How Long Does Hyperspace Travel Take in Star Wars?

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The Eye of Sion finally took to hyperspace in Episode 4 of Ahsoka , and we're counting the seconds until we get to see Grand Admiral Thrawn's ( Lars Mikkelsen ) debut in live-action. The ring-shaped starship jumped to hyperspace after finally getting the coordinates to Peridea, far from the borders of the known galaxy , and left our heroes Ahsoka Tano ( Rosario Dawson ) and Hera Syndulla ( Mary Elizabeth Winstead ) with a huge problem to crack if they want to stop Thrawn's return and find the lost Jedi Ezra Bridger ( Eman Esfandi ).

Part of this problem is that we can't be sure of how much time they have to figure out a way to get there because there's no way of knowing how long Morgan Elsbeth's ( Diana Lee Inosanto ) ship will take to reach Peridea in the first place. That's so not only because of the huge distance, but also because no one knows how long hyperspace travel is supposed to take in Star Wars. In all the existing canon and the old Expanded Universe (now the Legends label), no one managed to officially explain how this kind of travel actually works, a ratio between space and time traveled, nothing. We're terrible with theoretical physics ourselves, so we can't do it, either, but we can look at how this kind of travel works and see why no one has dared quantify it. Punch it, Chewie!

RELATED: The Purrgil Space Whales in 'Ahsoka' Could Be the Key to Thrawn

What Is Hyperspace in Star Wars?

To answer this question, let's begin by clarifying that there are two different types of space travel in Star Wars: sublight and lightspeed. The first is how starships usually get around and travel short distances on the galactic scale, like traveling inside the same star system, for example. This takes place in what's called "realspace," the standard dimension where events take place. Whenever sublight travel occurs, it's on realspace, where everything looks just like we know space to actually look like.

The second way, lightspeed, is a concept that a lot of fans have been trying to grasp for decades, but that not even in-universe storytelling has managed to fully make sense of. In principle, lightspeed is what happens when a ship uses its hyperdrive (a special kind of engine) to travel at speeds faster than that of light. It kind of makes sense for us — if you have the distance and average speed a ship can achieve, we can do the math, right? But it's more complicated than that. If sublight travel takes place on realspace, lightspeed happens in a whole separate dimension, the one we popularly call hyperspace. This is a realm where the very idea of a correlation between space and time is bent, so things can't be calculated. The rules that apply to realspace don't work on hyperspace, because those are two separate realms of reality.

That's not to say it doesn't make any sense, though. We still have a starting point and a fixed destination, and that's what pilots use to guide how they go from one place to another. In A New Hope , for example, Han Solo ( Harrison Ford ) offers Luke Skywalker ( Mark Hamill ) the best explanation we currently have of how it works: "Without precise calculations, we could fly right through a star or bounce too close to a supernova, and that'd end your trip real quick, wouldn't it?" That's why knowing your exact destination is so important for everyone who's using lightspeed travel, as well as what direction they are moving towards. Now, about that...

How Did Hyperspace Traveling Start in Star Wars?

To understand how to calculate the data to perform a hyperspace jump, it's important to understand the trajectory between the starting point and the destination. But in space that's not so easy because, as Han explains, there are lots of celestial phenomena that may occur along the way, so it's better to have a path to follow. That's where the importance of hyperspace in Ahsoka becomes evident, and not just because of the sheer distance between the known galaxy and Peridea, but also because of the giant space whales seen in Episode 3 , the purrgil.

The purrgil are the beings that helped create the whole mess that Ahsoka Tano and the Star Wars Rebels characters are now trying to deal with. At the end of the animated series, Ezra Bridger (then voiced by Taylor Grey ) called upon the purrgil to hijack Thrawn's Star Destroyer Chimera with both of them inside, and that's how they vanished. They can jump to hyperspace naturally and go even further than starships with a hyperdrive — in fact, that's why the Eye of Sion has multiple hyperdrives . Lightspeed traveling as a concept was initially inspired by the purrgil. Millennia before the events of the Skywalker Saga, space engineers observed the purrgil and designed the first hyperdrives to try and emulate how they jump to lightspeed.

Another important aspect of how the purrgil move through hyperspace is that they have previously established routes. Being space whales, they share with their real-world counterparts the habit of migrating , and that's how the first hyperspace routes were established, by following their migration paths. In the Ahsoka end credits , the star map even shows two of those hyperspace lanes, the Corellian Run and the Perlemian Trade Route. But those are just a few of these routes, and the purrgil don't usually travel in a straight line . Migrating often involves stops along the way, the purrgil just did most of it outside the borders of the known galaxy. Inside, though, they were key to helping establish hyperspace lanes and connect distant points of the galaxy, and this is how pilots can make their calculations before jumping to lightspeed. A hyperspace lane is certified to be safe, while smaller jumps tend to be more dangerous — looking at you and your lightspeed skipping, Poe Dameron ( Oscar Isaac ).

Do We Know How Long the Journey in ‘Ahsoka’ Is Going To Take?

That's the fun part: we can't know. Hyperspace is one of the defining traits of Star Wars lore, something that's unique to the franchise created by George Lucas . Many works have similar notions, like Star Trek and their warp cores or Dune and their Guild Navigators, for example, but none of those work like the hyperspace because, essentially, there are no fixed rules for how it's supposed to work in Star Wars. We have the notion that it's a separate dimension that the purrgil helped access, but there are still no rules as to how things work inside hyperspace, time the correlation between space and time, as we've mentioned before.

This is what makes hyperspace such a unique storytelling device for Star Wars: lightspeed traveling can take as much as it needs to take for the story to develop the way it needs. For example, in The Rise of Skywalker Rey ( Daisy Ridley ) and Kylo Ren ( Adam Driver ) go around the galaxy many times in a short period of time. When a fan asked Lucasfilm Storygroup member Matt Martin about this on social media , he answered that "hyperspace travels at the speed of the plot," although it might be difficult to justify. A year later, another Storygroup member, Pablo Hidalgo , mentioned how he once tried to calculate this himself in the past but warned against doing this because "it isn't very Star Wars."

What both Martin and Hidalgo are getting at is that hyperspace isn't supposed to make sense to begin with, and that's why it's such a fun aspect of Star Wars. The fact that it doesn't comply with specific measurements allows for any story to use it the way it needs to, without having to adjust to previously established lore based on accurate scientific data. Star Wars is more fantasy than science fiction , and even hard sci-fi works don't spend that much time explaining their concepts because it takes away from the magic and sense of wonder we get as an audience. Things happen the way they are supposed to happen, and that's enough for anyone to be able to enjoy a story without having to draw a calculator.

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Hyperspace Travel Times

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Homebrew Warning

Hyperspace Travel Times rules created by Wikia user ShadowDragon8685.

See also: House Rules

Hyperspace travel is based on the grid system found on standard maps of the galaxy. Travel times depend on the number of grid squares the travel will take you through. Different parts of the galaxy take different amounts of time to travel through.

  • In most of the galaxy, each grid square of distance traveled takes 16 hours to traverse.
  • The Deep Core is extremely densely populated with stars and stellar phenomena that make Hyperspace travel very difficult, and The Outer Rim is very poorly charted. Traveling through these regions increases the travel time to 24 hours per square.
  • Major Hyperspace lanes and minor trade lanes alike are very well charted and constantly kept up-to-date. These lanes override the difficulty of traveling through The Deep Core (As the best routes have already been found and are kept marked,) and The Outer Rim (As the routes have obviously been charted.) Travel along these routes is safe and secure, taking only 8 hours per grid square traveled.

All times are multiplied by the class multiplier of your Hyperdrive .

For example, a ship with a Class 1 Hyperdrive would take 24 hours to travel down the Rimma Trade Route from Sullust to Thyferra , a distance of 4 grid squares. A ship with a Class 0.75 Hyperdrive would take 72 hours to travel from Kuat to Ryloth , down the Hydian Way and transitioning to the Corellian Run.

This is how the majority of the galactic starfarers travel- down the charted Hyperspace Routes. Mishaps almost never happen, the routes are generally well-patrolled and their hazards frequently updated within minutes of being discovered, which is usually soon after they occur. You'll probably want to use the major lanes and the trade lanes to get as close to your destination as possible before going off the mainstream of travel, but you don't have to.

To go off the major space-lanes, however, is more difficult. You'll need a galactic star-chart, the most recently-updated the better. You can plot a "Hard" course from anywhere to anywhere, ignoring the main travel corridors entirely. This is how The Rebel Alliance operated back during the Galactic Civil War, to avoid Imperial patrols and random searches. Even if they were going to a place that was down a major spacelane, they would often travel parallel to it on an unpredictable vector, so the Empire couldn't intercept them.

If you have up-to-date charts and a Navicomputer or an Astromech Droid that can function as a Navicomputer (Or both), this is not significantly more risky than traveling along the space-lanes, just slower. If you're plotting your Hyperspace jump with out-of-date charts (More than a month old) or without the benefit of a Navicomputer or Astromech, you may be in trouble. If you're doing a jump with old charts and no Navicomputer , you're in real trouble. If you're trying to jump into uncharted sectors; such as into Wild Space , or exploring a star system nobody has visited before, you're in trouble. You're going to have to take your chances. Calculating a Hyperspace jump is a Use Computer check.

Exploring deep space is no simple matter. Going off-the-charts is dangerous, no less so today than when the first Duros exploration ship tested their first prototype Hyperdrive , lost to the mists of history. Long before the installation of Hyperspace beacons, which were themselves replaced with Navicomputers , Hyperspace jumps had the be calculated the hard way. They still do, if you're making a jump into unknown territory. You'll have to crunch the numbers, set your course, throttle up the Hyperdrive and pray. Beseeching The Force for help couldn't hurt.

hyperspace travel times

Star Wars’ Hyperspace Explained

One of the star wars galaxy's most iconic visuals is more fascinating than ever right now..

Han Solo and Chewbacca look out of the cockpit of the Millennium Falcon, as it accelerates to Lightspeed in preparation to jump into Hyperspace.

Lucasfilm’s version of faster-than-light travel—hyperspace—is as fundamental to the worldbuilding of Star Wars as the Force . It’s the backbone of making its galaxy an interconnected universe of potential , a concept that has become more and more integral to some of the franchise’s biggest storytelling pushes. But how it works, and how people use it, has become more complex and fascinating than ever.

Suggested Reading

So what is hyperspace.

Hyperspace is one of the oldest elements of Star Wars we know, having first glimpsed it in action when the Millennium Falcon raced on its way from Tatooine towards Alderaan (or, what was left of it) in 1977's A New Hope . Although the concept of faster-than-light travel is no stranger to science fiction, how Star Wars has started playing with it in recent years has made it one of its most quietly compelling worldbuilding mechanics. It can be charted, traveled, manipulated, even weaponized—and the very ramifications of using it outside of the expected point-a-to-point-b mechanics can upend what we thought we knew about the galaxy far, far away in an instant.

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On its most simple level, hyperspace—not unlike Star Trek ’s warp speed or myriad other sci-fi series’ take on interstellar travel—is an alternate dimension of reality that vessels (among other things) can slip in and out of at speeds unbound by the rules of physics in realspace. Accessible only by breaking the speed of light (j umping to lightspeed, as it’s known in Star Wars lingo), time and velocity operate differently in hyperspace, vastly reducing the time it takes to get from one point to another. Its discovery formed the possibility for galactic civilization as we know it in Star Wars to actually exist.

Image for article titled Star Wars’ Hyperspace Explained

It’s not all that easy though. Navigating it is still not fundamentally unlike traveling in realspace, it just happens at impossible-to-comprehend speeds. Things that exist in realspace cast adjacent shadows in hyperspace, meaning navigation can be difficult without proper knowledge or, as we will see become common in the Star Wars galaxy, pre-charted safe routes. Traveling in hyperspace can be incredibly dangerous both during the process and coming out of it.

As Han tells Luke in A New Hope , an unplanned exit (intentional or otherwise) could lead you to come out of hyperspace in the middle of a star, or within the gravity well of a planet or spatial anomaly. Hitting another ship or debris in hyperspace can have massive ramifications—in hyperspace and realspace—even beyond the fatal consequence of hitting something else at FTL speeds. We’ve witnessed this in the Great Distaster of the High Republic era , when debris from a ship destroyed mid-hyperspace travel was shot across the known galaxy and accelerated to speeds capable of wiping out entire planets . Hyperspace might be fundamental to how the Star Wars galaxy works, but it’s also something that, even by the time of the movies, people generally just don’t know all that much about.

How Do You Travel Through Hyperspace?

Most hyperspace travel we see in Star Wars media is technological; s tarships, everything from as small as an X-Wing to as large as a Star Destroyer, as long as it had a hyperdrive, could enter and exit the dimension. Fuelled by hypermatter, the engines shoot vessels to the speed that allows them to break into hyperspace in the first place, maintaining their mass and velocity (which is how Admiral Holdo’s maneuver in The Last Jedi proved to be so devastating ). This travel takes place along hyperspace lanes, safe passageways in the dimension that had been charted out hundreds and hundreds of years beforehand by the earliest explorers of the Old Republic, marked by beacons which provide route data and computational power as well as physical guide points to ships as they made jumps. In “contemporary” Star Wars —for want of a better word about a story that takes place a “ long time ago”—the computation power and layouts of those routes required to travel was now handled by onboard navigational systems known as navicomputers, or, to enhance limited computers in smaller vessels, an astromech droid’s internal systems.

Vessels could also fall out of hyperspace, intentionally or otherwise, at other points. Failure of a hyperdrive, for example, would cause a ship to jerk back into realspace. But they could also be forced: a gravitational pull could affect the velocity needed to breach hyperspace (which is why attempting to jump to lightspeed within the atmosphere of a planet was considered dangerous enough to be close to impossible) and a strong enough pull could block or terminate the process. The Empire built specific cruisers, known as the Interdictor class, that generated powerful gravity wells that could both stop nearby ships from entering hyperspace and pull them out mid-jump. This technology was vital to the Empire as, for much of Star Wars ’ history, it was deemed impossible to track a vessel once it made the jump to lightspeed. Just decades later, however, Imperial successor the First Order cracked the ability to do so. It broke a generation of conventional wisdom by isolating a computer system in a localized hyperspace field and accelerating its programming capabilities.

Are There Other Ways to Travel in Hyperspace?

Yes, there are other ways to navigate hyperspace. The Chiss Ascendancy existed in the “Unknown Regions” of the galaxy which had not been charted by hyperspace prospectors for the Galactic Republic or the Empire. They employed a secretive corps of hyperspace navigators (known in their language as ozyly-esehembo ) to help facilitate the computations required to navigate the volatile spaces in the region. Translated into basic as “Sky-walkers,” these Chiss were primarily very young girls between the ages of eight and 13. Sensitive to the Force, they had what was known in Chiss culture as “Third Sight,” the precognitive ability to help ships navigate through realspace and to map limited hyperspace jumps. Kept secret from all except the upper echelons of Chiss military and public society, each ship in the Ascendancy navy would be assigned a Sky-walker, and they would rotate out frequently. Why? Because Sky-walkers, no matter what training or preventative measures were taken, largely lost their ability to use Third Sight by the time they were teenagers.

Image for article titled Star Wars’ Hyperspace Explained

The Chiss were not the only Force-sensitive species that could use those abilities in such a manner, however incredibly rare such a manifestation of power actually was. In the time of the High Republic —roughly 200 years before the events of the main Star Wars movies—a force-sensitive human named Mari San Tekka could use her abilities to detect safe, but unconventional passageways through hyperspace known simply as “Paths.” Deemed too risky or even impossible by traditional prospectors’ standards, San Tekka’s paths could defy previously held conventional wisdom—like the ability to enter and exit hyperspace near spatial anomalies, or within and near the gravitational pull of a planet.

Due to the rarity of her abilities, however, San Tekka was an extremely valuable asset. She was captured and utilized exclusively by the pirate force known as the Nihil and sustained well beyond her natural lifespan by being hooked into medical systems aboard the flagship of the Nihil’s leader Marchion Ro (and his father before him, Asgar), the Gaze Electric . As they accelerated their operation outside of the Outer Rim territories they originated in and became a galactic-scale threat to the Republic, every ship was equipped with a “Path Engine.” It was a secondary hyperdrive that translated  t he data provided by San Tekka’s abilities into more standardized navigational information.

But humanoids weren’t the only sapient beings that could tap into this biological method of navigation. Introduced in Star Wars Rebels , the Purrgil were a species of whale-like semi-sentients that lived in deep space and had the unique natural ability to manifest “simu-tunnels” in hyperspace. While rare in and of themselves, Purrgils have taken on an almost folkloric status among space pilots and navigators. They’re ancient enough that it’s believed the study of their travel is what inspired galactic society to develop their own means of traveling through hyperspace in the first place, thousands of years before the Star Wars films. Additionally, their biological ways of travel and thought-processing formed the basis for the technology behind everything from the Wayfinders of ancient Force orders like the Jedi and Sith, to the hyperspace beacons and drives that made early intergalactic scouting possible.

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SW Hyperspace Travel Times

Astrogation.

Intellect (Astrogation) Astrogation involves the use of a navcomputer to plot a hyperspace course. The calculations involved are insanely complicated, and require an up-to-date set of charts.

  • The distance being traveled sets the Difficulty, time to calculate, and base duration of the trip (and number of jumps taken during the trip).
  • The Astrometrics Record: Ships docking in a space port are permitted an exchange of astrometrics data with the spaceport systems, downloading their information to the port (giving the port up to date data on where they've been) in exchange for uploading the port's compiled astrometics information. The downside of this, of course, is that this registers (by transponder identity) each ship's arrival and previous travels with the spaceport in question.
  • Time to Calculate: The actual time it takes to make the calculations can vary depending on the distance involved, running and rerunning travel scenarios based on the galactic astroscape as contained in the navcomp. The further the distance, the longer this cascade of projected routes takes. The time in parentheses is if the route taken is traceable entirely along hyperspace routes.
  • Trip Duration: This is the time the travel from origin point to destination takes along the calculated route. This duration assumes travel via little-known or even entirely new routes. Travel along hyperspace routes can significantly reduce this time. The time in parentheses is if the route taken is traceable entirely along hyperspace routes. (168 hours is one week; 336 hours is two weeks; 504 hours is three weeks)
  • Such instances are usually in uninhabited or remote systems, or in deep space between systems, as data for such locations rarely shows up on astrometrics, making it harder to account for them in calculations.
  • When a ship drops out of hyperspace, it frequently takes a short time (2d10 + 10 minutes) in sublight speed to realign past whatever it was that caused the drop-out and to get back on track.
  • Such encounters are usually uneventful, providing a quick look at a rarely-visited or even entirely undiscovered system before a leap back to hyperspace, but those moments of maneuvering have also been the cause of significant danger for vessels, as pirates, slavers, mynocks or other dangers spring in that moment. The phenomena that cause the drop-out can also prove a danger that needs to be escaped, as well.

Modifier Descriptions

  • Astrometrics Out of Date: For each step that a ship's astrometrics record is out of date, upgrade the Difficulty of the astrogation check once. Not having an up-to-date record makes it harder to perform accurate calculations to avoid the hazards of hyperspace travel. These penalties are negated by receiving an updated set of astrometrics, most commonly done at a spaceport.
  • High Stress during Calculations: Any high stress situation makes it easier to make mistakes, upgrading the Difficulty of the check.
  • Hyperspace Routes: Destinations and starting points that are along hyperspace routes make the calculations easier - those points in space are more judiciously recorded, after all. Conversely, those that are far from any established routes are less likely to have all variables accounted for.
  • Ship Damage: Astrogation calculations including risk assessments for bringing a ship near a hyperspace phenomenon. Undamaged ships can take risks that a navcomputer might rule are too risky for a damaged ship to take, making the calculations more difficult.
  • Edge of system: The ship arrives at the edge of the system in question. This can take 1d10 hours to reach the destination or so, but making a system's-edge jump can be a good way to approach stealthily and/or with ample time to run full scans on the system as a whole.
  • An hour out: The ship arrives quite a distance away (often closer to the planet's nearest neighbor than the planet itself). The destination is some distance out, with plenty of time to scan the arrival point.
  • Ten minutes out: No Modifiers. The ship arrives ten minutes from the destination point.
  • Five minutes out: The world is clearly visible, though a short distance away.
  • Lunary orbit: The ship arrives within easy sight of the planet in question, right around the lunary sphere (area where most moons orbit a planet).
  • In orbit: The ship arrives at the edge of the planet's gravity well, and is immediately coasted into its orbit. Pilot must make a Piloting check, (Dif 3) or take 3 System Strain.
  • In atmosphere: A dangerous and unpredictable trick, this puts the ship into the atmosphere of the planet in question, effectively aiming for hyperspace breach inside of the world's gravity shadow. Upon arrival, the ship takes 1 System Strain for every Silhouette level it has, and the pilot must make a Pilot check (with a Difficulty equal to his vessel's Silhouette -1) to avoid taking an immediate Critical Hit.

Success-result.png

Hyperspace Routes

Astrogation along one of the main hyperspace routes is very different from calculating hyperspace travel vectors along minor or even entirely new routes. Hyperspace interaction has a cumulative effect - the more vessels travel along a given route in hyperspace, the smoother and even faster that travel becomes. The five hyperspace routes of the known galaxy are so often traveled that they have dramatically smoothed the process of both calculation and travel along them.

Generally speaking, astrogators perform one set of calculations to get to a major hyperspace route, another to calculate their travel along it, and then a third set from their drop-out point along the route to wherever their final destination lies. This turns what might normally be a long and arduous cross-galactic journey into a series of much more reasonable jaunts.

  • Time to Calculate: The time to calculate a hyperspace jump along a major route is significantly reduced, dropping to 1 turn for each quarter of the route taken.
  • Number of Jumps: The jumps along a route are also significantly diminished, amounting to 1 jump for each quarter-length of the route. Thus, to run the entire length of a route results in only four jumps, and to run half its length is only two. These can still be reduced by Astrogation check results.

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This article details a subject that is considered canon.

The blue simu-tunnel of hyperspace travel

Hyperspace was an alternate dimension that could only be reached by traveling at or faster than the speed of light . Hyperdrives enabled starships to travel through hyperspace lanes across great distances, enabling travel and exploration throughout the galaxy .

  • 2 Hyperspace usage
  • 4.1 Non-canon appearances
  • 6 Notes and references
  • 7 External links

Falcon Hyperspace TROS

The Millennium Falcon exiting hyperspace

During the High Republic Era , hyperspace was not truly understood by anyone in the galaxy . [3] It was still regarded as a mystery during the Imperial Era . [2] It was at any rate a dimension of space-time [4] alternative to that of realspace . [5] In hyperspace, the normal laws of space and time did not apply, and beings traveling through hyperspace sometimes used stasis fields to slow the passage of time onboard a hyperspace-going vessel in order to have the pilot only age as fast as the rest of the galaxy . [6]

It could only be accessed through molecular displacement, which was achieved by breaking the speed of light . [5] The process created a simu-tunnel , a pocket of realspace allowing safe travel through the alternate dimension. [7] The Loth-wolves encountered by the Spectres [8] in 1 BBY [9] could travel in a similar manner to lightspeed via hyperspace tunneling . [8] Hyperspace was coterminous with realspace, meaning that each point in realspace was associated with a unique point in hyperspace, and all adjacent points in realspace were adjacent in hyperspace as well. Additionally, every object in realspace—such as stars , planets , and asteroids —had its " shadow " counterpart in hyperspace. Aside from those well-established facts acknowledged by all competent astrophysicists and astrogation experts, other aspects of hyperspace admittedly remained a mystery. [4]

Hyperspace usage [ ]

Phantom falls out of hyperspace

The Phantom detaches from the Ghost and falls out of hyperspace.

Hyperdrives manipulated hypermatter particles in order to thrust a starship into hyperspace [11] whilst preserving the ship's mass/energy profile. [11] This shortened travel distance significantly, allowing the vessel to "jump" from a specific point to another without having to travel directly between them, therefore reducing journey time by an extraordinarily large margin. [10] A vessel's ability to travel through hyperspace depended on it being equipped with a hyperdrive engine; [12] thus, vessels that suffered a hyperdrive failure while in hyperspace, [13] or lacked a hyperdrive and had separated from a vessel with one, would immediately fall out of hyperspace. [1] Cutting power to a functional hyperdrive would also have this effect. [14]

Quick jumps into hyperspace could be unsettling to even experienced pilots , but those with the proper stamina and training could overcome this. [15] Hyperspace whiplash was a condition experienced by some travelers upon exiting hyperspace. [16]

Large objects in realspace cast "mass shadows" in hyperspace, so hyperspace jumps necessitated very precise calculations. [17] Without those, a vessel could fly right through a star or another celestial body. [10] Because of the danger, there existed predetermined hyperspace routes which interstellar travelers could take. The discovery of a new, safe hyperspace route could play a pivotal role in war, as it would allow naval forces to move faster unbeknownst to their adversaries. [18] The Galactic Empire employed Interdictor vessels which utilized gravity well projectors that created artificial mass shadows, both to pull them from hyperspace and to prevent them from making the jump to it. [19]

Upon entering hyperspace, a ship appeared to accelerate dramatically—a phenomenon known as pseudomotion [20] —and emitted Cronau radiation , which made their jump detectable by specialized sensors. [19] Hyperspace could be traversed via methods including navigation computers , Force-sensitive navigators , or jump-by-jump journeys. The Unknown Regions hosted unstable hyperspace pathways which required its residents to rely on navigators and jump-by-jump navigation rather than navicomputers. [21]

T-70Hyperspace-SWCT

A T-70 X-wing starfighter traveling through hyperspace

Safely entering hyperspace from a standing start while docked or exiting hyperspace directly into the atmosphere of a planet were both feats that were generally considered impossible, even for an experienced pilot. Despite this, Han Solo accomplished both with the Millennium Falcon after being drawn into the First Order–Resistance conflict . [22] In fact, starships had safety protocols that prevented hyperdrive engines from firing within the gravitational pull of a planet. Although it was possible to turn those protocols off, such a move was highly dangerous, and any ship doing so had a high chance of blowing up, becoming severely damaged [23] or falling apart in hyperspace. [24] Successful jumps near a planet were possible, though: during the Clone Wars , a cruiser carrying an injured Anakin Skywalker had its hyperdrive accidentally triggered while still in a planet's atmosphere due to damage from droid fighters, and despite the proximity to the planet the ship successfully jumped to hyperspace without being destroyed. [14] Jyn Erso and her company jumped into hyperspace from inside the atmosphere of Jedha after the Death Star destroyed the moon's Holy city . [25] While fleeing Lothal in a U-wing , Hera Syndulla jumped to hyperspace right in front of an Imperial construction module and flew through the hangar, successfully getting out the other side and making the jump. [8] Desperate to save the remaining Resistance escape ships, Vice Admiral Amilyn Holdo engaged the hyperdrive of the Resistance cruiser Raddus directly into the path of the First Order Mega -class Star Dreadnought , the Supremacy , heavily damaging it and effectively vaporizing all traces of her ship. [26] This tactic became known as the Holdo maneuver . [27]

History [ ]

A pod of Purrgils in Hyperspace MandoS3

A pod of purrgils traveling through hyperspace.

The ability to travel through hyperspace occurred in nature. The space-based species known as the purrgil could naturally travel through hyperspace. [28] At some point in the ancient past of the galaxy , an ancestral species unlocked the secrets of traveling through hyperspace and opened the galaxy up to exploration. [19] According to legend, the Rakatans , an ancient amphibious humanoid species native to the planet Lehon , were the first to develop hyperspace travel. [29]

Hyperspace travel was mastered as early as four millennia before the Cold War , as demonstrated by the existence of hyperspace sextants from that era. [30] In the early days of the Galactic Republic , hyperspace travel between the Greater Seswenna and the Core Worlds required astrogating by hyperspace beacons , with numerous reversions to realspace necessary to ensure safe passage. [19] Nevertheless, access to hyperspace travel proved to be vital to the Republic's expansion, [3] leading to a period of time known as the Great Hyperspace Rush . [31]

CitadelRescueFleet-CR

Venator -class Star Destroyers traveling in hyperspace

Around two centuries before the Invasion of Naboo , [32] starships across the galaxy were abruptly knocked out of hyperspace in the Great Hyperspace Disaster [33] masterminded by the Nihil . [3] Thanks to their path engines , the Nihil were able to perform acts with lightspeed thought to be impossible. [34] Generalirius Nakirre of the Kilji Illumine nation viewed hyperspace as a swirling disorder. [35]

At the time of the First Order–Resistance conflict, the First Order discovered sub-hyperspace , which they utilized with their superweapon , Starkiller Base . [36] The firing of Starkiller Base during the Hosnian Cataclysm in 34 ABY released enough energy to create a temporary rip in sub-hyperspace. This made the disaster visible from across the galaxy instantaneously, for a short time. [37]

Appearances [ ]

Non-canon appearances [ ], sources [ ], notes and references [ ].

Rebels-mini-logo

  • ↑ 2.0 2.1 Battlefront: Twilight Company
  • ↑ 3.0 3.1 3.2 The High Republic: Light of the Jedi
  • ↑ 4.0 4.1 YT-1300 Millennium Falcon Owners' Workshop Manual
  • ↑ 5.0 5.1 Star Wars: Geektionary: The Galaxy from A - Z
  • ↑ Star Wars Complete Vehicles, New Edition

StarWars

  • ↑ Star Wars: Timelines
  • ↑ 10.0 10.1 10.2 Star Wars : Episode IV A New Hope
  • ↑ 11.0 11.1 Star Wars: The Force Awakens: Incredible Cross-Sections

StarWars

  • ↑ The Rebellion Begins
  • ↑ Star Wars Jedi: Survivor

StarWars-DatabankII

  • ↑ 19.0 19.1 19.2 19.3 Tarkin
  • ↑ Thrawn: Alliances
  • ↑ Star Wars : Episode VII The Force Awakens
  • ↑ The High Republic: The Rising Storm
  • ↑ Adventures in Wild Space: The Escape
  • ↑ Rogue One: A Star Wars Story
  • ↑ Star Wars : Episode VIII The Last Jedi
  • ↑ Star Wars : Episode IX The Rise of Skywalker

Build the Millennium Falcon

  • ↑ Star Wars: The Force Awakens: The Visual Dictionary
  • ↑ The High Republic: Out of the Shadows

SWYTlogo

  • ↑ The High Republic: A Test of Courage
  • ↑ Doctor Aphra (2020) 8
  • ↑ Thrawn Ascendancy: Lesser Evil
  • ↑ Star Wars : Episode VII The Force Awakens novelization

External links [ ]

WPfavicon

  • 1 Ki-Adi-Mundi
  • 2 Darth Plagueis
  • 3 Darth Tenebrous

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Star wars: everything you wanted to know about hyperspace (but were afraid to ask).

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"The Sacred Jedi Texts": Do You Actually Remember What The Star Wars Expanded Universe Was?

10 years after she joined star wars, daisy ridley finally meets rey, star wars: 10 force powers that came out of nowhere.

With countless worlds and alien species spread across an entire galaxy far, far away, it would only make sense to create a plausible form of travel by which individuals could jump back and forth. This convenient little plot mechanic is known as hyperspace, and it's been part of Star Wars lore since the very first film.

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Hyperspace might otherwise be known as "light speed," but this is a misleading term. There's a lot more that goes into this phenomenon, and its history stretches back for millennia. Here are ten facts about hyperspace that non-techies were afraid to ask, and physics experts were too embarrassed to ponder.

The Pre-Hyperspace Days

Long before hyperspace before the common method of travel within the Star Wars universe, the earliest spacefarers were setting out to chart the galaxy in hopes of laying down roots. To counteract the effects of extremely long voyages, these travelers would encase themselves in carbonite as a method of keeping their bodies in perfect hibernation.

Unfortunately, this rather crude preservation technique also brought about hibernation sickness and all of its undesirable side effects. Worse yet, certain individuals were at risk of dying from the condition. Hyperdrive motivators would put an end to the need for carbonite freezing during deep space travel.

Hyperspace Is An Alternate Dimension

While it's tempting to equate hyperspace with so-called "warp drive technology" that is theoretically possible, the two aren't related. Hyperspace in the Star Wars universe exists as an alternate dimension from realspace which can be accessed via hyperdrive technology.

As ships reach lightspeed (or greater) velocity, they can access this dimension and enter hyperspace "lanes" which allow for fast travel in between systems that would normally take thousands of years to reach. In effect, it's the watered-down version of space-folding physics that we may one day get to take advantage of.

The Role Of A Hyperdrive

Most Star Wars fans have heard of hyperdrive systems which are installed on ships in order to allow for jumps to hyperspace, but few know how they work. These engines were fueled by hypermatter, a substance that could be manipulated to propel a ship into hyperspace without damaging it.

These technological systems not only kicked a ship into hyperspace but maintained it as well. Any fault in the system would cause the ship to drop out immediately out of hyperspace, which was considered an extremely hazardous risk.

The Role Of Gravity

Although hyperspace is considered an alternate dimension separate from realspace, the two are connected by the (loose) laws of physics in the Star Wars universe. One of these laws is shared with our own universe - the power of gravitational forces.

Ships flying through hyperspace could be yanked out in mid-flight by interdictor vessels which were capable of generating large gravity wells that affected hyperspace lanes passing through their diameter. Similarly, a gravity well could nullify a hyperdrive and prevent a ship from making the jump. The Empire utilized interdictor vessels to trap Rebel forces and prevent them from escaping.

Hyperspace Is Not Linear

While many Star Wars fans might think a hyperspace jump is a simple straight-line move, that's not quite the case. Hyperspace is a twisting and turning dimension made up of specific lanes that ships must adhere to, as they forge a safe path to and from particular destinations.

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Entering hyperspace without precise calculations was extremely dangerous - a fact echoed by Han Solo who said it was possible to "fly right through a star, or bounce too close to a supernova." It also explains why tracking ships who jump to hyperspace is a difficult affair that requires guesswork and extrapolation.

Organics May Travel Through Hyperspace

Ships aren't the only thing that can travel through hyperspace. Certain organic life forms such as the Purrgil could also manipulate hyperspace lanes and travel freely, as evidenced by the Star Wars: Rebels episode "The Call."

Similarly, the Yuuzhan Vong from the New Jedi Order   Legends material implemented dovin basal technology to propel their organic vessels through hyperspace. If the physiology was correct, and the creature capable of withstanding the stresses of faster-than-light travel, they could make use of this natural phenomenon.

Discovery And Use

Without hyperspace, the Star Wars galaxy would simply not exist. It was the linchpin for all of the progress, growth, and expansion that eventually led to the formation of the Republic, the Galactic Empire, and the New Republic that followed in its wake.

Hyperspace had been in use for thousands of years before Luke Skywalker's time, and it was instrumental in the battles that took place between countless worlds and species. In peacetime, it served as an effective trade system between friendly worlds and galactic commerce groups.

The Evolution Of Travel

While Star Wars depicts the act of hyperspace travel as a singular jump with pre-programmed navigational coordinates, it wasn't always so. In the early days, hyperwave beacons were required to chart hyperspace lanes and set up multiple jump points leading to the desired destination.

This necessitated that the ship drop out of hyperspace several times in order to reposition for the next wave point jump. Eventually, this archaic form of travel was replaced by computer-driven hyperdrive systems with coordinates built into their star charts.

Pseudomotion

When a ship makes the jump to hyperspace, the resulting visual phenomenon makes it appear as if the ship picks up massive acceleration. This is actually a distortion known as pseudomotion which may not represent what most viewers think it does.

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This could be the same type of distortion phenomena hypothesized when one crosses the event horizon of a black hole and is drawn inside, which appears different than what is actually taking place. Either way, the science behind it remains mysterious in Star Wars canon - possibly on purpose.

The Great Disaster

Approximately 232 years before the Trade Federation invaded Naboo in Star Wars: The Phantom Menace , an incident known as the "Great Disaster" caused starships from all corners of the galaxy to suddenly drop out of hyperspace. This triggered a catastrophically destructive reaction that obliterated several moons including the inhabited Korbatal.

The Jedi were tasked with investigating what caused the Great Disaster and learned that a mass shadow of debris had been lodged in the hyperspace lanes which caused the disaster to take place. It was the first true depiction of stationery realspace objects threatening travelers from within hyperspace itself. This event was created specifically for the upcoming High Republic lore .

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Rhett Allain

The Physics of the Millennium Falcon's Jump to Hyperspace

inside smuggler's run ride at star wars galaxy's edge at disneyland

I'm a fan of both Star Wars and physics , but I have to admit I don't know what the "jump to hyperspace" means. In short, it's a way for spaceships in the Star Wars universe to travel great distances in very little time. It should be clear that hyperspace travel is not at the speed of light . Light has a speed of 3 x 10 8 meters per second. This means that even traveling to the closest star (from Earth) would take a couple of years. Some other weird things would also happen according to Einstein's Theory of Special Relativity—but suffice it to say that a jump to hyperspace is not just a matter of traveling at the speed of light.

One common idea about hyperspace is that it involves extra dimensions . Perhaps traveling through this extra dimension allows a starship to take a short cut through space so that a trip that would take years instead takes hours. It's just a thought.

But what about something we can actually measure? Can we determine the acceleration of a vessel as it makes the jump to hyperspace? Oh, yeah—we totally can, and we will. For this analysis I am going to use the shot of the Millennium Falcon as it jumps to hyperspace at the end of The Empire Strikes Back . To estimate the acceleration, we can look at the angular size of the back of the Falcon as it moves away.

What does angular size have to do with this anyway? Our eyes (and movie cameras) don't see the size of things. Instead, they see the angular size of objects. If you draw an imaginary line from your eye out to one side of an object and then another line to the other side of the object, you would make a tiny wedge. The angle between these two lines is the angular size.

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This is why when things get farther away, they appear smaller. But if you know the angular size (θ) in radians and the actual size ( L ), you can find the distance ( r ). Oh, I know what you're thinking. That relationship only works for the arc-length of a circle. Yes, that's technically true. If the object is sufficiently far away, however, then the difference between arc-length and width is super tiny, and we can ignore the distinction.

Now for some data. All I need to do is measure the position of the sides of the Falcon and use that to calculate the angular size in each frame of the video during the jump to hyperspace. Of course there is a big problem. I don't actually know the angular size at the beginning of the jump. I'm just going to have to estimate it. Let's say that the Millennium Falcon is 25 meters wide and starts off at a distance of 100 meters from the camera. With that, I can set the angular field of view for the scene. This gives the following plot of angular size vs. time for that Falcon as it escapes.

With that angular size and the width of the Millennium Falcon, I can calculate the distance from the camera to the starship.

There is a quite a bit to consider in this graph. Just look at the final position—around 8,000 meters. So, in about half a second the Millennium Falcon goes from a position of just 100 meters to about 5 miles. If you consider the average speed (change in position over change in time), that's about 29,000 miles per hour (for Imperial readers). No matter the units, that's a super fast speed.

OK, but what about the acceleration? I can fit a quadratic function to the data (as seen in the graph). This is useful since an object moving with a constant acceleration also will have a quadratic for the equation of motion. Since the motion of an object with constant acceleration comes up quite often in physics courses, we give this equation a special name—the kinematic equation. It gives the position of an object at different times based on the acceleration (and the initial position and velocity). Here is the fitting equation along with the kinematic equation for constant acceleration.

Image may contain Text

Here you can see that the fitting number in front of the t 2 term should be equal to half the acceleration. That puts the Falcon's acceleration at 33,922 meters per second squared. Ummmm ... that is a super high acceleration. If you drop an object on the surface of the Earth, it will have an acceleration of 9.8 m/s 2 . If you eject yourself from a fighter aircraft , you will have the painful acceleration of something like 60 m/s 2 . This spaceship jumping to hyperspace accelerates a little bit more than that.

What about the g-force? OK, let's be clear about two points here. First, surely the Millennium Falcon has some type of "inertial damper" that allows people inside the ship to accelerate without dying . Second, Star Wars isn't real life so it doesn't matter (but it's still fun to analyze). Now, for the g-force. This is a fake force. It's a way to make an accelerating reference frame behave like a non-accelerating reference frame. In this case, the fake force is essentially just a measure of the acceleration of the inside of the Millennium Falcon.

The measure of this fake force is in terms of the gravitational force on Earth—this is the acceleration in g's. If the ship accelerated at 9.8 m/s 2 , that would be a fake force of 1 g. Inside the ship, it would feel like an extra gravitational weight pushing on you in the opposite direction that the spaceship accelerates. So, the acceleration in the jump to hyperspace would be a g-force of 3,461 g's. That's a large enough acceleration to easily squish a human if you don't have something like an inertial damper.

But wait! We also have an idea about the g-forces inside the Millennium Falcon during this jump. First, you can see Leia in the cockpit getting thrown back into her seat. Second, R2-D2 rolls back and falls down into an access panel. Surprisingly, there is enough data to measure R2's acceleration inside the ship. Here is a plot of his position as a function of time along with a quadratic fit.

Image may contain Plot

From this, it seems that there is an internal fake force of 2.73 m/s 2 or 0.28 g's. Yes, this is much less than the acceleration as seen from outside the ship. Obviously the inertial dampers are still mostly working.

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Hyperspace travel times calculator (new and improved).

A while ago, I made a bare-bones hyperspace travel times calculator with Google Sheets. It did the basics of what needed to be done, but it wasn’t all that impressive and could be difficult to use. As I’ve learned more how to use spreadsheets (specifically Excel), I’ve made a new and improved version here: Hyperspace Calculator (.xlsx)

Every number is completely malleable. There are NO numbers hard-coded into formulas, making personalization and modification much easier. NO Excel knowledge required! Just change the numbers in the tables, you won’t have to touch any formulas.

If you just want to use this tool at its most basic, read the quick start guides. If you want to know how to get the most out of this tool, read the advanced guides, although it may be worth skimming the quick start guides first.

In the “Ships (table)” sheet, enter the appropriate stats for the ship you want to use (Hyperdrive class, fuel consumption modifier [I use 1, +1 for each point of silhouette past 4], and campaign name) and delete the other rows (Ctrl&-).

In the “Games (table)” sheet, enter your campaign name, the desired number of inches per hour (default is one), and the desired number of fuel cells consumed per hour (default is 0.5). Note: Hour:Inch is based on a 500 parsecs (1/3 grid square) per inch measurement. If you are working off a different measurement, see “Advanced setup>Games (table)>Hour:Inch.”

You’re good to go! Move on to “Calculation quick start” to see how to get your results.

Once you’ve entered the necessary data (see “Setup quick start”), you’re ready to get your results!

  • Choose your ship.
  • Add a new row (see “Expanding tables (tutorial)”).
  • Name your route.
  • Measure your route and enter the number (decimal please!) in the “Distance (Inches)” column.
  • Select a class of hyperlane (not sure what class? Enter something not on the list and read the error message).
  • Select region. (Note. If a trip crosses regions or travels over different classes of hyperlane, you will need to list separate “legs” of the journey. Alternatively, choose “Minor” and “Outer Rim” to multiply by 1 and ignore the variance in modifiers.)
  • Enter any additional modifiers (such as from Advantage or Threat) in the “Additional Modifiers” cell. Positive numbers increase the time, negative numbers decrease the time.
  • Filter out any unwanted entries and look at the “Total” row. Ta-da! (If you don’t know how to filter, it’s the little drop-down arrow beside the column’s header.)

For more on fuel, see “Advanced calculation.”

Before you can use the “Calculator” sheet, you need to input some basic data.

You need to do this first, as it is the source of another table’s Data Validation drop-down list.

Under “Campaign,” put the name of each campaign.

Under “Hour:Inch” put the base number of inches travelled in an hour. I’m basing my measurements off a galaxy grid of 3 inches per square, so 500 parsecs per inch. If you’re using a different measurement, you’ll need to adapt this number to fit your grid’s size. Here are some common alternatives to get you started:

  • 500 parsecs on the galaxy map in any given CRB is 3/16s of an inch, so you’d need 5.33 to get the (approximately) same result as 1 if you were using that map.
  • For my anywhere-else-in-the-world friends, you’ll be using centimeters. If 500 parsecs=1 inch, it equals 2.54 centimeters (so 2.54). If 500 parsecs=3/16 of an inch, it equals 0.476cm (so 13.54). I know it’s a bit complicated, but that’s what happens when you convert Imperial to Metric (hence a nice, neat number like “.50” becoming “12.7mm”).

From there, just adjust it however you want to get the number you’ll personally use. Heck, just round it off and make it easier on yourself. I’m just telling you how to match the default of 1 hour=1 inch.

Under “Hour:Fuel” put how much fuel is consumed in an hour of hyperspace travel. If you want a fuel-intensive, more expensive campaign, increase the number. If you want a less expensive campaign, tone it down. Default is 0.5, or one fuel cell every two hours. (I run it that sil 3-4 ships have a capacity of 50, while sil 5 ships have a capacity of 100 and sil 6+ ships increase by additional 100 cells each.)

Under “Ships” put the names of your ships. Under drive class, put the ships’ hyperdrive classes. Under fuel cost (“consumption” was too long), put an appropriate number. This basically multiplies fuel consumption. I use 1, +1 for each point of silhouette past 4. If you don’t want to bother with fuel costs, set it to 0. Under “Game,” put the name of your game or campaign. This is so you can easily use the sheet for multiple campaigns that may have different settings for some of the variables (such as how fast hyperspace travel is).

You shouldn’t have to do any adjustment here, but this shows the modifiers added to your time based on what region of space you are navigating. The Deep Core is very clustered and slow to navigate, while the Outer Rim is far less dense. Here, you can add regions (“Hapes Cluster”), manipulate the modifiers, or even flatten them out. To see how to add to tables, see “Expanding Tables (tutorial).”

Like “Region Modifier,” you shouldn’t have to do any adjustment here. But this shows the modifiers added to your time based on the hyperlane you are navigating. The Corellian Run is much faster than the Bakura Trace (like an interstate highway compared to a back road). Here, you can add hyperlane types, add specific hyperlanes, manipulate the modifiers, or even flatten them out. To see how to add to tables, see “Expanding Tables (tutorial).”

This shows the cost to purchase fuel at a given class of port. Higher-class ports have higher docking fees, but provide better service (including security, which may or may not be a good thing) at a better price. I only list the cost for fuel here, however. This is straightforward enough, manipulate it however you want.

Once you’ve entered the necessary data (see “Advanced setup”), you’re ready to get your results!

  • From the drop-down menu, select the name of the ship you want to use. This will automatically fill the Hour:Inch and Hour:Fuel cells, besides telling the formulas what your hyperdrive class is.
  • Add more rows. The “IFERROR” part of the formula keeps the new rows from giving you a bunch of annoying #N /A errors.
  • Name your route. I recommend “Start-Destination.” If your trip will cross various regions and hyperlane speeds, you’ll need several entries, adding an entry in the “Leg” column to order and group each piece of the single route.
  • Measure your route and list it under “Distance (Inches).” Remember region boundaries and hyperlane speeds! For more information on the Hour:Inch ratio, see “Advanced setup>Games (table)>Hour:Inch.”
  • Select hyperlane from the drop-down menu. A major hyperroute would be like the Perlemian, while a minor route would be something like the Bakura Trace. Indeterminate just means it’s probably there, but not listed on your map, and uncharted means you aren’t following a mapped hyperlane.
  • Select region from the drop-down menu.
  • Enter any additional modifiers in the “Additional Modifiers” cell, such as effects from Advantage or Threat, or just variables you as the GM want to throw in there. My method for Advantage/Threat is 5% per, or 15% for a Triumph/Despair, to a max of 25% +/-. Positive numbers increase the time by X%, negative numbers decrease the time by X%.
  • Filter your “Route” column so you only see the routes you’re actually taking and look at the “Total” row.
  • Enter the class of starport you’ll patronize upon reaching your destination in the “Starport Class” cell.
  • Look at your totals.
  • “Fuel”: How many fuel cells you consumed on each leg, and across the whole trip.
  • “Trip Cost”: The cost to replace the fuel cells expended on each individual leg . It rounds down to a whole fuel cell!! The “Trip Cost” “Total” row calculates NOT based on adding up the rows above it, but based on the TOTAL number of fuel cells consumed, again rounded down to a whole fuel cell. This is because you don’t buy partial fuel cells.
  • “Real Cost”: The exact cost for the exact amount of fuel consumed. Straightforward, but not the most helpful when you’re at the pump and need to buy a whole number of fuel cells.
  • “Proportional Cost”: The proportional cost of each leg of the trip based on the TOTAL COST TO REFUEL, rounded down to a whole fuel cell. This is not a particularly useful feature, but adding it provides a complete economic review of the refueling costs. If I only left the previous two columns, it would be somewhat incomplete.

To expand a table, simply type on a subsequent row. Alternatively, click on the tiny gray triangle in the bottom right-hand corner and drag. Then enter your data in the new rows.

Don’t worry! This won’t mess up any of the formulas, and you won’t have to change any named ranges or Data Validation lists. Because of how I’ve set it up, they’ll expand automatically with your table.

I include examples of all of this in the calculator, hopefully that makes it easy to figure out how to use this. I know it may seem intimidating, but it’s a pretty easy learning curve. The basics are simple, and once you’re more acquainted with how it works modifying it should be a cakewalk. But if it isn’t, I’ll be happy to help you.

Warning: For whatever reason, VLOOKUPs don’t like words that start with “Alt” or entries that start with “Clone” or “Clown” (why clown, I have no earthly idea). Please do not attempt to use such words in the names of ships, campaigns, hyperlanes, or regions. You will get an error.

How Does Star Wars Hyperspace Actually Work?

Han and Chewie in hyperspace

There are numerous visual moments that have become staples of the "Star Wars" franchise throughout its five decades-long history. Aside from the ignition of a lightsaber, arguably the most iconic is the image of a ship entering hyperspace. Movement in space around the cockpit seems to slow, if only for a moment before the stars ahead appear stretched. With that, the ship jumps forward with a bang as the windshield is overtaken by swirls of white and blue — though hyperspace can look different, as seen in the sixth episode of "Ahsoka" on Disney+ . It's an unforgettable sequence, but how does hyperspace actually work?

It hasn't been overly-explained by any one piece of "Star Wars" media, but, over the years, hyperspace has been explored here and there. Essentially, hyperspace is an alternate dimension accessed when traveling faster than the speed of light. Doing so creates a simu-tunnel that allows one to travel through space time from one location in space to another. While creatures such as purrgil are capable of navigating hyperspace naturally, most other species in the "Star Wars" galaxy must be aboard a ship equipped with a hyperdrive to get from point A to point B safely.

Even in the meaningless "Star Wars" canon , hyperspace is a bit of a conundrum within the scientific community. It's not fully understood, thus making it a somewhat risky form of travel for the uninitiated.

Hyperspace travel can go terribly wrong

Hyperspace has canonically been explored since ancient times, with folks from all walks of life aiming to understand it and use it to their advantage. Naturally, this has led to some important discoveries along the way. Most notable is the creation of hyperspace lanes: paths between key points in the galaxy that are almost entirely safe for pilots to travel through hyperspace on. Traveling outside of these established lanes is a big risk, seeing as one can collide with mass shadows, or hyperspace versions of large objects in normal space, and almost certainly guarantee the destruction of their ship and death.

Unfortunately, an infamous example of a hyperspace collision actually occurs within a hyperspace lane during the High Republic Era. Known as the Great Hyperspace Disaster, a ship called the Legacy Run collides with a Nihil Stormship, killing the crew aboard and tearing the ship apart. The debris returns to space from hyperspace and proceeds to wreak havoc on nearby worlds, notably those in the Hetzal system. Additionally, in the non-canon "Star Wars" Legends continuity, Starweirds — the scariest Force-powered creatures you've likely never seen – are known to appear on vessels within hyperspace and decimate the crew. Though these beings are canon, they've yet to exhibit such behavior in the official timeline.

Evidently, hyperspace can be dangerous and cost those who decide to make the jump their life. Be that as it may, without it, the franchise just wouldn't be the same and our favorite characters would likely often be stuck in whatever corner of the galaxy they happened to be in, meaning hyperspace will likely always remain a cornerstone of "Star Wars" well into the future.

hyperspace travel times

Star Wars: How Does Hyperspace Travel Work?

Quick links, what is hyperspace, how does hyperspace work in star wars, hyperspace in effect, the origins of hyperspace technology, hyperspace weaponry, the holdo maneuver.

If there’s one thing that’s iconic in the Star Wars series, other than the lightsabers and force powers, it’s the HyperSpace travel. Whether it’s Han's “Punch it Chewy!” or hearing that high-tech engine powering up as spacecraft suddenly zip into or out of the inky darkness, Hyperspace in Star Wars is incredibly cool, but how does it work?

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According to the Star Wars lore - although Senior LucasBooks Editor Jennifer Heddle has said that the entire expanded universe is to be considered non-canon - there is a generally accepted view for how this jump into faster than light travel is achieved. So with that in mind, here’s how Hyperspace works in Star Wars.

Updated May 4, 2024 By Matthew Mckeown: It’s a rough time to be a Star Wars fan. From the confused future of the movies to the spiraling chaos of the shows, there’s little left to cling on to for hope. But at least we’ve still got the old lore to fall back on.

Despite an annulment of the expanded universe by the higher ups, the fans still consider it canon and there’s at least somewhere to retreat to that is still enjoyable. Whilst there’s been no retconning or change of how hyperspace works, there’s still some interesting “additions” in the current media that are worth mentioning. So here’s an updated look at how Hyperspace works in Star Wars.

Unless you’ve been living under a rock, you'll likely know that Hyperspace travel is the process by which a subject or object travels faster than the speed of light through space to a distant point. It’s the bread-and-butter transport method for the majority of science fiction and a great workaround for the fact that it takes a really long time to get anywhere in space with current technology .

There have been different takes on it for every genre. From special hyperdrive engines using a space fungus nexus in Star Trek Discovery to flying through literal hell in Warhammer 40K , but in Star Wars it’s far more simple.

The jumping ship is thrust into a dimension of space-time that can only be accessed by molecular displacement caused by going faster than the speed of light . Basically, you point your ship in the direction you want to go, and you hit the big button to go really fast.

Though the previous description was oversimplified hyperbole , Hyperspace in Star Wars is pretty straightforward, albeit with a lot of behind-the-scenes maths going on. Basically, when a jump is going to be made special calculations have to be performed by navigation computers, this ensures that during the trip the ship is not going to collide with anything.

So routes around planets and stars are mapped out by special nav devices and artificial pathfinders, force-sensitives , or with short hops in and out of real space.

Objects within Hyperspace cannot be interacted with unless using special technology - as was the case with Empire Interdictor vessels that were capable of disabling ships from Hyperspace - or if a vessel within approaches another object of significant and substantial mass that creates a shadow outside real space and needs to be navigated around, e.g a planet, star, or large moon .

In some extreme cases, pilots are capable of jumping to and from Hyperspace within a planet's atmosphere. Whilst risky, only the extremely talented, or lucky, have pulled it off .

Most ships in the modern Star Wars era have access to hyperdrives. With such vast distances to cover in the universe, it’s the only real way of getting around . The majority of large transport and capital ships are capable of jumping out of real space. But smaller ships often require either docking inside larger carriers or special attachable hyperdrive engines that can accelerate a smaller vessel far beyond its means.

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Once the jump begins, hyperspace particles from a special fuel mix are manipulated by the drive engine and a pseudo-motion phenomenon occurs where the ship appears to shoot off dramatically. All the stars around the pilot blur into white lines that stream past the cockpit and this effect will continue until the traveling ship drops back into real space. At this point, everything returns to normal.

Simple, easy, fast .

An interesting feature of hyperspace technology in Star Wars is that it was inspired by a species in the universe that manages it naturally. A race known as the Purrgil, a gentle space whale that drifts through the galaxy happily in huge swarms, nourishing itself on gas clouds and zipping into hyperspace with ease.

It was discovered by the ancient inhabitants of the universe that the Purgil were able to fly through hyperspace by creating special tunnels through real space.

This was achieved by using the gas Coulzon-36 , which when absorbed turned their gray-brown skin into bright purplish-blue color and through a process of internal fusion provided a hyperdrive effect. Propelling the creatures in large swarms across vast distances of space in seconds .

These whales are a common occurrence in the universe and are often responsible for accidentally crashing into starships or causing massive disasters. As such are usually fired upon or regarded as the equivalent of birds at an airport , a verminous pest that could lead to disaster.

Asohka was able to use the hyperspace traveling ability of the Purgil to reach another galaxy. Something unheard of at the time and a distance that normally requires the use of multiple Hyperspace Engines attached to a vessel.

Though you may think you’re safe when you jump to Hyperspace, and in most cases in the Star Wars universe that has been true, this pocket of subspace is a lot more vulnerable than you would think. The Empire has previously developed ships capable of knocking other vessels out of faster-than-light travel easily. For example, in The Force Awakens , it was shown that this can be used as a weapon. More specifically when the Starkiller Base superweapon was fired.

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This event sent the combined energy harvested from a star through hyperspace using an artificially created tunneling effect, allowing it to reach multiple star systems regardless of their distance. This phenomenon also generated enough power to fracture a bubble in real space , allowing the destruction to be viewed from multiple planets outside the effective range. Though whether this effect is intentional or not, it achieved the same purpose. Terrifying everyone that witnessed it .

Say what you want about The Last Jedi, but it did bring us the screen-blasting CGI spectacular that was the Holdo Maneuver. A unique usage of a hyperdrive engine that we sadly haven’t seen much of a reappearance of outside a very brief shot of a heavy freighter destroying a Star Destroyer above Endor in Rise of Skywalker.

For those not aware, The Holdo Maneuver was a tactic used by Resistance leader Vice Admiral Amilyn Holdo in The Last Jedi and essentially involved ramming the Empire cruiser Supremacy with the Resistance ship the Raddus whilst the hyperdrive was engaged.

What happened was Holdo's ship was instantly vaporized at the moment of collision, with the energy of the impact at the point of transition from real space shattering the Supremacy , blowing it in half, and blasting apart several Star Destroyers behind it and any vessel that was docked within the gargantuan ship.

Unfortunately in the Asohka show it was shown that popping off a Hyperdrive to ram ships is no longer instantly lethal. As was shown by the Eye of Sion blasting through a few rebel X-Wings and a Corvette.

This move was a suicidal endeavor by Holdo , but it bought the surviving Resistance members in her, now evacuated crew, enough time to escape to a nearby planet.

Fans and characters in the movie have asked why this move hasn’t been used again, and in Rise Of The Skywalker, Fin remarks that it’s a “one in a million” move. Essentially the writers of the movie shutting down any debate as to why it never appears again . Still, it’s an interesting take on hyperspace travel as a weapon.

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Star Wars: How Does Hyperspace Travel Work?

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Star Wars Outlaws hyperspace jumps onto PLAY’s cover

A long time ago, in a galaxy far, far away, a little movie called Star Wars helped to shape pop culture as we know it, just as the gaming medium was beginning to gain momentum too. From inspiring Final Fantasy games to having games of its own, it’s helped define the current gaming landscape in which we find ourselves.

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Star Wars Outlaws

Star Wars Outlaws is the culmination of all those years, and also the first non-EA Star Wars game to be released on console following that company’s near-decade-long exclusive right to the licence. While going hands-on has shown it to be a great game in its own right, it also marks the start of a bold new future for the sci-fi series’ gaming ambitions.

Star Wars' gaming legacy

Having a clearer picture of that legacy can help us appreciate what’s to come, though, so we set the co-ordinates to blast through the whole thing, charting all the Star Wars games that have come before. Make sure your hyperdrive motivator is running smoothly, though, as there’s a lot to dig into!

Summer Game Fest

We return from Summer Game Fest to tell you all about it. Three years in, does the in-person Play Days live up E3’s history? We also unpack PS5’s future, and get into what Concord, Astro Bot, and Lego Horizon Adventures mean for the future of the console.

Plus: talking FFXIV: Dawntrail with Naoki Yoshida, The Last Of Us 2’s second TV season, Starship Troopers Extermination heads to PS5, “sometimes choosing to do the right thing isn’t the best choice overall”, and more!

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Designers, artists, and community managers talk the importance of cosplay when creating worlds, and how to embrace fandom.

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Sam Barlow talks fairy tales, film history, and building Immortality. From ‘the V word’ to the art of the insert shot, we unpack the live-action gaming milestone.

Metaphor: ReFantazio

There’s nothing metaphorical about some of the great games we’ve gone hands-on with this month… Except for Metaphor: Refantazio, that is, purely because of the title. This ambitious evolution of Atlus’ RPG formula is set to impress.

We also get into the ring with both Fatal Fury: City Of The Wolves and 2XKO. Old school meets the new school, and while both take vastly different approaches toward becoming new, modern fighters, they’re both shaping up to be excellent challengers.

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Talking about old school, Crow Country leads the reviews section this issue. Smartly updating PS1-era survival horror mechanics with an eye-catching diorama-like style, it’s a short but sweet horror treat!

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Skull & Bones came and went like a ship in the night, but there’s no missing Assassin’s Creed IV: Black Flag. Thanks to the boistrous, loud sea shanties there’s never any chance of forgetting about it, making it prime for revisitation this issue.

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  • Pacific Coast Highway Drive Times and Distances

Pacific Coast Highway: Drive Times and Distances

Drive times and distances on the Pacific Coast Highway or the quickest routes from Seattle to San Francisco to Los Angeles to San Diego.

Road signs for driving the Pacific Coast Highway

Here are the rough drive times and distances between the main cities along the Pacific Coast Highway. We cover the quickest routes from Seattle to San Francisco , San Francisco to Los Angeles, and Los Angeles to San Diego , given in miles and with the approximate driving time it takes. 

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We also give the drive time and distance if going along the coast the whole way, which can be very different. They're also optimum times, and take no account of any stops you might want to make, even rest stops, nor any traffic conditions. They assume you are driving at or just under the speed limit the whole way. If your personal driving speed is different from that, you need to take this into account too.

Golden Gate Bridge in San Francisco

Seattle to San Francisco

Quickest Route About 800 miles, almost 13 hours without a break

Pacific Coast Highway Route (Including the Olympic Peninsula) About 1100 miles, roughly 25 hours of driving

Our Pick of the Guides

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San Francisco to Los Angeles

Quickest Route About 380 miles, or 6 hours of driving

Pacific Coast Highway Route About 460 miles, or 9 hours without a break

Combining the two Note that if you set off from either end along the Pacific Coast Highway then there's no easy place to cut across to the freeway and make up time. What you gain in time you'll lose in getting to the freeway to begin with, as it doesn't run close to the coast.

Highway 101 Although the Pacific Coast Highway and Highway 101 are mostly one and the same, there's a stretch of this route roughly between Salinas and  San Luis Obispo  when 101 goes inland. Going that way is about 126 miles, or about 2 hours of driving.

Our Pick of the LA Guides

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Taking the coast route is about 150 miles and will take about 3 hours, as it's a slower route. That's what we've assumed you'll do in the above estimate of 460 miles. So if you really need to, you could shave an hour off your driving time by skipping this bit of the coast.

The Beach in San Diego

Los Angeles to San Diego

Note that this drive more than any of the others is affected by traffic, so the exact time taken depends on day of the week, time of day... and luck! The figures below are optimum times, if things run smoothly.

Quickest Route From Downtown Los Angeles to San Diego is about 120 miles, or 2 hours on a good day. If you want to stick to the coast, then Santa Monica to San Diego is roughly 135 miles, or maybe 2 hours 15 minutes.

Pacific Coast Highway Route If you really stick to the coast and beaches the whole way, that's going to turn into about 150 miles and take you about four hours, as driving is a lot slower as you pass through every town on the way.

Our Pick of San Diego Guides

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Other driving pages

Historic Route 66 winds from Chicago to LA, going through Los Angeles, meeting the Pacific Coast Highway in Santa Monica, California, at the Santa Monica Pier.

Route 66 Meets the Pacific Coast Highway

Historic Route 66 winds from Chicago to LA, going through Los Angeles, meeting the Pacific Coast Highway in Santa Monica, California, at the Santa Monica Pier.

Driving the Pacific Coast Highway is made easier with Road Trip USA by Jamie Jensen, a good handbook for the west coast drive.

Driving the Pacific Coast Highway

Driving the Pacific Coast Highway is made easier with Road Trip USA by Jamie Jensen, a good handbook for the west coast drive.

Driving from San Francisco to San Diego has two main options, the fast way on I-5 or the scenic route along the Pacific Coast Highway.

San Francisco to San Diego

Driving from San Francisco to San Diego has two main options, the fast way on I-5 or the scenic route along the Pacific Coast Highway.

Pacific Coast Highway Travel's advice on driving the Pacific Coast Highway in five days, including the best places to stay over, and the best things to do and see.

Driving the Pacific Coast Highway in Five Days

Pacific Coast Highway Travel's advice on driving the Pacific Coast Highway in five days, including the best places to stay over, and the best things to do and see.

Pacific Coast Highway Travel's advice on driving the Pacific Coast Highway in four days, including the best places to stay, and the best things to do and see.

Driving the Pacific Coast Highway in Four Days

Pacific Coast Highway Travel's advice on driving the Pacific Coast Highway in four days, including the best places to stay, and the best things to do and see.

If visiting California and planning to drive the Pacific Coast Highway it's important to know California driving laws in case they differ from your own state.

California Driving Laws

If visiting California and planning to drive the Pacific Coast Highway it's important to know California driving laws in case they differ from your own state.

When to Drive the Pacific Coast Highway depends on whether you want to drive in Oregon and Washington as well as California, and on the weather.

When to Drive the Pacific Coast Highway

When to Drive the Pacific Coast Highway depends on whether you want to drive in Oregon and Washington as well as California, and on the weather.

The Pacific Coast Highway in California book shows in historic photos the building of the Pacific Coast Highway from its earliest beginnings in 1911.

Pacific Coast Highway in California

The Pacific Coast Highway in California book shows in historic photos the building of the Pacific Coast Highway from its earliest beginnings in 1911.

The best time to drive the Pacific Coast Highway is when you have the most time to spare, but late spring and fall is when you'll get the best weather.

Best Time to Drive the Pacific Coast Highway

The best time to drive the Pacific Coast Highway is when you have the most time to spare, but late spring and fall is when you'll get the best weather.

California coast charging stations are so numerous that the Pacific Coast Highway is one of the best US road trips to drive in an electric vehicle or EV.

California Coast Charging Stations

California coast charging stations are so numerous that the Pacific Coast Highway is one of the best US road trips to drive in an electric vehicle or EV.

Pacific Coast Highway Travel reviews the Pacific Coast Highway Road Trip Guide book covering the drive from Vancouver to San Diego.

Pacific Coast Highway Road Trip Guide

Pacific Coast Highway Travel reviews the Pacific Coast Highway Road Trip Guide book covering the drive from Vancouver to San Diego.

Pacific Coast Highway stops include big city vacation destinations like Seattle, San Francisco, Los Angeles and San Diego, and smaller places like Monterey.

Pacific Coast Highway Stops

Pacific Coast Highway stops include big city vacation destinations like Seattle, San Francisco, Los Angeles and San Diego, and smaller places like Monterey.

Review of the Pacific Coast Highway Road Trips book from Lonely Planet, which includes a California Driving Guide, by the Pacific Coast Highway Travel website.

Pacific Coast Highway Road Trips: Lonely Planet Guidebook Review

Review of the Pacific Coast Highway Road Trips book from Lonely Planet, which includes a California Driving Guide, by the Pacific Coast Highway Travel website.

One of the best guides to West Coast RV Parks, covering campgrounds in California, Oregon, and Washington, is West Coast RV Camping from Moon Guides.

West Coast RV Parks

One of the best guides to West Coast RV Parks, covering campgrounds in California, Oregon, and Washington, is West Coast RV Camping from Moon Guides.

Pacific Coast Highway travel offers advice on driving from LA to Hearst Castle, including distance, journey time, and route.

LA to Hearst Castle

Pacific Coast Highway travel offers advice on driving from LA to Hearst Castle, including distance, journey time, and route.

Pacific Coast Highway driving tips for this great American road trip include finding cheap gas, watching the speed limits, and allowing plenty of travel time.

Pacific Coast Highway Driving Tips

Pacific Coast Highway driving tips for this great American road trip include finding cheap gas, watching the speed limits, and allowing plenty of travel time.

Pacific Coast Highway Travel's guide to Oregon coast charging stations for electric vehicles, from Brookings in the south to Astoria in the north.

Oregon Coast Charging Stations

Pacific Coast Highway Travel's guide to Oregon coast charging stations for electric vehicles, from Brookings in the south to Astoria in the north.

Lonely Planet's Coastal California guidebook is the ideal travel guide for driving or cycling the Pacific Coast Highway from the Oregon border to Mexico.

Coastal California Guidebook

Lonely Planet's Coastal California guidebook is the ideal travel guide for driving or cycling the Pacific Coast Highway from the Oregon border to Mexico.

Pacific Coast Highway Travel's advice on driving the Pacific Coast Highway in three days, including the best places to stay, and the best things to do and see.

Driving the Pacific Coast Highway in Three Days

Pacific Coast Highway Travel's advice on driving the Pacific Coast Highway in three days, including the best places to stay, and the best things to do and see.

Pacific Coast Highway Travel's advice on driving the Pacific Coast Highway in two days, including the best places to stay, and the best things to do and see.

Driving the Pacific Coast Highway in Two Days

Pacific Coast Highway Travel's advice on driving the Pacific Coast Highway in two days, including the best places to stay, and the best things to do and see.

 Pacific Coast Highway Travel takes the 17-Mile Drive from Carmel to Pacific Grove and Monterey, stopping to see the Lone Cypress and beautiful coastline views.

The 17-Mile Drive between Carmel, Pacific Grove, and Monterey

Pacific Coast Highway Travel takes the 17-Mile Drive from Carmel to Pacific Grove and Monterey, stopping to see the Lone Cypress and beautiful coastline views.

Pacific Coast Highway Travel's guide to Washington coast charging stations for electric vehicles along Highway 101 from Oregon and around the Olympic Peninsula.

Washington Coast Charging Stations

Pacific Coast Highway Travel's guide to Washington coast charging stations for electric vehicles along Highway 101 from Oregon and around the Olympic Peninsula.

Epic Drives of the World from Lonely Planet describes 50 of the world's most exciting road trips, including, of course, the Pacific Coast Highway.

Epic Drives of the World

Epic Drives of the World from Lonely Planet describes 50 of the world's most exciting road trips, including, of course, the Pacific Coast Highway.

Here are links to the different ways you can go along the Pacific Coast Highway, one of the most popular drives in the world but you can also cycle it.

Here are links to the different ways you can go along the Pacific Coast Highway, one of the most popular drives in the world but you can also cycle it.

Here are the basic facts if you plan to drive the Pacific Coast Highway, including which is the best direction and when is the best time to go driving.

Drive the Pacific Coast Highway

Here are the basic facts if you plan to drive the Pacific Coast Highway, including which is the best direction and when is the best time to go driving.

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Take a look at our latest books: 101 Best Things to Do on the Pacific Coast Highway and 101 Budget Hotels along the Pacific Coast Highway. Click on the covers to learn more.

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If you're planning a PCH road trip, take a look at our guide to hotels along the way:

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The Best PCH Guide We've read lots of guides to the Pacific Coast, and easily the best one is the Moon Handbook. You can read our review here , or buy it through the Amazon link below.

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Travelmath

Distance Calculator

Quick links, distance calculator.

Travelmath provides an online travel distance calculator to help you measure both flying distances and driving distances. You can then compare the two results to see the difference. Flight distance is computed from a GPS-accurate great circle formula, which gives you the straight line distance "as the crow flies". Driving distance by car is determined from the actual turn-by-turn driving directions. If you want to split the distance with a friend, you can use the halfway point calculator to find the best place to meet. For a long distance trip, you can plan a road trip with stops . Or browse the mileage charts for any state or country.

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  1. Hyperspace Travel times what should they actually be?

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  2. How Long Does Hyperspace Travel Take? [Star Wars Lore Discussion]

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  3. Hyperspace Travel times what should they actually be?

    hyperspace travel times

  4. In-universe, is there consistent science behind hyperspace travel

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  5. Hyperspace travel times : r/StarWarsEU

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  6. Abstract Background With Star Warp or Hyperspace. Abstract Exploding

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VIDEO

  1. Relax in cosmo. A long travel, 345 Hyperspace Jumps, Elite Dangerous, no commentary

  2. Star Wars Hyper Space

  3. Hyperspace Travel🚀...... #space #spacefacts #factshorts #facts #hyperspace

  4. Millenium Falcon: Smuggler's Run Disneyland Virtual Ride

  5. How do space ships fly faster than light?

  6. Sleep in Hyperspace

COMMENTS

  1. How Long Does Star Wars' Hyperspace Travel Take?

    The Eye of Sion finally took to hyperspace in Episode 4 of Ahsoka, and we're counting the seconds until we get to see Grand Admiral Thrawn's (Lars Mikkelsen) debut in live-action.The ring-shaped ...

  2. Hyperspace Travel Times

    Hyperspace Travel Times rules created by Wikia user ShadowDragon8685. See also: House Rules Hyperspace travel is based on the grid system found on standard maps of the galaxy. Travel times depend on the number of grid squares the travel will take you through. Different parts of the galaxy take different amounts of time to travel through. In most of the galaxy, each grid square of distance ...

  3. Is there any evidence in Canon for how long specific hyperspace trips

    Given all this, at a very liberal estimate, it takes no more than 3 1/2 hours to travel across the entire galaxy, and probably much less when allowing time for the rest of the events of the film, indirect hyperspace routes, most ships being slower than the Falcon, and the difficulty of navigating near Exegol.

  4. How should I calculate hyperspace times? : r/sw5e

    If you are traveling on a major route, the area is well mapped and programmed into most navicomputers, so the travel time is 15 minutes per square multiplied by your hyperdrive rating. IE. a ship with a class 1 hyperdrive travelling 9 squares down a major hyperspace lane would take about 2 hours and 15 minutes, while a class 3 hyperdrive would ...

  5. Detailed Hyperspace Travel Times Charts : r/StarWarsD6

    As a rule of thumb when deciding on the travel time, I estimate 1 week flying through 1 square. If you use some well travelled existing hyperspace routes, half a week per square. If you travel on one of the few big main routes, 2 days per square Because those are very well explored.

  6. Star Wars Hyperspace Explained—Lucasfilm's Lightspeed Spaceflight

    On its most simple level, hyperspace—not unlike Star Trek's warp speed or myriad other sci-fi series' take on interstellar travel—is an alternate dimension of reality that vessels (among ...

  7. SW Hyperspace Travel Times

    The time in parentheses is if the route taken is traceable entirely along hyperspace routes. Trip Duration: This is the time the travel from origin point to destination takes along the calculated route. This duration assumes travel via little-known or even entirely new routes. Travel along hyperspace routes can significantly reduce this time.

  8. [Star Wars] How long does hyperspace travel take?

    However, the faster your ship in hyperspace, the closer you can 'skim' gravity well-obstacles, opening up more direct routes and further saving time. So in fact it is the opposite, established hyperspace lanes allow slower (usually civilian) ships to travel safely. Whereas the faster (usually military) ships are able to take more direct routes.

  9. Hyperspace

    Hyperspace was an alternate dimension that could only be reached by traveling at or faster than the speed of light. Hyperdrives enabled starships to travel through hyperspace lanes across great distances, enabling travel and exploration throughout the galaxy. During the High Republic Era, hyperspace was not truly understood by anyone in the galaxy.[3] It was still regarded as a mystery during ...

  10. Star Wars: Everything You Wanted To Know About Hyperspace (But Were

    Published Dec 6, 2020. With countless worlds and alien species spread across an entire galaxy far, far away, it would only make sense to create a plausible form of travel by which individuals could jump back and forth. This convenient little plot mechanic is known as hyperspace, and it's been part of Star Wars lore since the very first film.

  11. The Physics of the Millennium Falcon's Jump to Hyperspace

    In short, it's a way for spaceships in the Star Wars universe to travel great distances in very little time. It should be clear that hyperspace travel is not at the speed of light. Light has a ...

  12. Hyperspace Travel

    Hyperdrive Travel Times. Once a ship is actually in Hyperspace, there is little for the crew and passengers to do but sit back and enjoy the ride. All Hyperspace routes have an average duration, in hours or days, based on the time required for a ship equipped with a Class 1 Hyperdrive to make the trip under ideal conditions.

  13. Hyperspace Travel Times Calculator (New and Improved!)

    P-47Thunderbolt January 11, 2022, 3:52am #1. A while ago, I made a bare-bones hyperspace travel times calculator with Google Sheets. It did the basics of what needed to be done, but it wasn't all that impressive and could be difficult to use. As I've learned more how to use spreadsheets (specifically Excel), I've made a new and improved ...

  14. How Does Star Wars Hyperspace Actually Work?

    Essentially, hyperspace is an alternate dimension accessed when traveling faster than the speed of light. Doing so creates a simu-tunnel that allows one to travel through space time from one ...

  15. Star Wars: How Does Hyperspace Travel Work?

    All the stars around the pilot. blur into white lines. that stream past the cockpit and this effect will continue until the traveling ship drops back into real space. At this point, everything ...

  16. Black Cat's Star Wars Hyperspace Travel Times Page

    While generally determined by the distance between two planets, hyperspace travel times between two locations seemingly close to one another could be drastically extended by the need to navigate around stellar hazards, such as asteroid fields and nebulae. An example of this is the journey from Coruscant and Alderaan.In terms of distance, Alderaan was very near to Coruscant.

  17. Calculating Hyperspace Travels

    Calculating Hyperspace Travels. If no relevant source is available then to calculate how long a hyperspace travel would take, follow these guidelines. First determine the number of jumps, using a galaxy map of your choice and plot a route from jump to jump. Multiply this number by the modifier on table 2.2 for the route's complexity.

  18. Star Wars Travel Calculator

    The maximum length of time that this starship can provide consumables for its entire crew without having to resupply. Input Travel Distance ... Maximum MGLT per hour Consumables (hours) Travel Time (hours) Ressuplies; CR90 corvette: 60: 8760: 16667: 1: Star Destroyer: 60: 17520: 16667: 0: Sentinel-class landing craft: 70: 720: 14286: 19: Death ...

  19. Discussion Handy travel time calculator

    Combat starfighters either have no hyperdrive or a quick drive with a low range, enough to cross a sector but no more. One square on the Essential Atlas map. Most capital ships can travel 30-60,000 light years, or 1/4 to 1/2 the diameter of the galaxy. Roughly 5-12 squares on the Essential Atlas map.

  20. Star Wars Outlaws hyperspace jumps onto PLAY's cover

    Star Wars Outlaws is the culmination of all those years, and also the first non-EA Star Wars game to be released on console following that company's near-decade-long exclusive right to the licence.

  21. Homepage

    HyperSpace After Dark Feat. Murdoch's Bar - Coming Soon to a Friday near you, 6pm-9pm. Entrance fee of $15 per person includes a 100-credit game card. ... shooting dinosaurs, or knocking down clowns, you're guaranteed to have a great time in our state of the art arcade. $5 - 20 credits $10 - 42 credits $20 - 100 credits $50 -255 ...

  22. Pacific Coast Highway Drive Times and Distances

    Quickest Route. About 380 miles, or 6 hours of driving. Pacific Coast Highway Route. About 460 miles, or 9 hours without a break. Combining the two. Note that if you set off from either end along the Pacific Coast Highway then there's no easy place to cut across to the freeway and make up time.

  23. Travel Distance

    Distance calculator. Travelmath provides an online travel distance calculator to help you measure both flying distances and driving distances. You can then compare the two results to see the difference. Flight distance is computed from a GPS-accurate great circle formula, which gives you the straight line distance "as the crow flies".

  24. Schedules

    Schedules. BART service hours: Weekdays (5:00 am- Midnight) Saturday (6:00 am - Midnight) Sunday (8:00 am - Midnight) Looking for the BART Trip Planner? It's the easiest, most accurate way to plan your trip, and includes planned delays. PDF timetables are also available as well as Caltrain and Capitol Corridor transfer timetables.