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Trip planning, travel destinations, destination highlights, mexico lifestyles, living & lifestyle, lifestyle planning, real estate, healthcare & wellbeing, leisure assistance, lifestyle assistance, insurance coverages, property assistance, about mexperience, mexico essentials, discover more, mexico entry requirements—for leisure, business or residency.

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This guide explains what you need to know about entry requirements when you are visiting Mexico for leisure, for business, or to take up residency here.

Mexico entry requirements for tourists and short term visitors

Mexico visitors permit, fmm.

Passport holders from countries on Mexico’s no visa required list do not need to apply for a formal visa to visit Mexico. They may, instead, use a visitor’s permit, known as a FMM ( Forma Migratoria Multiple ).

For the countries that don’t need a visa , a Mexico Visitor’s Permit (FMM) is issued in place of a visa. Learn more about Mexico’s visitor permit, the FMM .

How long is your Mexico visitor permit valid?

When you enter Mexico as tourist or business visitor, the immigration official at the port of entry will grant you a number of days stay in Mexico and write this on your visitor permit. This will be a maximum of 180 days; but it may be less than 180 days.

Check to see how many days you are granted to determine your exit date.

Learn more about the number of days being granted  to people arriving in Mexico under the auspice of a visitor permit, FMM.

Visitor permits cannot be extended or renewed

The Visitor Permit (FMM) will always expire after the number of days written on the permit: it cannot be extended beyond the number of days the immigration official grants when you arrive in Mexico, even if this is less than the maximum allowance of 180 days; and cannot be renewed.  You must leave the country before it expires.

Your Mexico Visitor Permit, FMM

Do I Need A Visa to Visit Mexico

Entry to Mexico: Essential Information for All Travelers

Regardless of whether you come to Mexico for leisure, for business or to take up residency here, take note of the following:

Required documentation

For a summary of the documentation required to enter Mexico, see Documents required for travel and entry to Mexico

Minors traveling to Mexico alone

Minors traveling to Mexico alone, or unaccompanied by at least one parent or their legal guardian: Read Traveling with Minors to Mexico .

Passport validity

The maximum period of time that a visitor/tourist may stay in Mexico under the auspice of a visitor permit (FMM, see above) is six months.

Therefore we recommend that your passport, regardless of country of origin, should be valid for a minimum period of six months, however long you intend to stay to avoid any potential problems at the port of entry.

Immigration authorities at the port of entry may allow or deny entry of any person into Mexico. If you have a passport that is valid for less than six months and you intend to stay in Mexico for a short period of time —perhaps a vacation— the Immigration Officer might allow you entry, especially if you can show a return air ticket.

Notwithstanding this, we recommend that you and your family members hold passports valid for at least six months from the date you intend to enter Mexico.

For holders of U.S. Passport Cards

U.S. passport cards are less expensive than passport books and can be used by U.S. citizens who cross the border between the United States and Mexico by land or sea. These look like a driver’s license, and are more robust and less bulky than a passport book. You can learn more about Passport Cards on this page of the US State Department web site. If you are a holder of a U.S. Passport Card, please note that this is NOT valid for air travel to Mexico . Passport Cards can only be used to cross the border between the United States and Mexico by land or sea ports. A passport is required for air travel to and from the the United States.

Traveling to Mexico via the United States:

In January 2009 the United States government introduced new rules for travelers entering the country using the Visa Waiver Program (US State Dept). See Also: Travel to Mexico via the USA

Arriving to Mexico by cruise ship

If you are traveling on a cruise ship that visits Mexico, you will be asked to complete a Visitors Permit/FMM (see information above) at your first Mexican port-of-call.  This permit will be valid for a maximum of 21 days.  Ask your cruise company for details.

Traveling in transit through Mexico

As of February 2004 foreigners passing through one of Mexico’s international airports to a third country no longer require a visa or any migratory documentation, provided that they remain at the airport and depart Mexico within 24 hours of arrival. See Also: Entry Procedure at Mexican Ports

Entry requirements for business visits to Mexico

Mexico welcomes business visitors and makes the immigration procedure for short visits straightforward by means of a special section on the Visitor’s Permit described above.

Business visits to Mexico

If you are traveling on business, or representing a company to conduct business in Mexico, and you hold a passport from a country on Mexico’s “ no visa required list ” you do not need to apply for a formal visa to visit Mexico. You can, instead, use a visitor’s permit —the same entry permit and procedures used by tourists to enter Mexico (see section above for full details).

If the country you hold a passport for does not appear on the no-visa list , you should check with your nearest local Mexican Consulate  for details of visa requirements before you travel to Mexico.

Longer-term business visits to Mexico

If you plan to work or live in Mexico longer periods ( more than 180 days ), you will need to apply for a business visit visa.

This visa enables the visitor to live, work and do business in Mexico, provided that certain criteria are satisfied. You can get more detailed information about long-term living and working permits on Mexperience by connecting to the Immigration Page that contains lots of information and advice about living and working in Mexico. See also: Working in Mexico

Entry requirements for residency in Mexico

People wishing to travel to Mexico to live, work, or retire must meet certain criteria to do so. Mexperience has comprehensive sections of information dedicated to these topics of interest:

Residency visas and immigration

Our guide to Mexico Visas and Immigration page gives an overview of the requirements for temporary and permanent residency in Mexico. Also see the regularly-updated  Mexico Immigration FAQs page for the most-commonly asked questions about immigration to Mexico.

Entry Procedure at Mexican Ports

The entry procedure will vary depending on where you arrive in Mexico and whether you arrive as a visitor or as resident. See also: Procedures for Entering and Leaving Mexico

Mexican Customs procedures and allowances

Like all countries, Mexico has policies on what can be brought in to the country without paying duties or taxes.

Your customs allowances when entering Mexico

Allowances are subject to change without notice, but listed below are the principal items followed by some tips about entry to Mexico.

  • Personal Luggage: including new and used goods for personal use to include clothes, footwear, personal hygiene and beauty items which, according to the form: ‘reasonably respond to the duration of the trip and that due to its quantities may not be used for commercial purposes’;
  • Two photographic or video cameras and twelve rolls of film or videotapes;
  • Two mobile phones or pagers;
  • One used or new laptop; one used or new printer; one projector;
  • Two used or new items of sports gear;
  • One CD player or portable music player; one DVD player;
  • One musical instrument;
  • Three surfboards; four fishing rods; a pair of skis;
  • Ten packs of cigarettes (200 cigarettes total), twenty-five cigars OR 200 grams of tobacco (over 18s only);
  • Vaping imports banned: The commercial import of vaping products was banned in February 2020; however, small quantities  for personal use by visitors to the country should not be confiscated (vaping itself is not illegal in Mexico); bringing an ‘excess’ deemed reasonable for personal use may cause your entire supply to be confiscated.
  • Three liters of liquor AND six liters of wine (if the person is aged over 18 years);
  • There is a US$300 tax exemption on items you import (in addition to those already listed above) when you enter the country by means or air or maritime transport; the exemption is reduced to US$50 if you travel in by land, except at Easter, Summer Holidays and Christmas time, when the land exemption limit is increased to US$300.

Please Note:  Refer to the Mexican Customs web site for full details about customs allowances as these limits are subject to change with little or no notice .

MEXICAN CUSTOMS: TIPS & ADVICE FOR TRAVELERS

Bringing prescription drugs to Mexico:  You are allowed to bring prescription drugs into Mexico provided that you have the accompanying documentation which proves a medical need. If you or a member of your family are taking prescription drugs, be sure to take the prescription/doctor’s note with you, which includes the patient’s name and the name of the medication(s) to prove medical need of the drugs you are carrying in case your luggage gets inspected.

Don’t bring firearms or ammunition!   A foreign firearms license is not valid in Mexico ; if you own a gun, don’t take it to Mexico with you and don’t bring any ammunition with you either. The only exception is a firearm and ammunition used for hunting purposes; but you will need to apply for a special permit – contact your local Mexican Consulate . Being in possession of lethal knives, firearms of all types, and even a single round of ammunition is a Federal crime in Mexico: caught in possession of a firearm can land you in very serious trouble—even if you have a license for it that was issued in your home country. See Also: Mexico’s Strict Gun Laws

Type and quantity of items : Don’t bring anything that obviously looks like you’re planning to resell goods; for example, several laptop computers. These items will get heavily taxed or confiscated. Items for personal use will be allowed, new or used, but only in quantities that are commensurate with the definition of ‘personal use.’ If you are carrying large quantities of anything, or if the Customs Inspector believes you are trying to commercialize any of the goods you are carrying, then you may be interviewed further.

Drug smuggling: Every year, foreign nationals are arrested and convicted for drug smuggling in Mexico.  Don’t attempt to smuggle any narcotics – not even small amounts of ‘soft’ drugs, e.g. cannabis/marijuana. You may be required to present documentary evidence for any powerful prescription drugs you need to carry on your person (i.e. doctor’s prescription, see note above about prescription drugs.) Narcotic offenses (use of, import, export, dealing) are likely to land you in a Mexican prison for many years. Don’t expect your consulate to bail you out because it won’t be able to. 20-25 year prison sentences for drug and serious firearm-related offenses are not uncommon in Mexico.

What you may take home from Mexico

Customs allowances into your home country will depend on where you live.

If you are planning to do a lot of shopping in Mexico, you should check at the information desk at (air)port of departure in your home country for the latest duty-free allowances.

Most goods classed as art and craft work are free of import taxes and you can bring as many home as many as you like, provided the quantities would be considered ‘for personal enjoyment’. Check with your local port/customs authorities for details.

The following items are are typical of duty-free allowances in many countries:

  • 200 Cigarettes;
  • 50 Cigars or 250g of Tobacco;
  • 2 liters of wine;
  • 1 or 2 liters of liquor (depending on country);
  • 60cl of perfume;
  • In addition to the above: a US dollar or euro amount of goods, ranging from about US$300-$500, depending upon the country. If you go over the monetary limit, duty and tax is usually payable on the whole amount not just the sum above the limit;
  • Exact rates and amounts vary by country/trading block. Check with the information desk at your home country’s port of departure for the latest details on allowances

Leaving Mexico and Consular Contacts

Leaving mexico.

There are some procedures to follow when you depart Mexico, whether you are a visitor, or resident here:

If you are in Mexico as a tourist/visitor: When you leave Mexico, you will need to show your visitor permit you were issued with when you arrived. See also: Your Mexico Visitors Permit, FMM

If you are resident in Mexico be sure to the immigration desk at the airport or land border to show your residency card and get passport stamped before you leave the country . See also: Procedures for entering and leaving Mexico

Foreign Embassies and Consulates

Foreign nationals may be able to get assistance from their country’s consulate.  Read our article about seeking consular assistance in Mexico for further details.

Directory of Mexican Consulates Abroad

Directory of Foreign Consulates in Mexico

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Travel Documents You Need to Visit Mexico

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Passports have been mandatory for air travel between the United States and Mexico since the Western Hemisphere Travel Initiative came into effect in 2007. But for travel by land and sea, there are a few alternative travel documents which are still accepted in some situations.

Traveling to Mexico With Children

When traveling to Mexico, U.S. citizens, Canadians, and other foreign visitors should check what identification and travel documents are valid and necessary. If you are traveling to Mexico with children , there are some special requirements you may need to complete before you book your trip.

U.S. Citizens

  • Passport: A passport is hands-down the best form of identification and proof of citizenship. It is highly recommended that you get a passport to travel to Mexico. If you'll be entering the country by air, it's necessary. If for some reason you are unable to get a passport or do not want to, you will need one of the following documents to travel to Mexico by land or sea. These documents are acceptable travel documents for all United States citizens.
  • Passport card: Issued by the U.S. Department of State, this passport substitute is credit-card sized and valid for entry into Mexico by land or sea. The passport card  is not accepted for air travel . This passport card can also be used for land and sea travel to Mexico, Canada, Bermuda, and the Caribbean. A passport card also costs less than a passport, however, a passport is more useful overall, especially if you plan on traveling outside of North America.
  • Enhanced Drivers License: Enhanced Drivers Licenses are proof of citizenship and identity. These special drivers licenses are valid for travel to Mexico by land or sea but are not valid for air travel. It's important to keep in mind that these are only available in some states, including Michigan, New York, Vermont, and Washington. You will need to research your individual state licensing department for specific details.
  • SENTRI Card: The U.S. Customs and Border Protection issue the SENTRI Card to pre-approved travelers who cross the U.S./Mexico border frequently. It has the added benefit of access to dedicated commuter lanes for crossing the border. The card is valid for five years.
  • FAST card: The FAST card provides expedited travel to pre-approved commercial truck drivers between the U.S. and Canada, and U.S. and Mexico borders through dedicated lanes.

U.S. Permanent Residents

For permanent residents of the United States, the I-551 Permanent Resident card is required for return to the US. For entry into Mexico, you will need to present a passport, and depending on your country of citizenship, possibly a visa as well.

Canadian Citizens

Mexico is the second most popular tourist destination for Canadian travelers . Since 2010, a new requirement was put into place, which states that a passport is required for Canadian citizens traveling to Mexico.

Citizens of Other Countries

A passport is necessary, and in some cases, a visa is also required for citizens outside of the US. Contact the Mexican embassy or consulate nearest you for more information about the requirements specific to your situation.

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Mexico Entry Requirements - Required Travel Documents for Travel to Mexico

Home » Passports » How to Obtain a U.S. Passport

A CBP agent checks a passport at the US Mexico border

It is one of the most common questions we have received over the past 20 years helping readers like you with their travel document needs:

Do you need a passport to go to Mexico?

The simple answer is yes . US citizens are required to present a valid passport book or passport card when entering Mexico.

There are also some alternative travel documents that can be used in place of a passport depending on where and how you plan to cross the U.S.-Mexico border.

Both the U.S. Department of Homeland Security and Mexican authorities have made a real effort to strengthen border security. As such, there are strict rules about considered a valid travel document to visit Mexico.

The following items are considered valid identification documents for traveling to Mexico:

  • A U.S. passport book (required for all international air travel to Mexico)
  • A U.S. passport card
  • An enhanced driver's license (EDL)
  • A trusted traveler program card (NEXUS card SENTRI card, FAST card, or Global Entry card)
  • An enhanced tribal card (ETC)
  • A military identification card (only for members of the U.S. armed services on official maritime business)
  • A Military ID with official orders that require travel to Mexico or through the country's borders

The items listed above are all considered WHTI compliant documents (more on this later). While a passport book is the only acceptable document for international air travel, the rest of these options can be used at most land and sea ports of entry to Mexico and back into the United States.

Note : Not every port of entry has the RFID card readers required to accept any WHTI compliant document other than a passport book. When planning travel to Mexico, travelers should be sure they have the proper type of identification documents accepted by the customs and border protection services at their planned port of entry.

The following documents are not acceptable substitutes for a valid passport:

  • a birth certificate
  • a standard driver's license
  • an automobile registration
  • a naturalization certificate
  • any other government issued photo ID that is not expressly a WHTI compliant document

While many of these are required documents for getting a passport , none of them are considered a valid travel document on their own for entering Mexico.

Currently, a valid passport book is the best option for all U.S. citizens traveling to Mexico . It is the most reliable and versatile way to travel internationally. If you have a valid passport book, you can be sure it will be accepted at every US Customs and Border Protection (CBP) and Instituto Nacional de Migracion (National Migration Institute) checkpoint.

Regardless of how you plan to travel to Mexico, U.S. citizens who do not have a passport book or a passport card should apply for one well in advance of their trip.

If you are planning a trip to Mexico soon , be sure to consider expedited passport processing options . In some cases, registered passport courier services can help you  get a passport in-hand is as few as 24 hours .

Our expert recommendation for passport expediting services goes to Rush My Passport . Their courteous and professional team has offices across the US at the ready to help you get a new passport or renew an existing one quickly and without hassle. With their help, you can save both time and money compared to the costs of getting a rushed passport on your own.

It is worth noting that there are some alternatives to a passport book that will allow US citizens to enter Mexico and reenter the US. However, there are limits to how and where these can be used. For example, none of these alternatives is acceptable for air travel to Mexico or other countries.

Using WHTI Documents to Cross the Mexico Border

A CBP agent checks a driver's travel document at the US Mexico border

The Western Hemisphere Travel Initiative ( WHTI ) was established in 2007 to both strengthen border security and make it simpler to travel between Mexico, Canada, Bermuda, and some Caribbean Islands. The program is ideal for US, Mexican, and Canadian citizens who must regularly travel back and forth across land or sea border crossings for work, family, or other reasons.

The most common of the WHTI compliant documents is the passport card , but they all essentially work the same way. Presenting one of these documents to Mexican immigration authorities will allow you to enter Mexico by land or by sea.

The same works in reverse. WHTI-approved travel documents meet the entry requirements for US citizens seeking passage back into the United States through most Customs and Border Protection checkpoints.

So, while US citizens must still always present a valid passport or valid identification when crossing back and forth across these borders, the WHTI compliant documents make life more convenient for frequent travelers in a number of ways:

  • RFID chips embedded in Western Hemisphere Travel Initiative documents speed up the process of crossing the border by land or sea.
  • Passport books have limited number of pages. Without WHTI alternatives, travelers who cross North American land and sea borders often would need to renew passports more frequently. This would cost travelers a lot of time and money.
  • Passport books are bulky. Conversely, a passport card, enhanced driver's license, SENTRI card, or other card issued as part of the Trusted Traveler Program can fit in a standard wallet or purse just like any credit or debit card. This makes life easier for those who need to carry travel documents with them as part of their daily routines.

If your international travel plans are focused solely on Western Hemisphere Travel Initiative countries (and don't involve international air travel), this may be a great way to travel to Mexico without a passport book.

Requirements for Minors Traveling to Mexico

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Getting a passport for a minor (considered by the State Department to be all U.S. citizens under the age of 16) is the best way to ensure flexibility when traveling to Mexico or any international destination.

For one thing, a passport book is the only way for a child (or anyone) to board and international flight.

This may not seem like a big deal, but should there be an emergency that requires travel abroad, a child will remain grounded without a valid passport book. This goes for traveling to Mexico and back, as well.

There are some acceptable WHTI documents that a minor can be eligible for (a passport card being one), but they carry the same limitations on ports of entry as they do for adults. Chief among them: WHTI documents cannot be used for air travel to Mexico or anywhere else.

In the specific case of traveling to Mexico, there are some other unique circumstances carved out for minors without passports:

  • Children who are U.S. citizens and under age 16 arriving by land or sea from contiguous territory can travel to Mexico from the United States without a passport. They must present an original or copy of his or her birth certificate, a Consular Report of Birth Abroad, a Naturalization Certificate, or a Canadian Citizenship Card when entering Mexico and when returning to the United States.
  • Children under the age of 19 who are U.S. citizens traveling with a school group, religious group, social or cultural organization or sports team , may present these documents as well; however, they must also provide documentation from the supervising organization, contact information, and letters of consent from a legal parent or guardian.

In either case, a passport book is still the most convenient option to ensure maximum travel flexibility.

Tourist Travel

friends dining in mexico with a mariachi band

A visa or tourist card - also called a Forma Migratoria Multiple (FMM) is now required for all U.S. citizens visiting as tourist for six months. Previous exemptions for short stays (less than 72-hours) or stays within the border zone no longer apply.

This Mexican tourist card is mandatory for all leisure visits by land, sea, or air. These FMM cards serve as your entry permit and can be purchased at Mexican consulates, Mexican border crossings, tourism offices, airports, and airline offices.

Mexican immigration officers and other law enforcement entities have the right ask visitors to provide proof of their legal status at any time. As such, travelers are expected to keep their tourist cards with them at all times.

Any non-Mexican citizen must must present a valid form of travel documentation-as well as their Mexican tourist card-upon request.

It is worth noting that, on occasion, travelers that have been unable to produce proper documentation have been detained by Mexican officials. Border protection and security is a big deal across North America, not just in the United States. For this reason, it is a good idea to keep photocopies of your passport and tourist card in case the originals are damaged, lost , or stolen .

While these tourist cards remain valid for up to 180 days, U.S. citizens must return the cards when they depart Mexico. Visitors who are unable to present their card may encounter significant delays and be asked to file a police report, pay fines, and/or go through the process of obtaining an exit visa .

Do You Need a Passport for Closed Loop Cruises?

No. Even if you don't have a valid passport yet, it is possible to visit Mexico as part of a closed loop cruise. You must present a valid form of identification to board, but you do not need to have a valid passport book or passport card.

Closed loop cruises are unique travel itineraries in which a cruise line starts and ends its journey from a port within the United States.

While these cruises may travel through waters controlled by other countries (or even dock at a foreign port of entry), the US citizens on board are not required to have a valid passport. Travelers can board and remain on the cruise with whatever valid identification documents the cruise line accepts.

This is a great way to travel without a passport , but it can also be quite limiting. A cruise line may advertise particular voyages as a closed loop cruises, but still offer excursions on land for travelers with valid passports or WHTI compliant documents that meet the entry requirements of the port. Being able to present a valid passport opens up the maximum potential for making the most of a cruise to Mexico - closed loop or otherwise.

Business Travel

a man and woman have a business meeting at a conference table

Travelers visiting Mexico for business must also complete and submit Form FFM . This form authorizes visitors to conduct business, but not to obtain employment. Business travelers, other non-tourist travelers, or any visitors remaining for more than 180 days must have a Mexican visa and a valid passport to enter the country. U.S. citizens can apply for a Mexican visa at the Mexican Embassy or any Mexican consulate .

For travelers expecting to cross the U.S.-Mexico border on a regular basis, the SENTRI card issued by the U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP) may be worth acquiring. It allows access to speedy commuter lanes, drastically reducing time spent waiting in line at CBP checkpoints.

Similarly, the FAST card allows commercial drivers (typically trucks) access to dedicated lanes through most North American border crossings.

A yellow Volkswagen Beetle parked in front of a Mexican cantina

Any U.S. vehicle traveling beyond the Mexican border zone may be confiscated unless the driver is able to present a temporary import permit (TIP). Incarceration, fines, or vehicle seizure may result from driving into the Mexican interior without this documentation.

Obtaining this permit involves producing several required documents:

  • evidence of citizenship
  • a vehicle title
  • a valid vehicle registration
  • a valid driver's license

There is a processing fee, as well.

In addition to the items listed above, drivers must also post a bond at an office of the Banjercito (the Mexican Army Bank) to guarantee that the vehicle will be exported by a certain date. This monetary deposit can be made by cash or credit card.

Posting this bond at a Mexican customs office or certain Mexican consulates will allow you to avoid additional fees and charges. You will receive a refund of your deposit as long as you leave Mexico before your Forma Migratoria Multiple (FMM) entry permit expires.

Be warned , travelers should never accept the service of individuals outside of official permit offices or consular agencies offering expedited service. These services are largely fraudulent and lack the authority to accept deposits, issue proper documentation, or handle deposit refunds.

Vehicles traveling in the Baja Peninsula or vehicles with the "Only Sonora" program are exempt from this requirement. This program allows any vehicle that enters at a land border in the Sonoran region to travel without a permit as long as it does not leave the region.

What may be brought into Mexico

U.S. citizens must declare the value of any gifts they are carrying when they enter Mexico.

There is a $75.00 duty free limit for entry by land, and a $300.00 limit for entry by air.

Alcohol and tobacco products always incur a duty. Personal effects will not incur a duty unless they exceed certain limits specified by Mexican customs. Undeclared items may be seized by customs.

Regulations are in place regarding imports, exports, and property donations, and visitors should contact the Embassy of Mexico or a Mexican consulate if they need details.

Before packing, consult our guide of the items NOT to pack for an international trip .

Dual Citizenship

Dual U.S./Mexican nationals should carry citizenship documentation for both countries when traveling to Mexico. In the case of Mexico, this means carrying both a U.S. and Mexican passport.

Mexico considers U.S. citizens born in Mexico or to Mexican parents to be dual citizens of Mexico. Dual citizens may be required to complete a period of military service in Mexico, and may have difficulty receiving U.S. consular assistance in the event of arrest or other emergencies. Dual nationals must declare their U.S. citizenship when returning to the United States.

The Border Zones

A hillside view of the US Mexico border

The immediate border area between Mexico's northern sates and the southern United States is known by many names:

  • The Border Zone
  • The Free Zone
  • The Free Trade Zone
  • The Liberated Zone
  • The Hassle-Free Zone
  • The Perimeter Zone

Initially, this area stretching 12-20 miles across the Mexican border, was designed to encourage travel and trade between Mexico and US travelers. As such, there were no FMM entry permit or Temporary Vehicle Import Permit (TIP) requirements. Passports were still a necessity, though.

This changed in 2015. The Mexican government required all those traveling to Mexico to get an FMM permit to enter the county. As it stands now, the only benefit to the Border Zone area is that a TIP is not required for vehicles that are not registered with Mexican documentation. Passports (or WHTI equivalents) and FMM are now always required for US citizens entering Mexico.

Still have questions about the requirements for crossing the U.S.-Mexico border? The Bureau of Consular Affairs website is the best source for further information about current regulations.

Should you need to obtain travel documentation quickly, be sure to visit our guides on how to expedite your passport and visa applications .

Top 5 Questions About Expedited Passport Couriers

1. How can you get a passport when you're in a hurry? 2. What exactly does a passport expediter do? 3. Are passport expediting services legitimate? 4. How can I identify a reliable passport expeditor? 5. Is expedited passport service worth it?

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  • Know Before You Go

Before Your Trip

Booking your tickets.

Match Names on Tickets and Documents

Purchase your travel tickets in the exact same name that appears on your passport or official ID. Ensure that all travel documents match that name precisely.

If the names don't match, your travel carrier or the Transportation Security Administration may require additional documents to verify your identity before allowing you to board.

Each Country is Different

Learn the required travel documents for each country you will visit. Find out about specific travel warnings, U.S. import restrictions, and other rules that apply to the countries on your itinerary by visiting www.state.gov/travelers .

Find the latest on making your return to the United States problem free - go to www.cbp.gov/travel .

Documents You Will Need

Carry - do not pack - all travel documents.

  • All U.S. citizens need U.S. passport books if re-entering by air. Land and sea border crossings accept additional travel documents, such as U.S. Passport cards and Trusted Traveler cards. Child travelers have additional options - see the Traveling with Children section.
  • Green card (Form I-551), or document for lawful permanent residents, or advance parole (Form I-512) if your Form I-551 is pending.
  • A visa or other entry document for the countries you will visit.
  • Receipts or registration ( CBP Form 4457 ) for new electronics, such as a camera or laptop, that you are taking abroad. (Only suggested if the goods are less than six months old.)
  • Proof of rabies vaccination for dogs traveling abroad. Check the requirements for other pets at www.aphis.usda.gov .
  • Valid license for driving overseas and for use as a second form of photo ID.
  • Permits and/or certificates if bringing restricted animal or plant products - go to www.aphis.usda.gov .
  • Medications in their original packages. Bring only the amount of medication you will need. Prescription medications have to be under the traveler's name.
  • Envelope to hold the receipts of your purchases abroad.

Traveling with Children

When U.S. citizen children under the age of 16 arrive by land or sea from Canada or Mexico they may present an original or copy of their birth certificate, a Consular Report of Birth Abroad, or a Naturalization Certificate.

Groups of Children: U.S. citizen children under the age of 19 arriving by land or sea from Canada or Mexico and traveling with a school group, religious group, social or cultural organization or sports team, may present an original or copy of their birth certificate, a Consular Report of Birth Abroad, or a Naturalization Certificate. The group should have a letter on organizational letterhead with:

  • The name of the group and supervising adult(s).
  • The names of the children on the trip and their primary address, phone number, date and place of birth, and name of at least one parent or legal guardian for each child.
  • A written and signed statement of the supervising adult certifying that he or she has parental or legal guardian consent for each child.

Mexico Entry Requirements for U.S. Citizens

Mexico Visa Needed

(for stays of up to 180 days)

Tourist Card (FMM) Needed

(if traveling by land)

Mexico has a number of entry requirements that citizens of the United States must meet when visiting the country.

US citizens planning to travel to Mexico should first check if they require a visa to cross the border, according to the Mexican visa policy.

mexico entry requirements us citizens

What U.S. Citizens Need to Travel to Mexico

American citizens must have a few essential documents to travel to Mexico. These include:

  • US passport
  • FMM tourist card (for land travel)
  • Mexican visa (if applicable)

A visa for Mexico may not be required for US passport holders. This depends on the period of stay and your reason for traveling.

U.S. passport requirements for Mexico

Your US passport must meet certain criteria when traveling to Mexico. It must not expire for at least 6 months after the date of arrival.

If your passport is due to expire sooner than this, renew it before getting the FMM and traveling to Mexico.

Do U.S. citizens need a Tourist Card for Mexico?

Americans must register for a Mexico tourist card to visit the country for the following reasons:

The tourist card required by visitors from the US is called the Forma Migratoria Múltiple (FMM) .

The FMM is not a visa. It’s an entry requirement for all foreign visitors, including Americans . It’s mandatory if you plan to travel more than 20 kilometers into Mexican territory and stay more than 72 hours.

A Mexican tourist card for United States citizens is a single-entry document. It becomes invalid once you leave Mexico. You need to get a new FMM for every trip to the country.

Do U.S. citizens need a Mexican visa?

Tourists and business travelers from the United States can stay up to 180 days visa-free in Mexico. Americans can also transit in Mexico for up to 30 days without a visa.

The same is true for non-US nationals who hold a valid US visa or Green Card . These documents must be brought as proof to gain visa-free entry to Mexico.

Citizens of the United States who plan to work, study, or engage in other non-tourist or business activities need a visa for Mexico .

Americans also need a visa to stay in Mexico for more than 180 days.

How Can U.S. Citizens Apply for a Mexico Tourist Card?

US citizens can now complete the tourist card form online. This saves time and the inconvenience of dealing with paperwork during their journey or at border control.

The streamlined electronic form greatly expedites the process of entering Mexico .

Mexico's Immigration Policy for U.S. Nationals

Citizens of the United States of America must comply with Mexico’s immigration policy when traveling to the country.

US nationals must :

  • Have the correct documentation
  • Comply with customs and border regulations
  • Leave Mexico within the time permitted (180 days for visa-free visitors)

Americans must not :

  • Bring any unauthorized or illegal items into Mexico
  • Overstay the terms of their visa or visa exemption

Do Americans need vaccinations for Mexico?

Mexico’s travel rules for US passport holders do not include any mandatory vaccinations .

However, the US CDC highly recommends being immunized against the following before traveling to Mexico:

  • Hepatitis A and B

Malaria is present in certain areas of Mexico. US nationals are advised to bring anti-malaria medication if staying in these regions.

What Do U.S. Citizens Need to Leave Mexico?

When leaving Mexico , you’re required to present the tourist card alongside your passport.

Therefore, it’s important to keep the slip of paper safe during the entirety of the stay in the country.

The validity of the FMM document for Americans begins from the moment it is stamped at the Mexican border . If the FMM is lost or stolen before arriving at immigration control in Mexico, you can obtain another form online.

If a validated Mexico FMM for US citizens is lost or stolen within Mexico, you should report the theft to local police. You must then include the subsequent police report in the application for a replacement tourist card. You can do this at an Instituto Nacional de Migración office within Mexico.

The U.S. Embassy in Mexico

The US Embassy in Mexico is located in Colonia Cuauhtemoc, Mexico City. The embassy provides a variety of services to American citizens in Mexico.

These include emergency assistance in cases of:

  • Loss of passport
  • Arrest of a US Citizen
  • Death of a US Citizen
  • International Parental Child Abduction

The embassy can provide emergency financial assistance and support to US citizens who are victims of crime. It is also authorized to issue certifications of US citizenship for eligible individuals born abroad to American parents, among other services.

Register with the U.S. Embassy in Mexico

It is now possible for US citizens and nationals to register with the nearest embassy or consulate when traveling in Mexico.

By registering with a US embassy in Mexico, travelers can:

  • Make informed travel plans based on information received from the embassy, such as safety and security advice.
  • Be contactable in the case of emergency: the US embassy will get in touch in circumstances such as a natural disaster or family emergency.
  • Help family and friends to get in contact in an emergency.

US passport holders can enrol when registering for the tourist card on this website . Simply select the Embassy Registration option on the payment page.

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  • Fact Sheets

Frequently Asked Questions: Guidance for Travelers to Enter the U.S.

Updated Date: April 21, 2022

Since January 22, 2022, DHS has required non-U.S. individuals seeking to enter the United States via land ports of entry and ferry terminals at the U.S.-Mexico and U.S.-Canada borders to be fully vaccinated for COVID-19 and provide proof of vaccination upon request.  On April 21, 2022, DHS announced that it would extend these requirements. In determining whether and when to rescind this order, DHS anticipates that it will take account of whether the vaccination requirement for non-U.S. air travelers remains in place.

These requirements apply to non-U.S. individuals who are traveling for essential or non-essential reasons. They do not apply to U.S. citizens, Lawful Permanent Residents, or U.S. nationals.

Effective November 8, 2021, new air travel requirements applied to many noncitizens who are visiting the United States temporarily. These travelers are also required to show proof of COVID-19 vaccination. All air travelers, including U.S. persons, must test negative for COVID-19 prior to departure. Limited exceptions apply. See  CDC guidance  for more details regarding air travel requirements.

Below is more information about what to know before you go, and answers to Frequently Asked Questions about cross-border travel.

Entering the U.S. Through a Land Port of Entry or Ferry Terminal

Q. what are the requirements for travelers entering the united states through land poes.

A:  Before embarking on a trip to the United States, non-U.S. travelers should be prepared for the following:

  • Possess proof of an approved COVID-19 vaccination as outlined on the  CDC  website.
  • During border inspection, verbally attest to their COVID-19 vaccination status. 
  • Bring a  Western Hemisphere Travel Initiative  compliant border crossing document, such as a valid passport (and visa if required), Trusted Traveler Program card, a Department of State-issued Border Crossing Card, Enhanced Driver’s License or Enhanced Tribal Card when entering the country. Travelers (including U.S. citizens) should be prepared to present the WHTI-compliant document and any other documents requested by the CBP officer.

 Q. What are the requirements to enter the United States for children under the age of 18 who can't be vaccinated?

A:  Children under 18 years of age are excepted from the vaccination requirement at land and ferry POEs.

Q: Which vaccines/combination of vaccines will be accepted?

A:  Per CDC guidelines, all Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved and authorized vaccines, as well as all vaccines that have an Emergency Use Listing (EUL) from the World Health Organization (WHO), will be accepted.

Accepted Vaccines:

  • More details are available in CDC guidance  here .
  • 2 weeks (14 days) after your dose of an accepted single-dose COVID-19 vaccine;
  • 2 weeks (14 days) after your second dose of an accepted 2-dose series;
  • 2 weeks (14 days) after you received the full series of an accepted COVID-19 vaccine (not placebo) in a clinical trial;
  • 2 weeks (14 days) after you received 2 doses of any “mix-and-match” combination of accepted COVID-19 vaccines administered at least 17 days apart.

Q. Is the United States requiring travelers to have a booster dose to be considered fully vaccinated for border entry purposes?

A:  No. The CDC guidance for “full vaccination” can be found here.

Q: Do U.S. citizens or lawful permanent residents need proof of vaccination to return to the United States via land POEs and ferry terminals?

A:  No. Vaccination requirements do not apply to U.S. citizens, U.S. nationals, or Lawful Permanent Residents (LPRs). Travelers that exhibit signs or symptoms of illness will be referred to CDC for additional medical evaluation.

Q: Is pre- or at-arrival COVID testing required to enter the United States via land POEs or ferry terminals?

A: No, there is no COVID testing requirement to enter the United States via land POE or ferry terminals. In this respect, the requirement for entering by a land POE or ferry terminal differs from arrival via air, where there is a requirement to have a negative test result before departure.

Processing Changes Announced on January 22, 2022 

Q: new changes were recently announced. what changed on january 22.

A:  Since January 22, 2022, non-citizens who are not U.S. nationals or Lawful Permanent Residents have been required to be vaccinated against COVID-19 to enter the United States at land ports of entry and ferry terminals, whether for essential or nonessential purposes. Previously, DHS required that non-U.S. persons be vaccinated against COVID-19 to enter the United States for nonessential purposes.  Effective January 22, all non-U.S. individuals, to include essential travelers, must be prepared to attest to vaccination status and present proof of vaccination to a CBP officer upon request. DHS announced an extension of this policy on April 21, 2022.

Q: Who is affected by the changes announced on January 22?

A: This requirement does not apply to U.S. citizens, U.S. nationals, or U.S. Lawful Permanent Residents. It applies to other noncitizens, such as a citizen of Mexico, Canada, or any other country seeking to enter the United States through a land port of entry or ferry terminal.

Q: Do U.S. citizens need proof of vaccination to return to the United States via land port of entry or ferry terminals?

A: Vaccination requirements do not apply to U.S. Citizens, U.S. nationals or U.S. Lawful Permanent Residents. Travelers that exhibit signs or symptoms of illness will be referred to CDC for additional medical evaluation. 

Q: What is essential travel?

A:  Under the prior policy, there was an exception from temporary travel restrictions for “essential travel.” Essential travel included travel to attend educational institutions, travel to work in the United States, travel for emergency response and public health purposes, and travel for lawful cross-border trade (e.g., commercial truckers). Under current policy, there is no exception for essential travel.

Q: Will there be any exemptions? 

A: While most non-U.S. individuals seeking to enter the United States will need to be vaccinated, there is a narrow list of exemptions consistent with the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) Order in the air travel context.

  • Certain categories of individuals on diplomatic or official foreign government travel as specified in the CDC Order
  • Children under 18 years of age;
  • Certain participants in certain COVID-19 vaccine trials as specified in the CDC Order;   
  • Individuals with medical contraindications to receiving a COVID-19 vaccine as specified in the CDC Order;
  • Individuals issued a humanitarian or emergency exception by the Secretary of Homeland Security;
  • Individuals with valid nonimmigrant visas (excluding B-1 [business] or B-2 [tourism] visas) who are citizens of a country with limited COVID-19 vaccine availability, as specified in the CDC Order
  • Members of the U.S. Armed Forces or their spouses or children (under 18 years of age) as specified in the CDC Order; and
  • Individuals whose entry would be in the U.S. national interest, as determined by the Secretary of Homeland Security.

Q: What documentation will be required to show vaccination status?

A:  Non-U.S. individuals are required to be prepared to attest to vaccination status and present proof of vaccination to a CBP officer upon request regardless of the purpose of travel.

The current documentation requirement remains the same and is available on the CDC website . Documentation requirements for entry at land ports of entry and ferry terminals mirror those for entry by air.

Q: What happens if someone doesn’t have proof of vaccine status?

A: If non-U.S. individuals cannot present proof of vaccination upon request, they will not be admitted into the United States and will either be subject to removal or be allowed to withdraw their application for entry.

Q: Will incoming travelers be required to present COVID-19 test results?

A: There is no COVID-19 testing requirement for travelers at land border ports of entry, including ferry terminals.

Q: What does this mean for those who can't be vaccinated, either due to age or other health considerations? 

A: See CDC guidance for additional information on this topic. Note that the vaccine requirement does not apply to children under 18 years of age.

Q: Does this requirement apply to amateur and professional athletes?

A: Yes, unless they qualify for one of the narrow CDC exemptions.

Q: Are commercial truckers required to be vaccinated?

A: Yes, unless they qualify for one of the narrow CDC exemptions. These requirements also apply to bus drivers as well as rail and ferry operators.

Q. Do you expect border wait times to increase?

A:  As travelers navigate these new travel requirements, wait times may increase. Travelers should account for the possibility of longer than normal wait times and lines at U.S. land border crossings when planning their trip and are kindly encouraged to exercise patience.

To help reduce wait times and long lines, travelers can take advantage of innovative technology, such as facial biometrics and the CBP OneTM mobile application, which serves as a single portal for individuals to access CBP mobile applications and services.

Q: How is Customs and Border Protection staffing the ports of entry? 

A: CBP’s current staffing levels at ports of entry throughout the United States are commensurate with pre-pandemic levels. CBP has continued to hire and train new employees throughout the pandemic. CBP expects some travelers to be non-compliant with the proof of vaccination requirements, which may at times lead to an increase in border wait times. Although trade and travel facilitation remain a priority, we cannot compromise national security, which is our primary mission. CBP Office of Field Operations will continue to dedicate its finite resources to the processing of arriving traffic with emphasis on trade facilitation to ensure economic recovery.

Q: What happens if a vaccinated individual is traveling with an unvaccinated individual?  

A:  The unvaccinated individual (if 18 or over) would not be eligible for admission.

Q: If I am traveling for an essential reason but am not vaccinated can I still enter?

A:  No, if you are a non-U.S. individual. The policy announced on January 22, 2022 applies to both essential and non-essential travel by non-U.S. individual travelers. Since January 22, DHS has required that all inbound non-U.S. individuals crossing U.S. land or ferry POEs – whether for essential or non-essential reasons – be fully vaccinated for COVID-19 and provide related proof of vaccination upon request.

Q: Are sea crew members on vessels required to have a COVID vaccine to disembark?

A:  Sea crew members traveling pursuant to a C-1 or D nonimmigrant visa are not excepted from COVID-19 vaccine requirements at the land border. This is a difference from the international air transportation context.

Entering the U.S. via Air Travel

Q: what are the covid vaccination requirements for air passengers to the united states  .

A:  According to CDC requirements [www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/travelers/noncitizens-US-air-travel.html | Link no longer valid], most noncitizens who are visiting the United States temporarily must be fully vaccinated prior to boarding a flight to the United States. These travelers are required to show proof of vaccination. A list of covered individuals is available on the CDC website.  

Q: What are the COVID testing requirements for air passengers to the United States?  

A:  Effective Sunday, June 12 at 12:01 a.m. ET, CDC will no longer require pre-departure COVID-19 testing for U.S.-bound air travelers.

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Mexico Travel Advisory

Travel advisory august 22, 2023, mexico - see state summaries.

Reissued after periodic review with general security updates, and the removal of obsolete COVID-19 page links.

Country Summary: Violent crime – such as homicide, kidnapping, carjacking, and robbery – is widespread and common in Mexico. The U.S. government has limited ability to provide emergency services to U.S. citizens in many areas of Mexico, as travel by U.S. government employees to certain areas is prohibited or restricted. In many states, local emergency services are limited outside the state capital or major cities.

U.S. citizens are advised to adhere to restrictions on U.S. government employee travel. State-specific restrictions are included in the individual state advisories below. U.S. government employees may not travel between cities after dark, may not hail taxis on the street, and must rely on dispatched vehicles, including app-based services like Uber, and regulated taxi stands. U.S. government employees should avoid traveling alone, especially in remote areas. U.S. government employees may not drive from the U.S.-Mexico border to or from the interior parts of Mexico, except daytime travel within Baja California and between Nogales and Hermosillo on Mexican Federal Highway 15D, and between Nuevo Laredo and Monterrey on Highway 85D.

Read the  country information page  for additional information on travel to Mexico.

Do Not Travel To:

  • Colima state  due to  crime  and  kidnapping .
  • Guerrero state  due to  crime .
  • Michoacan state  due to  crime  and  kidnapping .
  • Sinaloa state due to  crime  and  kidnapping
  • Tamaulipas state  due to  crime  and  kidnapping.
  • Zacatecas  state due to  crime  and  kidnapping .

Reconsider Travel To:

  • Baja California  state due to  crime  and  kidnapping .
  • Chihuahua state  due to  crime  and  kidnapping .
  • Durango state  due to  crime .
  • Guanajuato state  due to  crime and kidnapping .
  • Jalisco state  due to  crime  and  kidnapping .
  • Morelos state  due to  crime .
  • Sonora state  due to  crime  and  kidnapping .

Exercise Increased Caution When Traveling To:

  • Aguascalientes  state due to  crime .
  • Baja California Sur state  due to  crime .
  • Chiapas state  due to  crime .
  • Coahuila state  due to  crime .
  • Hidalgo state  due to  crime .
  • Mexico City  due to  crime .
  • Mexico State  due to  crime .
  • Nayarit state  due to  crime.
  • Nuevo Leon  state due to  crime  and  kidnapping .
  • Oaxaca state  due to  crime .
  • Puebla state  due to  crime  and  kidnapping .
  • Queretaro state  due to  crime .
  • Quintana Roo state  due to  crime .
  • San Luis Potosi state  due to  crime and kidnapping .
  • Tabasco state  due to  crime .
  • Tlaxcala state due to  crime .
  • Veracruz state  due to  crime .

Exercise Normal Precautions When Traveling To:

  • Campeche state
  • Yucatan state

Visit our website for  Travel to High-Risk Areas .

If you decide to travel to Mexico:

  • Keep traveling companions and family back home informed of your travel plans. If separating from your travel group, send a friend your GPS location. If taking a taxi alone, take a photo of the taxi number and/or license plate and text it to a friend.
  • Use toll roads when possible and avoid driving alone or at night. In many states, police presence and emergency services are extremely limited outside the state capital or major cities.
  • Exercise increased caution when visiting local bars, nightclubs, and casinos.
  • Do not display signs of wealth, such as wearing expensive watches or jewelry.
  • Be extra vigilant when visiting banks or ATMs.
  • Enroll in the  Smart Traveler Enrollment Program (STEP)  to receive Alerts and make it easier to locate you in an emergency.
  • Follow the Department of State on  Facebook  and  Twitter .
  • Follow the U.S. Embassy on Facebook and Twitter .
  • Review the  Country Security Report  for Mexico.
  • Mariners planning travel to Mexico should check for U.S. maritime  advisories  and  alerts , which include instructions on reporting suspicious activities and attacks to Mexican naval authorities.
  • Prepare a contingency plan for emergency situations. Review the  Traveler’s Checklist .
  • Visit the CDC page for the latest travel health information related to your travel. 

Aguascalientes state – Exercise Increased Caution

Exercise increased caution due to crime.

Criminal activity and violence may occur throughout the state.

There are no restrictions on travel for U.S. government employees in Aguascalientes state.

Baja California state – Reconsider Travel

Reconsider travel due to crime and kidnapping.

Transnational criminal organizations compete in the border area to establish narco-trafficking and human smuggling routes. Violent crime and gang activity are common. Travelers should remain on main highways and avoid remote locations. Of particular concern is the high number of homicides in the non-tourist areas of Tijuana. Most homicides appeared to be targeted; however, criminal organization assassinations and territorial disputes can result in bystanders being injured or killed. U.S. citizens and LPRs have been victims of kidnapping.

U.S. government employees must adhere to the noted restrictions:

  • Mexicali Valley:  U.S. government employees should avoid the Mexicali Valley due to the heightened possibility of violence between rival cartel factions.  The boundaries of the restricted area are: to the east, the Baja California/Arizona and Baja California/Sonora borders; to the south, from La Ventana (on Highway 5) due east to the Colorado River; to the west, Highway 5; and to the north, Boulevard Lazaro Cardenas/Highway 92/Highway 1 to Carretera Aeropuerto, from the intersection of Highway 1 and Carretera Aeropuerto due north to the Baja California/California border, and from that point eastward along the Baja California/California border.
  • Travelers may use Highways 2 and 2D to transit between Mexicali, Los Algodones, and San Luis Rio Colorado during daylight hours. Travelers may also use Highways 1 and 8 to transit to and from the Mexicali Airport during daylight hours.  Travel on Highway 5 is permissible during daylight hours.

There are no other travel restrictions for U.S. government employees in Baja California state. These include high-traffic tourism areas of border and coastal communities, such as  Tijuana ,  Ensenada , and  Rosarito .

Baja California Sur state – Exercise Increased Caution

There are no restrictions on travel for U.S. government employees in Baja California Sur state.

Campeche state – Exercise Normal Precautions

Exercise normal precautions.

There are no restrictions on travel for U.S. government employees in Campeche state.

Chiapas state – Exercise Increased Caution

There are no restrictions on travel for U.S. government employees in Chiapas state.

Chihuahua state – Reconsider Travel

Violent crime and gang activity are common. Most homicides are targeted assassinations against members of criminal organizations. Battles for territory between criminal groups have resulted in violent crime in areas frequented by U.S. citizens and U.S. government employees, including restaurants and malls during daylight hours. Bystanders have been injured or killed in shooting incidents. U.S. citizens and LPRs have been victims of kidnapping.

U.S. government employee travel is limited to the following areas with the noted restrictions:

  • Ciudad Juarez:  U.S. government employees may travel to the area of Ciudad Juarez bounded to the east by Bulevar Independencia; to the south by De los Montes Urales/Avenida Manuel J Clouthier/Carretera de Juárez; to the west by Via Juan Gabriel/Avenida de los Insurgentes/Calle Miguel Ahumada/Francisco Javier Mina/Melchor Ocampo; and to the north by the U.S.-Mexico border.  Direct travel to the Ciudad Juarez airport (officially called the Abraham González International Airport) and the factories located along Bulevar Independencia and Las Torres is permitted.  Travel to San Jerónimo is permitted only through the United States via the Santa Teresa U.S. Port of Entry; travel via Anapra is prohibited.

U.S. government employees may only travel from Ciudad Juarez to the city of Chihuahua during daylight hours via Federal Highway 45, with stops permitted only at the Guardia Nacional División Caminos station, the Umbral del Milenio overlook area, the border inspection station at KM 35, and the shops and restaurants on Federal Highway 45 in the city of Ahumada.

  • U.S. government employees may travel between Ciudad Juarez and Ascension via Highway 2.
  • Nuevo Casas Grandes Area (including Nuevo Casas Grandes, Casas Grandes, Mata Ortiz, Colonia Juárez, Colonia LeBaron, Paquimé and San Buenaventura):  U.S. government employees may travel to the Nuevo Casas Grandes area during daylight hours via Mexico Federal Highway 2, and subsequently Federal Highway 10, to Nuevo Casas Grandes.  Employees are permitted to stay overnight in the cities of Nuevo Casas Grandes and Casas Grandes only.
  • City of Chihuahua:  U.S. government employees may travel at any time to the area of the city of Chihuahua bounded to the north by Avenida Transformación; to the east by Avenida Tecnológico/Manuel Gómez Morín/Highway 16/Blvd.José Fuentes Mares; to the west by the city boundary; and to the south by Periférico Francisco R. Almada.
  • U.S. government employees may travel on Highways 45, 16, and 45D through the city of Chihuahua and to the Chihuahua airport (officially called the General Roberto Fierro Villalobos International Airport). 
  • U.S. government employees may travel to Santa Eulalia to the east of the city of Chihuahua, as well as to Juan Aldama via Highway 16 to the northeast.
  • U.S. government employees may travel south of the city of Chihuahua on Highway 45 to the southern boundary of Parral, including each town directly connected to Highway 45, including Lázaro Cárdenas, Pedro Meoqui, Santa Cruz de Rosales, Delicias, Camargo, Ciudad Jiménez, and Parral itself.
  • U.S. government employees may only travel on official business from the city of Chihuahua on Highway 16 to Ciudad Cuauhtémoc bounded by Highway 21 to the north and east, Highway 5 to the west, and Bulevar Jorge Castillo Cabrera to the south. 
  • Ojinaga:  U.S. government employees must travel to Ojinaga via U.S. Highway 67 and enter through the U.S. Port of Entry in Presidio, Texas.
  • Palomas:  U.S. government employees may travel to Palomas via U.S. highways through the U.S. Port of Entry in Columbus, New Mexico, or via Highway 2 in Mexico.

U.S. government employees may not travel to other areas of Chihuahua, including  Copper Canyon .

Coahuila state – Exercise Increased Caution

Violent crime and gang activity occur in parts of Coahuila state. 

U.S. government employees must adhere to the following travel restrictions:

  • Zaragoza, Morelos, Allende, Nava, Jimenez, Villa Union, Guerrero, and Hidalgo municipalities : U.S. government employees may not travel to these municipalities.
  • Piedras Negras and Ciudad Acuña:  U.S. government employees must travel directly from the United States and observe a curfew from midnight to 6:00 a.m. in both cities.

There are no other restrictions on travel for U.S. government employees in Coahuila state.

Colima state – Do Not Travel

Do not travel due to crime and kidnapping.  

Violent crime and gang activity are widespread. Most homicides are targeted assassinations against members of criminal organizations. Shooting incidents between criminal groups have injured or killed bystanders. U.S. citizens and LPRs have been victims of kidnapping.  

Travel for U.S. government employees is limited to the following areas with noted restrictions: 

  • Manzanillo:   U.S. government employee travel is limited to the tourist and port areas of Manzanillo.  
  • Employees traveling to Manzanillo from Guadalajara must use Federal Toll Road 54D during daylight hours.  

U.S. government employees may not travel to other areas of Colima state. 

Durango state – Reconsider Travel

Reconsider travel due to crime.

Violent crime and gang activity are common in parts of Durango state.

  • West and south of Federal Highway 45:  U.S. government employees may not travel to this region of Durango state.

There are no other restrictions on travel for U.S. government employees in Durango state.

Guanajuato state – Reconsider Travel

Gang violence, often associated with the theft of petroleum and natural gas from the state oil company and other suppliers, occurs in Guanajuato, primarily in the south and central areas of the state.  Of particular concern is the high number of murders in the southern region of the state associated with cartel-related violence. U.S. citizens and LPRs have been victims of kidnapping.

  • Areas south of Federal Highway 45D:  U.S. government employees may not travel to the area south of and including Federal Highway 45D, Celaya, Salamanca, and Irapuato.

There are no other restrictions on travel for U.S. government employees in Guanajuato state, which includes tourist areas in:  San Miguel de Allende ,  Guanajuato City , and  surrounding areas.

Guerrero state – Do Not Travel

Do not travel due to crime.

Crime and violence are widespread. Armed groups operate independently of the government in many areas of Guerrero. Members of these groups frequently maintain roadblocks and may use violence towards travelers. U.S. citizens and LPRs have been victims of kidnapping in previous years.

Travel for U.S. government employees is limited to the following area with the noted restrictions:

  • Taxco:  U.S. government employees must use Federal Highway 95D, which passes through Cuernavaca, Morelos, and stay within downtown tourist areas of Taxco. Employees may visit Grutas de Cacahuamilpa National Park during the day with a licensed tour operator.

U.S. government employees may not travel to other areas of the state of Guerrero, including to tourist areas in  Acapulco ,  Zihuatanejo , and  Ixtapa .

Hidalgo state – Exercise Increased Caution

There are no restrictions on travel for U.S. government employees in Hidalgo state.

Jalisco state – Reconsider Travel

Violent crime and gang activity are common in parts of Jalisco state. In Guadalajara, territorial battles between criminal groups take place in tourist areas. Shooting incidents between criminal groups have injured or killed innocent bystanders. U.S. citizens and LPRs have been victims of kidnapping.

  • Jalisco-Michoacan border and Federal Highway 110:  U.S. government employees may not travel to the area between Federal Highway 110 and the Jalisco-Michoacan border, nor travel on Federal Highway 110 between Tuxpan, Jalisco, and the Michoacan border.
  • Federal Highway 80:  U.S. government employees may not travel on Federal Highway 80 south of Cocula.

There are no other restrictions on travel for U.S government employees in Jalisco state which includes tourist areas in:  Guadalajara Metropolitan Area ,  Puerto Vallarta (including neighboring Riviera Nayarit) ,  Chapala , and  Ajijic .

Mexico City (Ciudad de Mexico) – Exercise Increased Caution

Both violent and non-violent crime occur throughout Mexico City. Use additional caution, particularly at night, outside of the frequented tourist areas where police and security patrol more routinely. Petty crime occurs frequently in both tourist and non-tourist areas.

There are no restrictions on travel for U.S. government employees in Mexico City.

Mexico State (Estado de Mexico) – Exercise Increased Caution

Both violent and non-violent crime occur throughout Mexico State. Use additional caution in areas outside of the frequented tourist areas, although petty crime occurs frequently in tourist areas as well.

There are no restrictions on travel for U.S. government employees in Mexico State.

Michoacan state – Do Not Travel

Do not travel due to crime and kidnapping.

Crime and violence are widespread in Michoacan state. U.S. citizens and LPRs have been victims of kidnapping.

Travel for U.S. government employees is limited to the following areas with the noted restrictions:

  • Federal Highway 15D:   U.S. government employees may travel on Federal Highway 15D to transit the state between Mexico City and Guadalajara.
  • Morelia:  U.S. government employees may travel by air and by land using Federal Highways 43 or 48D from Federal Highway 15D.
  • Lazaro Cardenas:  U.S. government employees must travel by air only and limit activities to the city center or port areas.

U.S. government employees may not travel to other areas of the state of Michoacan, including the portions of the  Monarch Butterfly Reserve  located in Michoacan.

Morelos state – Reconsider Travel

Violent crime and gang activity are common in parts of Morelos state.

There are no restrictions on travel for U.S. government employees in Morelos state.

Nayarit state – Exercise Increased Caution

Criminal activity and violence may occur throughout Nayarit state.

There are no restrictions on travel for U.S government employees in Nayarit state.

Nuevo Leon state – Exercise Increased Caution

Exercise increased caution due to crime and kidnapping.

Criminal activity and violence may occur throughout the state. U.S. citizens and LPRs have been victims of kidnapping.

There are no restrictions on travel for U.S. government employees in Nuevo Leon state.

Oaxaca state – Exercise Increased Caution

Criminal activity and violence occur throughout the state.

U.S. travelers are reminded that U.S. government employees must adhere to the following travel restrictions:

  • Isthmus region:  U.S. government employees may not travel to the area of Oaxaca bounded by Federal Highway 185D to the west, Federal Highway 190 to the north, and the Oaxaca-Chiapas border to the east.  This includes the cities of Juchitan de Zaragoza, Salina Cruz, and San Blas Atempa.  
  • Federal Highway 200 northwest of Pinotepa:  U.S. government employees may not use Federal Highway 200 between Pinotepa and the Oaxaca-Guerrero border.

There are no restrictions on travel for U.S. government employees to other parts of Oaxaca state, which include tourist areas in:  Oaxaca City ,  Monte Alban ,  Puerto Escondido,  and  Huatulco .

Puebla state – Exercise Increased Caution

There are no restrictions on travel for U.S. government employees in Puebla state.

Queretaro state – Exercise Increased Caution

There are no restrictions on travel for U.S. government employees in Queretaro state.

Quintana Roo state – Exercise Increased Caution

Criminal activity and violence may occur in any location, at any time, including in popular tourist destinations.  Travelers should maintain a high level of situational awareness, avoid areas where illicit activities occur, and promptly depart from potentially dangerous situations. 

While not directed at tourists, shootings between rival gangs have injured innocent bystanders.  Additionally, U.S. citizens have been the victims of both non-violent and violent crimes in tourist and non-tourist areas.

There are no restrictions on travel for U.S. government employees in Quintana Roo state. However, personnel are advised to exercise increased situational awareness after dark in downtown areas of Cancun, Tulum, and Playa del Carmen, and to remain in well-lit pedestrian streets and tourist zones.

San Luis Potosi state – Exercise Increased Caution

Criminal activity and violence may occur throughout the state.  U.S. citizens and LPRs have been victims of kidnapping.

There are no restrictions on travel for U.S. government employees in San Luis Potosi state.

Sinaloa state – Do Not Travel

Violent crime is widespread. Criminal organizations are based in and operating in Sinaloa. U.S. citizens and LPRs have been victims of kidnapping.

  • Mazatlan:  U.S. government employees may travel to Mazatlan by air or sea only, are limited to the Zona Dorada and historic town center, and must travel via direct routes between these destinations and the airport and sea terminal.
  • Los Mochis and Topolobampo:  U.S. government employees may travel to Los Mochis and Topolobampo by air or sea only, are restricted to the city and the port, and must travel via direct routes between these destinations and the airport.

U.S. government employees may not travel to other areas of Sinaloa state.

Sonora state – Reconsider Travel

Sonora is a key location used by the international drug trade and human trafficking networks. Violent crime is widespread. U.S. citizens and LPRs have been victims of kidnapping. Travelers should maintain a heightened level of awareness of their surroundings in all their travels in Sonora.  Security incidents may occur in any area of Sonora.

  • Travel between Hermosillo and Nogales:  U.S. government employees may travel between the U.S. Ports of Entry in Nogales and Hermosillo during daylight hours via Federal Highway 15 only. U.S. government employees may not use ANY taxi services, public buses, nor ride-share applications due to a lack of secure vetting and/or dispatching procedures. Travelers should exercise caution and avoid unnecessary stops as security incidents, including sporadic, armed carjackings, and shootings have been reported along this highway during daylight hours. Travelers should have a full tank of gas and inform friends or family members of their planned travel.
  • Nogales:  U.S. government employees may not travel in the triangular area north of Avenida Tecnologico, west of Bulevar Luis Donaldo Colosio (Periferico), nor east of Federal Highway 15D (Corredor Fiscal). U.S. government employees also may not travel in the residential and business areas to east of the railroad tracks along Plutarco Elias Calle (HWY 15) and Calle Ruiz Cortino, including the business area around the Morley pedestrian gate port-of-entry. U.S. government employees may not use ANY taxi services, public buses, nor ride-share applications in Nogales due to a lack of secure vetting and/or dispatching procedures and the danger of kidnapping and other violent crimes.  
  • Puerto Peñasco:  U.S. government employees may travel between Puerto Peñasco and the Lukeville-Sonoyta U.S. Port of Entry during daylight hours via Federal Highway 8 only. They may not travel on any other route to Puerto Peñasco. U.S. government employees may not use ANY taxi services, public buses, nor ride-share applications in Puerto Peñasco. due to a lack of secure vetting and/or dispatching procedures and the danger of kidnapping and other violent crimes.
  • Triangular region near Mariposa U.S. Port of Entry:  U.S. government employees may not travel into or through the triangular region west of the Mariposa U.S. Port of Entry, east of Sonoyta, and north of Altar municipality.
  • San Luis Rio Colorado, Cananea, and Agua Prieta : U.S. government employees may travel directly from the nearest U.S. Port of Entry to San Luis Rio Colorado, Cananea (via Douglas Port of Entry), and Agua Prieta, but may not go beyond the city limits. Travel is limited to daylight hours only. Travel between Nogales and Cananea via Imuris is not permitted. U.S. government employees may not use ANY taxi services, public buses, nor ride-share applications in these cities due to a lack of secure vetting and/or dispatching procedures and the danger of kidnapping and other violent crimes.
  • Eastern and southern Sonora (including San Carlos Nuevo Guaymas and Alamos):  U.S. government employees may not travel to areas of Sonora east of Federal Highway 17, the road between Moctezuma and Sahuaripa, and State Highway 20 between Sahuaripa and the intersection with Federal Highway 16. U.S. government employees may travel to San Carlos Nuevo Guaymas and Alamos; travel to Alamos is only permitted by air and within city limits.  U.S. government employees may not travel to areas of Sonora south of Federal Highway 16 and east of Federal Highway 15 (south of Hermosillo), as well as all points south of Guaymas, including Empalme, Guaymas, Obregon, and Navojoa.  U.S. government employees may not use ANY taxi services, public buses, nor ride-share applications in these areas due to a lack of secure vetting and/or dispatching procedures and the danger of kidnapping and other violent crimes.

U.S. government employees may travel to other parts of Sonora state in compliance with the above restrictions, including tourist areas in: Hermosillo , Bahia de Kino , and Puerto Penasco .

Tabasco state – Exercise Increased Caution

There are no restrictions on travel for U.S. government employees in Tabasco state.

Tamaulipas state – Do Not Travel

Organized crime activity – including gun battles, murder, armed robbery, carjacking, kidnapping, forced disappearances, extortion, and sexual assault – is common along the northern border and in Ciudad Victoria. Criminal groups target public and private passenger buses, as well as private automobiles traveling through Tamaulipas, often taking passengers and demanding ransom payments.

Heavily armed members of criminal groups often patrol areas of the state and operate with impunity particularly along the border region from Reynosa to Nuevo Laredo.  In these areas, local law enforcement has limited capacity to respond to incidents of crime. Law enforcement capacity is greater in the tri-city area of Tampico, Ciudad Madero, and Altamira, which has a lower rate of violent criminal activity compared to the rest of the state.

U.S. citizens and LPRs have been victims of kidnapping.

  • Matamoros and Nuevo Laredo:  U.S. government employees may only travel within a limited radius around and between the U.S. Consulates in Nuevo Laredo and Matamoros, their homes, the respective U.S. Ports of Entry, and limited downtown sites, subject to an overnight curfew.
  • Overland travel in Tamaulipas:  U.S. government employees may not travel between cities in Tamaulipas using interior Mexican highways. Travel between Nuevo Laredo and Monterrey is limited to Federal Highway 85D during daylight hours with prior authorization.

U.S. government employees may not travel to other parts of Tamaulipas state.

Tlaxcala state – Exercise Increased Caution

There are no restrictions on travel for U.S. government employees in Tlaxcala state.

Veracruz state – Exercise Increased Caution

Violent crime and gang activity occur with increasing frequency in Veracruz, particularly in the center and south near Cordoba and Coatzacoalcos. While most gang-related violence is targeted, violence perpetrated by criminal organizations can affect bystanders. Impromptu roadblocks requiring payment to pass are common.

There are no restrictions on travel for U.S. government employees in Veracruz state.

Yucatan state – Exercise Normal Precautions

There are no restrictions on travel for U.S. government employees in Yucatan state, which include tourist areas in:  Chichen Itza ,  Merida ,  Uxmal , and  Valladolid .

Zacatecas state – Do Not Travel

Violent crime, extortion, and gang activity are widespread in Zacatecas state. U.S. citizens and LPRs have been victims of kidnapping.

  • Zacatecas City : U.S. government employee travel is limited to Zacatecas City proper, and employees may not travel overland to Zacatecas City.
  • U.S. government employees may not travel to other areas of Zacatecas state.

Travel Advisory Levels

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us to mexico travel documents

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Travel documents for foreign citizens returning to the U.S.

If you are a citizen of another country and have been living in the U.S., you may need special documents if you leave the U.S. and then return.

Travel documents for permanent and conditional permanent residents

If you are outside the u.s. for less than one year.

If you are a permanent or conditional permanent resident who has been away from the U.S. for less than one year, you will only need to show your Green Card upon re-entry to the U.S.

If you are outside the U.S. for one year or longer

If you are a permanent or conditional permanent resident who has been outside the U.S. for one year or longer, apply for a re-entry permit before you travel. Use Form I-131 - Application for Travel Document .

  • For permanent residents, the re-entry permit is valid for two years from the date of issue.
  • For conditional permanent residents, the re-entry permit is valid for two years after the date of issue. Or it is valid up until the date you must apply for removal of the conditions on your status , whichever date comes first.

Travel documents for other foreign citizens living in the U.S.

If you are a foreign citizen re-entering the U.S., the documentation you need may depend on your immigration status:

  • Advance parole - You may use advance parole to re-enter the U.S. without applying for a visa. It is commonly used for re-entry by people in the process of applying for permanent residence, applying for a status adjustment, or applying for asylum.
  • Refugee travel document - You may be able to use this document to re-enter the U.S. if you have refugee or asylum status.

If you need help, contact U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS) .

LAST UPDATED: December 6, 2023

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United States Trade Representative

2024 U.S.-Mexico High-Level Economic Dialogue Mid-Year Review Fact Sheet

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The United States and Mexico share a powerful economic and commercial partnership that continues to grow. Mexico was the United States’ top trading partner in 2023 with total two-way goods trade at $799 billion. Our countries rely on closely integrated supply chains to power our economies and strengthen our global competitiveness.

U.S.-Mexico engagement under the HLED complements and strengthens our dynamic commercial relationship. In 2021, the United States and Mexico relaunched the HLED to advance shared strategic economic and commercial priorities. The HLED provides a platform for the United States and Mexico to leverage their strong economic integration to foster regional prosperity, expand job creation, promote investment in our people, and reduce inequality and poverty.

The HLED has continued its work over the last six months under the dialogue’s four pillars: 1. Building Back Together; 2. Promoting Sustainable Economic and Social Development in Southern Mexico and Central America; 3. Securing the Tools for Future Prosperity; and 4. Investing in Our People.

As part of the dialogue, our two governments engaged stakeholders to inform and advise on HLED workstreams and considered stakeholder recommendations in areas such as semiconductor supply chain coordination, commercial cybersecurity and information and communications technology (ICT), workforce development, and border infrastructure and trade facilitation efforts.

HLED accomplishments over the last six months are highlighted in the specific pillars below:  

  • The United States and Mexico are coordinating efforts through a joint semiconductor supply chain action plan with the following objectives: 1) supporting the integration of regional semiconductor supply chains; 2) scaling existing activities in the region by improving the investment climate, and attracting new investments in assembly, testing, and packaging (ATP); 3) promoting the diversification of investment towards activities not yet present in the region or which could have an expanded presence; 4) fostering state and local-level dialogues to promote investments in the semiconductor industry; and 5) supporting workforce development efforts in the region’s semiconductor industry.  
  • The United States and Mexico are advancing semiconductor workforce development through a community college initiative taking place during the January - May 2024 semester. This U.S.-funded pilot sent eleven Mexican engineering students to Mesa Community College in Arizona to pursue the Automated Industrial Technology program. The program will help catalyze further academic collaboration between both countries to train specialized talent in the semiconductor and ICT sectors in Mexico.  
  • In 2023, Mexico’s Secretariat of Economy launched its Ventanilla Única para Inversionistas (VUI) or One-Stop Shop for Investors to promote investment among business communities globally. The website provides relevant information to help interested stakeholders make informed decisions about investing in Mexico. In 2024, Mexico has promoted the VUI to technology investors and the U.S. semiconductor industry and plans to promote with state governments in Arizona, California and Texas, to bolster the semiconductor ecosystem in Mexico.  
  • In February 2024, the Mexican Chamber of Electronics, Telecommunications, and Information Technologies (CANIETI), with U.S. Embassy support, convened in Guadalajara, Jalisco the first of four quarterly semiconductor forums attended by over 160 participants. The forums catalyze dialogue among the U.S. and Mexican federal governments, Mexican states, municipalities, the private sector, academia, and other organizations to promote development of semiconductor supply chains in North America. The remaining quarterly forums will be held in Baja California, Chihuahua, and Mexico City.  
  • The Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) is working with Mexico on a study of the country’s semiconductor ecosystem funded by the U.S. CHIPS and Science Act International Technology, Security, and Innovation (ITSI) Fund. This report focuses on the Assembly, Testing and Packaging (ATP) segment of the supply chain, and includes a comprehensive assessment of the industry in Mexico. The study will provide joint recommendations to foster the semiconductor ecosystem.  
  • In February 2024, Mexico hosted a two-day OECD Semiconductor Informal Exchange Network meeting in Mexico City, covering topics such as the semiconductor ecosystem, workforce development needs, research and development innovation, and supply chain resilience.
  • On October 16, 2023, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and Mexico's Secretariat of Environment and Natural Resources (SEMARNAT) co-hosted a webinar on Challenges and Best Practices to address plastic waste and marine litter. Speakers from the U.S. and Mexico outlined national approaches to plastics and marine litter and showcased state level projects that aim to address plastic pollution and marine litter in the U.S.-Mexico border region.  
  • On February 15, 2024, a workgroup of the U.S.-Mexico Border 2025 environmental cooperation program hosted the first of two webinars on scrap tire management. The first session helped connect ongoing border wide work on scrap tire management by outlining state policies and initiatives, highlighting available resources, and providing a space for discussion to identify gaps, priority issues and opportunities for future work. The topics discussed in session one informed the agenda for the second session, which will focus on specific priority challenges and solutions. Over 100 virtual participants attended the first session.
  • The U.S. General Services Administration (GSA) expects to conclude feasibility studies for the Santa Teresa POE in April 2024 and the Nogales DeConcini POE in October 2024.   
  • The United States signed a memorandum of understanding allowing project sponsors to move forward with the 30 percent design of the Otay Mesa East POE.   
  • GSA expects to complete the Environmental Impact Statement regarding a new commercial crossing at the Douglas Agua Prieta POE in May 2024, with the project design-build process starting summer 2024.   
  • Mexico’s Secretariat of National Defense (SEDENA) reports a progress of almost 60% on the Mexican side of the construction of the new border crossing at Otay Mesa II. It is expected to be completed by September 21, 2024.  
  • Regarding Piedras Negras-Eagle Pass II, SEDENA reports a progress of 44% and expects to complete works by June 7, 2024.   
  • The Mexican National Customs Agency (ANAM) has concluded the necessary equipment installation to allow the crossing of empty cargo vehicles at the Rio Bravo-Donna International Bridge.  
  • Mexico’s Secretariat of Infrastructure, Communications, and Transportation (SICT) expects to conclude the construction on the Mexican side for the second span of the Nuevo Amanecer (Reynosa)-Pharr international bridge by October 2024.
  • The U.S. Agency for International Development (USAID) completed in November 2023 its public-private Medical Devices Regulatory Convergence (MDRC) project with Mexico, which provided training and technical assistance to Mexico’s Federal Commission for Protection from Sanitary Risks (COFEPRIS) and other regulatory agencies of the Americas region.   
  • Under the MDRC, experts supported by USAID provided technical assistance, which along with other efforts, contributed to COFEPRIS’ improvements in implementing Good Regulatory Practices as shown in the publication of its Regulatory Certainty Strategy for the Medical Device Sector in October 2023.  
  • The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) continues collaborating with COFEPRIS, which met important milestones by becoming an affiliate member of the Medical Device Single Audit Program (MDSAP) in November 2023, and an affiliate member of the International Medical Device Regulators’ Forum (IMDRF) in March 2024. In February 2024, COFEPRIS published for public comment a new equivalence agreement proposal to increase the number of authorizations of medical devices by recognition of the decisions of regulatory authorities in other countries, strengthening regulatory convergence. These advances will help COFEPRIS align with international standards and international best practices.
  • The United States and Mexico have been partnering to address the root causes of irregular migration in southern Mexico and northern Central America, since the Mexican Agency for International Development Cooperation (AMEXCID) and USAID launched Sembrando Oportunidades, a strategic collaboration, in December 2021. This collaboration has built upon AMEXCID’s successful Sembrando Vida and Jóvenes Construyendo el Futuro projects in El Salvador and Honduras and USAID’s complementary youth employment and agriculture projects in Central America. As of December 2023, Sembrando Oportunidades in Honduras and El Salvador has benefited 3,300 farmers and young people.  
  • In late 2023, USAID and AMEXCID extended their work under Sembrando Oportunidades to Guatemala. In early 2024, USAID and AMEXCID concluded the capacity building training of AMEXCID’s Sembrando Vida technicians in Guatemala on agri-business, good agricultural practices, and regenerative agriculture.  
  • USAID and AMEXCID cooperation will benefit farmers through AMEXCID's Sembrando Vida program in Guatemala. Field visits were conducted in February to identify municipalities for coordinated implementation of the Agricultural Innovation and Market Access Program. This activity is expected to begin in spring 2024.   
  • USAID and AMEXCID also institutionalized trilateral cooperation in Honduras with Global Affairs Canada (GAC). In October 2023, GAC conducted a training with USAID and AMEXCID missions in Honduras to improve gender approaches and increase the participation of women in regional value chains, and another training in January 2024 on gender mainstreaming in development projects. GAC also announced a $17.5 million (over 5 years) call for proposals for programs benefiting youth, and gender equality in Honduras. This project is expected to begin in summer 2024 and one of the objectives is to complement the bilateral Sembrando Oportunidades framework.  
  • In southern Mexico, USAID continues to work closely with state and municipal governments, small rural and indigenous communities, and businesses to create jobs, sales, investment, and positive environmental impacts. Over the last two years, USAID mobilized over $33 million in economic development investments that advance HLED goals, improving economic opportunities to over 30,000 people in southern Mexico. In 2024, USAID is launching two calls for proposals for programs working with community development organizations to increase efficiency, product quality and access to markets. The programs aim to mobilize $10 million within three years.
  • In April, the U.S. Department of Commerce in collaboration with SICT, convened a technical workshop on cybersecurity with Mexican government officials and industry to preview National Institute of Standards & Technology’s (NIST) new Cybersecurity Framework 2.0 and approaches to implementation. The workshop was an opportunity to present and discuss government and industry efforts and perspectives on cybersecurity, as well as ways for organizations to develop their own cybersecurity framework. NIST’s Cybersecurity Framework is based on existing international standards, guidelines, and practices for organizations to better manage and reduce cybersecurity risk. 
  • The United States and Mexico continue to work closely to develop, deploy and expand initiatives to improve workforce training and readiness to support the semiconductor, automotive, aerospace, medical devices, ICT, agroindustry and other strategic sectors of the regional economy.  
  • Mexico’s Secretariat of Public Education (SEP) signed in February 2024 a final licensing agreement with Arizona State University to begin an online pilot program on English for the Semiconductor Industry. SEP launched the twelve-week pilot program in March 2024 with an initial 5,106 enrolled students from the National Technological Institute of Mexico (TecNM by its acronym in Spanish).  
  • Since March 2024, the Government of Mexico, through the Ministry of Economy and the Mexican Ministry of Public Education, is coordinating a Binational Virtual Dialogue on competency certification processes that seeks to share and exchange experiences between certifying companies in the United States and Mexico's National Council for Standardization and Certification of Labor Competencies (CONOCER). The dialogue will take place in spring 2024 and will also include the participation of companies in the automotive sector from Mexico and the United States.

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  2. What Documents Do You Need to Travel to Mexico?

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  3. Can you enter Mexico with US visa?

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  4. Mexico tourist visa: Requirements and application procedure

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COMMENTS

  1. Mexico International Travel Information

    Call us in Washington, D.C. at 1-888-407-4747 (toll-free in the United States and Canada) or 1-202-501-4444 (from all other countries) from 8:00 a.m. to 8:00 p.m., Eastern Standard Time, Monday through Friday (except U.S. federal holidays). See the State Department's travel website for the Worldwide Caution and Travel Advisories.

  2. What Documents Do You Need to Travel to Mexico?

    A full list of IDs you can use is below: A Valid Passport. Trusted Traveler Cards (NEXUS, SENTRI, or FAST) State Issued Enhanced Driver's License (when available) Enhanced Tribal Cards (when available) U.S. Military Identification with Military Travel Orders. U.S. Merchant Mariner Document when traveling in conjunction with official maritime ...

  3. Documents Required for Travel and Entry to Mexico

    Arrivals to Mexico by air. If you are visiting Mexico and arriving by airplane, you must carry a current passport. Note that Passport Cards are not valid for air travel. We also recommend that your passport is valid for at least six months from the date of your arrival in Mexico. If your passport is expired the airlines will not allow you to ...

  4. Mexico Tourist Card

    Foreign citizens traveling to Mexico are issued an Official Entry Immigration Form (FMM) also known as Tourist Card. The online registration process is FREE, very convenient, straightforward, and to complete the process all you need is your passport and travel information. THE TOURIST CARD IS PER PERSON INCLUDING CHILDREN AND DIPLOMATIC ...

  5. Are You Planning a Trip to Mexico from the United States?

    Report drug and alien smuggling. Call (956) 542-5811 in the U.S., 001800-0105237 from Mexico. Prohibited/Permissible Items. All articles acquired in Mexico must be declared. $800 exemption for gifts and personal articles, including one liter of alcoholic beverages per person over 21 every 30 days. Cuban cigars are prohibited.

  6. Travel documents and entry requirements

    Travel documents. Flights within Mexico. Mexicans must present a valid and original photo ID (photocopied and digital documents are not accepted) Valid IFE/INE ... A valid and current visa* or permanent residency for the United States of America, Canada, the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland, Japan, a Schengen Area country ...

  7. Travel Advisory: Update for Mexico

    Read the Mexico Travel Advisory, including the detailed state summaries and advisory levels for information on your specific travel destination. Read the Mexico country information page. Assistance: Contact Form. U.S. Embassy and Consulates in Mexico. From Mexico: (55) 8526 2561. From the United States: +1-844-528-6611. Department of State ...

  8. Mexico Entry Requirements—For Leisure, Business or Residency

    A passport is required for air travel to and from the the United States. Traveling to Mexico via the United States: In January 2009 the United States government introduced new rules for travelers entering the country using the Visa Waiver Program (US State Dept). See Also: Travel to Mexico via the USA. Arriving to Mexico by cruise ship

  9. Travel Documents You Need to Visit Mexico

    These documents are acceptable travel documents for all United States citizens. Passport card: Issued by the U.S. Department of State, this passport substitute is credit-card sized and valid for entry into Mexico by land or sea. The passport card is not accepted for air travel. This passport card can also be used for land and sea travel to ...

  10. Traveling To Mexico From The U.S.: Requirements And Restrictions

    Discover the latest requirements and restrictions for traveling to Mexico from the U.S., including COVID-19 testing, insurance and quarantine. Forbes Advisor has all the details you need.

  11. Mexico Entry Requirements

    The following items are considered valid identification documents for traveling to Mexico: A U.S. passport book (required for all international air travel to Mexico) A U.S. passport card. An enhanced driver's license (EDL) A trusted traveler program card (NEXUS card SENTRI card, FAST card, or Global Entry card)

  12. Before Your Trip

    Documents You Will Need. Carry - do not pack - all travel documents. All U.S. citizens need U.S. passport books if re-entering by air. Land and sea border crossings accept additional travel documents, such as U.S. Passport cards and Trusted Traveler cards. Child travelers have additional options - see the Traveling with Children section.

  13. Mexico Entry Requirements for US Citizens

    What U.S. Citizens Need to Travel to Mexico. American citizens must have a few essential documents to travel to Mexico. These include: US passport. FMM tourist card (for land travel) Mexican visa (if applicable) A visa for Mexico may not be required for US passport holders. This depends on the period of stay and your reason for traveling.

  14. What documents do I need to enter Mexico?

    You will be asked for this document at your departure from Mexico. 3. Mexican immigration officers at the port of entry may request additional documents depending on the purpose/activity of your trip. Business: Letter in Spanish from your foreign company indicating that you are their employee and that you will not be paid by a Mexican company.

  15. International Travel Requirements

    Identification for travel. U.S. law requires all customers, regardless of citizenship, age, or destination, to hold a secure document to leave the United States by air. For all travel within the United States, you'll need U.S. federal or state-issued photo ID that contains your name, date of birth, gender, expiration date and a tamper ...

  16. Frequently Asked Questions: Guidance for Travelers to Enter the U.S

    Updated Date: April 21, 2022 Since January 22, 2022, DHS has required non-U.S. individuals seeking to enter the United States via land ports of entry and ferry terminals at the U.S.-Mexico and U.S.-Canada borders to be fully vaccinated for COVID-19 and provide proof of vaccination upon request.

  17. Requirements

    Valid passport. Visa. I-94 permit. All passengers, with the exception of U.S. citizens and residents, traveling more than 25 miles (approx. 40 km) from the border or staying more than 30 days in the United States will be required to prepay and complete their provisional I-94 permit before crossing through CBX. Pre-pay it here.

  18. Crossing the United States-Mexico Border By Land

    U.S. citizens must present a valid U.S. passport book or card, and an entry permit issued by Instituto Nacional de Migración. Enter Mexico with valid proof of automobile registration, even if remaining in the border zone. Entering Mexico with an expired U.S. vehicle registration may lead to the confiscation of the auto by Mexican authorities.

  19. Mexico Travel Advisory

    Reissued after periodic review with general security updates, and the removal of obsolete COVID-19 page links. Country Summary: Violent crime - such as homicide, kidnapping, carjacking, and robbery - is widespread and common in Mexico.The U.S. government has limited ability to provide emergency services to U.S. citizens in many areas of Mexico, as travel by U.S. government employees to ...

  20. U.S. citizens traveling abroad

    Authenticate an official document for use outside the U.S. Apostilles and authentication certificates show U.S. documents are genuine. Learn when to use each. Make traveling abroad easier: learn about visas, Trusted Traveler Programs, driving, and emergencies. Also, learn to authenticate documents with apostilles.

  21. USTravelDocs

    Apply for a U.S. Visa. At this website, you can learn about obtaining a visa, as well as applying for your visa. How to apply for your nonimmigrant visa for travel to the United States. What documents, photos and information you need to apply for your visa. How to access visa application forms and instructions.

  22. Entering the U.S. from Canada, Mexico, the Caribbean, and Bermuda

    Visit the Department of Homeland Security's Western Hemisphere Travel Initiative page to find the specific travel documents you will need to enter the U.S. from these locations as a U.S. citizen or a non-citizen. Port of entry officials issue everyone entering the U.S. a Form I-94, which electronically records arrival dates.

  23. Travel documents for foreign citizens returning to the U.S

    Travel documents for other foreign citizens living in the U.S. If you are a foreign citizen re-entering the U.S., the documentation you need may depend on your immigration status: Advance parole - You may use advance parole to re-enter the U.S. without applying for a visa. It is commonly used for re-entry by people in the process of applying ...

  24. Mexico

    EXECUTIVE SUMMARY. There were no significant changes in the human rights situation in Mexico during the year. Significant human rights issues included credible reports of: unlawful or arbitrary killings, including extrajudicial killings; enforced disappearance; torture or cruel, inhuman, or degrading treatment or punishment by security forces; harsh and life-threatening prison conditions ...

  25. 2024 U.S.-Mexico High-Level Economic Dialogue Mid-Year Review Fact

    Government officials from the United States and Mexico met virtually today, April 19, 2024, for the U.S.-Mexico High-Level Economic Dialogue (HLED) Mid-Year Review. HLED principals discussed joint accomplishments and progress on the dialogue's ongoing workstreams since the third HLED Ministerial in Washington, D.C. on September 29, 2023. The U.S.