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What do the Tour de France leaders jerseys mean? Yellow, green, polka dot and white jerseys explained

How to win the Tour de France general, sprint, mountains and youth classifications

POOL LEQUIPPE/BELGA MAG/AFP via Getty Images

Colin Henrys

To a first-time viewer, the Tour de France can be a minefield. The winner is not simply decided by which rider crosses the finish line first in Paris.

How can a rider win multiple stages and not wear the yellow jersey? What is that polka dot jersey about? And what's with all the jargon they use?

Here’s our full guide to how the Tour de France is won: the classifications, the jerseys and the previous winners.

Tour de France classifications explained – what do the different jersey colours mean?

Jumbo-Visma team's Belgian rider Wout Van Aert wearing the sprinter's green jersey (L), Cofidis team's German rider Simon Geschke wearing the climber's dotted jersey (2nd L), Jumbo-Visma team's Danish rider Jonas Vingegaard wearing the overall leader's yellow jersey (2nd R) and UAE Team Emirates team's Slovenian rider Tadej Pogacar wearing the best young rider's white jersey (R) await the start of the 19th stage of the 109th edition of the Tour de France cycling race, 188,3 km between Castelnau-Magnoac and Cahors, in southwestern France, on July 22, 2022.

The Tour de France consists of four classifications that individual riders can win. The different classifications are signified by coloured cycling jerseys :

  • The general classification (GC) – yellow jersey
  • Mountains classification – polka dot jersey
  • Points classification – green jersey
  • Young rider classification – white jersey

The leader of each classification at the end of each stage wears the jersey on the following day.

If they continue to lead, they continue to wear the jersey until someone knocks them from the top of the classification. The leader of the classification at the end of the race is the overall winner of that particular classification.

There is also a team classification, but no coloured jersey is awarded for this.

What is the Tour de France general classification (GC)?

Danish Jonas Vingegaard of Jumbo-Visma celebrates on the podium in the yellow jersey of leader in the overall ranking after stage 21, the final stage of the Tour de France cycling race, from Paris la Defense Arena to Paris Champs-Elysees, France, on Sunday 24 July 2022

The general classification is the oldest and most coveted classification in the Tour de France, and is led by the rider with the shortest cumulative time.

Each rider’s time is recorded on every stage and the GC ranks the entire field. The leader of the general classification after the final stage in Paris is the overall winner of the Tour de France.

Tour de France yellow jersey explained

The GC comes with the coveted yellow jersey – or maillot jaune in French – which is worn by the leader of the classification until their overall cumulative time is bettered by another rider at the end of a stage.

The yellow jersey then passes on to the new leader of the GC, and so on.

Previous Tour de France winners

Cycling : 99th Tour de France 2012 / Stage 20 Team Sky (Gbr)/ Bradley Wiggins (GBr) Yellow Jersey / Christopher Froome (GBr)/ Edvald Boasson Hagen (Nor)/ Mark Cavendish (GBr)/ Bernhard Eisel (Aut)/ Christian Knees (Ger)/ Richie PORTE (Aus)/ Michael Rogers (Aus)/ Celebration Joie Vreugde / Rambouillet - Paris Champs-Elysees (120Km)/ Ronde van Frankrijk TDF / Rit Stage /(c)Tim De Waele

Jonas Vingegaard (Team Jumbo-Visma) won his first Tour de France in 2022, beating Tadej Pogačar (Team UAE Emirates), winner of the previous two editions of the Tour de France.

Egan Bernal's success in 2019 marked Team Ineos-Grenadiers' (formerly Team Sky) seventh Tour de France title in eight years.

Geraint Thomas won in 2018 and Chris Froome claimed four editions before that, after Bradley Wiggins had set the ball rolling in 2012.

Frenchman Bernard Hinault, the overall leader of the 72nd Tour de France displays during a day-off on July 12, 1985 in Villard-de-Lans, his four yellow jerseys won in previous years (1978, 1979, 1981, 1982). Hinault won the 1985 edition as well to tie the record set by his compatriot Jacques Anquetil and Belgian rider Eddy Merckx

Since the beginning of the Tour, four riders have won the general classification five times: Jacques Anquetil, Eddy Merckx, Bernard Hinault and Miguel Indurain.

Meanwhile, Fabian Cancellara is the rider who has worn the yellow jersey for the most days without ever winning the Tour (29).

Julian Alaphilippe held the jersey for 14 days in 2019, but fell away in the general classification in the final few stages.

Tour de France mountains classification

What is the mountains classification.

Danish Jonas Vingegaard of Jumbo-Visma celebrates on the podium in the red polka-dot jersey for best climber after stage 21, the final stage of the Tour de France cycling race, from Paris la Defense Arena to Paris Champs-Elysees, France, on Sunday 24 July 2022. This year's Tour de France takes place from 01 to 24 July 2022.

The mountains classification was introduced in 1933 as a secondary competition within the Tour de France.

The first riders to reach the top of categorised climbs in the Tour are awarded a certain number of points according to their position across the summit.

The climbs are categorised by a number, from 1 (difficult) to 4 (least difficult) based on factors such as the climb’s length and gradient.

Only the most gruelling ascents earn the HC label.

Climbs that are more difficult than category 1 are called h ors catégorie – "a class of their own" in French.

Hors catégorie climbs carry the most points. Summit finishes – stages that finish atop a climb – and category 1 climbs are the next most lucrative followed by category 2 and so on.

The first rider to reach the Col de la Loze, the highest peak of the 2023 Tour de France, on stage 17 will earn double points.

The rider with the highest cumulative points total leads the mountains classification and wears the polka dot jersey. The exception is if they are also leading another classification, such as the general. In that case, the second rider in the rankings wears the jersey.

At the end of the Tour, the overall winner of the classification is the King of the Mountains.

Tour de France polka dot jersey explained

From left: Felice Gimondi from Italy, Frenchman Bernard Thevenet, wearing the Yellow Jersey of the leader, Lucien Van Impe from Belgium, wearing the red and white Polka Dot Jersey of the best climber, Dutch Joop Zoetelmelk and Eddy Merckx from Belgium, ride side by side during the 62nd Tour de France from 26 June to 20 July 1975. AFP PHOTO (Photo by - / AFP) (Photo credit should read -/AFP via Getty Images)

The mountains classification is signified by a white jersey with red polka dots (known as the polka dot jersey or maillot à pois ).

Vicente Trueba was the first winner of the King of the Mountains competition in 1933. The polka dot design wasn't introduced until 1975 when Bernard Thévenet won the classification.

Previous Tour de France mountains classification winners

TOPSHOT - Jumbo-Visma team's Danish rider Jonas Vingegaard wearing the overall leader's yellow jersey celebrates as he cycles to the finish line to win the 18th stage of the 109th edition of the Tour de France cycling race, 143,2 km between Lourdes and Hautacam in the Pyrenees mountains in southwestern France, on July 21, 2022. (Photo by Anne-Christine POUJOULAT / AFP) (Photo by ANNE-CHRISTINE POUJOULAT/AFP via Getty Images)

Jonas Vingegaard added the King of the Mountains jersey to his maillot jaune in 2022.

Tadej Pogačar took the mountains classification in 2021 and 2020, following Romain Bardet in 2019 and Julian Alaphilippe in 2018.

Another Frenchman, Richard Virenque, won the title seven times in his career between 1994 and 2004, while both Federico Bahamontes and Lucien Van Impe have won it six times, from 1954 to 1964 and 1971 to 1983 respectively.

Eight cyclists have now won the mountains classification and general classification in the same year:

  • Gino Bartali
  • Sylvère Maes
  • Fausto Coppi
  • Federico Bahamontes
  • Eddy Merckx
  • Carlos Sastre
  • Chris Froome

Pogačar, Bartali, Coppi and Merckx have all done it twice.

Tour de France points classification

What is the points classification.

Jumbo-Visma team's Belgian rider Wout Van Aert celebrates on the podium with the sprinter's green jersey after the 21st and final stage of the 109th edition of the Tour de France cycling race, 115,6 km between La Defense Arena in Nanterre, outside Paris, and the Champs-Elysees in Paris, France, on July 24, 2022. (Photo by Thomas SAMSON / AFP) (Photo by THOMAS SAMSON/AFP via Getty Images)

The points classification was introduced in 1953 as an incentive for sprinters, with Fritz Schär being the first rider to win it.

The first 15 riders to complete each stage are awarded points, with the most points going to the first rider and the following 14 receiving successively fewer points.

More points are on offer for flat stages, again as an incentive to the sprinters. Riders can also gain points by winning intermediate sprints (sprints that take place at designated points part-way through a stage).

Tour de France green jersey explained

The leader of the points classification is indicated by a green jersey ( maillot vert ). Green matched the logo of the first jersey sponsor, La Belle Jardinière clothing store.

The overall prize is awarded to the rider with the most points at the end of the Tour.

Previous Tour de France points classification winners

The green jersey went to Wout van Aert in 2022 and Mark Cavendish in 2021.

In previous years the award had become synonymous with one man: Slovakian superstar Peter Sagan. He claimed the prize for a record-breaking seventh time in 2019.

Tour de France young rider classification

What is the young rider classification.

Slovenian Tadej Pogacar of UAE Team Emirates celebrates on the podium in the white jersey for best young rider after stage 21, the final stage of the Tour de France cycling race, from Paris la Defense Arena to Paris Champs-Elysees, France, on Sunday 24 July 2022. This year's Tour de France takes place from 01 to 24 July 2022.

The young rider classification was introduced to the Tour in 1975. Classics great Francesco Moser was its first winner.

This year it applies only to cyclists born on or after January 1, 1998 (under the age of 26).

Just like the general classification, it’s calculated using each rider's cumulative overall time but is aimed at rewarding young riders in the early stages of their careers.

Tour de France white jersey explained

The youth classification is signified by a white jersey, and much in the same way as the other categories, the rider currently topping the classification wears it until someone else overtakes their lead.

Previous Tour de France young rider classification winners

HAUTACAM, FRANCE - JULY 21: Tadej Pogacar of Slovenia and UAE Team Emirates - White Best Young Rider Jersey competes in the chase while fans cheer during the 109th Tour de France 2022, Stage 18 a 143,2km stage from Lourdes to Hautacam 1520m / #TDF2022 / #WorldTour / on July 21, 2022 in Hautacam, France. (Photo by Tim de Waele/Getty Images)

Beaten into second in the GC, Tadej Pogačar was still the fastest young rider in 2022.

The Slovenian had become the sixth man to win both the white and yellow jersey in the same year when he rode to victory at the 2020 Tour de France, joining Egan Bernal (2019), Laurent Fignon (1983), Jan Ullrich (1997), Alberto Contador (2007) and Andy Schleck (2010). He then repeated the feat in 2021.

Pierre Latour won the young rider classification in 2018, while British twins Adam and Simon Yates were triumphant in the previous two years.

What is the Tour de France team classification?

PARIS, FRANCE - JULY 24: A general view of Jonathan Castroviejo Nicolas of Spain, Filippo Ganna of Italy, Daniel Felipe Martinez Poveda of Colombia, Thomas Pidcock of United Kingdom, Luke Rowe of United Kingdom, Geraint Thomas of The United Kingdom, Dylan Van Baarle of Netherlands, Adam Yates of United Kingdom and Team INEOS Grenadiers celebrate winning the best team trophy on the podium ceremony after the 109th Tour de France 2022, Stage 21 a 115,6km stage from Paris La Défense to Paris - Champs-Élysées / #TDF2022 / #WorldTour / on July 24, 2022 in Paris, France. (Photo by Antonio Borga/Eurasia Sport Images/Getty Images)

The team classification has been part of the Tour de France since 1930 but awards no coloured jersey. Instead, the team is given race numbers with a yellow background, rather than white.

It’s not considered to be as important as the individual classifications. Teams don’t normally set out with an ambition to win it. But they may change their tactics during the race if they are in a good position to do so.

The team classification takes the time of each squad's top three finishers on every stage. The team with the lowest cumulative time leads the classification.

Previous Tour de France team classification winners

PARIS, FRANCE - SEPTEMBER 20: Podium / Dario Cataldo of Italy, Imanol Erviti of Spain, Enric Mas Nicolau of Spain, Nelson Oliveira of Portugal, Jose Joaquin Rojas Gil of Spain, Marc Soler Gimenez of Spain, Alejandro Valverde Belmonte of Spain, Carlos Verona Quintanilla of Spain and Movistar Team / Jose Luis Arrieta of Spain Sports director of Movistar Team / Pablo Lastras of Spain Sports director of Movistar Team / Best Team / Celebration / Trophy / Flowers / Mask / Covid safety measures / during the 107th Tour de France 2020, Stage 21 a 122km stage from Mantes-La-Jolie to Paris Champs-Élysées / #TDF2020 / @LeTour / on September 20, 2020 in Paris, France. (Photo by Stuart Franklin/Getty Images,)

Movistar Team has dominated the classification in recent years, topping the team rankings in 2015, 2016, 2018, 2019 and 2020. This is despite none of its riders winning the Tour in those years.

Generally, the team with the rider leading the Tour will be more inclined to sacrifice teammates to protect the individual's lead, making winning both the individual and team classification – as Team Sky did in 2017 – a rare feat.

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Tour de France jerseys: Colors and meanings explained

The fanciful jerseys that cyclists wear during the Tour de France aren’t simply fashion choices.

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Le Tour de France 2017 - Stage Twenty One

As the Tour de France continues, some riders can be seen sporting jerseys in yellow, green, and white with red polka dots.

No, their jerseys are not a fashion decision. The color of the jerseys actually reflects where a handful of the riders stand in the competition, or their previous success in other races heading into the Tour.

So, what do all the colors of the jerseys mean?

Yellow Jersey:

Le Tour de France 2017 - Stage Twenty One

The yellow jersey is worn by the overall time leader of the Tour de France. This jersey is the most coveted of all the jerseys worn by a rider in the Tour.

The jersey is awarded after each stage of the race. The riders’ total times are added up, and the rider who has completed the stages up to that point in the least amount of time earns the yellow jersey. The overall leader then wears the yellow jersey during the following day of racing, and every day he is still in the lead.

Green Jersey:

Le Tour de France 2016 - Stage Twenty

The green jersey signifies the leading cyclist in stage points. Riders who finish among the top 15 riders at the end of each stage are awarded points based on position, with first earning the most points.

The number of points awarded for each stage depends on the terrain of the stage. The flatter the stage, the more points awarded to those top positions. As a result, the leaders of the green jersey competition tend to be the best pure sprinters.

There are other opportunities for riders to earn points that contribute to their standing on the points classification. Points are also awarded during the individual time trial stages, and intermediate sprint contests that take place in the midst of traditional stages. These intermediate sprint contests occur at least once during each stage, and are usually worth fewer points than the stage finishes.

Polka Dot Jersey:

Le Tour de France 2014 - Stage Fourteen

The white with red polka dot jersey, also known as the King of the Mountains jersey, is awarded to the cyclist who is the best climber. Points are awarded to the cyclists who top the categorized climbs of the Tour first. The number of points given to the riders depends on the category of the mountain.

The climbs are divided in five categories based on the steepness and length of the climb. An Hors Catégorie climb is literally an “outside category” climb, and is the most difficult type of climb on the Tour. From there, climbs are rated 1-4, with a Category 1 climb being especially difficult, and a Category 4 climb being relatively easy.

The harder the climb, the more points riders can earn at the summit. The points earned from all the climbs of the Tour are added together at the end of each stage, and the jersey is awarded to the rider with the most mountain points.

White Jersey:

Le Tour de France 2016 - Stage Eighteen

The white jersey is awarded to under-25 cyclist who has completed the race in the least amount of time. It is similar to the yellow jersey, but only for this certain age group.

Rainbow Jersey:

2018 Tour Down Under - Stage 4

The rainbow jersey is not awarded to a rider during the Tour. It can be worn by the reining men’s road race world champion, however — as determined at the UCI Road World Championships during the previous summer — as he competes in the Tour. The world champion in time trials also can wear the rainbow jersey during the time trial stages of the Tour. This year, the individual time trial takes place on Stage 20.

National Champion Jerseys:

Le Tour de France 2017 - Stage Four

Current national road race champions can also choose to wear their national team jerseys during the individual stages.

If a rider wins the yellow, green, polka dot, or white jersey while wearing the rainbow or national team jersey, he can choose which one he wants to race in. During the current Tour, Peter Sagan is both the reining world champion and green jersey leader at the moment, so he’s choosing to wear green as he competes in the Tour.

Other Awards:

Le Tour de France 2015 - Stage Eleven

There are other awards handed out to certain riders throughout the Tour. The most combative rider — meaning, someone the race jury decides displays a “fighting spirit” during the individual stages — gets to wear a white-on-red number during the following stage.

There is also a team classification, which is based on the times of the top three riders of each team in the overall time standings at the end of every stage. The leading team wears black-on-yellow numbers, and have the option to wear yellow helmets.

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The Ultimate Guide to the Iconic Jerseys of Tour de France

Picture of Mathew Mitchell

Mathew Mitchell

  • Published on June 29, 2023
  • in Men's Cycling

tour de france sprint jersey colour

Step into the world of Tour de France and be mesmerised by the kaleidoscope of colours and symbolism that grace the iconic jerseys worn by the pro peloton. In this ultimate guide, we take you on a journey through the rich history and captivating stories behind these renowned garments. From the infamous yellow jersey that symbolises the leader of the race, to the polka dot jersey representing the best climber, each jersey carries its own unique narrative.

Table of Contents

Discover the secrets behind the green jersey, awarded to the best sprinter, and the white jersey, honouring the best young rider. Unveiling the intricate details and design choices, we delve into the significance of every stripe, dot, and patch. Whether you’re a fan of cycling or simply intrigued by the world of sports fashion, this guide will leave you with a newfound appreciation for the artistry and symbolism woven into the fabric of the Tour de France jerseys. So gear up and embark on this captivating journey through the vibrant world of cycling attire.

Tour de France yellow jersey

The yellow jersey: Maillot Jaune – The leader’s jersey

The yellow jersey , or Maillot Jaune, is undoubtedly the most iconic and coveted jersey in the Tour de France. Worn by the overall leader of the race, it signifies their dominance and command over the peloton. The history of the yellow jersey dates back to 1919 when it was introduced as a way to easily identify the race leader. The colour yellow was chosen due to its close association with the yellow paper used by the organising newspaper, L’Auto, which later on became L’Équipe.

The yellow jersey is not just a symbol of leadership; it also represents the determination, endurance, and sheer willpower required to succeed in the gruelling race. The jersey’s design has evolved over the years, but its distinctive yellow hue remains a constant. From the classic golden shade to the vibrant lemon yellow, each iteration of the jersey has left an indelible mark on the history of the Tour de France. Similar to the All Blacks in rugby, a simple jersey has come to represent something much bigger.

The yellow jersey is not only a badge of honour but also a target for other competitors. Riders will fight tooth and nail to seize the coveted jersey, resulting in intense battles throughout the race. It is this relentless pursuit of the yellow jersey that adds an extra layer of excitement to the Tour de France, making it one of the most anticipated and thrilling sporting events in the world.

Tour de France green jersey

The green jersey: Maillot Vert – The sprinter’s jersey

While the yellow jersey represents the overall leader, the green jersey, or Maillot Vert, is awarded to the best sprinter in the Tour de France. This jersey recognises the riders who excel in the flat stages and possess exceptional speed and strength. It’s not just about flat stages though, increasingly the winner has had to do well on hills. The green jersey was first introduced in 1953 to add another dimension to the race and reward the sprinters for their unique skills.

The green jersey stands out from the crowd with its vibrant shade of green, often referred to as “sprinters’ green.” The colour was chosen to symbolise the lushness and energy associated with sprinting. The design of the jersey features various sponsors’ logos, contributing to its dynamic and eye-catching appearance. Fans of a certain age will remember PMU’s logos on it but for the 2023 Tour de France, Skoda will have their logo on the green jersey.

Winning the green jersey requires consistent performance across the flat stages, where the sprinters have the opportunity to showcase their explosive power. Points are awarded at intermediate sprints and the finish line, with the rider amassing the most points throughout the race being crowned the winner of the green jersey. The battle for the green jersey adds an extra layer of excitement to the Tour de France, as riders push themselves to the limit in thrilling sprint finishes.

Tour de France King of the Mountains jersey

The polka dot jersey: Maillot à Pois – The King of the Mountains jersey

The polka dot jersey, or Maillot à Pois, is one of the most visually striking jerseys in the Tour de France. It is awarded to the rider who excels in the mountain stages, conquering the challenging ascents and demonstrating exceptional climbing abilities. Introduced in 1975, the polka dot jersey adds a touch of drama to the race, highlighting the fierce battles that take place in the mountains. Despite being a relatively recent addition as a jersey, there has been a form of a mountains classification since 1905.

The polka dot jersey gets its name from the distinctive polka dot pattern adorning the jersey. The design was inspired by the red and white polka dot jersey worn by the best climber in the 1969 Vuelta a España, which caught the attention of the Tour de France organisers. The dots represent the mountains and the relentless effort required to conquer them.

To win the polka dot jersey, riders must accumulate points by reaching the mountain summits first. The more challenging the climb, the more points are awarded. The King of the Mountains is determined by the rider with the highest number of points, showcasing their climbing prowess and tenacity. The polka dot jersey has become a symbol of endurance and determination, representing the gruelling battle between man and mountain in the Tour de France.

Tour de France white jersey

The white jersey: Maillot Blanc – The best young rider jersey

The white jersey, or Maillot Blanc, is a symbol of youthful talent and promise in the Tour de France. It is awarded to the best young rider under the age of 26, highlighting the emerging stars of the sport. The white jersey was also introduced in 1975 to recognise the impressive performances of young riders and provide them with a platform to shine.

The white jersey stands out with its clean and crisp design, representing the purity and potential of young riders. It serves as a reminder that the future of cycling lies in the hands of these talented individuals. The white jersey is often hotly contested, as young riders seize the opportunity to make their mark on the race and showcase their potential.

To win the white jersey, riders must demonstrate exceptional skill and consistency throughout the race. They compete not only against each other but also against more experienced riders, making their achievements even more impressive. The white jersey offers a glimpse into the future of the sport, celebrating the young riders who have the potential to become the next generation of cycling legends.

Eddy Merckx yellow jersey

The history and significance of the jerseys

The jerseys of the Tour de France carry a rich history and deep significance that is intertwined with the race itself. Each jersey tells a story, representing different aspects of the sport and the extraordinary athletes who participate in it. From the inaugural yellow jersey that marked the birth of a tradition, to the green jersey that celebrates the explosive power of sprinters, these jerseys have become symbols of excellence and determination.

Over the years, the jerseys have evolved in design and style, reflecting the changing times and the advancements in sports fashion. What started as simple garments to distinguish the race leaders have transformed into works of art, with intricate patterns, bold colours, and sponsor logos adorning the fabric. The design choices are not arbitrary; they are carefully considered to capture the essence of each jersey and its respective category.

The jerseys have also witnessed the triumphs and tribulations of legendary riders who have left an indelible mark on the Tour de France. From Eddy Merckx ‘s dominance in the yellow jersey to Peter Sagan’s reign as the king of the green jersey, these riders have become synonymous with the jerseys they wore, etching their names into the annals of cycling history.

The significance of the jerseys extends beyond the race itself. They have become cultural icons, representing the spirit of competition, the pursuit of excellence, and the camaraderie among riders. Fans and collectors alike treasure these jerseys, displaying them as symbols of their love for the sport and the enduring legacy of the Tour de France.

Peter Sagan green jersey

Famous riders who have dominated the jerseys

Throughout the history of the Tour de France, there have been riders who have dominated the different jerseys, leaving an indelible mark on the race. These riders have become legends in their own right, their achievements etched into the fabric of the jerseys they wore.

In the yellow jersey category, one cannot overlook the legendary Eddy Merckx. The Belgian cyclist won the yellow jersey a record-breaking five times and is considered one of the greatest riders in the history of the sport. Merckx’s dominance in the yellow jersey remains unparalleled, earning him the nickname “The Cannibal” for his insatiable hunger for victory.

In the green jersey category, Peter Sagan’s name shines bright. The Slovakian cyclist has won the green jersey a record-breaking seven times, showcasing his exceptional sprinting abilities and versatility as a rider. Sagan’s charismatic personality and thrilling performances have made him a fan favourite, and his reign as the king of the green jersey continues to captivate audiences around the world.

In the polka dot jersey category, Richard Virenque stands out as one of the most successful climbers in the history of the Tour de France. The French cyclist won the polka dot jersey a record-breaking seven times, showcasing his mastery of the mountains and his relentless pursuit of victory. Virenque’s tenacity and climbing prowess have made him a legend among fans of the race.

In the white jersey category, Jan Ullrich’s name holds a special place. The German cyclist won the white jersey three times and went on to become the overall winner of the Tour de France in 1997. Ullrich’s achievements at a young age marked him as a rising star in the sport, and his performances continue to inspire young riders to this day.

These riders, among many others, have left an indelible mark on the Tour de France jerseys, solidifying their status as legends of the race and inspiring future generations of cyclists.

Bernard Hinault yellow jersey

The evolution of the jerseys over the years

The jerseys of the Tour de France have undergone significant changes over the years, reflecting the evolution of both the sport and the fashion industry. What started as simple garments to distinguish the race leaders have transformed into highly sought-after fashion statements, capturing the attention of fans and designers alike.

In the early years of the Tour de France, the jerseys were basic and functional, with minimal design elements. The emphasis was on functionality rather than fashion, as the primary purpose of the jerseys was to identify the race leaders. The yellow jersey, for example, was a simple garment made of wool, featuring a collar, buttons, and short sleeves.

As the race gained popularity and sponsorship deals became more prominent, the jerseys started to incorporate sponsor logos and branding. This marked the beginning of the jerseys’ transformation into advertising billboards, with sponsors’ names and logos becoming prominent features of the design.

In recent years, advancements in fabric technology and printing techniques have allowed for more intricate and visually stunning designs. The jerseys now feature bold colours, intricate patterns, and eye-catching graphics, capturing the attention of fans and creating a sense of excitement around the race.

The evolution of the jerseys is not just limited to their design; the materials used have also undergone significant changes. Wool has been replaced by lightweight synthetic fabrics that offer enhanced breathability and moisture-wicking properties, ensuring that the riders stay cool and comfortable during the race.

The jerseys of the Tour de France are a testament to the ever-changing nature of fashion and the sport itself. They reflect the trends and innovations of their respective eras, serving as a visual timeline of the race’s history and the evolution of cycling attire.

Bradley Wiggins Tour de France yellow jersey

Collecting and displaying Tour de France jerseys

For fans of the Tour de France, collecting and displaying jerseys is a way to celebrate their love for the sport and the iconic race. Tour de France jerseys hold immense sentimental value, representing the history, achievements, and legends of the race. Here are a few tips for collecting and displaying these cherished garments.

Research and authenticity

When collecting Tour de France jerseys, it is important to research their authenticity. Look for official replicas or jerseys that have been verified by reputable sources. Be cautious of counterfeit jerseys that may be circulating in the market.

Focus on significance

Consider collecting jerseys that hold significance to you personally. Whether it’s the yellow jersey of your favourite rider or the polka dot jersey of a legendary climber, choose jerseys that resonate with you and tell a story.

Display with care

When displaying Tour de France jerseys, it is important to handle them with care. Use proper hangers or display cases to prevent creasing or damage to the fabric. Avoid exposing the jerseys to direct sunlight or excessive moisture, as this can cause fading or deterioration.

Tell the story

Accompany your displayed jerseys with information and stories about the riders or the race itself. This adds depth and context to the jerseys, allowing viewers to appreciate their significance and the history they represent.

Rotate your collection

If you have a substantial collection of Tour de France jerseys, consider rotating them periodically to keep the display fresh and interesting. This allows you to showcase different jerseys and riders while preserving the condition of each garment.

Collecting and displaying Tour de France jerseys is not just a hobby; it is a way to pay homage to the sport and the athletes who have made it legendary. It is a celebration of the rich history and captivating stories behind these iconic garments, allowing fans to immerse themselves in the vibrant world of cycling attire.

2018 Tour de France podium

The Tour de France jerseys are more than just pieces of clothing; they are symbols of excellence, determination, and the indomitable spirit of the race. From the iconic yellow jersey that represents the leader to the polka dot jersey that honours the best climber, each jersey carries its own narrative and significance.

The jerseys of the Tour de France have evolved over the years, reflecting the changing times and the advancements in sports fashion. What started as simple garments to distinguish the race leaders have transformed into works of art, with intricate designs and bold colours capturing the attention of fans and designers alike.

Collecting and displaying Tour de France jerseys is a way to celebrate the sport and its legends. These jerseys hold immense sentimental value, representing the history, achievements, and legends of the race. They serve as a visual timeline of the Tour de France’s evolution and the enduring legacy of the athletes who have graced its stages.

So gear up and embark on this captivating journey through the vibrant world of cycling attire. Explore the secrets behind the yellow, green, polka dot, and white jerseys, and discover the stories that have shaped the Tour de France. Immerse yourself in the kaleidoscope of colours and symbolism that grace these iconic jerseys, and gain a newfound appreciation for the artistry woven into the fabric of the race. The Tour de France jerseys are not just garments; they are symbols of triumph, passion, and the enduring spirit of the race.

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Tour de France jerseys and meanings

Ever wondered what the yellow, green, polka dot and white jerseys mean at the tour de france.

Tour de France jerseys and meanings

If you’re new to watching the Tour de France, you may notice four jerseys that are different from the rest of the riders in the race. Unlike one-day races, grand tours and other stage races have competitions within the competition; the special jerseys signify the leaders in those specific categories and are worn, in part, so spectators can pick them out in the crowded field of riders. 

This year’s Tour de France (and the women’s version of the race, Le Tour Femmes) promises to be one of the most exciting yet, and the competition for these jerseys will be fierce. 

What do the jerseys of the Tour de France mean?

At the Tour de France, riders compete for the jerseys signifying four individual classifications: 

  • General Classification (Yellow) 
  • Mountains Classification (Polka Dot) 
  • Points Classification (Green) 
  • Young Rider Classification (White) 

In addition to the jersey competitions, riders also battle for the team classification and award for the most combative rider. The team isn’t awarded a jersey, but wear black on yellow race numbers and may wear yellow helmets, if they so choose. The most combatitive rider, chosen by the race jury each day, wears a special golden number the following race day.  

At the end of each stage, the leaders of each classification are awarded their jersey. Those leaders wear the Tour de France yellow, polka dot, green or white jersey the next day. At the end of the race, the leaders become the overall winners of their respective jerseys. 

What does the yellow jersey of the Tour de France mean?

tour de france sprint jersey colour

Perhaps the most famous jersey on the planet, the yellow jersey —or maillot jaune, as it’s known in French—belongs to the leader of the General Classification (GC). The yellow jersey of the Tour de France is the oldest and most coveted jersey not only of the TdF, but also the sport of cycling. The rules are simple: the rider with the fastest cumulative time wears the yellow jersey. At the end of the race, that rider is the overall winner of the Tour de France. 

Previous yellow jersey winners

The riders with the most Tour de France victories in history are Jacques Anquetil, Eddy Merckx, Bernard Hinault, and Miguel Indurain, each with five general classifications wins to their name. Jonas Vingegaard (Jumbo-Visma) has won the overall yellow twice in the last two years. 

Who are the main contenders for the yellow jersey in 2024?

Vingegaard was an early favorite to the overall yellow jersey again in 2024. However, his aspirations suffered a major setback after a horrible crash during stage four of Itzulia Basque Country, leaving him with a broken collarbone, multiple broken ribs, and a collapsed lung. Two of his main competitors for the yellow jersey this year, Remco Evenepoel (Soudal-QuickStep) and Primoz Roglic (Bora-Hansgrohe), were caught up in the same crash, with Evenpoel also suffering a broken collarbone. It remains to be seen how this will impact the race in July. 

What does the polka dot jersey of the Tour de France mean?

tour de france sprint jersey colour

Introduced in 1933 as a second classification for riders to pursue, the winner of the mountains classification is awarded a polka dot jersey for conquering the most climbs of the Tour de France . The rider wearing the polka dot jersey is often referred to as the King of the Mountains. 

Each significant climb throughout the race is categorised from 1 (most difficult) to 4 (least difficult) based on factors such as gradient and length. Tougher climbs attract more points for the riders first across the summit. Hors categorie –meaning uncategorised in French – climbs are so difficult, they’re said to defy categorization. As such, these ascents are awarded the most points, while summit finishes (stages that end at the peak of a climb) are worth double points. 

Previous winners of the polka dot jersey

Richard Virenque still holds the record for the number of polka dot jerseys to his name with seven King of the Mountains victories throughout his career. Giulio Ciccone ( Trek–Segafredo ) won the polka dot jersey at the 2023 race, the first Italian King of the Mountains since 1992. 

Who are the main contenders for the polka dot jersey in 2024?

Ciccone could contend for the polka dot jersey again in 2024, but his main focus this year may be his home tour, the Giro d’Italia. Canyon-sponsored Nairo Quintana (Movistar) won the polka dot jersey in 2013 and was expected to contend for that jersey once again this year, perhaps atop the Canyon Ultimate CFR . However, a ruptured ligament suffered during the Volta a Catalunya could derail those plans. The wide-open competition for this year’s polka dot jersey should be exciting, with any number of riders attempting to etch their name in the record books. 

What does the green jersey of the Tour de France mean?

Points Jersey

When fans think of the Tour de France, they often associate the race with daring climbers and massive mountain stages, but the sprinters deserve recognition as well. The green jersey of the Tour de France or the maillot vert is awarded to the rider with the most cumulative points at the end of each stage and, of course, at the end of the TdF. 

The first 15 riders across the line in any stage are awarded points. The first rider receives the most points and the following 14 gradually fewer points. To incentivise the sprinters, more points are available on flat stages. Intermediate sprints mid-way through other non-flat stages offer yet more points to add to the riders’ totals. 

Previous winners of the green jersey

Peter Sagan’s name became synonymous with the green jersey, winning the points classification a staggering seven times during his career, often in dominating fashion. Mark Cavendish has won the overall green jersey twice in his career and is tied for the most Tour de France stage victories (34) with Eddy Merckx. Jasper Philipsen (Alpecin-Deceuninck) dominated the sprints last year on his Canyon road bike on his way to winning the points classification. (You don’t have to win the green jersey competition to look like part of his team, as Canyon sells official Alpecin-Deceuninck gear .) 

Who are the main contenders for the green jersey in 2024?

All eyes will be on Cavendish during the sprints this year as he pursues his 35th stage win, but Philipsen will be tough to be beat, both in the individual sprints and the race for the overall green jersey. 

  

What does the white jersey of the Tour de France mean?

Young Rider Jersey

The young rider classification has been around since 1987 in its current format. The winner of the white jersey of the Tour de France is the leading rider under the age of 26 in the general classification. The winner of the white jersey has also been the winner of the yellow jersey numerous times throughout the race’s history. 

Previous winners of the white jersey

Andy Schleck and Jan Ullrich both won the white jersey three times during their Tour de France careers. Quintana won the young rider classification twice for Movistar Team: once in 2013 when he also won the polka dot jersey and again in 2015 when he came in second overall. Tadej Pogačar has won the best young rider categorization a record-breaking four times, spending 75 days in white. (He also won the overall yellow and polka dot jerseys in two of those years.) 

Who are the main contenders for the white jersey in 2024?

Pogačar is no longer eligible to win the white jersey, but this year he may attempt to win the yellow jersey once again, as well as the pink jersey given to the overall winner of the Giro d’Italia . (The last person to accomplish this feat was Marco Pantini in 1998.) So who will end the Tour de France in white this year? Carlos Rodríguez (INEOS Grenadiers) placed fifth in last year’s Tour and will only be 23 years old this year. Spanish national champion and Canyon-sponsored Oier Lazkano (Movistar) rider could potentially be a dark horse for the white jersey if the 24 year old is chosen for the TdF squad. Discover which Canyon racing bikes are used by the Movistar team . 

MVDP riding in Tour de France

Tour de France Team and Most Combative Rider Classifications

There are two categories that don’t receive a special jersey: the teams and most aggressive rider classifications. 

The team prize is awarded to the group of riders with the fastest cumulative time throughout the race. This takes into account every rider’s time, not just those in the highest position. Teams rarely, if ever, enter the Tour with the Team Classification as their sole goal, but later in the race, it can be a fun prize to aim for. Canyon-sponsored Movistar has taken the prize for the best team no less than five times, most recently in 2020. Jumbo-Visma won this classification last year. 

The most-combative rider award is awarded to the most aggressive rider of the day, typically one who animated a breakaway or attempted a daring solo escape. Victor Campenaerts (Lotto–Dstny) earned this honor last year. 

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The Colourful History Behind the Tour de France Jerseys

Few events capture the imagination quite like the Tour de France. A spectacle of endurance, strategy, and sheer will, the Tour is also a visual feast, not least because of its iconic jerseys. Each jersey not only signifies a leader in a particular section of the race, but also carries a rich history, symbolised through its distinctive colour or pattern. Let's pedal through the story behind the yellow, polka dot, white, and green jerseys of the Tour de France.

The Maillot Jaune (Yellow Jersey)

The most coveted of all, the yellow jersey, or "Maillot Jaune," belongs to the overall race leader. Its origins date back to 1919, a colour choice inspired by the yellow paper of "L'Auto," the newspaper that founded the Tour de France. This bright hue of canary yellow was chosen for its standout visibility in the peloton and as a tribute to the race's origins, singling out the wearer as the frontrunner in the epic journey across France.

The Maillot à Pois Rouges (Polka Dot Jersey)

The polka dot jersey is the top mountain cycler’s prize. Covered with red dots on a white background, it's awarded to the King (or Queen) of the Mountains, the rider who accumulates the most points on classified climbs. Introduced in 1975, the jersey's design was influenced by a major sponsor of the Tour at the time, a chocolate company that packaged their products in similarly patterned wrappers. This jersey not only highlights the best climber but also dots the mountain stages.

The Maillot Vert (Green Jersey)

The cyclist with the top speed and consistency across flat terrains and sprints is the wearer of the green jersey or "Maillot Vert." Since its inception in 1953, during the 50th anniversary of the Tour, the green jersey has been a symbol of the race's best sprinter, awarded on points earned in intermediate sprints and stage finishes. The choice of green was a nod to its original sponsor, a lawn mower manufacturer, linking the colour to speed and the sprinter's explosive energy across the green landscapes of France.

The Maillot Blanc (White Jersey)

The white jersey, or "Maillot Blanc," inspires hope and future potential. It's awarded to the best young rider, aged 25 or under, in the general classification. Reintroduced in 1975 after a brief appearance in the early years of the Tour, the white jersey's colour signifies purity and freshness, embodying youthful spirit and emerging talent within the peloton, marking this cyclist out as a future star.

In the whirlwind of strategy, stamina, and speed that defines the Tour de France, these jerseys stand as beacons of honour, each telling a story of human endurance and the legacy of cycling's greatest race. From the rolling hills to the sprint finishes, these colours not only distinguish the lead athletes, but also represent elements of triumph, perseverance, and the rich history of the Tour.

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Tour de France jerseys explained: Meaning behind the maillots – from Yellow and Green to Polka Dot and White

The yellow jersey is the iconic emblem of the tour de france - but the green, polka dot and white jerseys are also highly sought after.

PARIS, FRANCE - SEPTEMBER 20: Podium / Tadej Pogacar of Slovenia and UAE Team Emirates Yellow Leader Jersey, White Best Young Rider Jersey and Polka Dot Mountain Jersey / Sam Bennett of Ireland and Team Deceuninck - Quick-Step Green Points Jersey / Celebration / Trophy / during the 107th Tour de France 2020, Stage 21 a 122km stage from Mantes-La-Jolie to Paris Champs-??lys??es / #TDF2020 / @LeTour / on September 20, 2020 in Paris, France. (Photo by Stephan Mantey - Pool/Getty Images)

The 2021 Tour de France is back in its usual slot after the pandemic delayed last year’s edition, and as ever there will be more than just the yellow jersey on offer when the world’s biggest bike race gets under way.

The Grand Départ is in Brest on 26 June, with 21 stages and just two rest days meaning the final day of racing in Paris takes place on 18 July.

As sprinters chase victory down the Champs-Élysées on that final day, the general classification winner will be known already.

But the Maillot Jaune is by no means the only special jersey on offer during the race, though – here’s what they all mean.

The Yellow Jersey (Maillot Jaune)

tour de france sprint jersey colour

The oldest of the Tour’s jerseys, and the most iconic in cycling, is the Yellow Jersey, which is awarded to the overall leader of the general classification, and the race’s eventual winner – simply the rider to finish the course in the shortest time.

Last year’s edition marked the official centenary of the Maillot Jaune, although disputed accounts claim a Belgian rider, Philippe Thys, reluctantly wore one in 1913, after claiming it would make him vulnerable to rival riders.

It was introduced to make the race leader more visible to the crowd, which provoked the ire of its first official wearer, Frenchman Eugene Christophe, who claimed spectators imitated canaries as he rode past.

The Yellow Jersey takes its colour from the pages of  L’Auto,  the French newspaper owned by the Tour’s founder, Henri Desgrange.

Belgian legend Eddy “the Cannibal” Merckx wore yellow for a record 96 days during his career, while Froome leads the way of current riders, with 59 days.

The 2020 race saw Primoz Roglic hold the Yellow Jersey for 11 stages, but a stunning mountain time-trial performance from Tadej Pogacar in Stage 20 helped the then 21-year-old become the youngest general classification winner for over a century.

This year’s battle has been dubbed part two of “Pog vs Rog” in some quarters, but Geraint Thomas is out to win a title he won in 2018.

The Green Jersey  (Maillot Vert)

tour de france sprint jersey colour

The Green Jersey is worn by the current leader and eventual winner of the points classification, and has been used since the introduction of the competition in 1953.

Traditionally known as the “sprinters jersey”, the Maillot Vert (taking its colour from its original sponsor, a lawn mower producer) rewards points for high placings on individual stages, and for passing intermediate sprint points along the stage route.

The number of points allocated for each placing are weighted more heavily towards flat stages, encouraging purer sprinters, who excel in flat, bunch finishes but struggle in the mountains.

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This weighting has become even more pronounced in recent years, after the rules were changed before the 2011 Tour to favour riders like Mark Cavendish , who had won 15 stages in three years but lost out to more solid, consistent all-rounders.

Although Cavendish duly dominated the competition, becoming the first British rider to claim the prize, in recent years nobody has been able to come close to the domination of the Slovakian Peter Sagan.

Since 2012, the freakishly versatile three-time world champion has won seven Green Jerseys, surpassing the record of the German Erik Zabel.

Last year, Sam Bennett won the points classification, but injury this time around means Sagan is joint-favourite along with Caleb Ewan.

The Polka Dot Jersey (Maillot à  Pois Rouges)

tour de france sprint jersey colour

The Tour de France’s most sartorially flamboyant jersey, the Polka Dot, recognises the leader and champion of its second-oldest competition, the King of the Mountains.

Although the mountains classification was introduced in 1933, its distinctive prize has only been worn since 1975, taking its design from the chocolate bar wrappers of its sponsor, Chocolat Poulain.

The competition rewards riders in a similar way to the Green Jersey contest, with points awarded for traversing the Tour’s climbs in first place, and for higher placings on mountain stages.

There are greater rewards on offer for higher climbs – crossing an HC (Hors catégorie) peak brings 20 points, a meagre 4C a single point – and double points for stage placing on summit finishes of 2C or above.

Like the points classification, the King of the Mountains system has shifted to reward purer climbers by offering greater bonuses for tougher climbs, following criticism that the contest was being dominated by breakaway riders, rather than specialists.

Scottish climber Robert Millar won Britain’s first ever Tour jersey with the 1984 King of the Mountains competition, while in 2015 Chris Froome became the first to combine the Yellow and Polka Dot jerseys for 45 years.

Last year, it was won by Pogacar, the champion who won the below jersey as well…

The White Jersey (Maillot Blanc)

tour de france sprint jersey colour

The Tour’s youngest winner jersey, the Maillot Blanc is fittingly awarded to the leader of the Young Rider competition, recognising the top performer in the general classification below the age of 26.

First introduced in 1975, the competition was scrapped between 1989 and 1999, but has run uninterrupted since the millennium.

Remarkably, the two British riders to wear it in Paris were twin brothers, with Adam and Scott Yates winning in 2016 and 2017 respectively.

Last year, Pogacar took the White Jersey to go alongside his General Classification victory – on top of the Polka Dot Jersey it made him the first rider ever to win these three jerseys.

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The Green Jersey at the Tour de France - A Brief History

The best sprinter at the Tour de France is given the green jersey. But how long has the green jersey been around?

Words: Joe Timms

The green jersey (or maillot vert ) is second only to the world's most famous yellow jumper as the most coveted prize in all of cycling. It signifies the leader of the points classification at the Tour de France.

Points are awarded at stage finishes and intermediate sprints. Currently, 50 points are given to the stage winner on a flat stage and 20 points are given to the winner of each intermediate sprint. Less points are awarded at the finish line on hilly and mountain stages, which means the sprinters start with the best chance of winning the points classification.

Current Tour de France standings

Tour de France 2021 Guide

Joining the breakaway can be a great method to gain an upper hand in the green jersey. This way, competitors can reach intermediate sprints ahead of their rivals. However, this tactic often requires climbing skills and powers of recovery, something that not all sprinters possess in abundance. Therefore, the eventual winner of the green jersey must be a somewhat complete rider and not simply the fastest sprinter.

To win the green jersey, the victor must complete all 21 stages of the Tour de France. This means the winner must be able to cross the highest mountains within the time limit and  recover well between stages .

The green jersey was introduced at the 1953 Tour de France. The winner that year was Fritz Schär. In stark contrast to the modern profile of green jersey winners,  Schär came third in the overall general classification the following year.

tour de france sprint jersey colour

Fritz Schär at the 1953 Tour de France. Photo credit: RDB/ullstein bild via Getty Images

In 1968, the leader of the points classification wore a red jersey due to a change in sponsorship. The eventual winner that year was Franco Bitossi, though the colour of the jersey reverted to green only one year later, in 1969, and has remained green since.

Related – Mark Cavendish's transcendent win

Winners of the Points Classification / Green Jersey

Peter Sagan in the green jersey

  • Peter Sagan - 7 (2012, 2013, 2014, 2015, 2016, 2018, 2019)
  • Erik Zabel - 6 (1996,1997, 1998, 1999, 2000, 2001)
  • Sean Kelly - 4 (1982, 1983, 1985, 1989)

Peter Sagan has won the points classification seven times, more than any other rider. He won the green jersey every season between 2012 and 2019 bar the 2017 Tour de France where he was disqualified from the race after colliding with Mark Cavendish on stage 4. Sagan has only been defeated in the points classification once in a Tour de France he has completed — Sam Bennett won the green jersey ahead of Sagan at the 2020 Tour de France.

Erik Zabel previously held the record. He won the points classification every year between 1996 and 2001 whilst riding for Team Telekom. Although he never won the green jersey again after the 2001 Tour de France, Zabel finished second or third in all of the six Tour de France he entered between 2002 and 2008.

Jan Janssen, Eddy Merckx, Freddy Marten s, Djamolidine Abdoujaparov and Robbie McEwen are the five riders that have won the green jersey on three occasions throughout their careers.

Cover image: A.S.O./Charly Lopez

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Tour de France 101: What do different color jerseys mean?

The yellow, green, red polka dot, and white jerseys worn by cyclists in the Tour de France represent the best competitor in different categories. The standings can change from day to day, especially early in the race.

  • By David Clark Scott Staff writer

July 9, 2010

What do the different color Tour de France jerseys mean?

YELLOW: The maillot jaune , the yellow jersey, is the signature chemise of the Tour de France . It designates the overall leader of the race so far. When cyclists finish the three-week race by cruising through the streets of Paris , the photo of the yellow-shirted winner is seen around the globe.

The yellow jersey is awarded after each of the 20 stages, or race days, to the rider who is the overall leader of the race so far. Each day the total amount of time taken to finish that stage is added to the cumulative time of all previous races, and the overall leader is determined. The next day, he wears the yellow throughout the stage.

GREEN : The green jersey, or maillot vert , is the sprinter’s jersey. At every stage, points are awarded to the first 10-25 riders that cross the finish line. The amount of sprint points awarded depends on the day’s course (a flat course produces more points than the mountain terrain) and in what place the rider finishes that day. Some stages have mini-sprints within the stage that are worth points. German Erik Zabel holds the record for winning the final green jersey in the Tour six consecutive times, between 1996 and 2001.

WHITE WITH RED POLKA DOTS : This is the King of the Mountains jersey. Points are awarded to the first rider to reach the crest of designated hills and mountains. Mountains are graded according to steepness, length, and position on the course, and points correspond to the grade. The best climber awards began in 1933, and the maillot à pois rouges was first worn in 1975.

WHITE : This jersey is worn by the fastest overall rider under the age of 25 (on Jan. 1 in the year of the race). The first white jersey was worn in 1975.

There are other prizes and competitions within the Tour de France that don’t involve jerseys. For example, the most combative rider of each stage – the one who tries to break clear of the field – will wear a red number on a white background, instead of the usual black on white. And the team prize – based on the team with the fastest three riders – wears a black number on a yellow background.

More Tour de France 101 stories:

Tour de France 101: How long is the race?

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Tour de Suisse

Tour of slovenia, baloise belgium tour, uci mtb val di sole italy, tour de suisse women, uci mtb crans montana switzerland, tour de l'eurometropole, uci mtb haute savoie france, uci bmx freestyle urban session brussels, tour de france, giro d'italia women (giro donne), tour de l'ain, tour of wallonie, arctic race of norway, every tour de france green jersey sprint classification winner, year-by-year breakdown of every rider to win the tour de france green jersey points classification since 1953..

Every Tour de France Green Jersey Sprint Classification Winner

Year-by-year breakdown of every rider to win the Tour de France green jersey points classification since its addition to the race in 1953. Peter Sagan holds the record with seven victories in the green jersey competition while Belgium (19) and France (9) lead the way for countries with the most wins.

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HISTORY OF THE TOUR DE FRANCE HOMEPAGE

  • Mark Cavendish
  • Peter Sagan
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What do all the Giro d'Italia jerseys mean? Pink, purple, blue and white explained

There are no polka dot or green jerseys in this race

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The jerseys of the Giro d'Italia

Giro d'Italia jerseys

Other classifications.

If you're preparing to watch the  Giro d'Italia  as intently as we are, then you might be wondering what all the distinctive jerseys mean. Away from the 22 different teams, and the national championsm there are four more jerseys you need to keep your eyes on.

They are the pink ( rosa ), white ( bianco ), purple/cyclamen ( ciclamino ) and blue ( azzurra ). That is the leader's jersey, the young rider's jersey, the points jersey, and the king of the mountains jersey, respectively. There's no  Tour de France  green or polka dots here.

The jerseys are all worn by the leaders in those competitions, unless one rider holds two at once - in that case, the pink jersey takes priority, followed by the  ciclamino , then the blue and white. That's why you will see riders who are not leading the competition in the colourful jerseys.

General classification - pink jersey

Primož Roglič in the pink jersey at the Giro d'Italia

Primož Roglič in the pink jersey at the Giro d'Italia

First up is the maglia rosa , the pink jersey, the kit worn by the leader of the general classification, the rider who has got around the route faster than everyone else. It is given to the rider who sits atop the GC at the end of every day, with the final one awarded with the Trofeo Senze Fine to the winner after the final stage.

It was introduced in 1931 and is pink because La Gazzetta dello Sport , the Italian sports newspaper which created the race, is printed on pink paper.

It is not as simple as getting round fastest cumulatively. Time bonuses are also on offer, with the top three men on each of the 18 road stages taking 10, six, and four seconds. Intermediate sprints on each road stage also offer bonuses of three, two, and one seconds.

In the event of two riders tying on time, the organisers will decide the standings based on fractions of a second measured in the race's time trials.

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The pink jersey is sponsored by Enel, an Italian energy company.

The riders who have won the jersey the most are Eddy Merckx, Fausto Coppi and Alfredo Binda, who all took the coveted prize five times. The closest to that feat in recent years was Vincenzo Nibali (Trek-Segafredo) who won twice, in 2013 and 2016.

Points - purple jersey

The Giro d'Italia jerseys

Jonathan Milan in the ciclamino jersey at the Giro

To be clear, the purple isn't purple, it's technically cyclamen, or ciclamino. This eye-catching kit is worn by the rider who has accumulated the most points over the stages.

Points on offer are weighted towards sprint stages, so flat or punchy stages offer more than summit finishes. An intermediate sprint on each day - apart from time trials - also offers points. 

The 19 road stages of the race are separated into five difficulty categories with their own points weightings. On A and B category days, the top 15 score, while on others it is just the top 10.

A and B category:  50, 35, 25, 18, 14, 12, 10, 8, 7, 6, 5, 4, 3, 2, 1 points

C category:  25, 18, 12, 8, 6, 5, 4, 3, 2, 1 points

D and E category:  15, 12, 9, 7, 6, 5, 4, 3, 2, 1 points

Intermediate sprints:  12, 8, 6, 5, 4, 3, 2, 1 points

The jersey is sponsored by the Italian Ministry of Foreign Affairs and the Italian Trade Agency to promote the country under the banner of Made in Italy.

Mountains - blue jersey

The Giro d'Italia jerseys

The blue jersey, or maglia azzurra, is given to the rider who takes home the most points on classified climbs over the race; potentially the best climber in the race, or the most canny breakaway expert.

There are 45 classified climbs across the 21 stages and unlike the Tour de France in recent years, it is not normally the GC winner who takes home the mountains jersey. 

The mountain classification has appeared in the race since 1933 but a green was introduced in 1974. The jersey has been blue since 2012 to match the colours of the competition sponsor, the Milanese bank, Banca Mediolanum. 

Climbs are separated into five different categories, from the Cima Coppi award to fourth-category. Since 2023, summit finishes on first category climbs will gain extra points.

Cima Coppi:  50, 30, 20, 14, 10, 6, 4, 2, 1 points

First-category summit finishes:  50, 24, 16, 9, 6, 4, 2, 1 points

First-category:  40, 18, 12, 9, 6, 4, 2, 1 points

Second-category:  18, 8, 6, 4, 2, 1 points

Third-category:  9, 4, 2, 1 points

Fourth-category:  3, 2, 1 points 

Best young rider - white jersey

João Almeida in the white jersey at the Giro d'Italia

João Almeida in the white jersey at the Giro d'Italia

The best young rider classification awards the white jersey. It is, in effect, the same as the pink jersey yet can only be won by those who were 25 or under at the start of the year. The current iteration of the jersey was introduced in 2007.

Italian restaurant chain Eataly sponsors the jersey, so it will be interesting to see what the daily leaders get as prizes.

Evgeni Berzin, Nairo Quintana, Tao Geoghegan Hart, and Egan Bernal are the only men to win the pink and white jerseys in the same year, though Damiano Cunego would have been eligible had the prize existed in 2004. 

This is the teams classification at any other race. The top three finishers from each team are added up each day, and then added up across the 21 stages, to establish the best team overall.

Lowest accumulated time wins, and there are usually some big gaps in this competition. 

Intermediate sprints

There are two intermediate sprints on each road stage, with both offering points towards this competition. It gives an opportunity to riders who spend a lot of time in breakaways, but might not win stages, to win a prize.

Points are awarded to the first five riders across the line – 10, six, three, two, and one.

One intermediate sprint a day will also award riders bonus seconds and points as part of the Intergiro competition. 

The Intergiro sees the top three finishers awarded with three, two and one bonus seconds for the GC, and also the top eight finishers with 12, eight, six, five, four, three, two and one points for the points classification.

In addition, with the same points, a final daily and overall ranking called the Intergiro will be drawn up.

The Fuga Pinarello prize is given to the rider who spends the most time in front of the peloton across the three weeks. Only breakaways of fewer than 10 riders are counted, and the move must cover more than 5km of racing.

Fighting spirit

This is essentially the Giro d'Italia's version of the Tour de France's 'supercombativity' award, and is incredibly subjective. A poll with a maximum of four riders will run each day from 7pm to 7am on the Giro d'Italia's Twitter. The winner gets a red number to ride with for the next day, and there is an overall winner at the end of the Grand Tour.

Points are given to the squads which receive penalties across the 21 stages, and this is counted up over the race. The team with the least points wins. Simple.

The rider who crosses the highest point of the Giro d'Italia first is given the Cima Coppi , the prize named after Fausto Coppi, who won the race five times.

This year, the Cima Coppi is on stage 16, on the mythical Stelvio.

MONTAGNA PANTANI

Another deceased Italian cycling great, Marco Pantani, is honoured by a separate mountain prize, the Montagna Pantani . It is given to the rider who tops another of the race's great climbs. This year, it's Oropa on stage one.

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Adam is Cycling Weekly ’s news editor – his greatest love is road racing but as long as he is cycling on tarmac, he's happy. Before joining Cycling Weekly he spent two years writing for Procycling, where he interviewed riders and wrote about racing. He's usually out and about on the roads of Bristol and its surrounds. Before cycling took over his professional life, he covered ecclesiastical matters at the world’s largest Anglican newspaper and politics at Business Insider. Don't ask how that is related to cycling.

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LES QUATRE MAILLOTS DES LEADERS

Pour cette édition 2018 les quatre maillots de leaders intègrent une référence au passé. Leur design est inspiré d’un maillot mythique du Tour de France, le maillot du combiné, introduit en 1968. Il récompensait alors le coureur le plus complet, le plus à l’aise sur tous les terrains. A partir de 1985, la couleur distinctive des différents maillots de leaders, façon Mondrian, apparait sur ce maillot. C’est cette structure qui est le fil rouge de la construction visuelle de ces quatre maillots. Ainsi celui du leader du classement général présente en 2018 un camaïeu de jaune.

Santini goes yellow: the Tour de France to wear made in Italy

Santini Cycling Wear and A.S.O. are delighted to announce a new agreement making the Italian brand official partner to the Tour de France from 2022 to supply the prestigious Yellow Jersey and the other official jerseys for the elite multi-stage road race.  The sponsorship deal also includes the Tour de France Femmes avec Zwift and L’Étape du Tour de France.

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Jerseys and Classifications

Jerseys and Classifications

Special jerseys in cycling are used to indicate the leaders of each race classification during the Santos Tour Down Under. Find out about each jersey below.

tour de france sprint jersey colour

SANTOS LEADER'S JERSEY

The Santos Ochre Jersey is awarded to the rider with the fastest cumulative time at the end of each stage - the leader of the 'general classification - and the overall winner at the end of the race.

Ochre is the colour of the iconic South Australian outback, and is unique among the general classification jerseys in the UCI WorldTour.

Most recent winner: Stephen Williams (2024, Israel Premier Tech) Most Santos Ochre Winner's jerseys:  4 - Simon Gerrans (2006 with AG2R La Mondiale, 2012, 2014, 2016 with Orica-SCOTT/GreenEDGE)

Most recent winner:  Sarah Gigante (2024, AG INSURANCE - SOUDAL) Most Santos Ochre Winner's jerseys:  3 - Amanda Spratt (2017, 2018, 2019 with Mitchelton-Scott)

tour de france sprint jersey colour

ZIPTRAK® SPRINT JERSEY

This jersey is awarded at the end of each stage, and the race, to the rider with the most number of points in the sprint classification.

Sprint points are awarded at pre-defined checkpoints on stages, including the finish. Sprint checkpoints located along the route are referred to as intermediate sprints, and carry fewer points than those associated with the finish. The first three riders receive points towards the classification.

Most recent winner: Sam Welsford (2024, BORA - Hansgrohe) Most Ziptrak® Sprint jerseys:  3 - Robbie McEwen (2002, 2004-5 with Davitamon-Lotto)

Most recent winner: Sofia Bertizzolo (2024, UAE TEAM ADQ)

tour de france sprint jersey colour

efex KING/QUEEN OF THE MOUNTAIN JERSEY

The efex King/Queen of the Mountain jersey is awarded at the end of each stage, and the race, to the rider who leads the cumulative Mountains Classification.

efex King/Queen of the Mountains points are awarded at pre-determined summits along each stage. This jersey traditionally has a polka dot pattern, which started in the Tour de France in 1975 and has been adopted by other races around the world. The efex King/Queen of the Mountain jersey has green polka dots.

Most recent winner: Luke Burns (2024, ARA Australian Cycling Team) Most efex King of the Mountains jerseys:  3 - Cadel Evans (2002 with Mapei-QuickStep, 2003 with Telekom, 2006 with Davitamon Lotto)

Most recent winner: Katia Ragusa (2024, Human Powered Health) Most efex Queen of the Mountains jerseys: 2 - Amanda Spratt (2023, Trek Segafredo, 2018, Mitchelton-SCOTT)

tour de france sprint jersey colour

ZWIFT YOUNG RIDER'S JERSEY

The Zwift Young Rider's jersey is awarded at the end of each stage, and the race, to the rider under 23 years of age with the best cumulative time in the race. The Youth Classification leader and winner traditionally wears a white-coloured jersey in world cycling, and the Santos Tour Down Under also maintains this tradition.

Most recent winner: Isaac Del Toro (2024, UAE Team Emirates) Most Zwift Young Rider jerseys:  2 - Gene Bates (2001, 2003 with UniSA), Jose Joaquin Rojas (2008-09 with Caisse d'Epargne), Rohan Dennis (2012 with UniSA-Australia, 2015 with BMC)

Most recent winner: Nienke Vinke (2024, Team DSM-Firmenich PostNL)

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Tour de Suisse: Mark Cavendish Set for Key Pre-Tour de France Test Monday, Yves Lampaert Wins Opening TT

Belgian into first race leader’s jersey while manxman readies himself for first of two sprint stages..

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With less than three weeks to go until the start of his final Tour de France, Mark Cavendish will look to chase a stage victory on Monday or Tuesday in the Tour de Suisse .

The Manxman got the race underway on Sunday, netting 58th in a prologue won by the Belgian Yves Lampaert (Soudal Quick-Step). His goal was to loosen up for the upcoming two sprint stages, which will take the riders to Regensdorf on Monday and Rüschlikon Tuesday.

As for Lampaert, Sunday’s flat 4.77km was very much a goal in itself. He was an early starter in the race and set a time of 5:05 to top the leaderboard.

Hours later he had won, seeing off challenges from many other riders. These included Stefan Bissegger (EF Education-Easy Post) and Ethan Hayter (Ineos Grenadiers) who were second and third. They were both fractionally over three seconds slower.

Joâo Almeida (UAE Team Emirates) was best of the GC riders in fourth.

“It’s a big result for me as I have never expected to beat the Swiss time trial specialists,” Lampaert said. “So that makes me really proud. I am happy for myself and for the team who believed in me. It feels great to get a World Tour victory, it’s something that gives me a lot of confidence.

“The prologue wasn’t easy, but I gave my best and found from the start a good tempo which I could keep until the finish. From that point on, I had to wait quite a lot in the hot seat, but it was worth it.”

He will wear the race leader’s jersey on Monday, becoming the first Belgian in eight years to do so.

“It’s an honour to have the yellow jersey in a prestigious race such as the Tour de Suisse,” he said.

VADUZ, LIECHTENSTEIN - JUNE 09: Yves Lampaert of Belgium and Team Soudal Quick-Step sprints during the 87th Tour de Suisse 2024, Stage 1 a 4.77km individual time trial stage from Vaduz to Vaduz / #UCIWT / on June 09, 2024 in Vaduz, Liechtenstein. (Photo by Tim de Waele/Getty Images)

As is the case with the Critérium du Dauphiné, it is one of two top preparation races for the Tour de France, as well as being very prestigious events in their own right.

Many strong GC riders are present, and so too some of the world’s best sprinters.

Cavendish is one of those, and will be up against the likes of Arnaud De Lie (Lotto Dstny), Bryan Coquard (Cofidis), Pascal Ackermann (Israel-Premier Tech), Jordi Meeus (Bora-Hansgrohe) and others in the two expected sprint stages on Monday and Tuesday.

Both are likely harder than he would prefer, with Monday’s leg including two early category two climbs, constantly undulating roads and a category three ascent peaking 11km from the finish.

However while he has said that he is in Switzerland primarily to hone his climbing form, he will also grab any opportunity for a morale-boosting stage victory along the way.

Thus far he has clocked up just two victories this season, with this statistic underlining how much a win would confirm he is on track.

Tuesday’s third stage is also a little tricky, with early flat roads being followed by three category three climbs inside the final 40km.

Still, if he does manage to contest the expected reduced bunch sprints – and even more so if he wins one – it will show that he is in strong form in advance of what is almost certainly his last Tour de France.

He was due to retire last year but crashed out of that race and later decided to return in 2024.

Cavendish is level with Eddy Merckx on 34 stage wins and is trying to secure what would be an all-time record of 35.

Meanwhile his Astana Qazaqstan squad is trying to get its own momentum fully up to speed, with just six victories to its credit this season.

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Tour de france 2024 - stage 18 preview.

July 18, 2024: Gap - Barcelonnette, 179.6km

Stage 18 Sprints

Stage 18 mountains.

Stage 18 from Gap to Barcelonnette will be one for the breakaway and should offer a slight reprieve from the high mountains. The up-and-down route with 3,100 metres of elevation gain includes the Col du Festre (3.9km at 6.3%), the Côte de Corps (2.1km at 7.2%) and the Col de Manse (5.1km at 3.6%).

A strong puncheur might be able to go clear on the Côte de Saint-Apollinaire (7km at 5.5%) with 58 kilometres to go and will have even more opportunity to do so on the Côte des Demoiselles Coiffées (3.6km at 5.4%) with 40 kilometres to go.

  • Intermediate sprint, km 84.3
  • Col du Festre (3.9km at 6.3%), cat. 3, km 32.2
  • Côte de Corps (2.1km at 7.2%), cat. 3, km 57.5
  • Col de Manse (5.1km at 3.6%), cat. 3, km 97.3
  • Côte de Saint-Apollinaire (7km at 5.5%), cat. 3, km 121
  • Côte des Demoiselles Coiffées (3.6km at 5.4%), cat. 3, km 139.1

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Kirsten Frattini is the Deputy Editor of Cyclingnews , overseeing the global racing content plan.

Kirsten has a background in Kinesiology and Health Science. She has been involved in cycling from the community and grassroots level to professional cycling's biggest races, reporting on the WorldTour, Spring Classics, Tours de France, World Championships and Olympic Games.

She began her sports journalism career with Cyclingnews as a North American Correspondent in 2006. In 2018, Kirsten became Women's Editor – overseeing the content strategy, race coverage and growth of women's professional cycling – before becoming Deputy Editor in 2023.

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The (Other) Winners of the 2024 Giro d’Italia

Sure, Tadej Pogačar put together a legendary performance at the Giro—but who and what else stood out?

107th giro d'italia 2024 stage 21

The 107th Giro d’Italia wrapped up on Sunday in Rome with Slovenia’s Tadej Pogačar (UAE Team Emirates) taking home the maglia rosa (“pink jersey”) as the overall winner of the Italian grand tour.

Pogačar started the final week with a sizable lead: 6:41 ahead of Great Britain’s Geraint Thomas (INEOS Grenadiers) and 6:56 ahead of Colombia’s Daniel Martínez (BORA-hansgrohe). But the Slovenian left nothing to chance, winning Stages 16 and 20 to extend his lead even further.

By the time the dust had settled, the two-time Tour de France champion had won the General Classification by almost 10 minutes. Martínez ended the race in second-place overall, 9:56 behind Pogačar; and Thomas, who finished second overall in last year’s Giro, ended the race in third, 10:24 behind the Slovenian. To put things into perspective, Pogačar’s winning margin was the largest since 1965.

Pogačar and his UAE Team Emirates squad dominated the race from start to finish–perhaps even more emphatically than most expected. The Slovenian wore the maglia rosa for 20 days, falling one day short of taking the Giro’s first wire-to-wire victory since 1990. He won six stages, the most by anyone since Alessandro Petacchi won nine sprint stages in 2004 and the most ever by an overall winner. Even Belgian legend Eddy Merckx–who won the race five times–never won more than five stages in a single Giro. And with five of his six stage wins coming in the mountains, it comes as no surprise that Pogačar also won the maglia azzurra (“blue jersey”) as the Giro’s King of the Mountains.

Simply put: this was the greatest Giro performance by a single rider in the modern era– and maybe ever. The 25-year-old was far and away the best rider in this year’s race, and there was nothing anyone could do to stop him.

Now the Slovenian has his sights set on the Tour de France, where he will most likely enter the race as the top contender. His goal in winning a third Tour de France is to become the first rider since 1998 to win the Giro and the Tour in the same season. And after his Giro performance–and given the fact that the Tour’s two-time defending champion, Denmark’s Jonas Vingegaard (Visma-Lease a Bike), might not be healthy enough to start the Tour–we’re not betting against him.

Here’s a look at some of the other “ winners” from the 107th Giro d’Italia:

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Daniel Martínez (BORA-hansgrohe)

Thanks to Pogačar, the Giro quickly became a race for second, and credit goes to Martínez for scoring his first podium finish in a grand tour. The Colombian–who came to BORA from INEOS during the off-season–rode a near-flawless race after climbing into the top-3 on Stage 2 and then never leaving it.

Geraint Thomas (INEOS Grenadiers)

Thomas–who turned 38 on Saturday–finished second to Roglič last year after losing the maglia rosa in a mountain time trial on the penultimate day. Like Martínez, the Welshman raced into the top-3 on the General Classification on Stage 2 and then never left it; his dogfight with the Colombian was one of the race’s more interesting storylines once Pogačar had pulled away from the field.

A podium finish in a grand tour is a career achievement at any age, but at 38, it’s really something special. Then again, for Thomas–who’s probably the most consistent stage racer in the sport–it’s just another day at the office.

Thomas is retiring at the end of the season, but first he’s joining Pogačar and Martínez at the Tour de France, a race he won back in 2018. He’s not expected to lead the team, though. Instead he’ll join Spain’s Carlos Rodriguez and Colombia’s Egan Bernal as some sort of three-headed GC-monster that will attempt to use its strength and experience to try and upset the Tour’s more favored contenders.

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Jonathan Milan (Lidl-Trek)

For the second year in a row, Italy’s Jonathan Milan (Lidl-Trek) won the maglia ciclamino (“cyclamen jersey”) as the winner of the Giro’s Points Classification. While not quite as impressive as Pogačar, the 23-year-old won four stages–and finished second in four others–to run away with the competition for the second year in a row.

We’re not sure if the statuesque Italian (he’s about 6’3”) will be riding the Tour de France this summer. But if he does, he could give Belgium’s Jasper Philipsen (Alpecin-Deceuninck)–who won four stages and the Points Classification in last year’s Tour–a run for his money.

Antonio Tiberi (Bahrain-Victorious)

Prior to this year’s Giro d’Italia, Tiberi was known more for something he did off the bike–and it wasn’t very good. In early 2023, the Italian killed his neighbor’s cat with an air rifle and was subsequently fired by Trek-Segafredo, the team he was riding for at the time. After some time passed, Bahrain-Victorious signed the then-21-year-old and gave him a chance to resume his career and re-shape his image.

Well, in finishing fifth overall and taking home the maglia bianca (“white jersey”) as the Giro’s Best Young Rider, Tiberi has put himself squarely on the radar of his nation’s rabid fans. A gifted climber, he’s possesses two additional traits that might make him a future Giro champion: he’s a talented time trialist–he finished sixth in both ITTs in this year’s race; and he’s got a bit of swagger–Pogačar complimented Tiberi for being the only one willing to attack the Slovenian during the first week.

The 22-year-old is heading straight to France’s Critérium du Dauphiné–which starts this weekend–where he’ll see if he has enough form left to challenge some of the Tour’s top pre-race contenders. Then he’ll rest before tackling the Vuelta a España in late-August. If everything goes as planned, Tiberi will enter next year’s Giro as a top contender, a rider who could possibly win the host nation its first maglia rosa since 2016.

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Italian Tifosi

Italian cycling tifosi or “fans” haven’t had much to cheer about in the past few years, as the nation’s been experiencing a bit of a dry spell when it comes to producing riders capable of winning grand tours like the Giro d’Italia or Monuments like Milan-San Remo. But if this year’s Giro is any indication, that could be changing soon.

Obviously, Milan–a future world class sprinter–and Tiberi–a potential pink jersey contender–lead the way, but Italians also loved the gutsy ride from Giulio Pellizzari, a 20-year-old who rides for the small VF Group-Bardiani CSF-Faizanè team, one of a few squads to receive wild card invitations to this year’s race.

The youngest rider in the race, Pellizzari attacked relentlessly in the mountains, coming close to winning a stage on more than one occasion and even impressing Pogačar, who gifted the Italian his sunglasses and his maglia rosa after the Slovenian defeated the Italian to win Stage 16.

He ended the race as the runner-up in the Giro’s King of the Mountains competition, which meant he earned the right to wear the maglia azzurra into Rome–because Pogačar couldn’t wear two leaders’ jerseys at once. And even better, Pellizzari’s performance caught the eye of several WorldTour squads, with rumors swirling as to which team will sign the talented young climber to a big contract this off-season.

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Soudal-Quick Step

The Belgian WorldTour squad had a terrible spring, coming up short in cobbled Classics like the Tour of Flanders and Paris-Roubaix, events that the team once dominated. To make matters worse, the team’s marquee rider, Remco Evenepoel, crashed out of the Tour of the Basque Country, which prevented the Belgian superstar from going for a third-straight win in Liège-Bastogne-Liège, a victory that would have salvaged the team’s spring campaign.

But the team rebounded at the Giro, winning four stages. Belgium’s Tim Merlier led the way with three sprint victories–including the final stage into Rome.

But Julian Alaphilippe’s Stage 12 victory was easily the team’s most popular victory. The one-time “galactico” has had a rough couple of seasons and has since fallen out with his team’s outspoken General Manager, Patrick Lefevere . But after spending three weeks as one of the Giro’s most aggressive riders, Alaphilippe seems to have regained the swashbuckling spirit that won the French puncheur back-to-back world championships in 2020 and 2021.

Alaphilippe wasn’t slated to ride the Tour de France, but there are rumors that his Giro performance might help him make the team. And if it didn’t, it at least helped his asking price: with his contract set to expire at the end of the season, there are several French teams looking to sign him.

107th giro d'italia 2024 stage 21

Colnago bicycles have been ridden by some of cycling’s most famous champions. But the iconic Italian brand hasn’t stood on the top step of the Giro’s podium since Russia’s Denis Menchov (Rabobank) won the race back in 2009. Well, that’s all changed thanks to Pogačar, who ended the brand’s 15-year Giro drought with his victory.

The company might want to sign Pogačar to a lifetime contract , as the Slovenian seems to be a lucky talisman for the legendary brand. His 2020 Tour de France victory was Colnago’s first–a bit of a surprise for a company that once supplied bikes to Merckx. Then again, maybe it’s time to get used to Pogačar doing things that even Merckx–who’s widely considered to be the greatest men’s cyclist of all time–could not.

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