us government travel restrictions to mexico

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us government travel restrictions to mexico

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  • For U.S. Citizens/Lawful Permanent Residents

Are You Planning a Trip to Mexico from the United States?

Warning: it's Illegal to Carry Firearms or Ammo into Mexico.

For border crossing information, tune into the port of entry's Loop Radio on 1620 AM. Report drug and alien smuggling. Call (956) 542-5811 in the U.S., 001800-0105237 from Mexico.

Prohibited/Permissible Items

  • All articles acquired in Mexico must be declared.
  • $800 exemption for gifts and personal articles, including one liter of alcoholic beverages per person over 21 every 30 days.
  • Cuban cigars are prohibited.
  • Check with U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP) about importing any medications prior to crossing into Mexico.
  • CBP has a zero-tolerance policy on illegal drugs. Any type, in any amount may result in serious fines, seizure of vehicle, federal record and/or imprisonment.
  • Switchblade knives, sea turtle boots or any other articles of endangered species (i.e. spotted cats, coral, crocodile, elephant, etc) are prohibited.

Prohibited/Permissible Agricultural Items

  • Most fruits are prohibited (No oranges or apples)
  • Do not take U.S. fruits and meats to Mexico-You cannot bring them back.
  • Before you go to Mexico, ask a CBP Officer for a list of items you can bring back.
  • Fines of $50 to $1,000 may result if you fail to declared agricultural items.

Texas Alcoholic Beverage Commission

  • You must be 21 years of age to possess alcoholic beverages, if you are not 21, the alcohol will automatically be confiscated.
  • One liter of alcohol and one case of beer may be imported per person every 30 days.
  • No ID=no liquor. You must prove that you are 21 or older. If you show false or altered personal identification, the ID will be confiscated and you will be prosecuted.
  • If you are 18 or over one carton of cigarettes may be imported.
  • It is illegal in Texas to consume or possess with intent to consume alcoholic beverages in a public place on Sundays between 2:15 a.m. and noon or on any other day between 2:15 a.m. and 7 a.m.
  • You are required to pay state tax on all alcoholic beverages and all cigarettes imported into Texas.
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U.S. Issues Travel Warning for Mexico Ahead of Spring Break

The warning is asking travelers to “travel smart” and “be informed."

us government travel restrictions to mexico

marako85/Getty Images

The United States is warning travelers heading to Mexico to be aware of their surroundings ahead of the spring break holiday season.

The warning , which was issued this week by the U.S. Embassy and Consulates in Mexico, reminds travelers to “travel smart” and “be informed” as “thousands of U.S. citizens visit Mexico during spring break” each year. The embassy continued that “while the vast majority travel safely,” visitors should be aware of issues with crime, drugs, unregulated alcohol, drownings, and more. 

“Crime, including violent crime, can occur anywhere in Mexico, including in popular tourist destinations. Travelers should maintain a high level of situational awareness, avoid areas where illicit activities occur, and promptly depart from potentially dangerous situations,” the embassy warned. “U.S. citizens should exercise increased caution in the downtown areas of popular spring break locations including Cancun, Playa Del Carmen, and Tulum, especially after dark.”

The warning also reminded American travelers that drug possession and use is illegal in Mexico, including medical marijuana. It also advised that unregulated alcohol may be contaminated, that counterfeit medication is common, and that guns are illegal in Mexico.

When it comes to the country’s popular beaches, the embassy reminded travelers some beaches may have strong rip tides and “may lack lifeguards, warnings, or signs of unsafe conditions.”

The U.S. Embassy and Consulates in Mexico issued a similar spring break warning last year .

The U.S. Department of State classifies different states in Mexico under different warning levels. While travelers can “exercise normal precautions” when traveling to the Campeche and Yucatan states, the State Department warns them to “exercise increased caution” when heading to places like Baja California Sur (where Los Cabos is), Mexico City, and Quintana Roo (where Cancun is) due to crime.

The State Department also asks American travelers to “reconsider” going to the state of Jalisco, which is home to popular destination Puerto Vallarta , due to the danger of crime and kidnapping.

The State Department recommends Americans who do travel to Mexico keep people at home informed of their travel plans and enroll in the department’s Smart Traveler Enrollment Program (STEP) to both receive alerts and make it easier to locate them if an emergency occurs.

Travelers heading to international destinations can view all current travel advisories on the State Department's website at  travel.state.gov .

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Heading to Mexico? These Are the COVID Restrictions in Place

By Shannon McMahon

Mexico Restrictions Guide Tulum Mayan Ruins

Considering a getaway south of the border? As we all inch back out there, Mexico certainly has appeal, thanks to its proximity to the United States and familiarity for American travelers—especially at a time when traveling abroad is still nebulous.

In fact, with most of Europe and many other destinations off the table as of late, some parts of Mexico saw an increase in American arrivals late last year when compared to the same time in 2019. According to the Washington Post , the state of Quintana Roo, which is home to Cancun, Playa del Carmen, and Tulum, saw a 23 percent rise in U.S. visitors. (The proof is in most of our Instagram feeds, as well.)

The government of Mexico is asking visitors to come, too. The country declared its tourism sector reopened on June 1, 2020. “Mexico has maintained its borders open through air travel to North American visitors with no need to quarantine,” according to the Mexican Embassy in the United States . “It is encouraged that people continue respecting social distancing measures, washing their hands, and coughing or sneezing in the inner part of the elbow to prevent the spread of COVID-19.”

But there are some minor entry requirements in place for visitors, and a system for COVID-19 health restrictions on the ground that could greatly impact what you are able to enjoy on your trip. We've spelled them out below so you know what to expect. Remember, wherever you're headed, make sure to also do your homework on the wider situation on the ground—local case counts and hospital capacities, the sentiment towards visitors during the ongoing pandemic, if particular restaurants or site you want to visit are open—before you book a flight. 

Read on for our full list of Mexico COVID travel restrictions, by state. 

Mexico COVID travel: Entry and exit restrictions

Since March 21, 2020, Mexico’s northern border with the United States has been closed to all nonessential land crossings—and the closure has been renewed every month since. This means you cannot drive across the border to Mexico as a traveler; you will have to fly. Although air travel to tourism-dependent Mexico remains open to leisure travelers, who are permitted to visit without quarantining or testing negative for COVID-19, health checks have been implemented at Mexican airports. As always, Americans do not need a visa for stays of under 180 days. Air travelers are required to submit a mobile health questionnaire before they arrive in Mexico, and once it is completed travelers receive a QR code to be scanned by officials at their arrival airport for entry. Health measures at the airport may also include temperature checks. Public transportation in Mexico and public spaces where crowds may gather, including hotels and restaurants, require masks and social distancing (except when eating).

All travelers must test negative for COVID-19 to re-enter the United States. The U.S. Mission Mexico offers a list of private testing providers travelers can utilize if their hotel or resort does not offer on-site testing.

It’s also worth noting that the U.S. Department of State updated the travel advisory for Mexico to its highest, “Do Not Travel,” level on April 20 due to COVID-19. The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention also advises Americans to avoid international travel to Mexico due to COVID-19 levels. Data from the World Health Organization shows that the country has seen over 2.3 million confirmed coronavirus cases and more than 219,000 deaths, and about 20 million vaccine doses have been distributed in Mexico as of May 7.

What's open?

Varying levels of health restrictions, which are dependent on COVID-19 case rates in a given state, have been in place to varying degrees throughout Mexico since the beginning of the pandemic. The nation has implemented a stoplight-style alert system for its 32 states, assigning color-coded epidemiological statuses of green, yellow, orange, and red—with red carrying the highest restrictions. As of mid-May the most tourist-frequented states are yellow or orange, with less-visited areas in the green, or least-restrictive phase. The governor of the state of Quintana Roo, however, is warning that the area, which is home to Cancun, Tulum, Cozumel, and Playa del Carmen, is in danger of returning to red status, which implements stay-at-home orders and strict capacity limits on hotels and tourism sites. You can check the color assigned to each state on this interactive map , and read more about the country’s sanitary measures for reopening tourism here .

Here’s what each phase generally mandates:

Green: States in the green phase are largely open, with only social distancing and mask requirements in place for public places and at businesses.

Yellow: States designated as yellow have some reduced capacity requirements in place for public spaces that may become crowded: Hotel lobbies, restaurants, beaches, theaters, shops, and tourist attractions must operate at about 70 percent capacity or less (exact limits depend on the state case count), and bars and clubs are closed.

Orange: States categorized as orange have a tighter capacity limits. Hotel lobbies, restaurants, and tourist attractions are limited to 50 percent capacity, while beaches, theaters, and stores are limited to 30 to 40 percent or less , depending on the case count.

Red: States in red alert status are subject to stay-at-home orders and curfews, and public beaches and parks are closed. Hotels, restaurants, and tourist attractions operate at 20 percent capacity or less, while shops, theaters, gyms, bars, and clubs are closed.

Stop-light colors are assessed on a weekly basis and can change at any time. Here are the current colors assigned to some of the most tourist-frequented areas in Mexico, and where to find updates on their restrictions.

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Cancun, Playa del Carmen, Tulum, and Cozumel: Quintana Roo is currently in the second-highest orange phase and implementing 50 percent capacity limits on hotel spaces, restaurants, and tourist sites. Beaches, theaters, shops, and casinos are limited to 30 percent capacity. Updates can be found here .

Mexico City and Puebla’s Magic Towns: The states of Mexico City and Puebla are currently designated as yellow, with 70 percent capacity limits widely in place. Mexico City plans to return to allowing theater and other indoor events at 30 percent capacity starting on May 17. Updates can be found here for Mexico City and here for Puebla .

Cabo San Lucas, Los Cabos, and the Los Cabos Corridor: The states of Baja California & Baja California Sur are also yellow-designated states, with 70 percent capacity limits widely in place.  More health information on Los Cabos can be found here .

Puerto Vallarta and Punta Mita: Jalisco and Nayarit states are among Mexico’s green-designated areas, with most businesses operating at socially distanced capacities and with masks required. Online updates for Riviera Nayarit can be found here , and Puerto Vallarta updates can be found here .

Merida, Chichen Itza, and Valladolid: The state of Yucatan, home to the ancient ruins of Chichen Itza and the bustling city of Merida, is in the yellow phase and enforcing capacity limits of about 70 percent. More information can be found here . Chichen Itza briefly closed due to bad tourist behavior in April, but has since reopened with masking, social distancing, and health checks required.

Oaxaca City and Puerto Escondido: The state of Oaxaca and its resort towns are currently in the green phase, with most businesses open but social distancing and masking requirements still in place. More information can be found here .

Central Mexico and San Miguel de Allende: The states of Guanajuato and Querétaro are currently yellow with 70 percent capacity limits widely in place. Updates can be found here for Guanajuato , which is home to historic San Miguel de Allende, and here for Queretaro .

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us government travel restrictions to mexico

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COVID-19 international travel advisories

If you plan to visit the U.S., you do not need to be tested or vaccinated for COVID-19. U.S. citizens going abroad, check with the Department of State for travel advisories.

COVID-19 testing and vaccine rules for entering the U.S.

  • As of May 12, 2023, noncitizen nonimmigrant visitors to the U.S.  arriving by air  or  arriving by land or sea  no longer need to show proof of being fully vaccinated against COVID-19. 
  • As of June 12, 2022,  people entering the U.S. no longer need to show proof of a negative COVID-19 test . 

U.S. citizens traveling to a country outside the U.S.

Find country-specific COVID-19 travel rules from the Department of State.

See the  CDC's COVID-19 guidance for safer international travel.

LAST UPDATED: December 6, 2023

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Ask a real person any government-related question for free. They will get you the answer or let you know where to find it.

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  • Fact Sheets

Frequently Asked Questions: Guidance for Travelers to Enter the U.S.

Updated Date: April 21, 2022

Since January 22, 2022, DHS has required non-U.S. individuals seeking to enter the United States via land ports of entry and ferry terminals at the U.S.-Mexico and U.S.-Canada borders to be fully vaccinated for COVID-19 and provide proof of vaccination upon request.  On April 21, 2022, DHS announced that it would extend these requirements. In determining whether and when to rescind this order, DHS anticipates that it will take account of whether the vaccination requirement for non-U.S. air travelers remains in place.

These requirements apply to non-U.S. individuals who are traveling for essential or non-essential reasons. They do not apply to U.S. citizens, Lawful Permanent Residents, or U.S. nationals.

Effective November 8, 2021, new air travel requirements applied to many noncitizens who are visiting the United States temporarily. These travelers are also required to show proof of COVID-19 vaccination. All air travelers, including U.S. persons, must test negative for COVID-19 prior to departure. Limited exceptions apply. See  CDC guidance  for more details regarding air travel requirements.

Below is more information about what to know before you go, and answers to Frequently Asked Questions about cross-border travel.

Entering the U.S. Through a Land Port of Entry or Ferry Terminal

Q. what are the requirements for travelers entering the united states through land poes.

A:  Before embarking on a trip to the United States, non-U.S. travelers should be prepared for the following:

  • Possess proof of an approved COVID-19 vaccination as outlined on the  CDC  website.
  • During border inspection, verbally attest to their COVID-19 vaccination status. 
  • Bring a  Western Hemisphere Travel Initiative  compliant border crossing document, such as a valid passport (and visa if required), Trusted Traveler Program card, a Department of State-issued Border Crossing Card, Enhanced Driver’s License or Enhanced Tribal Card when entering the country. Travelers (including U.S. citizens) should be prepared to present the WHTI-compliant document and any other documents requested by the CBP officer.

 Q. What are the requirements to enter the United States for children under the age of 18 who can't be vaccinated?

A:  Children under 18 years of age are excepted from the vaccination requirement at land and ferry POEs.

Q: Which vaccines/combination of vaccines will be accepted?

A:  Per CDC guidelines, all Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved and authorized vaccines, as well as all vaccines that have an Emergency Use Listing (EUL) from the World Health Organization (WHO), will be accepted.

Accepted Vaccines:

  • More details are available in CDC guidance  here .
  • 2 weeks (14 days) after your dose of an accepted single-dose COVID-19 vaccine;
  • 2 weeks (14 days) after your second dose of an accepted 2-dose series;
  • 2 weeks (14 days) after you received the full series of an accepted COVID-19 vaccine (not placebo) in a clinical trial;
  • 2 weeks (14 days) after you received 2 doses of any “mix-and-match” combination of accepted COVID-19 vaccines administered at least 17 days apart.

Q. Is the United States requiring travelers to have a booster dose to be considered fully vaccinated for border entry purposes?

A:  No. The CDC guidance for “full vaccination” can be found here.

Q: Do U.S. citizens or lawful permanent residents need proof of vaccination to return to the United States via land POEs and ferry terminals?

A:  No. Vaccination requirements do not apply to U.S. citizens, U.S. nationals, or Lawful Permanent Residents (LPRs). Travelers that exhibit signs or symptoms of illness will be referred to CDC for additional medical evaluation.

Q: Is pre- or at-arrival COVID testing required to enter the United States via land POEs or ferry terminals?

A: No, there is no COVID testing requirement to enter the United States via land POE or ferry terminals. In this respect, the requirement for entering by a land POE or ferry terminal differs from arrival via air, where there is a requirement to have a negative test result before departure.

Processing Changes Announced on January 22, 2022 

Q: new changes were recently announced. what changed on january 22.

A:  Since January 22, 2022, non-citizens who are not U.S. nationals or Lawful Permanent Residents have been required to be vaccinated against COVID-19 to enter the United States at land ports of entry and ferry terminals, whether for essential or nonessential purposes. Previously, DHS required that non-U.S. persons be vaccinated against COVID-19 to enter the United States for nonessential purposes.  Effective January 22, all non-U.S. individuals, to include essential travelers, must be prepared to attest to vaccination status and present proof of vaccination to a CBP officer upon request. DHS announced an extension of this policy on April 21, 2022.

Q: Who is affected by the changes announced on January 22?

A: This requirement does not apply to U.S. citizens, U.S. nationals, or U.S. Lawful Permanent Residents. It applies to other noncitizens, such as a citizen of Mexico, Canada, or any other country seeking to enter the United States through a land port of entry or ferry terminal.

Q: Do U.S. citizens need proof of vaccination to return to the United States via land port of entry or ferry terminals?

A: Vaccination requirements do not apply to U.S. Citizens, U.S. nationals or U.S. Lawful Permanent Residents. Travelers that exhibit signs or symptoms of illness will be referred to CDC for additional medical evaluation. 

Q: What is essential travel?

A:  Under the prior policy, there was an exception from temporary travel restrictions for “essential travel.” Essential travel included travel to attend educational institutions, travel to work in the United States, travel for emergency response and public health purposes, and travel for lawful cross-border trade (e.g., commercial truckers). Under current policy, there is no exception for essential travel.

Q: Will there be any exemptions? 

A: While most non-U.S. individuals seeking to enter the United States will need to be vaccinated, there is a narrow list of exemptions consistent with the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) Order in the air travel context.

  • Certain categories of individuals on diplomatic or official foreign government travel as specified in the CDC Order
  • Children under 18 years of age;
  • Certain participants in certain COVID-19 vaccine trials as specified in the CDC Order;   
  • Individuals with medical contraindications to receiving a COVID-19 vaccine as specified in the CDC Order;
  • Individuals issued a humanitarian or emergency exception by the Secretary of Homeland Security;
  • Individuals with valid nonimmigrant visas (excluding B-1 [business] or B-2 [tourism] visas) who are citizens of a country with limited COVID-19 vaccine availability, as specified in the CDC Order
  • Members of the U.S. Armed Forces or their spouses or children (under 18 years of age) as specified in the CDC Order; and
  • Individuals whose entry would be in the U.S. national interest, as determined by the Secretary of Homeland Security.

Q: What documentation will be required to show vaccination status?

A:  Non-U.S. individuals are required to be prepared to attest to vaccination status and present proof of vaccination to a CBP officer upon request regardless of the purpose of travel.

The current documentation requirement remains the same and is available on the CDC website . Documentation requirements for entry at land ports of entry and ferry terminals mirror those for entry by air.

Q: What happens if someone doesn’t have proof of vaccine status?

A: If non-U.S. individuals cannot present proof of vaccination upon request, they will not be admitted into the United States and will either be subject to removal or be allowed to withdraw their application for entry.

Q: Will incoming travelers be required to present COVID-19 test results?

A: There is no COVID-19 testing requirement for travelers at land border ports of entry, including ferry terminals.

Q: What does this mean for those who can't be vaccinated, either due to age or other health considerations? 

A: See CDC guidance for additional information on this topic. Note that the vaccine requirement does not apply to children under 18 years of age.

Q: Does this requirement apply to amateur and professional athletes?

A: Yes, unless they qualify for one of the narrow CDC exemptions.

Q: Are commercial truckers required to be vaccinated?

A: Yes, unless they qualify for one of the narrow CDC exemptions. These requirements also apply to bus drivers as well as rail and ferry operators.

Q. Do you expect border wait times to increase?

A:  As travelers navigate these new travel requirements, wait times may increase. Travelers should account for the possibility of longer than normal wait times and lines at U.S. land border crossings when planning their trip and are kindly encouraged to exercise patience.

To help reduce wait times and long lines, travelers can take advantage of innovative technology, such as facial biometrics and the CBP OneTM mobile application, which serves as a single portal for individuals to access CBP mobile applications and services.

Q: How is Customs and Border Protection staffing the ports of entry? 

A: CBP’s current staffing levels at ports of entry throughout the United States are commensurate with pre-pandemic levels. CBP has continued to hire and train new employees throughout the pandemic. CBP expects some travelers to be non-compliant with the proof of vaccination requirements, which may at times lead to an increase in border wait times. Although trade and travel facilitation remain a priority, we cannot compromise national security, which is our primary mission. CBP Office of Field Operations will continue to dedicate its finite resources to the processing of arriving traffic with emphasis on trade facilitation to ensure economic recovery.

Q: What happens if a vaccinated individual is traveling with an unvaccinated individual?  

A:  The unvaccinated individual (if 18 or over) would not be eligible for admission.

Q: If I am traveling for an essential reason but am not vaccinated can I still enter?

A:  No, if you are a non-U.S. individual. The policy announced on January 22, 2022 applies to both essential and non-essential travel by non-U.S. individual travelers. Since January 22, DHS has required that all inbound non-U.S. individuals crossing U.S. land or ferry POEs – whether for essential or non-essential reasons – be fully vaccinated for COVID-19 and provide related proof of vaccination upon request.

Q: Are sea crew members on vessels required to have a COVID vaccine to disembark?

A:  Sea crew members traveling pursuant to a C-1 or D nonimmigrant visa are not excepted from COVID-19 vaccine requirements at the land border. This is a difference from the international air transportation context.

Entering the U.S. via Air Travel

Q: what are the covid vaccination requirements for air passengers to the united states  .

A:  According to CDC requirements [www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/travelers/noncitizens-US-air-travel.html | Link no longer valid], most noncitizens who are visiting the United States temporarily must be fully vaccinated prior to boarding a flight to the United States. These travelers are required to show proof of vaccination. A list of covered individuals is available on the CDC website.  

Q: What are the COVID testing requirements for air passengers to the United States?  

A:  Effective Sunday, June 12 at 12:01 a.m. ET, CDC will no longer require pre-departure COVID-19 testing for U.S.-bound air travelers.

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Be aware of current health issues in Mexico. Learn how to protect yourself.

Level 1 Practice Usual Precautions

  • Dengue in the Americas February 28, 2024 Dengue is a risk in many parts of Central and South America, Mexico, and the Caribbean. Some countries are reporting increased numbers of cases of the disease. Travelers to the Americas can protect themselves by preventing mosquito bites. Destination List: Argentina, Brazil, Colombia, Costa Rica, French Guiana (France), Guadeloupe, Guatemala, Haiti, Jamaica, Martinique (France), Mexico, Nicaragua, Panama, Paraguay, Peru, Saint Barthelemy, Saint Martin, Turks and Caicos Islands (U.K.)
  • Rocky Mountain Spotted Fever in Mexico December 11, 2023 There have been reports of Rocky Mountain spotted fever (RMSF) in people traveling to the United States from Tecate, in the state of Baja California, Mexico.
  • Salmonella Newport in Mexico September 08, 2022 Some travelers who have spent time in Mexico have been infected with multidrug-resistant (MDR) Salmonella Newport.

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Check the vaccines and medicines list and visit your doctor at least a month before your trip to get vaccines or medicines you may need. If you or your doctor need help finding a location that provides certain vaccines or medicines, visit the Find a Clinic page.

Routine vaccines

Recommendations.

Make sure you are up-to-date on all routine vaccines before every trip. Some of these vaccines include

  • Chickenpox (Varicella)
  • Diphtheria-Tetanus-Pertussis
  • Flu (influenza)
  • Measles-Mumps-Rubella (MMR)

Immunization schedules

All eligible travelers should be up to date with their COVID-19 vaccines. Please see  Your COVID-19 Vaccination  for more information. 

COVID-19 vaccine

Hepatitis A

Recommended for unvaccinated travelers one year old or older going to Mexico.

Infants 6 to 11 months old should also be vaccinated against Hepatitis A. The dose does not count toward the routine 2-dose series.

Travelers allergic to a vaccine component or who are younger than 6 months should receive a single dose of immune globulin, which provides effective protection for up to 2 months depending on dosage given.

Unvaccinated travelers who are over 40 years old, immunocompromised, or have chronic medical conditions planning to depart to a risk area in less than 2 weeks should get the initial dose of vaccine and at the same appointment receive immune globulin.

Hepatitis A - CDC Yellow Book

Dosing info - Hep A

Hepatitis B

Recommended for unvaccinated travelers younger than 60 years old traveling to Mexico. Unvaccinated travelers 60 years and older may get vaccinated before traveling to Mexico.

Hepatitis B - CDC Yellow Book

Dosing info - Hep B

CDC recommends that travelers going to certain areas of Mexico take prescription medicine to prevent malaria. Depending on the medicine you take, you will need to start taking this medicine multiple days before your trip, as well as during and after your trip. Talk to your doctor about which malaria medication you should take.

Find  country-specific information  about malaria.

Malaria - CDC Yellow Book

Considerations when choosing a drug for malaria prophylaxis (CDC Yellow Book)

Malaria information for Mexico.

Cases of measles are on the rise worldwide. Travelers are at risk of measles if they have not been fully vaccinated at least two weeks prior to departure, or have not had measles in the past, and travel internationally to areas where measles is spreading.

All international travelers should be fully vaccinated against measles with the measles-mumps-rubella (MMR) vaccine, including an early dose for infants 6–11 months, according to  CDC’s measles vaccination recommendations for international travel .

Measles (Rubeola) - CDC Yellow Book

Rabid dogs are commonly found in Mexico. However, if you are bitten or scratched by a dog or other mammal while in Mexico, rabies treatment is often available. 

Consider rabies vaccination before your trip if your activities mean you will be around dogs or wildlife.

Travelers more likely to encounter rabid animals include

  • Campers, adventure travelers, or cave explorers (spelunkers)
  • Veterinarians, animal handlers, field biologists, or laboratory workers handling animal specimens
  • Visitors to rural areas

Since children are more likely to be bitten or scratched by a dog or other animals, consider rabies vaccination for children traveling to Mexico. 

Rabies - CDC Yellow Book

Recommended for most travelers, especially those staying with friends or relatives or visiting smaller cities or rural areas.

Typhoid - CDC Yellow Book

Dosing info - Typhoid

Avoid contaminated water

Leptospirosis

How most people get sick (most common modes of transmission)

  • Touching urine or other body fluids from an animal infected with leptospirosis
  • Swimming or wading in urine-contaminated fresh water, or contact with urine-contaminated mud
  • Drinking water or eating food contaminated with animal urine
  • Avoid contaminated water and soil

Clinical Guidance

Avoid bug bites, chagas disease (american trypanosomiasis).

  • Accidentally rub feces (poop) of the triatomine bug into the bug bite, other breaks in the skin, your eyes, or mouth
  • From pregnant woman to her baby, contaminated blood products (transfusions), or contaminated food or drink.
  • Avoid Bug Bites

Chagas disease

  • Mosquito bite

Leishmaniasis

  • Sand fly bite
  • An infected pregnant woman can spread it to her unborn baby

Airborne & droplet

Avian/bird flu.

  • Being around, touching, or working with infected poultry, such as visiting poultry farms or live-animal markets
  • Avoid domestic and wild poultry
  • Breathing in air or accidentally eating food contaminated with the urine, droppings, or saliva of infected rodents
  • Bite from an infected rodent
  • Less commonly, being around someone sick with hantavirus (only occurs with Andes virus)
  • Avoid rodents and areas where they live
  • Avoid sick people

Tuberculosis (TB)

  • Breathe in TB bacteria that is in the air from an infected and contagious person coughing, speaking, or singing.

Learn actions you can take to stay healthy and safe on your trip. Vaccines cannot protect you from many diseases in Mexico, so your behaviors are important.

Eat and drink safely

Food and water standards around the world vary based on the destination. Standards may also differ within a country and risk may change depending on activity type (e.g., hiking versus business trip). You can learn more about safe food and drink choices when traveling by accessing the resources below.

  • Choose Safe Food and Drinks When Traveling
  • Water Treatment Options When Hiking, Camping or Traveling
  • Global Water, Sanitation and Hygiene | Healthy Water
  • Avoid Contaminated Water During Travel

You can also visit the Department of State Country Information Pages for additional information about food and water safety.

Prevent bug bites

Bugs (like mosquitoes, ticks, and fleas) can spread a number of diseases in Mexico. Many of these diseases cannot be prevented with a vaccine or medicine. You can reduce your risk by taking steps to prevent bug bites.

What can I do to prevent bug bites?

  • Cover exposed skin by wearing long-sleeved shirts, long pants, and hats.
  • Use an appropriate insect repellent (see below).
  • Use permethrin-treated clothing and gear (such as boots, pants, socks, and tents). Do not use permethrin directly on skin.
  • Stay and sleep in air-conditioned or screened rooms.
  • Use a bed net if the area where you are sleeping is exposed to the outdoors.

What type of insect repellent should I use?

  • FOR PROTECTION AGAINST TICKS AND MOSQUITOES: Use a repellent that contains 20% or more DEET for protection that lasts up to several hours.
  • Picaridin (also known as KBR 3023, Bayrepel, and icaridin)
  • Oil of lemon eucalyptus (OLE) or para-menthane-diol (PMD)
  • 2-undecanone
  • Always use insect repellent as directed.

What should I do if I am bitten by bugs?

  • Avoid scratching bug bites, and apply hydrocortisone cream or calamine lotion to reduce the itching.
  • Check your entire body for ticks after outdoor activity. Be sure to remove ticks properly.

What can I do to avoid bed bugs?

Although bed bugs do not carry disease, they are an annoyance. See our information page about avoiding bug bites for some easy tips to avoid them. For more information on bed bugs, see Bed Bugs .

For more detailed information on avoiding bug bites, see Avoid Bug Bites .

Some diseases in Mexico—such as dengue, Zika, leishmaniasis, and Chagas disease—are spread by bugs and cannot be prevented with a vaccine. Follow the insect avoidance measures described above to prevent these and other illnesses.

Stay safe outdoors

If your travel plans in Mexico include outdoor activities, take these steps to stay safe and healthy during your trip.

  • Stay alert to changing weather conditions and adjust your plans if conditions become unsafe.
  • Prepare for activities by wearing the right clothes and packing protective items, such as bug spray, sunscreen, and a basic first aid kit.
  • Consider learning basic first aid and CPR before travel. Bring a travel health kit with items appropriate for your activities.
  • If you are outside for many hours in heat, eat salty snacks and drink water to stay hydrated and replace salt lost through sweating.
  • Protect yourself from UV radiation : use sunscreen with an SPF of at least 15, wear protective clothing, and seek shade during the hottest time of day (10 a.m.–4 p.m.).
  • Be especially careful during summer months and at high elevation. Because sunlight reflects off snow, sand, and water, sun exposure may be increased during activities like skiing, swimming, and sailing.
  • Very cold temperatures can be dangerous. Dress in layers and cover heads, hands, and feet properly if you are visiting a cold location.

Stay safe around water

  • Swim only in designated swimming areas. Obey lifeguards and warning flags on beaches.
  • Practice safe boating—follow all boating safety laws, do not drink alcohol if driving a boat, and always wear a life jacket.
  • Do not dive into shallow water.
  • Do not swim in freshwater in developing areas or where sanitation is poor.
  • Avoid swallowing water when swimming. Untreated water can carry germs that make you sick.
  • To prevent infections, wear shoes on beaches where there may be animal waste.

Leptospirosis, a bacterial infection that can be spread in fresh water, is found in Mexico. Avoid swimming in fresh, unchlorinated water, such as lakes, ponds, or rivers.

Keep away from animals

Most animals avoid people, but they may attack if they feel threatened, are protecting their young or territory, or if they are injured or ill. Animal bites and scratches can lead to serious diseases such as rabies.

Follow these tips to protect yourself:

  • Do not touch or feed any animals you do not know.
  • Do not allow animals to lick open wounds, and do not get animal saliva in your eyes or mouth.
  • Avoid rodents and their urine and feces.
  • Traveling pets should be supervised closely and not allowed to come in contact with local animals.
  • If you wake in a room with a bat, seek medical care immediately. Bat bites may be hard to see.

All animals can pose a threat, but be extra careful around dogs, bats, monkeys, sea animals such as jellyfish, and snakes. If you are bitten or scratched by an animal, immediately:

  • Wash the wound with soap and clean water.
  • Go to a doctor right away.
  • Tell your doctor about your injury when you get back to the United States.

Consider buying medical evacuation insurance. Rabies is a deadly disease that must be treated quickly, and treatment may not be available in some countries.

Reduce your exposure to germs

Follow these tips to avoid getting sick or spreading illness to others while traveling:

  • Wash your hands often, especially before eating.
  • If soap and water aren’t available, clean hands with hand sanitizer (containing at least 60% alcohol).
  • Don’t touch your eyes, nose, or mouth. If you need to touch your face, make sure your hands are clean.
  • Cover your mouth and nose with a tissue or your sleeve (not your hands) when coughing or sneezing.
  • Try to avoid contact with people who are sick.
  • If you are sick, stay home or in your hotel room, unless you need medical care.

Avoid sharing body fluids

Diseases can be spread through body fluids, such as saliva, blood, vomit, and semen.

Protect yourself:

  • Use latex condoms correctly.
  • Do not inject drugs.
  • Limit alcohol consumption. People take more risks when intoxicated.
  • Do not share needles or any devices that can break the skin. That includes needles for tattoos, piercings, and acupuncture.
  • If you receive medical or dental care, make sure the equipment is disinfected or sanitized.

Know how to get medical care while traveling

Plan for how you will get health care during your trip, should the need arise:

  • Carry a list of local doctors and hospitals at your destination.
  • Review your health insurance plan to determine what medical services it would cover during your trip. Consider purchasing travel health and medical evacuation insurance.
  • Carry a card that identifies, in the local language, your blood type, chronic conditions or serious allergies, and the generic names of any medications you take.
  • Some prescription drugs may be illegal in other countries. Call Mexico’s embassy to verify that all of your prescription(s) are legal to bring with you.
  • Bring all the medicines (including over-the-counter medicines) you think you might need during your trip, including extra in case of travel delays. Ask your doctor to help you get prescriptions filled early if you need to.

Many foreign hospitals and clinics are accredited by the Joint Commission International. A list of accredited facilities is available at their website ( www.jointcommissioninternational.org ).

In some countries, medicine (prescription and over-the-counter) may be substandard or counterfeit. Bring the medicines you will need from the United States to avoid having to buy them at your destination.

Malaria is a risk in some parts of Mexico. If you are going to a risk area, fill your malaria prescription before you leave, and take enough with you for the entire length of your trip. Follow your doctor’s instructions for taking the pills; some need to be started before you leave.

Select safe transportation

Motor vehicle crashes are the #1 killer of healthy US citizens in foreign countries.

In many places cars, buses, large trucks, rickshaws, bikes, people on foot, and even animals share the same lanes of traffic, increasing the risk for crashes.

Be smart when you are traveling on foot.

  • Use sidewalks and marked crosswalks.
  • Pay attention to the traffic around you, especially in crowded areas.
  • Remember, people on foot do not always have the right of way in other countries.

Riding/Driving

Choose a safe vehicle.

  • Choose official taxis or public transportation, such as trains and buses.
  • Ride only in cars that have seatbelts.
  • Avoid overcrowded, overloaded, top-heavy buses and minivans.
  • Avoid riding on motorcycles or motorbikes, especially motorbike taxis. (Many crashes are caused by inexperienced motorbike drivers.)
  • Choose newer vehicles—they may have more safety features, such as airbags, and be more reliable.
  • Choose larger vehicles, which may provide more protection in crashes.

Think about the driver.

  • Do not drive after drinking alcohol or ride with someone who has been drinking.
  • Consider hiring a licensed, trained driver familiar with the area.
  • Arrange payment before departing.

Follow basic safety tips.

  • Wear a seatbelt at all times.
  • Sit in the back seat of cars and taxis.
  • When on motorbikes or bicycles, always wear a helmet. (Bring a helmet from home, if needed.)
  • Avoid driving at night; street lighting in certain parts of Mexico may be poor.
  • Do not use a cell phone or text while driving (illegal in many countries).
  • Travel during daylight hours only, especially in rural areas.
  • If you choose to drive a vehicle in Mexico, learn the local traffic laws and have the proper paperwork.
  • Get any driving permits and insurance you may need. Get an International Driving Permit (IDP). Carry the IDP and a US-issued driver's license at all times.
  • Check with your auto insurance policy's international coverage, and get more coverage if needed. Make sure you have liability insurance.
  • Avoid using local, unscheduled aircraft.
  • If possible, fly on larger planes (more than 30 seats); larger airplanes are more likely to have regular safety inspections.
  • Try to schedule flights during daylight hours and in good weather.

Medical Evacuation Insurance

If you are seriously injured, emergency care may not be available or may not meet US standards. Trauma care centers are uncommon outside urban areas. Having medical evacuation insurance can be helpful for these reasons.

Helpful Resources

Road Safety Overseas (Information from the US Department of State): Includes tips on driving in other countries, International Driving Permits, auto insurance, and other resources.

The Association for International Road Travel has country-specific Road Travel Reports available for most countries for a minimal fee.

For information traffic safety and road conditions in Mexico, see Travel and Transportation on US Department of State's country-specific information for Mexico .

Maintain personal security

Use the same common sense traveling overseas that you would at home, and always stay alert and aware of your surroundings.

Before you leave

  • Research your destination(s), including local laws, customs, and culture.
  • Monitor travel advisories and alerts and read travel tips from the US Department of State.
  • Enroll in the Smart Traveler Enrollment Program (STEP) .
  • Leave a copy of your itinerary, contact information, credit cards, and passport with someone at home.
  • Pack as light as possible, and leave at home any item you could not replace.

While at your destination(s)

  • Carry contact information for the nearest US embassy or consulate .
  • Carry a photocopy of your passport and entry stamp; leave the actual passport securely in your hotel.
  • Follow all local laws and social customs.
  • Do not wear expensive clothing or jewelry.
  • Always keep hotel doors locked, and store valuables in secure areas.
  • If possible, choose hotel rooms between the 2nd and 6th floors.

To call for emergency services while in Mexico, dial 066, 060, or 080. Write these numbers down to carry with you during your trip.

Learn as much as you can about Mexico before you travel there. A good place to start is the country-specific information on Mexico from the US Department of State.

Americans in Mexico have been arrested for purchasing souvenirs that were, or looked like, antiques and that local customs authorities believed were national treasures. Familiarize yourself with any local regulations for antiques and follow these tips:

  • When you are considering purchasing an authentic antique or a reproduction, ask if you are allowed to export these items before you purchase them.
  • If you buy a reproduction, document on the customs form that it is a reproduction.
  • If you buy an authentic antique, obtain the necessary export permit (often from the national museum).

Healthy Travel Packing List

Use the Healthy Travel Packing List for Mexico for a list of health-related items to consider packing for your trip. Talk to your doctor about which items are most important for you.

Why does CDC recommend packing these health-related items?

It’s best to be prepared to prevent and treat common illnesses and injuries. Some supplies and medicines may be difficult to find at your destination, may have different names, or may have different ingredients than what you normally use.

If you are not feeling well after your trip, you may need to see a doctor. If you need help finding a travel medicine specialist, see Find a Clinic . Be sure to tell your doctor about your travel, including where you went and what you did on your trip. Also tell your doctor if you were bitten or scratched by an animal while traveling.

If your doctor prescribed antimalarial medicine for your trip, keep taking the rest of your pills after you return home. If you stop taking your medicine too soon, you could still get sick.

Malaria is always a serious disease and may be a deadly illness. If you become ill with a fever either while traveling in a malaria-risk area or after you return home (for up to 1 year), you should seek immediate medical attention and should tell the doctor about your travel history.

For more information on what to do if you are sick after your trip, see Getting Sick after Travel .

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FACT SHEET: President   Biden Announces Up To $8.5 Billion Preliminary Agreement with Intel under the CHIPS & Science   Act

Funding catalyzes $100 billion in private investment from Intel to build and expand semiconductor facilities in Arizona, Ohio, New Mexico, and Oregon and create nearly 30,000 jobs

Today, President Biden will travel to Chandler, Arizona, to visit Intel’s Ocotillo campus and announce that the Department of Commerce has reached a preliminary agreement with Intel to provide up to $8.5 billion in direct funding along with $11 billion in loans under the CHIPS and Science Act. The announcement will support the construction and expansion of Intel facilities in Arizona, Ohio, New Mexico, and Oregon, creating nearly 30,000 jobs and supporting tens of thousands of indirect jobs. During his visit to Arizona, President Biden will discuss the vision that he laid out in his State of the Union, underscoring how his Investing in America agenda is building an economy from the middle out and bottom up, creating good-paying jobs right here in America, strengthening U.S. supply chains, and protecting national security. Semiconductors were invented in America and power everything from cell phones to electric vehicles, refrigerators, satellites, defense systems, and more. But today, the United States produces less than 10 percent of the world’s chips and none of the most advanced ones. Thanks to President Biden’s CHIPS and Science Act, that is changing. Companies have announced over $240 billion in investments to bring semiconductor manufacturing back to the United States since the President took office. Semiconductor jobs are making a comeback. And thanks to CHIPS investments like the one today, America will produce roughly 20% of the world’s leading-edge chips by the end of the decade. Today’s announcement is critical to realizing President Biden’s vision to reestablish America’s leadership in chip manufacturing. In particular, this CHIPS investment will support Intel’s construction and expansion projects across four states and will create nearly 30,000 jobs:

  • Chandler, Arizona:  Funding will help construct two leading-edge logic fabs and modernize one existing fab, significantly increasing manufacturing capacity to produce Intel’s most advanced semiconductors in the United States. This investment will create over 3,000 manufacturing jobs, 7,000 construction jobs, and thousands of indirect jobs. Intel’s investment in Arizona is among the largest private sector investments in the state’s history.
  • New Albany, Ohio:  Funding will establish a new regional economic cluster for U.S. chipmaking with the construction of two leading-edge logic fabs. This investment will create 3,000 manufacturing jobs, 7,000 construction jobs, and an estimated 10,000 indirect jobs. Intel’s investment in Ohio is the largest private-sector investment in the state’s history.
  • Rio Rancho, New Mexico:  Funding will support the nearly complete modernization and transformation of two fabs into advanced packaging facilities, where chips are assembled together to boost their performance and reduce costs. Advanced packaging is critical for artificial intelligence (AI) applications and the next generation of semiconductor technology. It also allows manufacturers to improve performance and function and shorten the time it takes to get many advanced chips to market.  When completed, these facilities will be the largest for advanced packaging in the United States. This investment will create 700 manufacturing jobs and 1,000 construction jobs.
  • Hillsboro, Oregon:  Funding will expand and modernize facilities to increase clean-room capacity and utilize advanced lithography equipment, further strengthening this critical innovation hub of leading-edge development and production in the United States. This investment will support several thousand new permanent and construction jobs and thousands of indirect jobs.  

Creating Good-Paying and Union Jobs with Good Benefits Across America

President Biden promised to be the most pro-worker, pro-union President in American history, and his Administration has committed to ensuring that workers have the free and fair choice to join a union and equitable training pathways to good jobs. As part of the Administration’s effort to connect workers with good-paying jobs created by the President’s Investing in America agenda, the White House announced five initial Workforce Hubs across the country – two of which have focused on building pipelines to good jobs in the semiconductor industry: Phoenix, Arizona, and Columbus, Ohio. And, last year, the National Science Foundation and Intel announced $100 million to expand semiconductor workforce training opportunities, education, and research across the nation. Under their preliminary agreement with the Department of Commerce, Intel has committed to work closely with workforce training providers (e.g., educational institutions, state and local agencies, labor unions) to develop and train workers for jobs created by the investment announced today. The Ohio State Building Trades signed a Project Labor Agreement (PLA) for the Ohio construction site, and there is a majority-union construction crew in both the Arizona and Oregon sites. The Administration strongly supports workers’ right to organize and expects Intel to continue its longstanding tradition of creating good jobs and respecting workers’ rights, including expecting Intel to neither hold mandatory captive audience meetings nor hire anti-union consultants. The announcement today also includes significant funding to train and develop the local workforce, including $50 million in dedicated CHIPS funding. The focus of this funding will be further determined in the coming months based on the Department of  Commerce’s labor and workforce priorities  in partnership with the Department of Labor. Those priorities include funding workforce intermediaries and labor-management partnerships, promoting inclusive and equitable training and hiring across the construction and facilities workforces, and providing supportive services, such as child care. Intel’s construction spending is contributing to union apprentice programs across all four sites—expected to amount to over $150 million in apprenticeship contributions. Additionally, Intel has committed to providing affordable, accessible, high-quality child care for its workers across its facilities. Intel will be increasing the reimbursement amount and duration for its back-up care program, adding additional access to discounted primary child care providers, and expanding access to a vetted network of child care providers for its employees. In addition, Intel will pilot a primary child care reimbursement program for non-salary employees.  

Strengthening Local Economies

Today’s announcement is also poised to strengthen the local economies of these states and cities, and is part of the President’s commitment to investing in all of America and leaving no community behind. Intel’s investments in Arizona and Ohio are among the largest private-sector investments in each state’s history, and Arizona has received the highest level of private sector manufacturing investment per capita of any state since the President took office. Intel’s investment in Arizona is expected to create tens of thousands of indirect jobs across suppliers and supporting industries – on top of the nearly 30,000 manufacturing and construction jobs it will create, fostering a more resilient semiconductor supply chain in the U.S. In Arizona, Intel’s investments have  grown  the surrounding community, attracting opportunities for professional growth and upward economic mobility for everyone – from graphic designers to restaurants and small businesses. And in Ohio, Intel continues expanding their partnerships with local businesses to support their construction projects and operations at other facilities – growing from 150 Ohio-based suppliers in 2022 to over 350 today.  Intel has also prioritized sustainability and being responsible stewards of the environment at its facilities. It currently uses 100% renewable electricity in its fabs and factories in the United States, and plans to achieve net-positive water and zero waste to landfill by 2030.

Building on Historic Progress Under the CHIPS and Science Act

Today’s announcement is the fourth and largest preliminary memorandum of terms (PMT) under the CHIPS and Science Act:

  • In February 2024, the Biden-Harris Administration announced $1.5 billion for GlobalFoundries to support the development and expansion of facilities in Malta, NY, and Burlington, VT.
  • In January 2024, the Administration announced $162 million for Microchip Technology Inc. to increase its production of microcontroller units and other specialty semiconductors, and to support the modernization and expansion of fabrication facilities in Colorado Springs, CO, and Gresham, OR.
  • In December 2023, the Administration announced $35 million for BAE Systems Electronic Systems to support the modernization of the company’s Microelectronics Center in Nashua, NH. This facility will produce chips that are essential to our national security, including for use in F-35 fighter jets.

President Biden’s Investing in America agenda – including the CHIPS and Science Act – is spurring a manufacturing and clean energy boom. Since President Biden took office, companies have announced over $675 billion in private sector investments in manufacturing and clean energy, and over 50,000 infrastructure and clean energy projects are underway. This announcement is part of the President’s broader commitment to build an economy from the middle out and bottom up, not the top down, and invest in all of America. 

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Mexico Condemns Texas Law, and Says It Will Not Accept Deportations From the State

Mexico’s top diplomat for North America rejected the Supreme Court’s ruling, saying that immigration policy was something to be negotiated between federal governments.

  • Share full article

People walk along a fence toward the Mexico border.

By Emiliano Rodríguez Mega

Reporting from Mexico City

  • March 19, 2024

Mexico will not accept deportations made by Texas “under any circumstances,” the country’s foreign ministry said on Tuesday in response to the U.S. Supreme Court’s decision to allow Texas to arrest migrants who cross into the state without authorization.

The ministry condemned the state law, known as Senate Bill 4 , saying it would separate families, violate the human rights of migrants and generate “hostile environments” for the more than 10 million people of Mexican origin living in Texas.

Mexico’s top diplomat for North America, Roberto Velasco Álvarez, rejected the ruling on the social media on Tuesday, saying that immigration policy was something to be negotiated between federal governments.

The Mexican government has severely criticized the measure since last year, and rejected the idea of local or state agencies, rather than federal authorities, detaining and returning migrants and asylum seekers to Mexican territory.

“Texas has taken a very combative stance,” said Rafael Fernández de Castro, director of the Center for U.S.-Mexican studies at the University of California, San Diego. “It’s only aggravating the problem because you violently close one part of the border, but others are still open.”

A senior Mexican foreign ministry official who was not allowed to speak publicly said that the Supreme Court ruling would not affect existing migration agreements between the two countries.

While Mexico has served as the United States’ immigration enforcer, often discouraging migrants from massing at the border, the country has also publicly pushed for two key policies to address the root causes that force people out of their home countries — such as poverty, violence, inequality and climate change — and expand regular pathways for migration.

Last week, President Andrés Manuel López Obrador of Mexico said his administration was proposing that the Biden administration give legal status to at least five million undocumented Mexicans living and working in the United States.

He has also called on the United States to suspend sanctions against Venezuela and lift the blockade against Cuba, saying that such measures would reduce migration flows from those countries. And he has called proposals to build walls or close the border as “electoral propaganda.”

“Do you think the Americans and Mexicans will approve of this?” Mr. López Obrador said last month. “Companies cannot stand it. Maybe for a day, but not for a week.”

Emiliano Rodríguez Mega is a reporter and researcher for The Times based in Mexico City, covering Mexico, Central America and the Caribbean. More about Emiliano Rodríguez Mega

Supreme Court allows Texas to enforce immigration law

WASHINGTON — The Supreme Court on Tuesday allowed Texas to enforce for now a contentious new law  that gives local police the power to arrest migrants.

The conservative-majority court, with three liberal justices dissenting, rejected an emergency request by the Biden administration, which said states have no authority to legislate on immigration , an issue the federal government has sole authority over.

That means the law can go into effect while litigation continues in lower courts. It could be blocked at a later date.

Texas Gov. Greg Abbott, a Republican, hailed the court order , calling it "clearly a positive development," though he acknowledged that the legal battle is not over.

White House press secretary Karine Jean-Pierre said in a statement that the law "will not only make communities in Texas less safe, it will also burden law enforcement and sow chaos and confusion at our southern border."

An aerial view of migrants crossing the Rio Grande.

“The court gives a green light to a law that will upend the longstanding federal-state balance of power and sow chaos,” liberal Justice Sonia Sotomayor wrote in a dissenting opinion. Justices Elena Kagan and Ketanji Brown Jackson also objected to the decision.

The majority did not explain its reasoning, but one of the conservative justices, Amy Coney Barrett, wrote separately to note that an appeals court has yet to weigh in on the issue.

"If a decision does not issue soon, the applicants may return to this court," she wrote. Her opinion was joined by fellow conservative Justice Brett Kavanaugh. The court has a 6-3 conservative majority.

In response to the Supreme Court order, the New Orleans-based 5th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals fast-tracked oral arguments on the Biden administration’s effort to block the law. Arguments are set to take place Wednesday morning, meaning a decision could come quickly.

The law in question, known as SB4, allows police to arrest migrants who illegally cross the border from Mexico and imposes criminal penalties. It would also empower state judges to order people to be deported to Mexico.

A top Mexico official said Tuesday in a statement on X that the country will not accept deportations from Texas.

According to a spokesperson for the Texas Department for Public Safety, there is no start date yet for enforcement of the law. Lt. Chris Olivarez said that state officials have been planning for its implementation for months, but they’re still discussing some practical details.

In Val Verde County on the U.S.-Mexico border, Sheriff Joe Frank Martinez said his small force, with three deputies on duty around the clock for a 3,145 square mile county of 47,586 people, will not start arresting migrants until he receives guidance from the state.

“I think that we all are in uncharted waters,” he said Tuesday.

He said not only is he not sure how and when to initiate enforcement of the state law, but that he will likely need more deputies and jail space if tasked with the new enforcement initiative. The county jail has a daily capacity of 94, Martinez said.“Right now we’re not equipped to handle that,” he said.

The dispute is the latest clash between the Biden administration and Texas over immigration enforcement on the U.S.-Mexico border.

In a separate opinion, Kagan wrote that the Texas law appears to conflict with federal law, noting that "the subject of immigration generally, and the entry and removal of noncitizens particularly, are matters long thought the special province of the federal government."

A federal judge blocked the law after the Biden administration sued, but the New Orleans-based 5th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals said in a brief order that it could go into effect March 10 if the Supreme Court declined to intervene. The appeals court has not yet decided whether to grant the federal government's request to block the law.

On March 4, Justice Samuel Alito issued a temporary freeze on the law to give the Supreme Court time to consider the federal government’s request.

Solicitor General Elizabeth Prelogar said in court papers that the law is “flatly inconsistent” with Supreme Court precedent dating back 100 years.

“Those decisions recognize that the authority to admit and remove noncitizens is a core responsibility of the national government, and that where Congress has enacted a law addressing those issues, state law is preempted,” she wrote.

The appeals court, Prelogar added, did not explain its reasoning for allowing the law to go into effect.

She dismissed Texas’ argument that its law can be defended on the basis that the state is effectively battling an invasion at the border under the State War Clause of the Constitution. The provision says states cannot “engage in war, unless actually invaded” or in imminent danger.

“A surge of unauthorized immigration plainly is not an invasion within the meaning of the State War Clause,” Prelogar wrote.

Defending the law, Texas Attorney General Ken Paxton said in court papers that the measure complements federal law and the state should be allowed to enforce it.

The Constitution “recognizes that Texas has the sovereign right to defend itself from violent transnational cartels that flood the state with fentanyl, weapons, and all manner of brutality,” he added.

Texas is “the nation’s first-line defense against transnational violence and has been forced to deal with the deadly consequences of the federal government’s inability or unwillingness to protect the border,” Paxton said.

The city of El Paso and two immigrant rights groups, Las Americas Immigrant Advocacy Center and American Gateways, have also challenged the law and filed their own emergency request at the Supreme Court.

In 2012, the Supreme Court invalidated provisions of a tough immigration law enacted in Arizona. Only two of the justices who were in the majority in that case are still on the court: Chief Justice John Roberts and Sotomayor.

us government travel restrictions to mexico

Lawrence Hurley covers the Supreme Court for NBC News.

New York City's mayor cancels a border trip, citing safety concerns in Mexico

New York City’s mayor has nixed a planned trip to the U.S.-Mexico over security concerns

NEW YORK -- New York City's mayor nixed a planned Sunday trip to the U.S.-Mexico border over security concerns.

Mayor Eric Adams was slated to depart Saturday night to visit Brownsville and McAllen, Texas. The Democrat was expected to meet with U.S. immigration leaders as his city struggles to house new migrants seeking asylum.

But Adams spokesperson Amaris Cockfield said Sunday that the U.S. State Department flagged safety concerns at one of the mayor's planned stops in Mexico , prompting his office to postpone the trip.

Adams had been invited to the southern border by Sister Norma Pimentel, executive director of Catholic Charities of the Rio Grande, she said.

“As Lent draws to a close, our team was excited to stand with faith and humanitarian leaders who have dedicated their lives to serving the most needy among us and we were eager to discuss our work in New York City and explore new ways to collaborate with leaders in cities across the country,” Cockfield said in an emailed statement. "We hope to continue our partnership with these nationally-recognized Latino leaders and organizations as we look for concrete solutions to resolve the crisis at the border.”

In a visit to El Paso, Texas in January, Adams offered up a blistering criticism of the federal government’s response to the increase of immigrants into U.S. cities far from the border.

The former New York Police Department officer also took a four-day tour through Latin America in October in which he made stops in Mexico, Ecuador and Colombia and implored people to stop making the dangerous journey to the U.S.

More than 180,000 migrants have come to New York City since the spring of 2022, according to the mayor's office. More than 64,000 are in the city's care through its more than 200 emergency shelter sites.

Last week, city officials and human rights advocates reached an agreement on Adams' bid to suspend the city's “ right to shelter ” policy.

The agreement essentially ends the city's blanket requirement to provide shelter for adult immigrants without any time limits. Now, officials can decide whether to allow a migrant to stay in a shelter beyond 30 days on a case-by-case basis.

Additional time will be granted if a person shows “significant efforts to resettle,” which can include making an appointment with an immigration lawyer, applying for a resettlement program or proof that they’re searching for housing.

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Opinion Will Mexico’s president change the course of U.S. elections?

us government travel restrictions to mexico

In December, the Mexican migration authority said it had run out of money and stopped deporting migrants moving through the country. It also stopped flying them from Mexico’s northern border to the interior of the country. Coincidentally, perhaps, migrant encounters with U.S. agents at the border with Mexico surged over 300,000 , the highest monthly tally on record.

Homeland Security Secretary Alejandro Mayorkas and Secretary of State Antony Blinken had barely returned from Christmas break when they were dispatched to plead with Mexican President Andrés Manuel López Obrador on Dec. 27. And on the 30th, the Mexican government found the cash to start moving migrants away from the U.S. border again.

AMLO, as the Mexican president is known, took the opportunity to lay down some demands : an end to the Cuba embargo, removal of all U.S. sanctions against Venezuela, the legalization of some 10 million unauthorized immigrants living in the United States, and $20 billion for countries in the region. He forgot to ask for a unicorn.

Still, Washington exhaled: In January, migrant encounters with the U.S. Border Patrol plunged.

us government travel restrictions to mexico

President Biden’s caution with his demanding counterpart south of the border has been, let’s say, uncharacteristic for the United States. Washington has said next to nothing about López Obrador’s campaign to dismantle the institutions underpinning Mexico’s young democracy or anything about the military’s encroachment on civilian life. Issues of direct national importance — the flow of fentanyl over the border, Mexico’s nationalist energy policy likely in breach of agreements with the United States — have elicited little more than a polite suggestion from Washington to reconsider.

The reason, of course, is immigration : AMLO finds himself in control of the most powerful political narrative in Washington, one that could determine the presidential election in November.

As presidential elections approach in both Mexico (June) and the United States (November), some Mexican critics are voicing concerns that AMLO might be playing with the migration valve to warn Washington about the potential consequences of saying anything mean about his, say, questionable tactics to ensure a win for his handpicked successor, Claudia Sheinbaum.

It’s not unreasonable for Washington to fear AMLO might be willing to play with the migration valve to favor Donald Trump , for whom the Mexican president has expressed some inexplicable affinity . Few things would hurt Biden more than an October migration surprise.

“Mexico’s changes in migration policy have an inevitable political impact in the U.S.,” noted Tonatiuh Guillén López, who headed Mexico’s National Institute of Migration in the early years of López Obrador’s administration. “It would be innocent to think Mexico doesn’t know this.”

In 2022, Mexico returned, on average, more than 10,000 migrants per month to the countries of their origin. In 2023, the average dropped to 4,500, less than 7 percent of migrants encountered by the authorities. In December, Mexico returned only 378.

Whatever López Obrador is thinking, though, Biden’s vulnerability to Mexico’s migration policies is Washington’s own fault — a predictable consequence of outsourcing migration control to Mexico. It is hardly crazy that Mexico’s president would deploy what leverage he has to ensure some favorable political outcome. The United States has played that game for years . What is preposterous is that the U.S. political system (here’s looking at you, Speaker Mike Johnson) would expose the United States to this kind of manipulation.

Biden is to be commended for refraining from using the hardball tactics of his predecessor, who threatened Mexico with tariffs unless it kept Central American migrants south of the border. But Biden failed to do anything else, perhaps believing that goodwill would seal a deal on its own.

Cruel as it may seem, migrants make for powerful weapons. Think of the Mariel boatlift of 1980 , when Fidel Castro opened the door for an exodus of disillusioned Cubans toward Miami, partly to get rid of them and partly to buy leverage with President Jimmy Carter .

President Nicolás Maduro has tried to extract political gain from millions of desperate Venezuelans fleeing oppression and destitution, many hoping to make a life in the United States. President Daniel Ortega opened Nicaragua to serve as a transit point for hundreds of thousands of migrants hoping to reach the United States from as far away as former Soviet republics, mainly to poke Washington in the eye.

While there is no obvious fix, there are a few things Washington could do to meet the moment. Number one would be to ensure the swift processing of asylum applications. This alone would establish that the United States will offer safe harbor to those who need it while dispelling the idea, held by many migrants across the hemisphere, that asylum offers an open door to everybody.

Washington should also reconsider limits on work-related visas, opening a wider door for migrants seeking a more prosperous life. Critically, it should engage with neighboring countries to share the burden — and the opportunity — carried by hundreds of thousands of migrants moving to improve their lot wherever they land.

While the United States reconsiders its immigration policy, it might also make sense for Mexico to think hard about its goals and strategy. Donald Trump benefits from the immigration mess — so much so that he single-handedly turned House Republicans against bipartisan legislation that took a small step toward establishing order at the border. He would be delighted by an October migration surprise.

AMLO might very well like that too. Trump’s no-nonsense transactional style seems to suit him. Both share an undisguised contempt for democratic institutions constraining their power. Democrats may remember President López Obrador’s words to President Trump soon after winning the Mexican election in June 2018: “We managed to put our voters and citizens at the center and displace the political establishment.” The “establishment” was them.

From where I sit, though, another Trump administration, complete with arbitrary import tariffs , mass deportations and concentration camps for migrants, looks like a disaster for Mexico. Whomever Mexicans elect come June — AMLO’s chosen candidate Sheinbaum looks like the lucky one — would have to live with the consequences.

There is an old analysis sitting in the CIA archives that notes Castro stopped the Mariel exodus when he saw the political damage it inflicted on Carter and the boost it gave to the candidacy of Ronald Reagan , “who is viewed with grim foreboding in Havana.” It was too late. Reagan won. And the 125,000 Cubans that made their way to Miami turned Florida, and American politics, even more hostile toward the island.

Sheinbaum might want to have a conversation with her patron about the substantial risks that can flow from the migration authority running out of money.

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us government travel restrictions to mexico

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IMAGES

  1. This Map Shows Where Americans Are Being Told 'Do Not Travel' in Mexico

    us government travel restrictions to mexico

  2. Travel Restrictions

    us government travel restrictions to mexico

  3. U.S. issue its highest 'do not travel' warning for five Mexican states

    us government travel restrictions to mexico

  4. COVID-19 Pandemic Travel Restrictions By U.S. State

    us government travel restrictions to mexico

  5. Four questions about Mexico travel, safety VERIFIED

    us government travel restrictions to mexico

  6. Fact Sheet: DHS Measures on the Border to Limit the Further Spread of

    us government travel restrictions to mexico

COMMENTS

  1. Mexico Travel Advisory

    The U.S. government has limited ability to provide emergency services to U.S. citizens in many areas of Mexico, as travel by U.S. government employees to certain areas is prohibited or restricted. ... There are no other travel restrictions for U.S. government employees in Baja California state. ... U.S. Citizen Services: From Mexico 800-681 ...

  2. Mexico International Travel Information

    Call us in Washington, D.C. at 1-888-407-4747 (toll-free in the United States and Canada) or 1-202-501-4444 (from all other countries) from 8:00 a.m. to 8:00 p.m., Eastern Standard Time, Monday through Friday (except U.S. federal holidays). See the State Department's travel website for the Worldwide Caution and Travel Advisories.

  3. Travel Advisory: Update for Mexico

    Read the Mexico Travel Advisory, including the detailed state summaries and advisory levels for information on your specific travel destination. Read the Mexico country information page. Assistance: Contact Form. U.S. Embassy and Consulates in Mexico. From Mexico: (55) 8526 2561. From the United States: +1-844-528-6611. Department of State ...

  4. Are You Planning a Trip to Mexico from the United States?

    Warning: it's Illegal to Carry Firearms or Ammo into Mexico. For border crossing information, tune into the port of entry's Loop Radio on 1620 AM. Report drug and alien smuggling. Call (956) 542-5811 in the U.S., 001800-0105237 from Mexico. Prohibited/Permissible Items. All articles acquired in Mexico must be declared.

  5. Travel Advisory Updates

    Office of the Spokesperson. April 19, 2021. State Department Travel Advisory Updates. In order to provide U.S. travelers detailed and actionable information to make informed travel decisions, the Department of State regularly assesses and updates our Travel Advisories, based primarily on the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC ...

  6. Travel Advisories

    Mexico Travel Advisory: Other: August 22, 2023: Micronesia Travel Advisory: Level 1: Exercise Normal Precautions: ... Subscribe to get up-to-date safety and security information and help us reach you in an emergency abroad. ... You are about to leave travel.state.gov for an external website that is not maintained by the U.S. Department of State.

  7. Coronavirus: Covid News: U.S.-Mexico Border Reopens to Vaccinated

    The lifting of the U.S. travel ban from dozens of countries ends more than 18 months of restrictions. The U.S. is prepared to defend its vaccine mandate for big businesses. Tourists enter from ...

  8. U.S. Issues Travel Warning for Mexico

    The United States is warning travelers heading to Mexico to be aware of their surroundings ahead of the spring break holiday season. The warning, which was issued this week by the U.S. Embassy and ...

  9. Mexico COVID Travel Restrictions: A State-By-State Guide

    Read on for our full list of Mexico COVID travel restrictions, by state. Mexico COVID travel: Entry and exit restrictions. Since March 21, 2020, Mexico's northern border with the United States ...

  10. Travel.State.Gov CSI

    Planning to travel abroad? Check out the interactive map from the U.S. Department of State that shows the travel advisories for different countries and regions. You can zoom in and out, click on the icons, and get the latest information on health, safety, and entry requirements. The interactive map is a useful tool for travelers who want to stay informed and prepared.

  11. COVID-19 international travel advisories

    COVID-19 testing and vaccine rules for entering the U.S. As of May 12, 2023, noncitizen nonimmigrant visitors to the U.S. arriving by air or arriving by land or sea no longer need to show proof of being fully vaccinated against COVID-19. As of June 12, 2022, people entering the U.S. no longer need to show proof of a negative COVID-19 test .

  12. Frequently Asked Questions: Guidance for Travelers to Enter the U.S

    Effective November 8, 2021, new air travel requirements applied to many noncitizens who are visiting the United States temporarily. These travelers are also required to show proof of COVID-19 vaccination. All air travelers, including U.S. persons, must test negative for COVID-19 prior to departure. Limited exceptions apply.

  13. Mexico Travel Advisory

    The U.S. government has limited ability to provide emergency services to U.S. citizens in many areas of Mexico, as travel by U.S. government employees to certain areas is prohibited or restricted. ... 8526 2561 from Mexico or 1-844-528-6611 from the United States. The U.S. Embassy in Mexico City is located at: ...

  14. Mexico

    Rocky Mountain Spotted Fever in Mexico December 11, 2023 There have been reports of Rocky Mountain spotted fever (RMSF) in people traveling to the United States from Tecate, in the state of Baja California, Mexico. Salmonella Newport in Mexico September 08, 2022 Some travelers who have spent time in Mexico have been infected with multidrug ...

  15. COVID-19 Travel Advisory Updates

    However, if the CDC raises a country's COVID-19 THN to a Level 4, the State Department's Travel Advisory for that country will also be raised to a Level 4: Do Not Travel due to COVID-19. This update will leave approximately 10% of all Travel Advisories at Level 4: Do Not Travel. This 10% includes Level 4 Travel Advisories for all risk ...

  16. City Pair Program (CPP)

    CPP is a mandatory use, government-wide program, designated as a Best-In-Class procurement by OMB. The program delivers best value airfares, and ensures federal agencies effectively and efficiently meet their mission. CPP saves the federal government time and money by maintaining one government-wide air program.

  17. FACT SHEET: President Biden Announces Up To $8.5 Billion Preliminary

    Funding catalyzes $100 billion in private investment from Intel to build and expand semiconductor facilities in Arizona, Ohio, New Mexico, and Oregon and create nearly 30,000 jobs Today, President ...

  18. FedRooms

    FedRooms rates are available through the preferred government booking channels: E-Gov Travel Service 2 (ConcurGov and E2), the Defense Booking Tools, FedRooms.com (when permissible by your agency), or your agency's Travel Management Company. Ensure you choose a FedRooms rate in your agency's online booking tool, or ask your TMC specifically for the FedRooms rate to receive the program's ...

  19. Mexico Condemns Texas Law, and Says It Will Not Accept Deportations

    Mexico will not accept deportations made by Texas "under any circumstances," the country's foreign ministry said on Tuesday in response to the U.S. Supreme Court's decision to allow Texas ...

  20. Mexico warns US court of 'substantial tension' if controversial Texas

    Mexico is warning a federal US court that if its judges permit a controversial Texas immigration law to take effect, the two nations would experience "substantial tension" that would have far ...

  21. Supreme Court allows Texas to enforce immigration law

    In Val Verde County on the U.S.-Mexico border, Sheriff Joe Frank Martinez said his small force, with three deputies on duty around the clock for a 3,145 square mile county of 47,586 people, will ...

  22. New York City's mayor cancels a border trip, citing safety concerns in

    New York City's mayor has nixed a planned trip to the U.S.-Mexico over security concerns NEW YORK -- New York City's mayor nixed a planned Sunday trip to the U.S.-Mexico border over security ...

  23. International Travel

    International Travel. The highest priority of the Bureau of Consular Affairs is to protect the lives and serve the interests of U.S. citizens abroad. Across the globe, we serve our fellow citizens during some of their most important moments - births, adoptions, medical emergencies, deaths, arrests, and disasters.

  24. Travel to Mexico, December 27, 2023

    Secretary of State Antony J. Blinken traveled to Mexico City, Mexico December 27, 2023. He joined Secretary of Homeland Security Alejandro Mayorkas and White House Homeland Security Advisor Liz Sherwood-Randall at a meeting with President Andrés Manuel López Obrador in Mexico. Secretary Blinken discussed unprecedented irregular migration in ...

  25. Opinion

    Migrants who entered the United States from Mexico are lined up for processing by U.S. Customs and Border Protection in 2023 in Eagle Pass, Texas. (Eric Gay/AP photo) Listen

  26. Privately owned vehicle (POV) mileage reimbursement rates

    If use of privately owned automobile is authorized or if no government-furnished automobile is available: January 1, 2024: $0.67: If government-furnished automobile is available: January 1, 2024: $0.21: Motorcycle: January 1, 2024: $0.65

  27. Travel Advisory Update for Mexico

    See state summaries and advisory levels in the Mexico Travel Advisory for information on your specific travel destination. Some areas of Mexico have increased risk of crime and kidnapping. Assistance: Contact Form; U.S. Embassy and Consulates in Mexico; From Mexico: (55) 8526 2561; From the United States: 1-844-528-6611

  28. Mexico COVID-19 Update

    The United States and Mexico entered a joint initiative March 21 restricting non-essential travel along the U.S.-Mexico land border to prevent the spread of the COVID-19 virus. Non-essential travel includes travel that is considered tourism or recreational in nature. These restrictions apply to travel in both directions across the border.

  29. Mexico COVID-19 Update

    The Department of State issued a Level 4 Travel Advisory for Mexico on April 20, 2021, advising U.S. citizens to not travel to Mexico due to COVID-19, and to exercise increased caution in Mexico due to crime and kidnapping. Some areas have increased risk - read the entire Travel Advisory. The U.S. government has limited ability to provide ...

  30. Mexico fears discrimination, strained US relations under new Texas

    Mexico filed a court brief supporting the U.S. Department of Justice's opposition to a Republican-backed Texas law that would empower state authorities to arrest and prosecute people suspected of ...