Past Tenses

Travel Past Tense

Commonwealth travelled, US traveled past tense of travel is Commonwealth travelled, US traveled.

Travel verb forms

Conjugation of travel.

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PastTenses is a database of English verbs. One can check verbs forms in different tenses. Use our search box to check present tense, present participle tense, past tense and past participle tense of desired verb.

Conjugation verb travel

Model : cancel

Auxiliary : have , be

Other forms: travel oneself / not travel

Contractions

in the U.K. spelling we double up the 'l' in preterite and participle endings

The verb has several variants of conjugation, which may correspond to different meanings. Please use the menu to select one or all variants.

  • he/she/it travels
  • they travel
  • I travelled/traveled
  • you travelled/traveled
  • he/she/it travelled/traveled
  • we travelled/traveled
  • they travelled/traveled

Present continuous

  • I am travelling/traveling
  • you are travelling/traveling
  • he/she/it is travelling/traveling
  • we are travelling/traveling
  • they are travelling/traveling

Present perfect

  • I have travelled/traveled
  • you have travelled/traveled
  • he/she/it has travelled/traveled
  • we have travelled/traveled
  • they have travelled/traveled
  • I will travel
  • you will travel
  • he/she/it will travel
  • we will travel
  • they will travel

Future perfect

  • I will have travelled/traveled
  • you will have travelled/traveled
  • he/she/it will have travelled/traveled
  • we will have travelled/traveled
  • they will have travelled/traveled

Past continous

  • I was travelling/traveling
  • you were travelling/traveling
  • he/she/it was travelling/traveling
  • we were travelling/traveling
  • they were travelling/traveling

Past perfect

  • I had travelled/traveled
  • you had travelled/traveled
  • he/she/it had travelled/traveled
  • we had travelled/traveled
  • they had travelled/traveled

Future continuous

  • I will be travelling/traveling
  • you will be travelling/traveling
  • he/she/it will be travelling/traveling
  • we will be travelling/traveling
  • they will be travelling/traveling

Present perfect continuous

  • I have been travelling/traveling
  • you have been travelling/traveling
  • he/she/it has been travelling/traveling
  • we have been travelling/traveling
  • they have been travelling/traveling

Past perfect continuous

  • I had been travelling/traveling
  • you had been travelling/traveling
  • he/she/it had been travelling/traveling
  • we had been travelling/traveling
  • they had been travelling/traveling

Future perfect continuous

  • I will have been travelling/traveling
  • you will have been travelling/traveling
  • he/she/it will have been travelling/traveling
  • we will have been travelling/traveling
  • they will have been travelling/traveling
  • let's travel
  • travelling/traveling
  • travelled/traveled

Perfect participle

  • having travelled/traveled

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ESLBUZZ

Past Tense of Travel: Traveling Back in Time

By: Author Oliver

Posted on Last updated: August 12, 2023

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Welcome to our article on the past tense of travel! If you’re learning English grammar, you know that understanding verb tenses is an essential part of the language. The past tense is particularly important, as it allows us to talk about events and experiences that have already happened. In this article, we’ll explore the basics of English tenses, give an overview of the past tense, and focus specifically on how to use the past tense when talking about travel.

Travel is one of the most common topics of conversation, and being able to talk about past trips is a great way to connect with others and share experiences. However, using the past tense correctly can be tricky, especially when it comes to irregular verbs and complex sentence structures. In this article, we’ll provide plenty of examples and exercises to help you master the past tense of travel. We’ll also cover some common mistakes to avoid and provide additional resources for further learning.

So whether you’re planning your next trip or just want to improve your English skills, read on to learn everything you need to know about the past tense of travel!

Key Takeaways

  • The past tense is essential for talking about past events and experiences, past tense of ‘travel’ is ‘traveled’
  • By practicing with examples and exercises, you can improve your use of the past tense of travel and avoid common mistakes.

Past Tense of Travel: Traveling Back in Time

Past Tense of Travel

Travel is a verb that is commonly used in the past tense. In this section, we will cover the formation and usage examples of the past tense of travel.

To form the past tense of travel, we add “-ed” to the base form of the verb. For example:

  • I traveled to Europe last summer.
  • She traveled to Asia for business.
  • We traveled to South America for vacation.

Simple Past

The simple past is used to describe a completed action in the past. Regular verbs like travel are formed by adding -ed to the base form. For example:

  • I traveled to Paris last year.

Past Continuous

The past continuous is used to describe an action that was in progress at a specific point in the past. It is formed by using the past tense of “to be” (was/were) and the present participle (-ing) of the main verb. Here are some examples:

  • I was traveling to Paris when I got a call from my boss.

Usage Examples

The past tense of travel is used to talk about a completed action in the past. Here are some examples:

  • I traveled to Japan last year and had an amazing time.
  • She traveled to Italy for her honeymoon and fell in love with the country.
  • We traveled to Mexico for our anniversary and enjoyed the beautiful beaches.

We can also use the past tense of travel to talk about a past habit or routine. For example:

  • When I was younger, I traveled to different countries every summer.
  • She traveled for work every week and got used to living out of a suitcase.
  • We traveled to visit our family every holiday season.

In conclusion, the past tense of travel is formed by adding “-ed” to the base form of the verb and is used to talk about completed actions or past habits. Practice using the past tense of travel in your own sentences to improve your English grammar skills.

Common Mistakes with Past Tense of Travel

If you are learning English, you might be struggling with the past tense of the verb “travel.” Here are some common mistakes people make and how to avoid them.

Mixing Past and Present Tenses

One of the most common mistakes is mixing past and present tenses. For example, saying “I travel to Paris last year” instead of “I traveled to Paris last year.” To avoid this mistake, remember to use the past tense of “travel” when referring to something that happened in the past.

Using the Present Participle

Another mistake is using the present participle instead of the past tense. For example, saying “I am traveling to London last week” instead of “I traveled to London last week.” To avoid this mistake, remember to use the past tense of “travel” when referring to something that happened in the past.

Using the Wrong Auxiliary Verb

Using the wrong auxiliary verb is also a common mistake. For example, saying “I was travel to Rome” instead of “I traveled to Rome.” To avoid this mistake, remember to use the correct auxiliary verb (in this case, “did”) when forming the past tense.

Example Sentences

Here are some example sentences to help you practice using the past tense of “travel” correctly:

  • I traveled to Japan last summer.
  • She visited her grandparents in Florida last month.
  • They took a road trip across the United States.
  • We flew to Paris for our honeymoon.
  • He backpacked through Europe after college.

Remember, practice makes perfect! Keep practicing using the past tense of “travel” correctly, and soon it will become second nature.

Exercises to Practice Past Tense of Travel

Learning English grammar can be challenging, especially when it comes to mastering the past tense of travel. To help you improve your skills, we have compiled a list of exercises that you can use to practice and perfect your past tense of travel.

Interactive Exercises

Interactive exercises are a great way to practice the past tense of travel. They allow you to engage with the material and receive immediate feedback on your progress. Here are a few interactive exercises you can try:

  • Fill in the Blank: In this exercise, you will be given a sentence with a blank space where the past tense verb should go. Your task is to fill in the blank with the correct past tense verb. For example, “I ___ to Paris last year.” The correct answer would be “went.”
  • Matching: In this exercise, you will be given a list of past tense verbs and a list of travel-related words. Your task is to match the past tense verb with the correct travel-related word. For example, “flew” would match with “airplane.”

Written Exercises

Written exercises are another great way to practice the past tense of travel. They allow you to focus on the material and practice at your own pace. Here are a few written exercises you can try:

  • Sentence Writing: In this exercise, you will be given a travel-related word, and your task is to write a sentence using the correct past tense verb. For example, “train” could be used in the sentence, “I ___ to New York on a train.”
  • Paragraph Writing: In this exercise, you will be given a prompt related to travel, and your task is to write a paragraph using the correct past tense verbs. For example, “Write a paragraph about your last vacation.” You could write, “Last summer, I ___ to Hawaii with my family. We ___ on the beach, ___ in the ocean, and ___ at some amazing restaurants.”

By practicing these exercises, you will improve your understanding and mastery of the past tense of travel. Keep practicing, and before you know it, you’ll be a pro at English grammar!

Frequently Asked Questions

What is the past tense of travel?

The past tense of travel is “traveled” in American English and “travelled” in British English. Both spellings are correct, but American English tends to drop the second “l” in the past tense and past participle forms of the verb.

Is it spelled Travelled or traveled?

As mentioned above, both spellings are correct. The difference in spelling is due to the variation in American and British English.

Which is correct travel or travelling?

Both “travel” and “travelling” are correct, but “traveling” is the preferred spelling in American English, while “travelling” is the preferred spelling in British English.

What’s the difference between travel and Travelled?

“Travel” is the present tense of the verb, while “travelled” is the past tense. The difference between the two is the time frame in which the action occurs.

What is the V2 form of travel?

The V2 form of travel is “traveled” in American English and “travelled” in British English.

What is the V3 form of travel?

The V3 form of travel is “traveled” in American English and “travelled” in British English.

In summary, the past tense of travel is “traveled” in American English and “travelled” in British English. Both spellings are correct, and the difference in spelling is due to the variation in American and British English. Additionally, “traveling” is the preferred spelling in American English, while “travelling” is the preferred spelling in British English.

The past tense of travel is \"traveled\" in American English and \"travelled\" in British English. Both spellings are correct, but American English tends to drop the second \"l\" in the past tense and past participle forms of the verb.

"}},{"@type":"Question","name":"Is it spelled Travelled or traveled?","acceptedAnswer":{"@type":"Answer","text":"

"}},{"@type":"Question","name":"Which is correct travel or travelling?","acceptedAnswer":{"@type":"Answer","text":"

Both \"travel\" and \"travelling\" are correct, but \"traveling\" is the preferred spelling in American English, while \"travelling\" is the preferred spelling in British English.

"}},{"@type":"Question","name":"What's the difference between travel and Travelled?","acceptedAnswer":{"@type":"Answer","text":"

\"Travel\" is the present tense of the verb, while \"traveled\" is the past tense. The difference between the two is the time frame in which the action occurs.

"}},{"@type":"Question","name":"What is the V2 form of travel?","acceptedAnswer":{"@type":"Answer","text":"

The V2 form of travel is \"traveled\" in American English and \"travelled\" in British English.

"}},{"@type":"Question","name":"What is the V3 form of travel?","acceptedAnswer":{"@type":"Answer","text":"

The V3 form of travel is \"traveled\" in American English and \"travelled\" in British English.

In summary, the past tense of travel is \"traveled\" in American English and \"travelled\" in British English. Both spellings are correct, and the difference in spelling is due to the variation in American and British English. Additionally, \"traveling\" is the preferred spelling in American English, while \"travelling\" is the preferred spelling in British English.

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travel past tense

Past Tense of Travel: Conjugations in Past and Present Participles

past tense for travel

What is the past tense of 鈥渢ravel?鈥 Most commonly, the past tense of the word 鈥渢ravel鈥 is 鈥渢raveled.鈥 Although the word form will change based on its participle. And the sentence where it鈥檚 used. For example, referencing 鈥渢ravel鈥 in the present participle form will change it to 鈥渢raveling,鈥 but in the infinitive form, will be 鈥渢ravel.鈥

What is the past tense of the word "travel"

The past tense (past participle) form of 鈥渢ravel鈥 is 鈥渢raveled.鈥 The infinitive of the word form is 鈥渢ravel.鈥 The present participle form is 鈥渢raveling.鈥 The past tense form is 鈥渢raveled鈥 and past participle form is 鈥渢raveled.鈥

Understanding verb tenses

The general grammar rules that govern past tenses are as follows. The simple past tense form is created by adding a -ed or -d affix to the root word of the verb. Some verbs use a -t variation where they end in a -t. For example, when "dream" turns into "dreamt."

The past perfect tense is formed for regular verbs (ending in -ed, -d, or -t) by adding "had" followed by the verb. For example, "I had finished ."

The past continuous tense is formed by the verb "be" followed by the affix or ending of -ing. For example, " we were having dinner."

Lastly, the past perfect continuous tense is formed by adding "had been" followed by the affix or ending of -ing. For example, "I had been building a castle with my sister."

For more information on forming all past tenses, visit our " understanding verb tenses " resource.

Sentence examples for the past tense of the word "travel"

  • Infinitive: I travel.
  • Present participle: She is traveling.
  • Past tense: I traveled.
  • Past particle: I have traveled.

Verb forms of the word "travel"

Example sentences in all verb forms:

Indefinite present tense

Present continuous tense.

She/he/it is traveling.

Present perfect continuous tense

She/he/it has/had traveled.

Present perfect tense

She/he/it has/had been traveling.

Simple past tense

She/he/it traveled.

Past continuous tense

She/he/it were traveling.

Past perfect tense

Perfect continuous tense.

She/he/it will/shall travel.

Simple future tense

She/he/it will/shall be traveling.

Future perfect tense

She/he/it will/shall have traveled.

Future perfect continuous tense

She/he/it will/shall have been traveling.

Sentence examples in all forms

Sentence examples in all participles and parts of speech :

travel past tense

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travel past tense

About the author

Dalia Y.: Dalia is an English Major and linguistics expert with an additional degree in Psychology. Dalia has featured articles on Forbes, Inc, Fast Company, Grammarly, and many more. She covers English, ESL, and all things grammar on GrammarBrain.

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Perfect tenses, continuous (progressive) and emphatic tenses, compound continuous (progressive) tenses, conditional, subjunctive.

*Blue letters in conjugations are irregular forms. ( example ) *Red letters in conjugations are exceptions to the model. ( example )

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How to conjugate "to travel" in English?

English "to travel" conjugation.

  • traveled; travelled

Full conjugation of "to travel"

Translations for "to travel", present continuous, simple past, past continuous, present perfect, present perfect continuous, past perfect, past perfect continuous, future continuous, future perfect, future perfect continuous, conditional, conditional present, conditional present progressive, conditional perfect, conditional perfect progressive, subjunctive, present subjunctive, past subjunctive, past perfect subjunctive, present participle, past participle.

Translations for "to travel" in our English dictionaries

Popular English verbs

Find out the most frequently used verbs in English.

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Verb Table for travel

  • Simple tenses
  • Continuous tenses

Conditional

Simple tenses  •  continuous tenses  •  conditional  •  imperative  •  impersonal, present perfect, past perfect, will -future, going to -future, future perfect, conditional past, past participle, browse the conjugations (verb tables), look up "travel" in other languages, links to further information.

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  • To Travel Conjugation

In the US the spelling 'traveling' and 'traveled' are preferred.

Continuous Perfect

Conditional.

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travel past tense

Conjugation English verb to travel

Simple present, present progressive/continuous, simple past, past progressive/continuous, present perfect simple, present perfect progressive/continuous, past perfect, past perfect progressive/continuous, future progressive/continuous, future perfect, future perfect continuous, conditional, progressive, perfect progressive, translation to travel.

'travel' conjugation table in English

Past participle, present participle, present continuous, present perfect, present perfect continuous, past continuous, past perfect, past perfect continuous, future continuous, future perfect, future perfect continuous.

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All ENGLISH words that begin with 'T'

Verb "travel"

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Conjugation

Simple tense.

Present Simple

  • he, she travels
  • they travel

Past Simple

  • I traveled ; travelled
  • you traveled ; travelled
  • he, she traveled ; travelled
  • we traveled ; travelled
  • they traveled ; travelled

Future Simple

  • I will travel
  • you will travel
  • he, she will travel
  • we will travel
  • they will travel

Continuous Tense

Present Simple Continuous

  • I am traveling ; travelling
  • you are traveling ; travelling
  • he, she is traveling ; travelling
  • we are traveling ; travelling
  • they are traveling ; travelling

Past Simple Continuous

  • I was traveling ; travelling
  • you were traveling ; travelling
  • he, she was traveling ; travelling
  • we were traveling ; travelling
  • they were traveling ; travelling

Future Simple Continuous

  • I will be traveling ; travelling
  • you will be traveling ; travelling
  • he, she will be traveling ; travelling
  • we will be traveling ; travelling
  • they will be traveling ; travelling

Perfect Tense

Present Perfect

  • I have traveled ; travelled
  • you have traveled ; travelled
  • he, she has traveled ; travelled
  • we have traveled ; travelled
  • they have traveled ; travelled

Past Perfect

  • I had traveled ; travelled
  • you had traveled ; travelled
  • he, she had traveled ; travelled
  • we had traveled ; travelled
  • they had traveled ; travelled

Future Perfect

  • I will have traveled ; travelled
  • you will have traveled ; travelled
  • he, she will have traveled ; travelled
  • we will have traveled ; travelled
  • they will have traveled ; travelled

Perfect Continuous Tense

Present Perfect Continuous

  • I have been traveling ; travelling
  • you have been traveling ; travelling
  • he, she has been traveling ; travelling
  • we have been traveling ; travelling
  • they have been traveling ; travelling

Past Perfect Continuous

  • I had been traveling ; travelling
  • you had been traveling ; travelling
  • he, she had been traveling ; travelling
  • we had been traveling ; travelling
  • they had been traveling ; travelling

Future Perfect Continuous

  • I will have been traveling ; travelling
  • you will have been traveling ; travelling
  • he, she will have been traveling ; travelling
  • we will have been traveling ; travelling
  • they will have been traveling ; travelling

Conditional

  • I would travel
  • you would travel
  • he, she would travel
  • we would travel
  • they would travel
  • I would have traveled ; travelled
  • you would have traveled ; travelled
  • he, she would have traveled ; travelled
  • we would have traveled ; travelled
  • they would have traveled ; travelled

Present Continuous

  • I would be traveling ; travelling
  • you would be traveling ; travelling
  • he, she would be traveling ; travelling
  • we would be traveling ; travelling
  • they would be traveling ; travelling

Perfect Continuous

  • I would have been traveling ; travelling
  • you would have been traveling ; travelling
  • he, she would have been traveling ; travelling
  • we would have been traveling ; travelling
  • they would have been traveling ; travelling
  • we Let's travel

Other verbs

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Here are the past tense forms of the verb travel

馃憠 Forms of verb travel in future and past simple and past participle. 鉂 What is the past tense of travel.

Travel: Past, Present, and Participle Forms

What are the 2nd and 3rd forms of the verb travel.

馃帗 What are the past simple, future simple, present perfect, past perfect, and future perfect forms of the base form (infinitive) ' travel '? 馃憠 It's quite simple -->

Learn the three forms of the English verb 'travel'

  • the first form (V1) is 'travel' used in present simple and future simple tenses.
  • the second form (V2) is 'travelled (BrE)', 'traveled (AmE)' used in past simple tense.
  • the third form (V3) is 'travelled (BrE)', 'traveled (AmE)' used in present perfect and past perfect tenses.

What are the past tense and past participle of travel?

What is the past tense of travel.

The past tense of the verb "travel" is "travelled (BrE)", or "traveled (AmE)", and the past participle is "travelled (BrE)" or "traveled (AmE)".

Verb Tenses

Past simple 鈥 travel in past simple travelled (BrE), traveled (AmE) (V2) . Future simple 鈥 travel in future simple is travel (will + V1) . Present Perfect 鈥 travel in present perfect tense is travelled (BrE), traveled (AmE) (have/has + V3) . Past Perfect 鈥 travel in past perfect tense is travelled (BrE), traveled (AmE) (had + V3) .

travel regular or irregular verb?

馃憠 Is 'travel' a regular or irregular verb? The verb 'travel' is regular verb .

Examples of Verb travel in Sentences

  •   These days we travelled 1400 km (Past Simple)
  •   We didn't travel that long (Past Simple)
  •   She has travelled extensively in the Philippines (Present Perfect)
  •   I can't travel without you (Present Simple)
  •   We usually travel to work by bus (Present Simple)
  •   A plane travels faster than a train (Present Simple)
  •   They are travelling together since 2018 (Present Continuous)
  •   You can travel by foot, why not? (Present Simple)
  •   Unfortunately you can't travel without a ticket, so please proceed to the ticket office (Present Simple)
  •   How many countries have you travelled to? (Present Perfect)

Along with travel, words are popular see and tell .

Verbs by letter: r , d , u , c , m , p , b , w , h , a , e , g , s , q , j , l , t , f , o , n , k , i , v , y , z .

English verbs

  • 318 Irregular verbs
  • 904 Regular verbs
  • 5 Modal verbs
  • 407 Phrasal verb

Online verb dictionary

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Travel Past Tense: Verb Forms, Conjugate TRAVEL

travel past tense

  • commonwealth travelled, us traveled

The past tense of travel is commonwealth travelled, us traveled

The Forms of Travel

Conjugate travel, travel in present simple (indefinite) tense, travel in present continuous (progressive) tense, travel in present perfect tense, travel in present perfect continuous tense, travel in past simple (indefinite) tense, travel in past continuous (progressive) tense, travel in past perfect tense, travel in past perfect continuous tense, travel in future simple (indefinite) tense, travel in future continuous (progressive) tense, travel in future perfect tense, travel in future perfect continuous tense, leave a comment cancel reply.

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Travel Verb Forms – Past Tense, Past Participle & V1V2V3

travel verb forms v1 v2 v3 past tense and past participle

Table of Contents

Travel past tense

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Example: eat, ate, eaten

Past Perfect

Future perfect, present - conditional, perfect - conditional.

Conjugation of verb (past tense) travel

Past simple, traveled; travelled, past participle.

  • 猸怌onjugation
  • Podm铆nkov茅 v臎ty
  • Fr谩zov谩 slovesa
  • 猸怌onditional
  • 猸怱ubjunktiv
  • 猸怭articiple

Conjugation of the regular verb [travel]

Conjugation is the creation of derived forms of a verb from its principal parts by inflection (alteration of form according to rules of grammar). For instance, the verb "break" can be conjugated to form the words break, breaks, broke, broken and breaking.

The term conjugation is applied only to the inflection of verbs, and not of other parts of speech (inflection of nouns and adjectives is known as declension). Also it is often restricted to denoting the formation of finite forms of a verb 鈥 these may be referred to as conjugated forms, as opposed to non-finite forms, such as the infinitive or gerund, which tend not to be marked for most of the grammatical categories.

Conjugation is also the traditional name for a group of verbs that share a similar conjugation pattern in a particular language (a verb class). A verb that does not follow all of the standard conjugation patterns of the language is said to be an irregular verb .

Present Continuous

Past continuous, present perfect, present perfect continuous, past perfect, past perfect continuous, future continuous, future perfect, future perfect continuous, conditional of the regular verb [travel].

Causality (also referred to as causation or cause and effect ) is influence by which one event, process, state or object (a cause) contributes to the production of another event, process, state or object (an effect) where the cause is partly responsible for the effect, and the effect is partly dependent on the cause. In general, a process has many causes, which are also said to be causal factors for it, and all lie in its past. An effect can in turn be a cause of, or causal factor for, many other effects, which all lie in its future.

The conditional mood (abbreviated cond) is a grammatical mood used in conditional sentences to express a proposition whose validity is dependent on some condition, possibly counterfactual.

English does not have an inflective (morphological) conditional mood, except in as much as the modal verbs could, might, should and would may in some contexts be regarded as conditional forms of can, may, shall and will respectively. What is called the English conditional mood (or just the conditional) is formed periphrastically using the modal verb would in combination with the bare infinitive of the following verb. (Occasionally should is used in place of would with a first person subject 鈥 see shall and will. Also the aforementioned modal verbs could, might and should may replace would in order to express appropriate modality in addition to conditionality.)

Conditional present -->

Conditional present progressive -->, conditional perfect -->, conditional perfect progressive -->, subjunktiv of the regular verb [travel].

The subjunctive is a grammatical mood, a feature of the utterance that indicates the speaker's attitude toward it. Subjunctive forms of verbs are typically used to express various states of unreality such as: wish, emotion, possibility, judgement, opinion, obligation, or action that has not yet occurred; the precise situations in which they are used vary from language to language. The subjunctive is one of the irrealis moods, which refer to what is not necessarily real. It is often contrasted with the indicative, a realis mood which is used principally to indicate that something is a statement of fact.

Subjunctives occur most often, although not exclusively, in subordinate clauses, particularly that-clauses. Examples of the subjunctive in English are found in the sentences "I suggest that you be careful" and "It is important that she stay by your side."

The subjunctive mood in English is a clause type used in some contexts which describe non-actual possibilities, e.g. "It's crucial that you be here" and "It's crucial that he arrive early." In English, the subjunctive is syntactic rather than inflectional, since there is no specifically subjunctive verb form. Rather, subjunctive clauses recruit the bare form of the verb which is also used in a variety of other constructions.

Present subjunctive -->

Past subjunctive -->, past perfect subjunctive -->, imperativ of the regular verb [travel].

The imperative mood is a grammatical mood that forms a command or request.

An example of a verb used in the imperative mood is the English phrase "Go." Such imperatives imply a second-person subject (you), but some other languages also have first- and third-person imperatives, with the meaning of "let's (do something)" or "let them (do something)" (the forms may alternatively be called cohortative and jussive).

Imperativ -->

Participle of the regular verb [travel].

鈥婽he past participle is one of the most important parts of English grammar. It鈥檚 used to express perfect tenses and to form the passive voice. It鈥檚 also a useful tool for writing sentences that describe actions that started in the past and are still happening today. The past participles of irregular verbs don鈥檛 follow a specific pattern and can have numerous endings.

Present participle -->

Past participle -->, recent articles.

  • 50 Examples of sentences in the past perfect continuous tense
  • Past perfect continuous structure
  • Examples of affirmative sentences in the past perfect continuous tense
  • Examples of interrogative questions in sentences using the past perfect continuous tense
  • Examples of negative sentences in the past perfect continuous tense

Start with any verb and browse through irregular verbs in alphabetical order

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Definition of travel verb from the Oxford Advanced Learner's Dictionary

  • I go to bed early if I'm travelling the next day.
  • + adv./prep. to travel around the world
  • I love travelling by train.
  • We always travel first class.
  • I travel abroad a lot.
  • They travelled on the bus to and from work together.
  • We travelled to California for the wedding.
  • They enjoy travelling to other European countries.
  • My client travels extensively on business.
  • When I finished college I went travelling for six months (= spent time visiting different places) .
  • travel something As a journalist, she has travelled the world .
  • He travelled the length of the Nile in a canoe.
  • I travel 40 miles to work every day.
  • They travelled huge distances in search of food.
  • Many residents must travel long distances to a grocery store.
  • He travels back and forth across the Atlantic.
  • He travels with a huge entourage.
  • I prefer travelling independently to going on a package holiday.
  • She travels widely in her job.
  • The dissidents were unable to hold meetings or travel freely.
  • The job gives her the opportunity to travel abroad.
  • We decided to travel by car.
  • We had to travel separately as we couldn't get seats on the same flight.
  • We plan to travel through Thailand and into Cambodia.
  • business people who travel regularly to the US
  • information for the backpacker who wants to travel farther afield
  • Children under five travel free.
  • I spent a year travelling around Africa.
  • More people travel by air than ever before.
  • We travelled the length and breadth of the country.
  • We've travelled a long way in the past few days.
  • Hundreds of hospital patients may have to travel long distances for treatment.
  • freedom to travel
  • go travelling/鈥媡raveling
  • travel all over the world

Want to learn more?

Find out which words work together and produce more natural-sounding English with the Oxford Collocations Dictionary app. Try it for free as part of the Oxford Advanced Learner鈥檚 Dictionary app.

travel past tense

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Table of irregular verbs

Note that be has several irregular forms:

Present: ( I ) am , ( she, he, it ) is , ( you , we , they ) are

Past: ( I, she, he, it ) was , ( you , we , they ) were

-ed form: been

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Verb conjugation of "travel" in English

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Conjugaci贸n verbo travel - ingl茅s

Modelo : cancel

Auxiliar : have , be

Otras formas: travel oneself / not travel

Contracciones

in the U.K. spelling we double up the 'l' in preterite and participle endings

La declinaci贸n de este verbo presenta algunas variantes ortogr谩ficas que podr铆an conllevar significados distintos. Seleccione una variante o todas en el men霉.

  • he/she/it travels
  • they travel
  • I travelled/traveled
  • you travelled/traveled
  • he/she/it travelled/traveled
  • we travelled/traveled
  • they travelled/traveled

Present continuous

  • I am travelling/traveling
  • you are travelling/traveling
  • he/she/it is travelling/traveling
  • we are travelling/traveling
  • they are travelling/traveling

Present perfect

  • I have travelled/traveled
  • you have travelled/traveled
  • he/she/it has travelled/traveled
  • we have travelled/traveled
  • they have travelled/traveled
  • I will travel
  • you will travel
  • he/she/it will travel
  • we will travel
  • they will travel

Future perfect

  • I will have travelled/traveled
  • you will have travelled/traveled
  • he/she/it will have travelled/traveled
  • we will have travelled/traveled
  • they will have travelled/traveled

Past continous

  • I was travelling/traveling
  • you were travelling/traveling
  • he/she/it was travelling/traveling
  • we were travelling/traveling
  • they were travelling/traveling

Past perfect

  • I had travelled/traveled
  • you had travelled/traveled
  • he/she/it had travelled/traveled
  • we had travelled/traveled
  • they had travelled/traveled

Future continuous

  • I will be travelling/traveling
  • you will be travelling/traveling
  • he/she/it will be travelling/traveling
  • we will be travelling/traveling
  • they will be travelling/traveling

Present perfect continuous

  • I have been travelling/traveling
  • you have been travelling/traveling
  • he/she/it has been travelling/traveling
  • we have been travelling/traveling
  • they have been travelling/traveling

Past perfect continuous

  • I had been travelling/traveling
  • you had been travelling/traveling
  • he/she/it had been travelling/traveling
  • we had been travelling/traveling
  • they had been travelling/traveling

Future perfect continuous

  • I will have been travelling/traveling
  • you will have been travelling/traveling
  • he/she/it will have been travelling/traveling
  • we will have been travelling/traveling
  • they will have been travelling/traveling
  • let's travel
  • travelling/traveling
  • travelled/traveled

Perfect participle

  • having travelled/traveled

Ayudando a millones de personas y grandes organizaciones a comunicar con m谩s eficacia y precisi贸n en todos los idiomas.

travel past tense

Ukraine's defence lines stretched as Russian troops advance

We travel at speed towards the village of Liptsy 鈥 now under siege.

Russian forces have penetrated this border area north of Kharkiv, Ukraine鈥檚 second largest city.

We are being escorted by members of Ukraine鈥檚 National Guard, among the latest reinforcements to try to halt this most recent Russian advance. They鈥檝e gone from a fierce battle in the east to another further north 鈥 without rest.

The heavy thuds of artillery grow louder when we arrive at their position, just a mile from the frontline.

We run past a smouldering fire towards a bunker, where we are told to take cover.

In the dank, gloomy basement a group of soldiers are watching a drone feed. They鈥檙e directing Ukrainian artillery fire towards a tree line.

Andrii tells me the situation: 鈥淚t鈥檚 dynamic and tense and hard to predict."

We鈥檝e been told we can鈥檛 stay for long. Even underground you can hear the explosions.

I ask Andrii whether he and his men鈥檚 arrival on this front is making a difference.

鈥淩elatively, but it鈥檚 always hard to get involved in someone else鈥檚 defence lines because there鈥檚 no proper interaction, with other units,鈥 he replies.

But he understands the importance of their task and why the Russians have opened this new front.

鈥淭hey want to pull our forces from defence lines in Donetsk and Luhansk regions. It was just a question of time. The Russians always use mean tactics," he says.

It鈥檚 getting dark outside and they鈥檙e now using a thermal image camera on a drone to watch Russian movements. 鈥淥ur pilot has just found out the movement of the enemy group near to our positions,鈥 Andrii tells me.

We鈥檙e told to leave quickly.

At a field hospital well behind the front line, Ukrainian medics are treating yet another casualty.

Viktor has lost some of his fingers in a mortar explosion. He鈥檚 lying on a bed, conscious, wrapped in a foil blanket as he receives treatment from a nurse.

But Viktor is more worried about the men he鈥檚 left behind. 鈥淚 can鈥檛 live without my guys,鈥 he says, 鈥渢hey鈥檙e my friends, my second family." He says he wants to get back to them as soon as he is patched up.

The Russians too have been taking heavy casualties. But there are more of them.

Viktor says they were fighting off wave after wave of attacks. 鈥淭here are a lot of them,鈥 he says.

Russia鈥檚 believed to have massed a force of more than 30,000 just over the border.

Ukraine has not just been outnumbered on this front, it鈥檚 also been outgunned.

鈥淭he Russians have everything, whatever they want says Viktor, 鈥渁nd we have nothing to fight with. But we do what we can."

Delays in US military support has made their job more difficult. Ammunition has had to be rationed over the past few months.

On average Russia鈥檚 been able to fire 10 times as many artillery shells. The hope is the deficit will narrow with the arrival of more US weapons and ammunition.

At an artillery position, hidden in a treeline outside Vovchansk, men of Ukraine鈥檚 57th Brigade have been firing 50 to 100 rounds a day to defend the town.

When we arrive they鈥檙e waiting for a fresh delivery of ammunition for their Russian made self-propelled gun. Another 20 rounds are soon delivered by a small van. It鈥檒l keep them going for a few more hours.

This unit too had been fighting further east before the call came to defend Kharkiv.

Ukraine鈥檚 defence lines are being stretched and thinned out.

Another brigade nearby has arrived from Robotyne in the south, where Russian forces are also advancing.

The small gains made in Ukraine鈥檚 2023 offensive are slowly but surely disappearing.

This time last year Ukraine was hoping to take back its land. Now its simply hoping it can hold the line.

Ukrainian reinforcements are making a difference in repelling this latest Russian assault. But at what cost elsewhere on the 800 mile (1,287 km) front?

It鈥檒l be hard to dislodge all the Russian forces who have now gained a significant foothold in the Kharkiv region.

Mykhailo, the Ukrainian artillery commander at the position, tells me: 鈥淲e are losing Vovchansk and we are also losing the villages around Vovchansk."

And there is a feeling that this could have been avoided if defences had been better prepared.

鈥淲e could have used logs and concrete to build defences. Now we鈥檒l [have] to use shells and people to take back this land,鈥 he tells me.

  • The Russians simply walked in, Ukrainian troops in Kharkiv tell BBC
  • Key weeks ahead for Russia鈥檚 war in Ukraine

Andrii, drone unit commander, tells the BBC the situation in Kharkiv is "tense and hard to predict"

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Democrats鈥 Split Over Israel Takes Center Stage in Tense Primary Debate

A rancorous clash between Representative Jamaal Bowman and his Democratic opponent, George Latimer, exposed sharp divisions in their party.

In front of an array of American flags, a debate moderator stands to the left of the two participants.

By Nicholas Fandos

Democrats鈥 smoldering divisions over the war in Gaza flared in New York on Monday, as Representative Jamaal Bowman, one of the House鈥檚 most endangered incumbents, debated a party rival over Israel鈥檚 war tactics, American military aid and a powerful pro-Israel group.

In many ways, their exchanges echoed those playing out from Congress to college campuses . But for Mr. Bowman, there was something more at stake: His sharp criticism of Israel has put him at risk of losing his seat in a primary in the New York City suburbs next month.

That possibility appeared to be front of mind as he began the race鈥檚 first televised debate in White Plains, N.Y. Mr. Bowman joined his more moderate opponent, George Latimer, in reiterating support for two states 鈥 one Palestinian and one Jewish 鈥 and condemning antisemitism. He steered clear of incendiary terms like 鈥済enocide鈥 that have cost him key Jewish support. Both candidates let some deeper differences slide.

The comity lasted all of 25 minutes.

Friction spiked 鈥 and never really abated 鈥 after the conversation turned to the American Israel Public Affairs Committee, the influential pro-Israel lobby that helped push Mr. Latimer into the race and has pledged millions of dollars to defeat Mr. Bowman and other members of the House鈥檚 left-wing 鈥淪quad.鈥

Sensing a rare opportunity to go on the attack, the congressman accused Mr. Latimer, the Westchester County executive, of being 鈥渂ought and paid for鈥 by the group and its deep-pocketed funders, who Mr. Bowman said also support 鈥渞ight-wing Republicans who want to destroy our democracy.鈥

Mr. Latimer did not take the gibe kindly. The group, as he quickly pointed out, has deep ties to Democratic leadership, but its brook-no-criticism approach to Israel鈥檚 deadly counteroffensive in Gaza has alienated large numbers of Democratic lawmakers and voters.

Mr. Latimer, 70, pointed out that he had a long liberal record supporting abortion rights, gun restrictions and other issues 鈥 and then took his own shot back at Mr. Bowman, 48.

鈥淚f he had a stronger record as congressman, he wouldn鈥檛 have to attack me,鈥 he said. 鈥淗e wouldn鈥檛 even have to mention my name.鈥

Things quickly devolved. Mr. Latimer suggested the incumbent had done little more than 鈥減reach and scream鈥 from the steps of the Capitol in two terms in Washington. Mr. Bowman, who is Black, accused his white opponent of playing 鈥渢he Southern strategy in the North鈥 by portraying him as 鈥渢he angry Black man.鈥

The News 12 moderator, Tara Rosenblum, frequently intervened to try to restore order.

The fight underscored just how raw the race has become in the run-up to the June 25 primary and how a contest that began over American policy toward Israel has exposed deeper cleavages over race, class and ideology that divide the modern Democratic Party.

The safely Democratic district itself is one of the most diverse in the country, stretching from working-class precincts of the Bronx to some of the nation鈥檚 wealthier suburbs in Westchester County. The primary electorate could be roughly a quarter Jewish, making it one of the most Jewish seats in the country. But the district is also nearly 50 percent Black and Latino.

Mr. Bowman, a former middle school principal in the Bronx, had no political experience before he defeated a powerful Democratic incumbent in a 2020 primary. He has positioned himself as a champion of Black, working-class and left-leaning New Yorkers; and turned heads with viral, outspoken confrontations with Republicans around the Capitol.

Mr. Latimer, by contrast, is a fixture of the New York Democratic establishment after decades rising through state and local offices. He is a middle-of-the-road liberal and has a strong base of support in the Westchester County business community and its more affluent suburbs. He has pitched himself as a steady hand who will not generate unflattering headlines.

No public polling firms have tested the race yet. Allies of Mr. Bowman and Mr. Latimer have each leaked private survey data suggesting their candidate is ahead, but even some of Mr. Bowman鈥檚 allies worry he has become the underdog.

In addition to attracting AIPAC鈥檚 ire, Mr. Bowman has found himself explaining several unrelated embarrassing episodes. The Daily Beast turned up an old blog where Mr. Bowman dabbled in conspiracy theories about the Sept. 11, 2001, terrorist attacks. And he pleaded guilty to a criminal charge last fall after pulling a fire alarm in a House office building.

On Monday, the two men did find some common ground. Though they quibbled about their records, both said there was an urgent need to build more affordable housing, offered welcoming stances toward the influx of migrants arriving in New York and indicated support for President Biden.

But it was their differences that consumed the most time in the one-hour debate 鈥 especially related to Israel.

The candidates differed on whether a common protest chant, 鈥渇rom the river to the sea, Palestine will be free,鈥 constituted hate speech. The phrase has a long, contested history.

Mr. Bowman said he knew the phrase hurt some people, but he aligned himself with those who characterize it as a hopeful cry for Palestinian freedom.

Mr. Latimer disagreed, saying that the expression鈥檚 goal was 鈥渢o try to delegitimize Israel.鈥

As time went on, Mr. Bowman reiterated his basic outlook on the conflict, one that has alienated even some longtime Jewish allies but has also gradually gained more acceptance in his party.

He criticized American tax dollars being used to fund Israeli weapons, reminded voters that he was one of the first members of Congress to call for a permanent cease-fire and closely aligned himself with the Palestinian cause.

鈥淕oing after Hamas in this way is not going to end the cycle of conflict that has been going on for 75 years,鈥 Mr. Bowman said. 鈥淲e can have a free Palestine and fight antisemitism.鈥

Mr. Latimer was more defensive of Israel, but repeatedly appeared hesitant to share details about his own views. All but invited to criticize the government of Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu 鈥 a stance adopted by many Democrats 鈥 he took a conspicuous pass.

He also declined to offer a substantive view on the wave of pro-Palestinian demonstrations sweeping college campuses this spring. And he said he would leave it to Mr. Biden and his administration to steer the war to its proper end.

鈥淪tatements that are made outside of that may not be helpful,鈥 he said, 鈥渁nd in fact may be counterproductive.鈥

Nicholas Fandos is a Times reporter covering New York politics and government. More about Nicholas Fandos

Politics in the New York Region

Office of Cannabis Management: The head of New York State鈥檚 cannabis agency will step down at the end of his three-year term in September as part of an overhaul of the embattled agency , Gov. Kathy Hochul said.

A Thorny Mayoral Race: Zellnor Myrie, an Afro-Latino state senator from Brooklyn known for backing progressive causes, announced that he is moving to challenge 聽Mayor Eric Adams in next year鈥檚 Democratic primary in New York City.

Special House Election: Timothy Kennedy, a Democratic New York State senator, easily won a special House election 聽to replace a retiring congressman in western New York, narrowing the Republican majority in Washington.

A $237 Billion Budget: Hochul and New York City emerged as two of the winners from a budget process that blew past the April 1 deadline. Here鈥檚 a look at how things went .

Concessions From N.Y. Lawmakers: Hochul used the budget to wedge in contentious issues 聽like extending Adams鈥檚 control聽over New York City schools.

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  1. Travel Past Tense: Conjugation in Present, Past & Past Participle Tense

    Learn how to conjugate the verb travel in past tense and other tenses. See the difference between Commonwealth and US spellings and examples of travel verb forms.

  2. Conjugation travel

    Conjugate the English verb travel: indicative, past tense, participle, present perfect, gerund, conjugation models and irregular verbs. Translate travel in context, with examples of use and definition.

  3. Past Tense of Travel: Traveling Back in Time

    Learn the formation and usage of the past tense of travel with examples and exercises. Avoid common mistakes like mixing past and present tenses, using the present participle, or the wrong auxiliary verb.

  4. Past Tense of Travel: Conjugations in Past and Present Participles

    What is the past tense of "travel?". Most commonly, the past tense of the word "travel" is "traveled.". Although the word form will change based on its participle. And the sentence where it's used. For example, referencing "travel" in the present participle form will change it to "traveling," but in the infinitive form ...

  5. Conjugation of travel

    travel. 'travel' is the model of its conjugation. In British English, the final consonant is doubled before -ing and -ed. infinitive: present participle: past participle: (to) travel. trave ll ing. trave ll ed.

  6. Conjugate "to travel"

    Learn how to conjugate "to travel" in English in all tenses and moods. The simple past form is traveled or travelled, and the past participle is also traveled or travelled.

  7. Conjugation of travel

    Learn how to conjugate the verb travel in different tenses and moods, including past tense. See the tables for simple, continuous, conditional, imperative and other forms of travel.

  8. To Travel Conjugation

    To Travel Conjugation; To Travel Infinitive: to travel Gerund: travelling Past participle: travelled Simple past: travelled. Note. In the US the spelling 'traveling' and 'traveled' are preferred. Irregular forms Auxilliary verb Spelling change Use contractions. Positive Negative. Indicative.

  9. Conjugation English verb to travel

    Conjugation English verb to travel in several modes, tenses, voices, numbers, persons : indicative mode, subjunctive, imperative mood, conditional, participle form, gerund, present, past, future perfect, progressive. The-conjugation.com. Menu. Other languages available English ... I will/shall have been traveling you will have been traveling he ...

  10. TRAVEL conjugation table

    Present Continuous. I am travelling or traveling you are travelling or traveling he/she/it is travelling or traveling we are travelling or traveling you are travelling or traveling they are travelling or traveling.

  11. Conjugation Travel Verb in all tenses and forms

    Conjugation of the verb Travel in all tenses: future, present and past. 馃幃 Conjugation trainer for memorizing forms.

  12. Travel Past Tense and Past Participle Verb Forms in English

    Learn how to conjugate the verb 'travel' in past simple, past participle, and other tenses. See examples of 'travel' in sentences and compare British and American spellings.

  13. Travel Past Tense: Verb Forms, Conjugate TRAVEL

    Travel in Past Continuous (Progressive) Tense. Singular. Plural. I was commonwealth travelling, us traveling. We were commonwealth travelling, us traveling. You were commonwealth travelling, us traveling. You were commonwealth travelling, us traveling. He/She/It was commonwealth travelling, us traveling. They were commonwealth travelling, us ...

  14. Travel Verb Forms

    Visit. Travelled is the past tense of the word travel. Travelled is the past participle of the word travel. travel past form, verb forms, v1v2v3, Inf.

  15. What is the past tense of travel?

    Answer. The past tense of travel is travelled UK or traveled US (US) . The third-person singular simple present indicative form of travel is travels . The present participle of travel is travelling UK or traveling US .

  16. Verb 1-2-3

    Look up English verb forms - over 5000 verbs! Excellent resource for students and teachers.

  17. Conjugation of verb (past tense) TRAVEL

    Conjugation is the creation of derived forms of a verb from its principal parts by inflection (alteration of form according to rules of grammar). For instance, the verb "break" can be conjugated to form the words break, breaks, broke, broken and breaking. The term conjugation is applied only to the inflection of verbs, and not of other parts of speech (inflection of nouns and adjectives is ...

  18. travel verb

    business people who travel regularly to the US; information for the backpacker who wants to travel farther afield; Children under five travel free. I spent a year travelling around Africa. More people travel by air than ever before. We travelled the length and breadth of the country. We've travelled a long way in the past few days.

  19. Table of irregular verbs

    Table of irregular verbs - English Grammar Today - a reference to written and spoken English grammar and usage - Cambridge Dictionary

  20. What is the past tense of travel?

    Similar to the past simple form, the past participle form of 'travel' is 'traveled' in American English and 'travelled' in British English. It is used in perfect tenses to talk about actions that have a connection to the present or were completed at an unspecified time in the past. For example, 'I have traveled/travelled to over 10 countries.'.

  21. Conjugation of travel

    During the exercise you will be asked to translate the conjugated verb with the given tense and personal pronoun into english. Angel, Buenos Aires, Argentina: 'every day I am learning a new lesson. I use it to study English. It is a very good tool.' Someone who doesn't read books has no advantage over someone who can't read them. - Mark Twain

  22. Conjugaci贸n verbo travel

    Conjugaci贸n verbo travel en ingl茅s, ver modelos de conjugaci贸n ingl茅s, verbos irregulares. Definici贸n y traducci贸n en contexto de travel. Traducci贸n Context Corrector Sin贸nimos Conjugaci贸n. ... Conjugaci贸n verbo travel ingl茅s: present, past tense, past perfect, present perfect, future. ...

  23. Ukraine's defence lines stretched as Russian troops advance

    Ammunition has had to be rationed over the past few months. On average Russia's been able to fire 10 times as many artillery shells. The hope is the deficit will narrow with the arrival of more ...

  24. Eurovision braces for its most tense contest yet, as protesters and

    Ahead of the semi-final events, Jordan rightly predicted there would be booing during Golan's performance. "We could well see protests in the arena, we could see booing," Jordan said. "I ...

  25. Democrats' Split Over Israel Takes Center Stage in Tense Primary Debate

    A $237 Billion Budget: Hochul and New York City emerged as two of the winners from a budget process that blew past the April 1 deadline. Here's a look at how things went .

  26. Opinion: Putin's lightning assault jolts Europe awake

    CNN 鈥. It was a carefully choreographed show of force in Beijing Thursday as Russian President Vladimir Putin arrived for yet another meeting with his Chinese counterpart, Xi Jinping. They were ...