba Fins .

Quick Answer - The Best Scuba Fins for Travel

  • Scubapro Jet Sport View at Amazon
  • Mares Volo Race View at Amazon
  • Scubapro Go View at Amazon
  • Mares Avanti Quattro + View at Amazon
  • Hollis F-2 View at Amazon

Comparison Table - Best Scuba Fins for Travel

Reviews - the best scuba diving fins for travel, scubapro jet sport.

  • Heel Style : Closed
  • Fin Length : Medium
  • Blade Type : Vented
  • Pull Tab (for easy grip when pulling the fins on)
  • Flexible Panels (to give you a wider range of motion while flutter kicking underwater)
  • Non-Slip Sole

BEST FOR: DIVERS ON A BUDGET

If you’re new to diving or booking your very first dive trip, you might want to start with a budget set of fins. The Scubapro Jet Sport is a basic model, perfectly suited to warm water diving and snorkeling. And these fins won’t break the bank.

This entry level fin is lightweight and flexible, easy to don and doff, and ultra comfortable. Plus, they have one of the most simple and straightforward designs on the market, so even the newest of newbies will feel totally confident using them. The Scubapro Jet Sport also comes in a wide variety of sizes, making it a popular choice for growing children and female divers with smaller feet.

Mares Volo Race

  • Fin Length : Long
  • Flexible Channels (to give you a wider range of motion while flutter kicking underwater)
  • Carrying Loops

BEST FOR: WARM WATER DIVE TRAVEL

When it comes to warm water diving, the Mares Volo Race is one of the best models for your money. It’s a lightweight and flexible fin that provides plenty of power both on the surface and underwater. And, its round vents (the opening at the back of the fin that allows for water to flow through it, increasing kicking efficiency) double as carrying loops for easy transport, perfect for shore diving and long walks with equipment.

The Mares Volo Race is also a top pick for daily wear thanks to its comfortable and durable design. And, no matter how fast a swimmer you think you are, this fin was built for racing and is sure to make you faster. Best of all, this fin is great for snorkeling and performs perfectly on the surface, too!

Scubapro Go

  • Heel Style : Open
  • Fin Length : Short
  • Blade Type : Non-Vented
  • Bungee Strap
  • Solid Construction

BEST FOR: LIMITED LUGGAGE SPACE

Designed specifically for travel, The Scubapro Go is more lightweight and shorter than similar models. In fact, this fin is so small that it meets carry-on luggage requirements for all major airlines. Divers in the know claim this fin has just as much power as the original Scubapro Jet that it was modeled after, too.

This fin’s solid construction can take a beating and is ideal for a variety of environments including cold water and strong currents. And, its shape works well for divers who prefer the frog kick, or plan to dive in caves and wrecks.

Mares Avanti Quattro +

Best for: divers who want a classic style.

Ask any experienced diver what fins they like and the chances are good you’ll hear them mention the Mares Avanti Quattro +. This fin style has been around for ages and remains one of the most popular models on the market. And, while it might not be the most compact option out there, this fin is still an excellent choice for dive travel.

These fins are flexible enough to shove in the side of your gear bag but strong enough that they won’t lose their shape. They offer plenty of power in a current, but feel light on the surface. Plus, their super straightforward design is strong, durable, and above all else, comfortable. If you have the spare room in your luggage, you won’t regret filling it with these Quattro+ dive fins.

BEST FOR: TECH AND WRECK DIVERS

If you want a high-performance travel fin that looks as good as it feels in the water, the Hollis F-2 won’t disappoint. Even though this fin was designed for travel, it’s appropriate for tech, wreck, and cold water divers too. Fashion-focused divers take notice – this is without a doubt one of the most stylish options out there.

The F-2 is short, lightweight, and highly maneuverable underwater. And, it offers one of the most modern takes available on the classic solid fin construction. Whether you plan to use them at home or away, these might be the last fins you buy for a very long time.

THINGS TO CONSIDER BEFORE BUYING FINS FOR DIVE TRAVEL

Not all fins are created equal, and if you’re serious about dive travel, your best bet is buying a fin that was designed for it. Snorkeling and freediving fins may not be powerful enough for SCUBA. This is especially important if you’re planning to dive in a current. And, if you plan to take on any advanced environments like caverns and caves, you’ll want fins that are appropriate for tech diving.

While closed heel fins just slip on, open heeled alternatives use an ankle strap or bungee and dive boots to secure to your foot. Most divers agree that open heeled fins offer more power and are best for SCUBA. Closed heel fins are more lightweight and flexible, and are better for warm water diving with little to no current, and snorkeling. If you have sensitive skin, a hard to fit foot shape, or are prone to blisters, an open heel is your best bet.

BLADE LENGTH

When it comes to fins, size matters. Longer fin blades perform well in the open ocean and are best for SCUBA divers who prefer to use the flutter kick. Shorter, more compact fins are best for diving in enclosed environments and provide more power when combined with the frog kick. Keep your luggage size, dive environment, and kicking style in mind when shopping. Keep in mind that freediving fins are specifically for apnea, and do not work well for diving.

Vents allow water to pass through your fin, reducing effort underwater and increasing each kick’s efficiency. This added propulsion makes a big difference when diving in a current. Vents can also be handy when it comes to dive travel because they make it easy to strap your fins to the outside of a gear bag. Some vents even double as carrying loops for easy transport when shore diving.

No matter what gear you’re buying, fit is the most important factor to shop for. A fin that fits well should be snug but not tight, and it shouldn’t slide around on your foot or create friction.

Full foot fins should be easy to don and doff, and shouldn’t squeeze any part of the foot. To try this fin style on, you should wear the fin and stand normally, then lift your heel off the ground while keeping your toe planted. If the fin slides during this “lift” test, you need a smaller size. Double check that the fin isn’t rubbing or chafing the tops of your toes or bunion area.

Open heel fins are worn with dive boots. They should fasten with an ankle strap, and your foot should not move around in the “pocket.” To try this fin style on, you should wear the fin and stand normally with the strap in place. Then, lift your foot and move it around to imitate kicking. Your foot should stay in place without any rubbing or pressure.

Some fins are only available in larger sizes because they aren’t designed for use by women and kids. If you have a small foot, be sure that your fins of choice are manufactured in a full range of sizes.

FEATURES EXPLAINED

Bungee strap.

Open heel fins are worn with booties and secure around your ankle with a strap. While there are all kinds of straps available, a bungee style is best for dive travel. This design has no moving parts or clips that could break in transit, and it is super easy to don and doff on the boat or the water’s surface. Bungee straps are also the most comfortable style because they automatically conform to fit your foot’s shape and size.

Full foot fins are worn barefoot or with neoprene socks, so it’s important that you can grip them firmly to pull them on or off. Otherwise, you might wind up with uncomfortable blisters or painful rub spots. A pull tab is vital for donning and doffing your full foot fins, especially if you are putting them on in the water. This extra rubber to grab onto will also prevent splits and tearing on your fin’s foot pocket.

FLEXIBLE CHANNELS AND PANELS

Many fins have either flexible channels or panels to give you more power in the water. This style of fin is best for divers who use the flutter kick because it helps the fin bend, giving you a wider range of motion. These bendable sections also help your fins contour to the shape of a gear bag, making them easier to pack. Flexible fins usually weigh less than their solid counterparts, too.

SOLID CONSTRUCTION

If you’ve ever seen a video of cave or wreck divers, you’ve probably noticed that they wear a shorter fin made from solid rubber or Monoprene. This fin style is smaller and more compact than its traditional counterpart, though slightly heavier. Some models are even short enough to fit in carry-on luggage! Solid fins are perfect for dive travel if you’re planning to explore enclosed environments or take on tech diving . Keep in mind that this fin is best for divers who use the frog kick.

NON-SLIP SOLE

The soles of most fins are rubber, which helps you grip the ground. But, some fins have a textured bottom, much like a dive bootie for extra traction. This is an excellent safety feature to prevent accidental slips and falls. And, it’s an easy precaution to take if you are accident prone. A non-slip sole will definitely come in handy if you’re planning liveaboard dive travel or will spend most of your time boat diving.

CARRYING LOOPS

While it’s possible to carry your fins by their vents, it can eventually cause serious wear and tear and even ripping. If you’re planning to walk with your equipment over long distances or your dive travel includes multiple immersions away from shore, you’ll want fins with a built-in loop for carrying to prevent this. A sturdy carrying loop also makes it easy to strap fins to the outside of a gear bag if necessary and is handy for hang drying.

For more of our top scuba diving gear recommendations, check out these popular buyer's guides:

Scuba Diving Masks

Scuba Regulators

Scuba Diving Fins

Wetsuits for Diving

What the new FAA funding legislation says about airplane seat sizes | Cruising Altitude

blade length for travel

The new Federal Aviation Administration authorization has a lot of wonky stuff, but some interesting nuggets have fallen through the cracks.

The high-profile changes, of course, include things like much-needed additional funding for air traffic control staffing and codifying passenger compensation rules into law. One thing that hasn’t gotten as much attention, though, is the new push to get the FAA to regulate seat sizes .

Let’s back up for a second.

The last long-term FAA funding bill passed in 2018 required the agency to study evacuation standards and how seemingly ever-densifying airplane cabins affect the ability of people to get off the plane safely in an emergency. Regulations stipulate that all passengers should be able to evacuate any airplane in 90 seconds or less with only half the emergency exits available. 

Airlines and airplane manufacturers have mostly addressed this requirement through computer models in recent years, rather than live evacuation testing, but the previous law required a new live demonstration.

Members of Congress were not satisfied with how that played out .

Rep. Steve Cohen, D-Tenn., told me the last tests, which didn’t include any senior citizens, minors, or disabled participants, weren’t really representative of the traveling public.

“If you want to find out what is the ability to get off an airplane, you’ve got to have a valid sample,” he said in an interview.

So Cohen and other members of Congress pushed to get more robust testing provisions in the new FAA legislation, and Cohen said he’s optimistic it will get done properly this time around.

“It’s a much better bill for us than last time,” he told me. “It specifically says the testing has to be more practical.”

What is the minimum airplane seat size?

There’s no minimum standard for economy seats on airplanes (or seats in any other class, for that matter) in the U.S., and members of Congress say they suspect that could impede safety.

Economy airplane seats can be as close together as 28 inches on some airlines, and barely more than 16 inches wide in some configurations. The 28-inch dimension measures pitch, or the distance from a point on one seat to the same point on the seat in the row ahead. The width of airplane seats is typically defined as the distance between a seat’s armrests.

Tight airplane seats can also be uncomfortable, especially on long flights, as many of you let me know when I asserted that we’re in something of a golden age for air travel affordability and connectivity a few weeks ago. 

What does the FAA reauthorization say about airplane seat sizes?

The new FAA legislation requires the agency to reevaluate evacuation standards “including studying the impacts of passenger age, height and weight, disability status, speech difficulties, language barriers, baggage, seat size and configuration, and service animals, among other factors.”

Depending on what that testing shows, there could soon be a floor for airplane seat sizes, although that could drive up prices if airlines are forced to space out their seats more.

For its part, the FAA said it plans to comply with the regulations and begin making a rule for minimum seat sizes within 60 days or send its reasoning for any further delay to Congress.

“The FAA is grateful to have a long-term, bipartisan reauthorization bill and we look forward to implementing all provisions, including how to include all perspectives of the flying public as we continue to ensure planes can be evacuated safely,” the agency said in a statement.

What can be learned from real-world evacuations?

While evacuation testing is good, it can never quite replicate real-world evacuation scenarios. This year has already seen two noteworthy airplane evacuations: one of a Japan Airlines Airbus A350 in Tokyo and, more recently, a Delta Air Lines Airbus A321neo in Seattle.

Both evacuations took more than 90 seconds from the time the emergency slides were first deployed, although, fortunately, there were no fatalities on either.

Looking more closely at the Delta incident, the video shows people evacuating from both sides of the plane, and the procedure appears to take about two minutes from when the slides first deployed until the last person is seen walking away from the aircraft.

One aspect that surely slowed down the evacuation was the fact that many passengers appeared to take their bags with them. In an emergency, travelers should leave all their belongings behind, as bags and other items could block exits or slow people down on their way to the door.

It’s possible, though by no means guaranteed, that the Delta evacuation could have happened in 90 seconds or less if passengers did not collect their belongings first.

Cohen acknowledged that evacuations can be slowed down by baggage, and said it’s worth exploring how that affects the timeline.

“The rules should be what’s safe, and if the bags make it longer and it causes people in the last 30 seconds to die, that’s what happens, but the rules won’t change that,” he said. 

Cohen and other members of Congress have previously said that they will wait to see what the test results show before endorsing specific minimum airplane seat dimensions, but Cohen did say that he expects airlines will ultimately have to make their layouts a little roomier. 

Zach Wichter is a travel reporter for USA TODAY based in New York. You can reach him at [email protected].

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If packed in carry-on, they must be less than 4 inches from the pivot point.

Any sharp objects in checked bags should be sheathed or securely wrapped to prevent injury to baggage handlers and inspectors.

Weekend rundown: Here's the biggest news you missed this weekend

A potentially habitable Earth-size planet was discovered just 40 light-years away

Gliese 12 b, which orbits a cool, red dwarf star located just 40 light-years away, promises to tell astronomers more about how planets close to their stars retain or lose their atmospheres. In this artist’s concept, Gliese 12 b is shown retaining a thin atmosphere.

A potentially habitable exoplanet that is roughly similar in size to Earth has been found in a system located 40 light-years away, according to a new study.

The planet is about the size of Venus, so slightly smaller than Earth, and may be temperate enough to support life, the researchers said.

Dubbed Gliese 12 b, the planet takes 12.8 days to orbit a star that is 27% of the sun’s size. It’s not yet known whether the exoplanet has an atmosphere.

But the scientists behind the study, published Thursday in the journal Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society , estimated that Gliese 12 b has a surface temperature of about 107 degrees Fahrenheit (42 degrees Celsius). While hot, that temperature is lower than most of the thousands of exoplanets discovered to date.

“Gliese 12 b could be at the right temperature for liquid water to pool on its surface, and that’s important because we tend to think liquid water is an essential ingredient for life as we know it,” Shishir Dholakia, one of the study’s authors and a doctoral student at the University of Southern Queensland’s Centre for Astrophysics, said in a statement .

The researchers are keen to get a closer look at the exoplanet, including with NASA’s James Webb Space Telescope , which launched into space in 2021 and is equipped with a sophisticated suite of instruments capable of studying exoplanet atmospheres .

The scientists want to determine if the planet has an atmosphere similar to that on Earth, or whether its atmosphere is as extreme and hostile as that on Venus. Alternately, Gliese 12 b could have no atmosphere at all, or one that is unfamiliar and not seen in our own solar system, they said.

The findings could help researchers better understand the factors that make exoplanets potentially habitable. The observations may also shed light on how our own solar system evolved.

“Because Gliese 12 b is between Earth and Venus in temperature, its atmosphere could teach us a lot about the habitability pathways planets take as they develop,” study co-author Larissa Palethorpe, a doctoral student at the University of Edinburgh and University College London, said in a statement .

Gliese 12 b was discovered using data from NASA’s Transiting Exoplanet Survey Satellite , which is designed to stare at a huge patch of the sky for about a month at a time. The space telescope, which launched into space in 2018, looks for periodic changes in brightness of tens of thousands of stars.

If a star dims at regular intervals, it may be a sign that a planet is orbiting the star, passing in front of it and temporarily obscuring its light.

blade length for travel

Denise Chow is a reporter for NBC News Science focused on general science and climate change.

IMAGES

  1. New TSA guidelines permit small knives as carry-on items aboard planes

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  2. How to measure the blade length? I’m taking a flight in a week and the

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  3. How to Measure a Knife Length in 3 Easy Steps

    blade length for travel

  4. How to Measure a Knife Blade

    blade length for travel

  5. Choosing the Blade Length for Your Folding Pocket Knife

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  6. Choosing the Right Blade Length » KnifeKnow-How: Your Ultimate Knife

    blade length for travel

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COMMENTS

  1. TSA Knife Rules: Can You Take a Knife on a Plane?

    For vacationing knife enthusiasts, Plaza Cutlery's Dan Delavan suggests a Spyderco, Kershaw or CRKT knife in the $30 to $70 range. An example of the latter is the CRKT Pilar with a 2.4-inch blade of 8Cr13MoV stainless and a closed length of 3.5 inches. MSRP: $39.99. The kinds of people who walk into Dan and Pam Delavan's Plaza Cutlery ...

  2. Knives

    The final decision rests with the TSA officer on whether an item is allowed through the checkpoint. Except knives with rounded-blades, blunt edges without serration/teeth such as butter knives, or plastic cutlery. Any sharp objects in checked bags should be sheathed or securely wrapped to prevent injury to baggage handlers and inspectors.

  3. Pocket Knife

    Pocket Knife. In general, you are prohibited from traveling with sharp objects in your carry-on baggage; please pack these items in your checked baggage. For more prohibited items, please go to the 'What Can I Bring?' page. The final decision rests with the TSA officer on whether an item is allowed through the checkpoint. In general, you are ...

  4. Rules on Bringing a Pocket Knife on a Plane: Cutting Through the

    TSA does not have a limit on the length or type of blade either - i.e. curved blades, for example, are allowed. ... Honored as one of "30 Under 30" by TTG Media (the world's very first weekly travel trade newspaper), a "Tour Operator Travel Guru" and "Legend Award" winner, Ella is also a Fellow of the Institute of Travel, a Member of the ...

  5. Pocket Knives and Airports

    1. Gerber MP600 Bladeless Multi-Tool. First up is the Gerber MP600 Bladeless. The general rule of thumb is that if it has a blade, it's going to be confiscated. So Gerber created a bladeless version of the renowned MP600, specifically for compliance with "No Knife" policies at hospitals, government buildings, and even airports.

  6. How to Pack a Knife in Checked Baggage: TSA Travel Rules

    Blades of any size with pointed or sharp edges are only allowed in checked baggage. This includes box cutters, pocket knives, Swiss army knives, and utility knives. [3] X Trustworthy Source U.S. Transportation Security Administration U.S. government agency responsible for ensuring safety by setting and enforcing travel protocols Go to source

  7. TSA Approved Pocket Knives

    Spyderco Bug Non-Locking Knife with 1.27″ Blade. TSA Approved Pocket Knives. The Spyderco Bug Non-Locking Knife is a testament to the saying, "good things come in small packages.". With a blade length of just 1.27 inches, this compact knife is perfect for those who need a reliable tool that's also travel-friendly.

  8. Traveling With a Knife

    Blade length: many places restrict larger blades. Locks: in some locations locking knives are restricted. ... have regulations banning specifically named knives like daggers, push knives, and dirk knives. Traveling by Air. Air travel is very restrictive, and policy is set by both the federal government through the TSA and individual airline ...

  9. Can You Bring Knives On A Plane? (TSA Rules Update)

    The TSA and international aviation authorities strictly prohibit certain types of knives on planes. Small non-locking folding knives with blades under a specific length may be allowed in checked baggage but not in carry-on luggage. It is vital to research & understand the specific rules of the airline & the country you are travelling.

  10. Can You Bring Knives On Planes: Airline Rules You Need to Know

    Multi-tools: These tools have numerous functions, including knives, and are permitted provided that the blade's length does not exceed 2.36 inches. Note: Remember that any knife with a blade longer than the specified lengths above is strictly banned in checked luggage. Additionally, any knife that is deemed to be a weapon, such as ...

  11. TSA Rules: Can You Take Knives On A Plane?

    Travel Insurance. SafetyWing — For general travelers and digital nomads with great rates. Book Tours, Tickets & Attractions. Viator — The largest selection for almost all locations. ... Folding knives with blades that are less than 4 inches in length are permitted in checked luggage. These knives must be securely wrapped in a sheath or ...

  12. Can You Bring Knives on Planes in Checked or Hand Luggage?

    Canada. On Canadian flights, knives with a blade length of 6 cm (2.36 inches) or shorter are allowed both in hand and checked luggage. Usually, small scissors, nail clippers, multi-tools, and pocket knives fall within this category. Knives with blades over 6 cm are also allowed, but only in checked baggage.

  13. What Can I Bring?

    Checked Bags: Yes. Except knives with rounded-blades, blunt edges without serration/teeth such as butter knives, or plastic cutlery. Any sharp objects in checked bags should be sheathed or securely wrapped to prevent injury to baggage handlers and inspectors. Current page 1. Page 2.

  14. Can You Bring Scissors On A Plane? The TSA Rules Explained

    Scissors in hand luggage cannot have blades that are longer than 4 inches. You can take scissors in your carry on if the blades are smaller than 4 inches as measured from the pivot point. TSA Approved Carry On Scissors. So it's all about blade length. This means that Christina was able to take her small thread cutting scissors:

  15. State-by-State Guide To Knife Length Laws In The US

    4 inches blade length. None identified. Class B misdemeanor with potential fines and imprisonment. Delaware - 3 inches blade length for folding knives - 3.5 inches blade length for fixed blades. None identified. N/A: Florida: No specific limit is defined. None identified. N/A: Georgia: No specific limit is defined. None identified. N/A: Hawaii

  16. Knives with a blade over 6 cm

    Checked baggage. Yes. A knife with a blade over 6 cm must be placed in checked baggage and are permitted when flying within Canada or to an international (non-U.S.) destination. Knives of any type or length are not permitted in your carry-on on flights to the U.S. Date modified: 2022-12-22.

  17. What Knife Size Is Legal To Carry On A Plane?

    CAA (Civil Aviation Authority) It allows you to bring knives that are shorter than 2.4 inches (6cm). Here is the answer to what size of knife is legal to carry on a plane. Of course, it also depends on the rules of each country you move in and from. Some countries have stricter rules, and some are easier for you to bring knives.

  18. pocketknife blade length for air travel

    pocketknife blade length for air travel. Last year we flew to London for a few days and then took the high-speed train through the Chunnel to Paris. While in London I bought a dandy Victorinox Swiss Army pocketknife with lots of blade/tool options, including a corkscrew (which got LOTS of use). Rather than give it away when we departed from ...

  19. California Knife Laws

    with a blade length of 2 or more inches, and; which can be released by a flick of a button, pressure on the handle, flip of the wrist, or another mechanical device. Switchblades also go by the names: automatic knives, spring-blade knives, spring-loaded knives, snap-blade knives, ejector knives, and; pushbutton knives. In California ...

  20. Best Scuba Fins for Travel of 2024

    The best fins for dive travel are lightweight and compact but don't sacrifice power or comfort. Unfortunately, that's not always ... BLADE LENGTH. When it comes to fins, size matters. Longer fin blades perform well in the open ocean and are best for SCUBA divers who prefer to use the flutter kick. Shorter, more compact fins are best for diving ...

  21. Best Short Fins for Snorkeling and Travel

    Cressi CSSPSAF-BL-ML Palau Short Snorkeling Fins with Mesh Bag, Blue, Medium/Large. Soft short blade and foot pocket able to be put on quickly and easily. Accommodates 3-4 consecutive sizes and can be worn over thin footwear. Adjustable fin for pool or beach use. Buy on Amazon Price incl. tax, excl. shipping.

  22. Why minimum seat standards may be coming to planes

    What is the minimum airplane seat size? There's no minimum standard for economy seats on airplanes (or seats in any other class, for that matter) in the U.S., and members of Congress say they ...

  23. 210 E 2nd St, Blades, DE 19973

    Zillow has 16 photos of this $309,900 3 beds, 2 baths, 1,348 Square Feet single family home located at 210 E 2nd St, Blades, DE 19973 built in 2024. MLS #DESU2060762.

  24. Senua's Saga: Hellblade 2 Review (Xbox): Get Out Of My Head

    Hellblade 2. Ninja Theory. Senua's Saga: Hellblade 2 is a gorgeous game full of industry-best visuals and performances. It is also not terribly fun to play. Admittedly, I was not the biggest fan ...

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    Speaking from the site of the decimated AP Travel Center at the intersection of I-35 and Lone Oak Road between Valley View and Sanger early Sunday morning, Cooke County Sheriff Ray Sappington gave ...

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    J-2000. $237 at Walmart. $253 at Amazon. Garment steamers offer another way to remove wrinkles, using a steady flow of hot steam to relax fabric fibers and release creases while garments are ...

  27. Scissors

    Scissors. Carry On Bags: Yes (Special Instructions) Checked Bags: Yes. If packed in carry-on, they must be less than 4 inches from the pivot point. Any sharp objects in checked bags should be sheathed or securely wrapped to prevent injury to baggage handlers and inspectors. For more prohibited items, please go to the 'What Can I Bring?' page.

  28. Potentially habitable Earth-size planet discovered 40 light-years away

    A potentially habitable Earth-size planet was discovered just 40 light-years away. Dubbed Gliese 12 b, the planet takes 12.8 days to orbit a star that is 27% of the sun's size. Gliese 12 b ...