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jamaica tourist board

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Jamaica tourist board (jtb), public bodies.

jamaica tourist board

Mission Statement

To always position destination Jamaica as the pre-eminent Caribbean tourist destination that delivers value for the People and Government of Jamaica and the tourism industry stakeholders.

The Jamaica Tourist Board (JTB), founded in 1955, is Jamaica's national tourism agency based in the capital city of Kingston. The JTB is a public company governed by a Board of Directors, appointed by the Minister of Tourism. The Director of Tourism, also appointed by the Minister, is the administrative head of the organization and is responsible for the day-to-day activities of the JTB.

The JTB is responsible for the worldwide tourism marketing and promotion for Jamaica. Its mandate has been to promote Jamaica as a preferred travel destination; identify new and emerging consumer groups; cultivate new relationships with travel partners and disseminate timely and useful marketing information to its offices and travel partners worldwide. The Jamaica Tourist Board is the most preferred point of contact for persons travelling to Jamaica. The organization markets the uniqueness and diversity of destination JAMAICA through creative programmes and advertisements worldwide. Throughout the years, the JTB has been recognized for its exceptional leadership and outstanding service with accolades from industry and trade partners both regionally and internationally.

JTB offices are located in Kingston, Montego Bay, Miami, Toronto and London. Representative offices are located in Berlin (Germany), Barcelona (Spain), Rome (Italy), Amsterdam (The Netherlands) and Tokyo (Japan).

Corporate Data

Board of Directors

Mr. John Lynch - Chairman Mr. John Byles - Deputy Chairman Mrs. Nicola Madden-Greig - Director Mr. Bertram Wright - Director Mr. Adam Stewart - Director Mr. Clifton Reader - Director Mr. Josef Forstmayr - Director Mr. Fred Smith - Director Mr. Philipp Hofer - Director Ms. Hyacinth Lightbourne - Director Mrs. Tanikie McClarthy Allen - Director Mr. Donovan White (ex officio) - Director of Tourism

Visit the JTB at: http://www.visitjamaica.com/

Visit Jamaica |  Important Notices | FAQ |  Help | Staff Login Copyright © 2018 Ministry of Tourism, Government of Jamaica. All Rights Reserved Site Design & Development: 876 Solutions

jamaica tourist board

Jamaica Tourist Board (JTB)

The Jamaica Tourist Board was founded in 1955. Its mandate is pursued primarily through the promotion of Jamaica as a preferred destination; identifying new and emerging customer groups, cultivating new relationships with travel partners and the dissemination of timely and useful marketing information to its offices and travel partners across the world. The Government of Jamaica oversees the Board through the Ministry of Tourism. The Board of Directors sets policies for the functioning of the organization and the Director of Tourism is responsible for the day-to-day administration. He is supported by three Deputy Directors- Attractions Cruise and Events, Marketing and Sales, and their respective teams.

JTB offices are located in Kingston, Montego Bay, Miami, Toronto and London. Representative offices are located in Berlin (Germany), Barcelona (Spain), Rome (Italy), Amsterdam (The Netherlands) and Tokyo (Japan).

Source: www.jtbonline.org/jtb/

Current Budget: $0.00

Recurrent: $0.00

Capital A: $0.00

Total: $0.00

Board Chairperson: John Lynch

Head of Agency: Donovan White

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Jamaica’s tourist arrivals continue to grow despite headwinds – Seiveright

KINGSTON, Jamaica — Senior Advisor and Strategist in the Ministry of Tourism, Delano Seiveright says official tourist arrival numbers as at the first week of May are ahead of the same period in 2023, which was a major growth year for the sector.

Seiveright noted that Jamaica recorded just over 1.7 million tourist arrivals up to the first week of May with just more than one million stopover arrivals and more than 700,000 cruise passengers.

“This represents a remarkable 4.6 per cent increase for stopover arrivals and a whopping 23 per cent increase for cruise passengers,” said Seiveright.

“The still strong numbers also reinforce the continued success of efforts and strategies piloted by Minister of Tourism Edmund Bartlett and his team since the devastating impact of the COVID -19 pandemic,” added Seiveright.

He pointed out that despite the decelerating effect of headwinds created by growing global economic uncertainties, relatively high inflation and interest rates in primary markets, and the negative effects of recent travel advisories, the Ministry of Tourism and its agencies continue to effect multipronged initiatives and actions to bolster growth.

Seiveright also noted that the world’s largest online travel agency, Expedia, recently cut 1,500 employees or nine per cent of its global staff due in part to slowing travel demand.

As it relates to most recent Level 3 US Travel advisory, Seiveright noted that Government at the very highest levels, including the Minister of Foreign Affairs and Foreign Trade Kamina Johnson-Smith, Jamaica’s Ambassador to the United States, Audrey Marks and several other Government officials, private sector leaders and influential US citizens  have and continue to treat this very seriously.

“There have been multiple engagements with high ranking US officials across the State Department, Congress and so on. Several other countries impacted by similar negative travel advisories have raised concerns too.

“The Jamaica Tourist Board also continues to work around the clock with its global team including its public relations and advertising teams and international partners like airlines, tour operators, travel agents, hotels and other critical stakeholders to drive Jamaica’s tourism growth efforts despite the odds,” said Seiveright.

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Travel Advisory January 23, 2024

Jamaica - level 3: reconsider travel.

Last Update: Reissued with updates to crime and health information

Reconsider travel to Jamaica due to  crime and medical services . U.S. government personnel under Chief of Mission (COM) security responsibility are prohibited from traveling to many areas due to increased risk. Please read the entire Travel Advisory. 

Country Summary:  Violent crimes, such as home invasions, armed robberies, sexual assaults, and homicides, are common. Sexual assaults occur frequently, including at all-inclusive resorts.

Local police often do not respond effectively to serious criminal incidents. When arrests are made, cases are infrequently prosecuted to a conclusive sentence. Families of U.S. citizens killed in accidents or homicides frequently wait a year or more for final death certificates to be issued by Jamaican authorities. The homicide rate reported by the Government of Jamaica has for several years been among the highest in the Western Hemisphere. U.S. government personnel under COM security responsibility are prohibited from traveling to the areas listed below, from using public buses, and from driving outside of prescribed areas of Kingston at night.

Emergency services and hospital care vary throughout the island, and response times and quality of care may vary from U.S. standards. Public hospitals are under-resourced and cannot always provide high level or specialized care. Private hospitals require payment up front before admitting patients and may not have the ability to provide specialized care. Ambulance services are not always readily available, especially in rural areas, and are not always staffed by trained personnel.

We strongly encourage you to obtain traveler’s insurance, including medical evacuation insurance, before traveling to Jamaica. The Department of State does not pay medical bills.

Be aware that U.S. Medicare/Medicaid does not apply overseas. Most hospitals and doctors overseas do not accept U.S. health insurance. U.S. citizens with medical emergencies can face bills in the tens of thousands of dollars, with air ambulance service to the United States in the range of $30,000-50,000.  Read the  country information page  for additional information on travel to Jamaica.

If you decide to travel to Jamaica:

  • Do not attempt to bring firearms or ammunition.  This includes stray rounds, shells or empty casings . The penalties for carrying firearms and/or ammunition, even inadvertently, are severe, and can include lengthy prison sentences.
  • Avoid walking or driving at night.
  • Avoid public buses.
  • Avoid secluded places or situations.
  • Do not physically resist any robbery attempt.
  • Be aware of your surroundings and keep a low profile.
  • Enroll in the  Smart Traveler Enrollment Program (STEP)  to receive Alerts and make it easier to locate you in an emergency.
  • Follow the Department of State on  Facebook  and  Twitter .
  • Review the  Country Security Report  for Jamaica.
  • Prepare a contingency plan for emergency situations. Review the  Traveler’s Checklist .
  • Visit the CDC page for the latest  Travel Health Information  related to your travel.

Violence and shootings occur regularly in many neighborhoods, communities, and parishes in Jamaica. 

U.S. government personnel under COM security responsibility are prohibited from traveling to the following areas of Jamaica due to crime:

St. Ann’s Parish—Do Not Travel - Steer Town and the Buckfield neighborhood near Ocho Rios

St. Catherine’s Parish—Do Not Travel

  • Spanish Town
  • Central Village
  • Areas within Portmore, including: Naggo Head, New Land, Old Braeton, Portmore Lane, Gregory Park, and Waterford

All of Clarendon Parish—Do Not Travel

All of Clarendon Parish, except passing through Clarendon Parish using the T1 and A2 highways.

St. Elizabeth’s Parish—Do Not Travel

Vineyard District Community, between the communities of Salt Spring and Burnt Savanna, St. Elizabeth

Hanover Parish—Do Not Travel

Logwood and Orange Bay

St. James Parish/Montego Bay—Do Not Travel

All of Montego Bay on the inland side of the A1 highway and The Queen’s Drive from San San to Harmony Beach Park

Kingston and St. Andrew Parish—Do Not Travel

  • Cassava Piece
  • Downtown Kingston, defined as between Mountain View Avenue and Hagley Park Road, and south of Half Way Tree and Old Hope Roads. Downtown Kingston includes Arnett Gardens, Cockburn Gardens, Denham Town, Olympic Gardens, Seaview Gardens, Trench Town, and Tivoli Gardens.
  • Duhaney Park
  • Swallowfield
  • Elleston Flats
  • August Town

Manchester Parish—Do Not Travel

Green Vale, Gray Ground, Red Ground, and Vineyard neighborhoods of Mandeville

St. Thomas Parish—Do Not Travel

  • Black Lane neighborhood in Seaforth
  • Grands Penn
  • Church Corner neighborhood near Yallahs
  • Town of Yallahs, except when driving through on the main highway

Trelawny Parish—Do Not Travel

  • Clarks Town

Westmoreland Parish—Do Not Travel

  • Russia community in Savanna-la-Mar (The Southeastern quadrant of Savannah la Mar east of Darling Street and south of the A2 highway/Barracks Road)
  • Kings Valley
  • The Whitehall, Bethel Town, and Red Ground neighborhoods of Negril

If you do decide to travel to the above-listed Do Not Travel areas, please visit our website for  Travel to High-Risk Areas .

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Embassies and Consulates

U.s. embassy kingston.

142 Old Hope Road Kingston 6 Jamaica, West Indies Telephone: +(876) 702-6000 Emergency After-Hours Telephone: +(876) 702-6000 Fax: +(876) 702-6018 Email:   [email protected]

U.S. Consular Agent - Montego Bay Whitter Village, Ironshore Unit EU-1 (across from Burger King) Montego Bay, Jamaica Telephone: +(876) 953-0620 Emergency After-Hours Telephone: Please contact the U.S. Embassy in Kingston, Jamaica: +(876) 702-6000 Fax: +(876) 953-3898 Appointments are made by phone or email Email:   [email protected]

Destination Description

See the Department of State’s Fact Sheet on Jamaica for information on U.S.-Jamaica relations. 

Entry, Exit and Visa Requirements

U.S. citizens are generally required to present a valid U.S. passport when traveling to Jamaica, as well as proof of anticipated departure from Jamaica. If you are traveling to Jamaica on a cruise, you may use another  Western Hemisphere Travel Initiative  (WHTI) compliant document. However, we strongly recommend you obtain a passport before travel in case an emergency requires you to disembark and return by air. You do not need a visa for tourist travel up to 90 days. All other travelers will need a visa and/or work permit.

Visit the  Passport, Immigration, & Citizenship Agency of Jamaica  or the  Embassy of Jamaica in Washington D.C.  websites for the most current visa information.

Exit Information: Your departure tax is regularly included in the airfare. You won’t be charged an exit tax on your way out.

HIV/AIDS restrictions: The U.S. Department of State is unaware of any HIV/AIDS entry restrictions for visitors to or foreign residents of Jamaica.

Find information on  dual nationality ,  prevention of international child abduction , and  customs regulations  on our websites.

Safety and Security

Crime:  Violent crime, including sexual assault, is a serious problem throughout Jamaica, particularly in Kingston and Montego Bay. Jamaica’s police force often does not respond effectively to serious criminal incidents. When arrests are made, cases are infrequently prosecuted to a conclusive sentence. Families of U.S. citizens killed in accidents or homicides frequently wait a year or more for final death certificates to be issued by Jamaican authorities. Gated resorts are not immune to violent crime.

Recommendations:

  • Review the  Crime and Safety Report  for Jamaica.
  • U.S. citizens who travel abroad should always have a contingency plan for emergency situations. Review the  Traveler’s Checklist .

International Financial Scams:  See the  Department of State  and the  FBI  pages for information. Internet romance and financial scams are prevalent in Jamaica. Scams are often initiated through Internet postings/profiles or by unsolicited emails and letters. Scammers almost always pose as U.S. citizens who have no one else to turn to for help.  Common scams include:

  • Romance/Online dating
  • Money transfers

The most notorious Jamaican scam is the Lotto Scam, a kind of advance-fee fraud. The victim is led to believe that a Jamaican lottery prize will be released after the payment of “fees.”

  • You did NOT win a lottery. The person on the telephone is lying. Just hang up.
  • Never send money to someone who calls to say you have won the lottery in Jamaica.
  • Do not travel to Jamaica to collect a “prize.” Victims have been killed, kidnapped, extorted, or robbed.
  • Be very cautious about sending money to help a traveler claiming to be in trouble. When in doubt, contact your local police department for advice and assistance.
  • Be wary of promises to protect a loved one from harm or to help the loved one out of trouble, in exchange for money. That is extortion – contact your local police department.
  • Scam artists often fake romantic interest to get money from a would-be lover, especially on the internet. When in doubt, contact your local police department.
  • If you are being targeted for financial scams, you will need to file a report with your local police department.

Victims of Crime:  U.S. citizen victims of sexual assault are encouraged to contact the U.S. Embassy for assistance.

Report crimes to the local police at 119 and contact the U.S. Embassy at +1 (876) 702-6000.  Remember that local authorities are responsible for investigating and prosecuting crime.

Sexual Assault:   Rape and sexual assault are serious problems throughout Jamaica, including at resorts and hotels. Date rape drugs may be used at private parties and resorts.

If you are victim of a sexual assault, contact the police and the U.S. Embassy in Kingston as soon as possible. In a hotel, management should assist you with these communications.

Victims of sexual assault in Jamaica should not expect the same assistance routinely offered in the United States. Rape kits are not always available, and victims must often ask for medication to avoid STD transmission and reduce the chances of pregnancy. Counseling is unlikely to be offered. Law enforcement shortcomings exist in collection of evidence. Prosecution of rape cases moves very slowly, and victims may need to return to Jamaica during the legal process.

  • Avoid secluded places or situations, including at resorts. Try to always be accompanied by someone you know, including when going to the restroom.
  • Security outside of resort areas is unpredictable, especially at night. Do not leave resort property with someone you have just met.
  • Many guests drink heavily in all-inclusive resorts, which can lead to unpredictable behavior and increased vulnerability. 
  • Shout for help immediately if you feel threatened or encounter individuals who make you feel uncomfortable. 
  • Report any suspicious or inappropriate activity, including inappropriate comments or behavior by hotel employees or other guests, to hotel management, the U.S. Embassy, and local police as appropriate.R esort employees are generally prohibited from engaging in romantic or sexual relations with guests.

See our webpage on help for U.S. victims of crime overseas .

  • Help you find appropriate medical care
  • Assist you in reporting a crime to the police
  • Contact relatives or friends with your written consent
  • Provide general information regarding the victim’s role during the local investigation   and following its conclusion
  • Provide a list of local attorneys
  • Provide our information on victim’s compensation programs in the U.S.
  • Provide an emergency loan for repatriation to the United States and/or limited medical support in cases of destitution
  • Help you find accommodation and arrange flights home
  • Replace a stolen or lost passport

Domestic Violence:  U.S. citizen victims of domestic violence are encouraged to contact the Embassy for assistance.

Tourism: The tourism industry is unevenly regulated, and safety inspections for equipment and facilities do not commonly occur. Hazardous areas/activities are not always identified with appropriate signage, and staff may not be trained or certified either by the host government or by recognized authorities in the field.  In the event of an injury, appropriate medical treatment is typically available only in/near major cities. First responders are generally unable to access areas outside of major cities and to provide urgent medical treatment. U.S. citizens are encouraged to purchase medical evacuation insurance. See our webpage for more information on insurance providers for overseas coverage .

Local Laws & Special Circumstances

Criminal Penalties:  You are subject to local laws.  If you violate local laws, even unknowingly, you may be expelled, arrested, or imprisoned.  Individuals establishing a business or practicing a profession that requires additional permits or licensing should seek information from the competent local authorities, prior to practicing or operating a business.  

Futhermore, some laws are also prosecutable in the United States, regardless of local law. For examples, see our website on  crimes against minors abroad  and the  Department of Justice  website.

Arrest Notification:  If you are arrested or detained, ask police or prison officials to notify the U.S. Embassy immediately. See our  webpage  for further information.

Firearms:  Jamaica strictly forbids importing or possessing firearms in Jamaica without prior authorization of the Firearms Licensing Authority of Jamaica. A U.S. concealed carry permit does  not  allow you to bring a firearm or ammunition into Jamaica. On November 1, 2022, the Firearms (Prohibition, Restriction and Regulation) Act 2022 went into effect.  This new law includes mandatory minimum sentences of 15 years for possession of even a single cartridge.

If you bring an unauthorized firearm, firearm components, firearm parts, or ammunition to Jamaica, you will be arrested and prosecuted. This will result in a large fine and/or incarceration for an unspecified amount of time. Bringing mace, pepper spray, or knives into Jamaica without authorization will also lead to arrest.

Faith-Based Travelers:  See the following webpages for details:

  • Faith-Based Travel Information
  • International Religious Freedom Report   – see country reports
  • Human Rights Report   – see country reports
  • Best Practices for Volunteering Abroad

LGBTQI+ Travelers:  Jamaican law contains specific prohibitions on “acts of gross indecency” – generally interpreted as any kind of physical intimacy – between persons of the same sex, in public or in private, and provides punishment of up to 10 years in prison. There is also a law that specifically prohibits even consensual same-sex sexual conduct between men.

Negative attitudes towards LGBTQI+ issues are widespread in Jamaica. There are continued reports of serious discrimination and abuse against LGBTQI+ individuals, including:

  • “Corrective rape” of women accused of being lesbians
  • Arbitrary detention
  • Mob attacks
  • Harassment of LGBTQI+ patients by hospital and prison staff
  • Blackmail 

See our  LGBTQI+ Travel Information  page and section 6 of our  Human Rights Report  for further details.

Lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, queer, and intersex (LGBTQI+) individuals have been targeted through the use of dating apps, especially apps popular within the LGBTQI+ communities.  Criminals have used dating apps to lure foreign visitors into meeting in public spaces such as hotel restaurants and bars, and then later assaulting, threatening , and or robbing the victims. Police have not been responsive in making arrests or prosecuting assailants in these cases.

  • Protect your identity and be careful about sharing personal information on your public profile.
  • Remember that criminals both in the United States and abroad use dating apps to extort victims through threats to expose compromising pictures or other information.  Only share personal information with users who you trust, and be aware of phishing and romance scams.
  • Don’t rush into things; try to verify through social media or mutual friends that the person you are communicating with is who they say they are.  Make sure you have a photo and name of the person you plan to meet through an app.

Travelers with Disabilities:  The law in Jamaica prohibits discrimination against persons with physical, sensory, intellectual or mental disabilities, although the law is not reliably enforced. Social acceptance of persons with disabilities in public is not as prevalent as in the United States.  The most common types of accessibility may include accessible facilities and information. Expect accessibility to be limited in public transportation, lodging, communication/information, and general infrastructure. There is a significant difference in accessibility between major cities such as Kingston and Montego Bay compared to accessibility in Jamaica’s smaller communities. Qualified and certified service providers such as sign language interpreters and personal assistants and rental, repair services, and replacement parts for aids, equipment, and devices can be difficult to locate outside of the major cities.

Students:  See our  Students Abroad  page and  FBI travel tips .

Women Travelers:  See our travel tips for  Women Travelers .

For emergency services in Jamaica, dial 119 .

Ambulance services are:

  • not widely available and training and availability of emergency responders may be below U.S. standards.
  • not present throughout the country or are unreliable in most areas, especially in rural areas.
  • not equipped with state-of-the-art medical equipment.
  • not staffed with trained paramedics and often have little or no medical equipment.
  • Injured or seriously ill travelers may prefer to take a taxi or private vehicle to the nearest major hospital rather than wait for an ambulance.
  • Traffic congestion and road conditions may slow response times.

We do not pay medical bills.   Be aware that U.S. Medicare/Medicaid does not apply overseas. Most hospitals and doctors overseas do not accept U.S. health insurance.

Medical Insurance:  Make sure your health insurance plan provides coverage overseas. Most care providers overseas only accept cash payments. See our webpage for more information on insurance providers for overseas coverage. Visit the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention for more information on type of insurance you should consider before you travel overseas.

We strongly recommend supplemental insurance to cover medical evacuation.

Always carry your prescription medication in original packaging, along with your doctor’s prescription.  Check with the Government of Jamaica to ensure the medication is legal in Jamaica.

Vaccinations:  Be up-to-date on all vaccinations recommended by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

Further health information:

  • World Health Organization
  • U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC)

The U.S. Embassy maintains a list of doctors and hospitals here .  We do not endorse or recommend any specific medical provider or clinic.

Health facilities in general:

  • Health facilities may be below U.S. standards, especially when it comes to mental health care and specialty care.
  • Public medical clinics lack basic resources and supplies.
  • Private hospitals and doctors require payment “up front” prior to service or admission.
  • Be aware that some hotels and resorts have exclusive agreements with medical providers, which may limit your choices in seeking emergency medical attention.
  • Generally, in hospitals only minimal staff is available overnight in non-emergency wards
  • Patients bear all costs for transfer to or between hospitals.
  • Psychological and psychiatric services are limited, even in the larger cities, with hospital-based care only available through government institutions

The following diseases are prevalent:

  • Chikungunya
  • Use the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recommended mosquito repellents and sleep under insecticide-impregnated mosquito nets.  Chemoprophylaxis is recommended for all travelers even for short stays.
  • Visit the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention website for more information about Resources for Travelers regarding specific issues in Jamaica. 

Travel and Transportation

Road Conditions and Safety:   Jamaicans drive on the left side of the road. Here are some notes for your safety:

  • Nighttime driving is extremely hazardous due to poor lighting and unpredictable pavement.
  • Heavy rains can make roads impassable and dangerous.
  • Many roads suffer from ill repair, inadequate signage, large potholes and poor traffic markings. There is a lack of pedestrian crosswalks.
  • Pedestrians and animals share the roadways with vehicles.
  • There have been reports of carjackings, including of rental cars.
  • Only two highways are roughly comparable to U.S. standards. Both are toll roads and part of Highway 2000. The East-West leg (“T1”) runs from Portmore to May Pen. The North-South leg (“T3” or the Edward Seaga Highway) connects Caymanas (west of Kingston) to Ocho Rios (Mammee Bay).
  • Driving habits range from aggressive speeding and sudden stops by taxis in the middle of the road to over-polite drivers who suddenly stop to allow a car to pull in front of them. All can lead to accidents.
  • Official emergency response can be slow. In practice, assistance given in emergency situations is generally by fellow motorists.

Traffic Laws:

  • Traffic circles (“roundabouts”) are often poorly marked and require traffic to move in a clockwise direction. Motorists entering a roundabout must yield to those already in it. 
  • Drivers and front-seat passengers are required to wear seat belts.
  • Motorcycle riders are required to wear helmets.

Public Transportation:

  • Official public transportation vehicles have red license plates. 
  • Private vehicles, NOT licensed for public transportation, have white license plates with blue letters/numbers.
  • Avoid public buses, which are often overcrowded and frequently a venue for crime. There are reports of private buses, acting as public transport, driving erratically leading to injury and death for both riders and pedestrians. You should only use licensed taxicabs having red-and-white PP license plates or transportation services recommended by your hotel.
  • Do not accept rides from strangers.

See our  Road Safety  page and the website of Jamaica’s  national tourist office  for more information.

Aviation Safety Oversight:  The U.S. Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) has assessed the government of Jamaica’s Civil Aviation Authority as being in compliance with International Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO) aviation safety standards for oversight of air carrier operations in Jamaica. Further information may be found on the  FAA’s safety assessment page .

Maritime Travel:  Mariners planning travel to Jamaica should also check for U.S. maritime advisories and alerts . Information may also be posted to the  U.S. Coast Guard homeport website , and the  National Geospatial-Intelligence Agency (NGA) broadcast warnings .

For additional travel information

  • Enroll in the  Smart Traveler Enrollment Program (STEP)  to receive security messages and make it easier to locate you in an emergency.
  • Call us in Washington, D.C. at 1-888-407-4747 (toll-free in the United States and Canada) or 1-202-501-4444 (from all other countries) from 8:00 a.m. to 8:00 p.m., Eastern Standard Time, Monday through Friday (except U.S. federal holidays).
  • See the  State Department’s travel website  for the  Worldwide Caution  and  Travel Advisories .
  • Follow us on  Twitter  and  Facebook .
  • See  traveling safely abroad  for useful travel tips.

Review information about International Parental Child Abduction in  Jamaica . For additional IPCA-related information, please see the International Child Abduction Prevention and Return Act ( ICAPRA ) report.

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Jamaican Tourist Board   Functions & Interesting Facts

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jamaican tourist board information

Jamaican Tourist Board by Kesha Stewart, Associate Writer

In Jamaica there is an organization responsible for taking systematic steps to ensure that Jamaica remains the preferred Caribbean destination and we call it… the Jamaican Tourist Board (JTB).

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However, before the JTB was created, there was a Jamaica Tourist Association formed in 1910. Very forward thinking don’t you think?

It had the mandate to enhance the claims of the colony as a health and pleasure resort, sounds familiar?  It was tasked to share information with prospective and present visitors of the day (familiar?). 

The JTB, like its predecessor, has been mandated to market Jamaica’s tourism product. The whole idea is that the world must know or come to see Jamaica offers the best vacation available and is the most complete, inimitable and diverse warm weather destination in the world.

I have to agree with the JTB here. Jamaica is really "The Home of Alright. "

Are you wondering just when the Jamaican Tourist Board was founded? Well if you are thinking prior to independence you are correct; the JTB was formed in 1955.  

By 1922 the government decided to directly intervene in the promotion of the tourist industry. They, at the time, saw to the enactment of laws which led to the formation of the Tourist Trade Development Board. 

Interestingly an amalgamation of these entities took place in 1926. The then British Colonial Government sent funds to the entity which used the money to promote the destination in overseas markets.

In a quest for a more effective organization with a broader mandate, the Tourist Trade Development Board was abolished. The JTB then came into being in on April 1, 1955. The entity was governed by the Tourist Board Act and financed by the Government of Jamaica.

Prior to 1993 the JTB had the dual responsibility of promoting Jamaica’s tourism product and seeing to its development.

However the responsibility of product development was handed to the Tourism Development Company (TPDCo) in that year.

Responsibilities Of The Jamaica Tourist Board

Some of JTB’s responsibilities include:

  •  Identify new customer groups
  • Identify emerging customer groups
  • Cultivating new relationships with travel partner
  • Dissemination of timely and useful marketing information to its offices and travel partners across the world.

But who ensures all these happen? Let me tell you a little about the JTB’s Governance structure. The JTB falls under the Ministry of Tourism. It is a government entity and is governed by a nine member board of directors. Theses directors are appointed by the Minister of Tourism (Hon. Edmund Bartlett).

The administrative head of the JTB is given the title Director of Tourism, this individual is also appointed by the Minister of Tourism. Our present director of tourism is Mr. Donovan White.

Did You Know?

There have been at least fourteen 14 directors of tourism since 1963?

  • Carole Gruntley Brady (1984-1990) was the first female director of tourism? 
  • Fay Pickersgill (1994 – 2003) served as ambassador to the Peoples’ Republic of China in 2015? She has the longest tenure of all directors, serving for 9 years.
  • There have only been two female Directors of tourism?
  • You can connect with the JTB on Instagram, Twitter, Facebook, Youtube and at JTBonline.org?
  • That JTB has local  offices in Kingston (Head Office) (876) 929-9200 – 19, and Montego Bay, Jamaica ((876) 952-4425) ?
  • There are JTB offices in Miami, Toronto and London?
  • That JTB has representative offices in Berlin (Germany), Barcelona (Spain), Rome (Italy), Amsterdam (The Netherlands), Mumbai (India) and even Tokyo (Japan)?

For more information about the Jamaican tourist board, visit their website at this link:  http://www.jtbonline.org/ .

For recommendations on Jamaican attractions, Jamaican hotels, things to do etc, they proved an extensive travel guide at:  http://www.visitjamaica.com/ .

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A patriotic Jamaican who adores its culture, Wellesley has been using this medium to share what he calls 'the uniqueness of Jamaica with the world' since April 2007.  

To date, he serves over 9,300 unique readers / viewers per day (and over 1.1millon page views monthly)

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C5 Immigration Form

All travellers to Jamaica are required to complete and submit the Immigration/Customs Passenger Declaration (C-5) Form. The form is available online and is required for entry to the island. Visitors can access the form at www.enterjamaica.com

How to complete the form

There is no cost associated with the C-5 form.

You can complete and submit the form two (2) days before your entry. You will be required to enter a valid email address to complete the form. A verification code will be sent to your email. Enter the verification code to continue.

The C-5 form is straightforward and won’t require more than a few minutes to fill out. The form will ask for your name, dates of travel, flight number, and the address at which you will be staying in Jamaica. Once you complete the form online, you will receive an email confirmation that the application was successful.

Both visitors and residents of Jamaica are required to complete the C-5 form. The Jamaican immigration form does not replace a visa.

Airlift To Jamaica 

The following airlines operate flights to Norman Manley International Airport in Kingston:

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  • The Tourist Board Act
  • Revised Statutes

Statute Details

Preamble : A law to establish a Tourist Board charged with the duty of developing the tourist industry of Jamaica and promoting its efficiency and for purposes incidental to or connected with the foregoing purposes

Long Title :

Short Title : The Tourist Board Act

Operational Date : April 1, 1955

Number : of 1955

Last Amendment : January 1, 2016

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A bust for Jamaica’s iconic wet T-shirt girl

S kingston unveils statue of sintra bronte; model famous for 1972 tourist board campaign.

The striking resemblance to herself. Sintra Bronte stands next to her statue commissioned by hotelier Christopher Issa.

A statue of Sintra Bronte, the woman at the centre of Jamaica’s iconic tourism campaign of the 1970s, was unveiled Wednesday evening at the Strings Restaurant at the S Kingston in St Andrew.

The statue, commissioned by S Hotel’s CEO Chris Issa and moulded by Jamaican sculptor, Scheed Cole, depicts Bronte in a wet T-shirt, with the word ‘Jamaica’ emblazoned across her chest, as she emerges from the Caribbean Sea. The image is from the photograph of Bronte which was used during the island’s marketing campaign which got under way in 1972.

Minister of Tourism Edmund Bartlett, who was the guest speaker at the unveiling event, disclosed that in the first year of that campaign, Jamaica registered a huge increase in visitor arrival, credited mainly to the “beautiful” picture of Bronte.

“Sintra is a Trinidadian and she carried Jamaica’s face worldwide. The very first year that poster was put in the marketplace, 500,000 visitors came to Jamaica, and the story I read said that it was attributed to that particular representation of Jamaica. Suddenly the world saw us in a different light, and it was a new way of presenting destination Jamaica,” Minister Bartlett stated.

He added, “Sintra has done for Jamaica what she never thought. She has no way of calculating the impact and the actual monetary returns because 500,000 people coming to Jamaica in the first year that the poster was in the marketplace, if we do the maths, we will understand what it might mean today.”

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Chance encounter.

Bronte, who was living in Jamaica with her husband at the time, shared that it was a chance encounter at The Jamaica Pegasus hotel in New Kingston that she became the face of Jamaica. In an interview, she said she was at the venue waiting on her husband when she was approached by members of the tourist industry, who were there scouting talent for their advertising campaign.

They shot the iconic picture at Frenchman’s Cove in Portland the very next day, with the photoshoot taking more than seven hours. She expressed delight at being a part of the campaign, as well as her stay in Jamaica.

“Everything was so wonderful here. I will never forget here as I consider it my first home and I now consider myself a Jamaican and Caribbean woman,” Bronte said.

“At the time I never imagined that this would become an iconic image. I did it not thinking that this would turn out to be such an important portrait, as I have been recognised around the world because of it.

“I am just five feet (in height) but I became a giant in Jamaica. It is still a very unique photograph that is famous around the world today. To me the photo will not die,” she added.

Bronte also credits Scheed Cole for his impression of her with the statue.

“It is true to form. That’s Sintra and I love the eyes,” she said.

The, 42-year-old Cole was overjoyed to be commissioned to provide the sculptor, which he worked on with individuals he trains. He said it was made from waste material.

“This is an iconic image that is older than me, which I grew up seeing and when I was asked to do the sculpture, I was amazed that I would have even gotten the opportunity to do it. It is a beautiful woman and I thought it was a moment that would be embellished that would make a difference to Jamaican people,” he said.

S Hotel’s manager Kirk Clarke, shared that Issa got permission for the statue from Bronte last year, while she was in Jamaica celebrating the 50th anniversary of the photograph. He suggested that Jamaicans should create other iconic images and moments.

“Sintra has lost none of her beauty, but most importantly her natural warmth, which we believe radiates from the poster and represents the warmth of the Jamaican people. We hope that in honouring her with this statue, we not only recognise her contribution to Jamaica’s tourism, but that the statue will also serve as an inspiration to the new Jamaican icons, who will no doubt emerge,” Clarke said.

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COMMENTS

  1. Jamaica Tourist Board (JTB)

    JTB is Jamaica's national tourism agency that markets and promotes the destination worldwide. Learn about its mission, board of directors, offices and awards.

  2. Visit Jamaica

    Discover the vibrant culture, natural wonders and adventure of Jamaica. Plan your stay with the official tourism website by Jamaica Tourist Board and find fun things to do, hotels, beaches and more.

  3. Jamaica Tourist Board

    Find out the latest tourism happenings in Jamaica, including new flights, events, and partnerships. Download stock photos of Jamaica's beautiful beaches and attractions from the JTB library.

  4. Entry Requirements

    Learn about the travel documents and visa requirements for visiting Jamaica from different countries. Find out how to apply for unconditional landing, a type of extended stay for foreign nationals.

  5. Jamaica Tourist Board

    Brief History The Jamaica Tourist Board is charged with a mission of marketing the tourism product so that Jamaica remains the premier Caribbean tourism destination. To this end, we are positioning Jamaica as the most complete, unique and diverse warm weather destination in the world, which offers the best vacation value available. We operate

  6. Plan Your Trip to Jamaica

    Find out how to get to Jamaica, where to stay, and what to do in this official travel guide. Explore six distinct resort areas, transportation options, and sample itineraries for your perfect holiday.

  7. Jamaica Tourist Board

    Find out how to visit Jamaica, the premier Caribbean tourist destination, with the Jamaica Tourist Board. Access the Tourism Information Publishing Site (TIPS) for industry information and the official website and contact details of the JTB.

  8. Report And Statistics

    64 Knutsford Boulevard, Kingston 5 Jamaica, West Indies. TOURISM INFORMATION PUBLISHING SITE (TIPS) Who We Are | Tourism In Jamaica | Report And Statistics |

  9. Jamaica Tourist Board unveils new destination campaign

    The JTB aims to position Jamaica as a global culturally relevant brand that influences the world with its music, cuisine, sports, and more. The campaign will be supported by international marketing and global events such as the James Bond movie and the Olympics.

  10. Jamaica Tourist Board

    The Jamaica Tourist Board (JTB), founded in 1955, is Jamaica's national tourism agency with head offices based in the capital city of Kingston. The Board is fully funded by the government of ...

  11. Jamaica Tourist Board (JTB)

    Learn about the history, mandate and structure of the JTB, the organization that promotes Jamaica as a preferred destination. Find out the locations and functions of its offices and representative offices around the world.

  12. VisitJamaica

    VisitJamaica. 968,757 likes · 10,109 talking about this. JAMAICA | Our site http://www.VisitJamaica.com | Our Sweetest Deals & Promotions. @VisitJamaicaNow |

  13. Annual Travel Statistics 2021

    64 Knutsford Boulevard, Kingston 5 Jamaica, West Indies. TOURISM INFORMATION PUBLISHING SITE (TIPS) Who We Are | Tourism In Jamaica | Report And Statistics |

  14. Come back to Jamaica

    The Jamaica Tourist Board (JTB) invites visitors to rediscover themselves in Jamaica with its new advertising campaign, featuring music, culture and people. The campaign aims to capture the island's uniqueness and value proposition as a destination for adventure, romance, relaxation and more.

  15. Things to Do in Jamaica

    Explore the diverse activities, events and attractions that Jamaica has to offer. Whether you're into nature, culture, nightlife, golfing, shopping or history, you'll find something to suit your taste and budget.

  16. Jamaica's tourist arrivals continue to grow despite headwinds

    Seiveright noted that Jamaica recorded just over 1.7 million tourist arrivals up to the first week of May with just more than one million stopover arrivals and more than 700,000 cruise passengers ...

  17. Jamaica International Travel Information

    You do not need a visa for tourist travel up to 90 days. All other travelers will need a visa and/or work permit. Visit the Passport, Immigration, & Citizenship Agency of Jamaica or the Embassy of Jamaica in Washington D.C. websites for the most current visa information. Exit Information: Your departure tax is regularly included in the airfare ...

  18. Government of Jamaica Portal

    Find information about travelling, staying, and getting married in Jamaica. Explore attractions, immigration, visa, and emergency services on the official government website.

  19. PDF Market Performance

    Tourism data from all the Immigration/Customs C5 Forms were entered in a computer system located at the Corporate Head Office, Jamaica Tourist Board, Kingston. The data on stopovers, including demographics, were derived from this source. Jamaican nationals' resident abroad and who visited Jamaica are included in the visitor arrival figures.

  20. Jamaican Tourist Board Functions & Interesting Facts

    The entity was governed by the Tourist Board Act and financed by the Government of Jamaica. Prior to 1993 the JTB had the dual responsibility of promoting Jamaica's tourism product and seeing to its development. However the responsibility of product development was handed to the Tourism Development Company (TPDCo) in that year.

  21. Travel Alerts

    Travel Alerts. Travel Alerts. Information for Visitors. C5 Immigration Form. All travellers to Jamaica are required to complete and submit the Immigration/Customs Passenger Declaration (C-5) Form. The form is available online and is required for entry to the island. Visitors can access the form at www.enterjamaica.com. How to complete the form.

  22. Jamaica Tourism Website Receives Award of Excellence

    It's all love for VisitJamaica.com as the Jamaica Tourist Board announced its website has been named a winner in the 30th Annual Communicator Awards. In partnership with Simpleview, VisitJamaica ...

  23. The Tourist Board Act

    Preamble: A law to establish a Tourist Board charged with the duty of developing the tourist industry of Jamaica and promoting its efficiency and for purposes incidental to or connected with the foregoing purposes. Long Title: Short Title: The Tourist Board Act. Operational Date: April 1, 1955. Number: of 1955. Last Amendment: January 1, 2016

  24. Resource Center

    Welcome to the Clive Taffe Information and Resources Centre (IRC), your gateway to information resources provided by the Jamaica Tourist Board. The IRC is one of the leading information unit in Jamaica and the Caribbean. Its clientele includes primary through tertiary students, researchers of the trade and general tourism interests both locally ...

  25. A bust for Jamaica's iconic wet T-shirt girl

    5. A statue of Sintra Bronte, the woman at the centre of Jamaica's iconic tourism campaign of the 1970s, was unveiled Wednesday evening at the Strings Restaurant at the S Kingston in St Andrew. The statue, commissioned by S Hotel's CEO Chris Issa and moulded by Jamaican sculptor, Scheed Cole, depicts Bronte in a wet T-shirt, with the word ...

  26. Contact Us

    JTB Office Locations Jamaica Kingston The Tourism Centre 64 Knutsford Boulevard Kingston 5 Jamaica, West Indies (876) 929-9200 (876) 929-9375 [email protected] Montego Bay ?? Montego Bay??Convention Centre Rose Hall, St. James Jamaica, West Indies (876) 952-4425 (876) 952-3587 ?? NORTH AMERICA Canada 303 Eglinton Avenue East Suite 200????Toronto , Ontario M4P IL3 , Canada