What does it take to be a Tour de France contender?

Relentless drive, unwavering resilience, exceptional fitness – all required just to make it to the startline of the Tour de France. What more, then, does it take to challenge for the win?

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Tadej Pogačar racing Jonas Vingegaard at the Tour de France

1. Unbreakable work ethic

2. world-beating watts per kilo, 3. oxygen-burning furnaces, 4. lionhearted beats, 5. jack sprat fat levels, 6. endless appetite, 7. brimming carb tanks, 8. solid sleep patterns, 9. a-head for heights, 10. can stand the heat, what makes pogačar so special.

  • How did Vingegaard and Remco win Grand Tours last year?

Chris Marshall-Bell

The Tour de France is an almighty undertaking. This year’s edition packs in 3,404km over 21 stages, with an accumulated elevation total in excess of 56,000 metres. Just getting selected for the start requires all the riders to be in peak physical condition, but winning the biggest race of all demands an even more finely turned body. The general classification (GC) contenders are arguably the fittest athletes on the entire planet – but what exactly does it take, in terms of talent and training, to get there? In other words, what makes them the best of the best?  

The basic description of a Tour de France winner – the last being Jonas Vingegaard ( Jumbo-Visma ) – won’t shock anyone: almost always European, typically aged between 24 and 34; usually with a height between 175 and 185cm (5ft 9in and 6ft 1in), and low body weight of between 60 and 66kg. But there have been exceptions: two-time champion Tadej Pogačar (UAE Team Emirates) was only 21 when he claimed his first title in 2020 – 98 years after the race’s oldest winner, 36-year-old Firmin Lambot, took the title in 1922. The race’s first ever winner in 1903, Maurice Garin, was a petite 162cm (5ft 4in), while 2012 winner Bradley Wiggins was 190cm (6ft 3in). On the scales, five-time winner Miguel Induráin was 80kg, some 28kg heavier than his Spanish compatriot Luis Ocaña who won in 1973. As for non-Europeans, there have been three: American Greg LeMond won in 1986, 1989 and 1990; Australian Cadel Evans won in 2011; and Colombian Egan Bernal became the first South American winner in 2019. 

There are clearly no strict physical parameters, at least not on the surface, so what do we know about their habits – their monk-like devotion to their single objective – and how they get their bodies ready for the biggest challenge in sport? 

The road to a Grand Tour starts all the way back in the dark, cold winter months, when riders log 30-hour training weeks of low-intensity rides, building aerobic efficiency and reinforcing the body’s ability to burn fuel as fat – to push hard while using as little energy as possible. As spring nears, more tempo, sub-threshold and threshold work are introduced, and the work becomes ever more tailored and specific. 

“There are no sessions specifically for GC riders, but what is most important for them is that they’re able to recover from big loads,” says Bora-Hansgrohe ’s head of performance, Dan Lorang. “GC riders will train in a three-to-one rhythm: three weeks of load, one week of recovery. These riders do a lot more climbing, and they train to reproduce high-intensity efforts after four to five hours.” Putting in hard efforts after many hours of steady riding is bread-and-butter for prospective Tour winners. “An example would be four hours of training at Zone 2 , finishing off with 30 minutes of threshold climbing to simulate a final climb,” adds Lorang. “GC guys also train on their time trial bikes two or three times a week.” To simulate Grand Tour demands, many GC riders train intensely before heading straight into a one-week stage race, or extend a heavy block of training to imitate three weeks of racing. Two weeks before the Tour, they begin their taper with more rest periods and less intense work. 

To think of cycling as solely a watts per kilogram game removes the romance and the panache, but time gaps are made in the mountains and in time trials thanks to a rider’s power output. Put simply, if a rider wants to win the Tour de France, they need to be able to maintain an exceptional power output over a sustained period of around 30 minutes after several hours of attritional, varied-intensity riding. Not just exceptional, but better than every other cyclist in the world.

The numbers are mind-boggling. When Jonas Vingegaard crushed the field on Stage 11 to win atop the Col du Granon (11.3km at 9.2% gradient) at last year’s Tour, he averaged 6.1W/kg for 35 minutes 52 seconds. No one has gone faster. Six days later, on Stage 17, Brandon McNulty (UAE Team Emirates) climbed the Col d’ Azet (8.34km, 7.9%) averaging 6.58W/kg for a time of 22:24. Again, it was the fastest time ever recorded.

Jump on Zwift and try riding at 6.5W/kg – then imagine sustaining it for 20 minutes. You’ll get a taste for just how hard GC riders are able to push. Over shorter periods of around 10 minutes, some riders, including former Tour winner Chris Froome ( Israel-Premier Tech ), have registered eye-popping figures of around 7.5W/kg. 

During a normal stage before any attacks go off, riders generally pedal along at 220 to 250 watts. That’s a stout effort for most of us amateurs, but bear in mind that Tadej Pogačar’s functional threshold power (FTP) – the highest power he can sustain for one hour – is as high as 415 watts. 

VO2max – very simply put – is the maximum rate at which the body can use oxygen during exercise, so it is used to measure an individual’s aerobic capacity. Measured in millilitres of oxygen per kilogram per minute, the relative figure in an averagely fit 30-year-old male is usually in the upper 40s. It can be improved substantially with training. 

What about VO2max in those who win the yellow jersey? Way, way higher. When Chris Froome was dominating Tours, he could intake 88.2ml/kg/min. Remarkably, that’s not the best. American Greg LeMond, winner of the Tour on three occasions, had a reported VO2max of 92. If your VO2max isn’t in the 70s, at least, you’re probably not going to the Tour.

During the 2020 Tour de France, the WorldTour team now known as EF Education-EasyPost released data on each of their riders’ heart rates and heart rate variability . Among their roster of eight, the average resting heart rate was 42bpm before the race began. During the race, this rose to 51bpm ahead of the first rest day, but after a day off it dropped to 40bpm, highlighting the power of recovery.

Chris Froome had a reported resting heart rate of 29bpm, and Miguel Induráin’s was claimed to be even lower, at 28bpm – about half the speed of a typical adult’s heart rate. A pro rider’s cardiovascular system is so efficient that this plodding heart rate is fast enough, at rest, to supply their body with all the blood and oxygen it needs. 

On intense days in the mountains, with full-throttle racing, GC riders spend as much as 50% of their day performing in the upper heart rate zones, at 80-90% of their maximum heart rate.

You only need to look at a Tour de France rider to know that they aren’t carrying so much as a twig’s worth of spare timber. A ‘normal’ man usually has body fat of between 18 and 24% – but for our Grand Tour cyclists, determined not just to make it over the mountains but to triumph up them, their body fat needs to be as low as possible, around 5-6%.

There is a danger, however, in going too low. The body needs between 3% and 5% of body fat to protect organs and to regular body temperature, so while there have been some reported cases of riders competing with less than 5% of body fat, that is the lowest they can go without jeopardising their health.

It’s become a cycling press cliche to quantify a Tour de France rider’s daily calorie intake by showing the equivalent number of McDonald’s Big Macs. Oh go on, then: it’s 12 to 18 Big Macs, depending on the stage. 

A Tour rider shovels anywhere between 6,000 and 9,000kcal of food down them per 24 hours during a stage race. While racing, up to six hours per stage, they burn around 1,000kcal per hour. Unsurprisingly, riders are prone to losing weight and shedding fat during a three-week race, since consuming enough – in food and carb-laden drinks – isn’t easy.

Dropping a little weight is sometimes in the plan: at the 2018 Giro, Chris Froome only ate 2,500 calories on stage 11 as he was attempting to drop to his ideal weight of 68.5kg in time for his famous late-race assault that secured him the maglia rosa. 

Riding relentlessly hard for three weeks is only possible to endlessly consuming huge amounts of carbohydrate – before and during each stage. Iñigo San Millán is UAE-Team Emirates’ head of performance: “A rider needs to absorb 500 grams of glycogen [stored carbohydrate] before the race starts,” he says. “They should be completely full before the race, and empty afterwards.”

Filling up the proverbial tank relies on mammoth breakfasts containing 200g carbs – equivalent to about 13 slices of bread – with similarly gut-busting amounts for dinner once the day is done. During the race they replenish their energy stores with about 100g carbs per hour, in various forms including energy gels , carb drinks and rice cakes. Over the course of a day, a rider imbibes a massive carb load of about 1,200g – compared to about 300g in a normal diet.

“ Sleep is the most important recovery resource for people in general, but especially for cyclists who use their bodies so intensively,” says Jumbo-Visma’s head of performance, Mathieu Heijboer. “The enormous effort during a race damages the body… [and] physical recovery is therefore the most important thing. Deep sleep is essential. If it is disturbed, it is at the expense of recovery, which slows down reaction times, causes memory problems and has a negative effect on motor coordination.”

Getting a good amount of shut-eye, night after night, is essential for someone who wants to win the world’s biggest race. Some teams carry their own mattresses and bedding, such is the emphasis on good sleep. On average, riders in a Grand Tour sleep for eight hours, with most going to bed at 11.30pm and waking up at 8am. If that sounds late, it’s because stages don’t start until around 1pm, and dinner is often not served until 9pm.

Several times a season, riders go on altitude camp to increase their blood haemoglobin levels – the component of blood that carries oxygen and gives blood its red colour. Having more haemoglobin allows riders not only to perform better at higher elevations but to use oxygen more efficiently at sea level too.

Bora-Hansgrohe’s Dan Lorang: “For a rider wanting to win a Grand Tour, I would recommend that they spend two 18-day periods at altitude, and then one block of 15 days before the Grand Tour.” This approach is mirrored across the WorldTour. The final altitude block has to finish as close as possible to the start of the race, as half of the haemoglobin increase disappears after a week, and returns to normal after a fortnight. If the altitude camp is too early, “the effect evaporates,” according to Professor Lars Nybo of the University of Copenhagen. “High-altitude camps conducted in the winter or pre-season will almost certainly have no direct effect on performance several months later.”

Temperatures on Stage 15 of last year’s Tour de France got close to 40ºC, putting riders under even greater strain. As summer temperatures climb ever higher, Ineos Grenadiers have begun to perfect cooling strategies, having realised that excessive heat can have a direct effect on a rider’s power output. “A one degree increase in core temperature results in a 1% drop in gross efficiency, which means about a 10-12 change in watts,” says Dan Bigham, Ineos’ performance engineer.

Ice vests have become a common sight – for good reason. Studies have shown that a rider’s performance can decline by as much as 16% when not acclimatised to hot conditions . Given at least two weeks getting used to the weather they’ll be racing in, these losses can be reduced to as little as 2%. 

Although Tadej Pogačar isn’t going into this year’s Tour as the defending champion, it is widely accepted that the Slovenian is the greatest bike rider on the planet. Some believe he may even surpass the winning feats of Eddy Merckx . But what makes him so good?

“First things first, he has a massive motor,” says Allan Peiper, his former DS, “and a recuperative power that I’ve never seen before. It’s natural, for sure. There are very few guys who can go into a Grand Tour and get better and keep the motor running, but Tadej’s one of them.

“I’ve been on [UAE-Team Emirates] training camps and riders have ridden themselves into the ground trying to keep up with him and it hasn’t been beneficial for them.”

It’s not just the 24-year-old’s exceptional cardiovascular system. “The other defining thing about Tadej is his approach and outlook on life: he’s always got a positive mindset,” Peiper adds. “He has a way of putting everything into perspective, and that ability to do that when you’re in the hurt box in a Grand Tour keeps you afloat.” 

“You can have all these great physical characteristics, but if you’re weighed down by the mental side or overpowered by stress or the fear of failure, it’ll bring you down. Tadej has the physical talent as well as this unbelievable mental side. I have no idea what motivates this kid, but it’s definitely not his ego or by having a chip on his shoulder.”

First-time winners: How did Vingegaard and Remco win Grand Tours last year?

All of last year’s Grand Tours were won by riders who had never before won a three-week race: Jai Hindley in the Giro d'Italia ; Jonas Vingegaard in the Tour de France; and Remco Evenepoel in the Vuelta a España .

The latter’s coach, Koen Pelgrim, summarises how the current world champion ensured he was in peak condition to win the Spanish race. “He needed a really good base to be able to work on that to optimise his shape. A few months before we were focusing on shorter work, and then closer to the Vuelta it was about specific and longer efforts so that he could handle multiple consecutive days and multiple efforts. 

“The Vuelta had a lot of steep ascents, so he did a lot of efforts on steeper climbs, and he also trained in the middle of the day in Spain so that he was used to the heat. When it’s warm and steep, you suffer more, and we wanted him to be totally acclimatised to that.”

As for 26-year-old Vingegaard, his coach Tim Heemskerk faced a dilemma after the Dane finished second at the Critérium du Dauphiné. “He was in really great shape and I had a choice to make: do I let him have more recovery days or not?” he reflects. “We had three weeks until the Tour, we couldn’t let him get ill, and we couldn’t let him overdo it. This is the time when a coach really has to analyse and manage the situation.

“Getting someone into the best possible shape requires a lot of hard work from the rider, their coaches, the nutritionist and focusing on planning everything correctly. Optimising recovery is really essential.”

This full version of this article was published in the print edition of Cycling Weekly.  Subscribe online  and get the magazine delivered direct to your door every week. 

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A freelance sports journalist and podcaster, you'll mostly find Chris's byline attached to news scoops, profile interviews and feature writing across a variety of different publications. He has been writing regularly for Cycling Weekly since 2013.

Previously a ski, hiking and cycling guide in a number of places, but mostly in the Canadian Rockies and Spanish Pyrenees, he almost certainly holds the record for the most number of interviews conducted from snowy mountains.

He lives in Valencia, Spain.

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Tour de France – The Rules Explained

Tour de France – The Rules Explained

Some teams will focus on the general classification Yellow Jersey, whereas others will focus on winning sprints for The Green or the King of the Mountains Spotted Jersey. There are many rules, both spoken and unspoken, as teams stand to gain a lot from cooperation and respect. Here is what you need to know to enjoy watching Le Tour.

Keep the leaders safe

The start of Le Tour is always an edgy affair as teams compete to establish themselves at the head of the peloton. Crashes and injuries are a real risk, so team leaders need to be protected by their domestiques who effectively muscle everyone else away.

in tour de france what is gc

The irony is, the more the teams muscle each other away, the greater the risk of crashes in the peloton. The safest place to be is the front, and everyone is fighting to be there. This Catch 22 situation is almost impossible to mitigate through any official rules, but it’s exciting to watch.

The Yellow Jersey

Winning the General Classification (GC) means you get to wear The Maillot Jaune, aka The Yellow Jersey. To win the GC the leader of a race team must complete all the stages with the lowest overall time.

This means that a GC contender should be a solid all-rounder, equally at home on the mountains as they are in time-trial stages. It can become confusing when you consider a rider could win the GC without winning any individual stage.

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Think of it like this – Mark Cavendish may win every flat stage suited to a sprinter, but will probably finish mountain stages at least 20 minutes behind the likes of Nairo Quintana, whereas Quintana will finish a sprint stage within 3 minutes of Cavendish.

Breaks and stage wins

Regardless of who wins the overall Yellow Jersey, an individual stage win on Le Tour is always a special event, and smaller teams will often target one or two specific stages out of the Tour simply to get on the podium. Breaks are the coolest way to achieve that, but not the easiest.

Early on in a stage you may see a small group of riders attempt a break. Usually these are lower order riders with nothing to lose – they keep their sponsors happy by grabbing TV coverage, and most of the time they’re easily caught by the peloton that uses energy much more efficiently.

Royal Breaks

That doesn’t mean that Yellow and Green Jersey contenders can’t have some fun going for a break, but they’re only likely to do it when conditions go in their favour – and in 2016 that’s exactly what Froome and Sagan exploited.

Stage 11 of Le Tour was plagued with crosswinds, so the peloton had been doing their best to speed through it. Sagan found himself at the front with Thomas, Bodnar, and Froome. The Peloton was battered and bruised from minor crashes down the coastal route from Carcasonne, so when Sagan attacked, few cyclists felt confident enough to respond.

in tour de france what is gc

Froome leapt on Sagan’s wheel, and Bodnar and Thomas read the situation and realised a fully-fledged Royal Break was on the cards, with both the Yellow and Green Jerseys of Froome and Sagan committed to escaping the peloton. Sagan won the stage, and Froome put a significant dent into his rivals for the Yellow Jersey, finishing the stage in 2nd place.

King of the Mountains

Points are given at the top of climbs for suitably impressive performance, so specialist climbers have an advantage. Climbs are categorised from 1 to 4, with 1 being the steepest. The numbers loosely correspond to the gears of a car – so to drive up a Cat 1 climb you’d need to stick your car in first gear.

Race planners may give big points at the top of a Cat 3 climb if it’s deemed long enough to pose the same challenge as a shorter Cat 1 climb. I should add that there is one climb more difficult than a Cat 1 climb – the Hors Catégorie (HC). An HC climb is beyond categorisation and originally described a climb so severe a car couldn’t pass.

Getting points for the Green Jersey

Points can be given for winning sprints at various parts of a stage, often early on to encourage teams to either up the tempo in the peloton or break early in the hopes the break may succeed.

More points are given to the sprint at the end of the stage, and this encourages teams with specialist sprinters like Sagan, Greipel, Kittel, or Cavendish to stay together. This leads to a similar paradox of teams trying to dominate the front of the peloton to give their team leader a clear run at the finish line.

in tour de france what is gc

The classic race rule applies – the rider with the racing line may stick to it knowing that any competing cyclist will yield their line when they realise they have the disadvantage. Naturally, this doesn’t always work in the heat of the moment and spectacular crashes are a real risk in bunch sprints.

in tour de france what is gc

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Top cycling terms you need to watch the Tour de France

Top cycling terms you need to watch the Tour de France

I love to ride bikes. I commute, mountain bike, join weekly group rides and even track my rides with an app to push myself to be faster. Most of my friends and family would describe me as an “avid cyclist,” but when it comes to understanding bike racing… that’s a different story.

Yellow jersey, polka-dot jersey, the chase, the peloton, a pace line – honestly, it’s enough to make my head spin. So, in preparation for this year’s Tour de France, I thought I’d take a moment to educated myself before the race.

These are the top terms you need to know to watch (and enjoy!) the Tour de France and understand what those guys in colorful spandex are doing out there.

The jerseys

Yellow – overall leader

Also known as the maillot jaune , the yellow jersey is worn by the rider who is the General Classification (GC) leader, riding the race in the least amount of time.

Green – points leader

The green jersey, or maillot vert, is worn by the rider that has accrued the most points during the race. Points are awarded based on the positions that riders finish each stage as well as their performance during intermediate sprints within stages.

Polka-dot – King of the Mountains

Worn by the rider that has the had the best finishes and earned the most points in the mountain stages of the race. The more difficult the climb, the more points can be won.

Rider roles

A light rider who specializes in hilly or mountainous racing.

A powerful rider who can perform high-velocity burst finishes.

Time trialist

A strong endurance rider who excels at maintaining a high speed over a long period of time to win stage sprints or time trials.

Road captain

An experienced rider in charge of executing the team strategy and ensuring each rider goes to the right place at the right time.

Protected rider

The rider who is favored by the team for either the day’s stage or the overall. This may be a climber on a mountain stage, a sprinter on the flats or the GC contender.

A teammate who helps the protected rider, whether by sheltering them from the wind, physically buffering them from other riders or bringing more water from the team car.

Rider positioning

Peloton/Bunch

The main group of racers.

When riders arrange themselves in a single or double line to gain aerodynamic shelter from the rider in front of them. Riders will then rotate to the front of the line, breaking wind for their teammates.

When one or more riders escape from the peloton and rides ahead of the main bunch.

Riders or groups of riders who are trying to catch up with the break but are stuck between the break and the peloton.

The group of riders off the back of the peloton. During a mountain stage, this is usually the sprinters or heavier riders who can’t match the pace of the light climbers.

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Tour de France 2023: Daily stage results and general classification standings

The latest updates on the winners of each stage and the top contenders for the coveted yellow jersey in the 110th edition of the Tour de France, taking place from 1 to 23 July.

Jonas Vingegaard celebrates victory in the 2023 Tour de France

Jonas Vingegaard claimed back-to-back Tour de France titles beating main rival Tadej Pogacar into second place in a repeat of the 2022 result.

Jordi Meeus (Bora-Hansgrohe) produced the best result of his career, winning the final stage on his Le Tour debut. He triumphed in a photo finish beating Jasper Philipsen and Dylan Groenewegen into second and third place, respectively.

The 2023 Tour de France , the second and most prestigious Grand Tour of the year in the men’s road cycling season , started in Bilbao on 1 July.

Check out the daily results and the general classification standings after each stage right here.

  • Tour de France 2023 preview: Full schedule and how to watch live

Sunday July 23: Stage 21 - Saint-Quentin-en-Yvelines - Paris Champs-Élysées, 115.1 km

The final stage of the 2023 Tour de France came to a climactic end with Belgium’s Jordi Meeus claiming a surprise victory in a sprint for the line on the Champs-Élysées in Paris.

Meeus won by the narrowest of margins in a photo finish edging Jasper Philipsen (Alpecin Deceuninck) and Dylan Groenewegen (Team Jayco Alula) into second and third place, respectively.

Meeus celebrated an emphatic end to his debut while Denmark’s Jonas Vingegaard claimed a second consecutive Tour de France title. Vingegaard finished seven minutes, and 29 seconds ahead of Slovenia's Tadej Pogacar with Adam Yates of Great Britain taking third overall.

2023 Tour de France: Stage 21 Results - Sunday 23 July

Saint-quentin-en-yvelines - paris champs-élysées, 115.1 km.

  • Jordi Meeus (BEL, BORA-hansgrohe) 2h 56’13’’
  • Jasper Philipsen (BEL, Alpecin-Deceuninck) +0"
  • Dylan Groenewegen (NED, Team Jayco-AIUla) +0"
  • Mads Pedersen (DEN, LidI-Trek) +0"
  • Cees Bol (NED, Astana Qazaqstan Team) +0"
  • Biniam Girmay (ER, Intermarché-Circus-Wanty) +0"
  • Bryan Coquard (Cofidis) +0"
  • Søren Wærenskjold (NOR, Uno-X Pro Cycling Team) +0"
  • Corbin Strong (NZ, Israel-Premier Tech) +0"
  • Luca Mozzato (ITA, Arkéa-Samsic) +0"

2023 Tour de France: General Classification standings after Stage 21

  • Jonas Vingegaard (DEN, Jumbo-Visma) 82h 05'42"
  • Tadej Pogacar (SLO, UAE Team Emirates) +7:29"
  • Adam Yates (GBR, UAE Team Emirates) +10:56"
  • Simon Yates (GBR, Team Jayco AlUla) +12:23"
  • Carlos Rodriguez Cano (ESP, Ineos Grenadiers) +13:17"
  • Pello Bilbao (ESP, Bahrain - Victorious) +13:27"
  • Jai Hindley (AUS, BORA - hansgrohe) +14:44"
  • Felix Gall (AUT, AG2R Citroën Team) +16:09"
  • David Gaudu (FRA, Groupama) +23:08"
  • Guillaume Martin (FRA, Cofidis) +26:30"

Saturday 22 July: Stage 20 - Belfort - Le Markstein Fellering, medium mountains, 133.5 km

Despite failing to regain the yellow jersey he won in 2020 and 2021, Tadej Pogacar  ended his Tour de France on a high note.

In his last Tour de France mountain stage before retirement, home favourite Thibaut Pinot went on a solo attack to the delight of the French fans.

But the climbing specialist was unable to stay in front with first Tom Pidcock and Warren Barguil catching him before Pogacar made his bid to bridge the gap.

Overall race leader Jonas Vingegaard covered the move with Felix Gall , and the three forged clear on the closing Col du Platzerwase climb.

As things became tactical at the front, the Yates brothers - Adam and Simon - made it a lead group of five.

Vingegaard made his bid for the stage win with 250m to go, but Pogacar was too strong this time with the Dane losing second to Gall on the line.

Pinot received a hero's welcome as he crossed the line in seventh place.

2023 Tour de France: Stage 20 Results - Saturday 22 July

Belfort - le markstein fellering, medium mountains, 133.5 km.

  • Tadej Pogacar (SLO, UAE Team Emirates) 3h 27'18"
  • Felix Gall (AUT, AG2R Citroën Team) +0"
  • Jonas Vingegaard (DEN, Jumbo-Visma) +0"
  • Simon Yates (GBR, Team Jayco AlUla) +0"
  • Adam Yates (GBR, UAE Team Emirates) +7"
  • Warren Barguil (FRA, Team Arkéa Samsic) +33"
  • Thibaut Pinot (FRA, Groupama - FDJ) +33"
  • Pello Bilbao (ESP, Bahrain - Victorious) +33"
  • Tobias Halland Johannessen (NOR, Uno-X Pro Cycling Team) +50"
  • Rafał Majka (POL, UAE Team Emirates) +50"

2023 Tour de France: General Classification standings after Stage 20

  • Jonas Vingegaard (DEN, Jumbo-Visma) 79h 16'38"
  • Carlos Rodriguez Cano (ESP, Ineos Grenadiers) +12:57"

Friday 21 July: Stage 19 - Moirans-en-Montagne - Poligny, hilly, 172.8 km

Matej Mohoric denied Kasper Asgreen a second consecutive win at the 2023 Tour de France after a thrilling photo-finish sprint in Poligny.

The two riders emerged from a three-man breakaway and outsprinted Australia's Ben O'Connor, with Mohoric narrowly beating Asgreen to the finish line.

Throughout the 172.8km stage, there were numerous fragmented attacks across the field, leading to an intense pursuit among different breakaway groups in the final 20km.

Overall leader Jonas Vingegaard finished with the main peloton and kept his seven-and-a-half-minute lead on Tadej Pogacar in the general classification (GC) with just two stages remaining

2023 Tour de France: Stage 19 Results - Friday 21 July

Moirans-en-montagne - poligny, hilly, 172.8km.

  • Matej Mohoric (SLO, Bahrain-Victorious) 3h 31'02"
  • Kasper Asgreen (DEN, Soudal - Quick Step) +0"
  • Ben O'Connor (AUS, AG2R Citroen Team) +4"
  • Jasper Philipsen (BEL, Alpecin-Deceuninck) +39"
  • Mads Pedersen (DEN, Lidl - Trek) +39"
  • Christophe Laporte (FRA, Jumbo-Visma) +39"
  • Luka Mezgec (SLO, Team Jayco AlUla) +39"
  • Alberto Bettiol (ITA, EF Education-EasyPost) +39"
  • Matteo Trentin (ITA, UAE Team Emirates) +39"
  • Thomas Pidcock (GBR, INEOS Grenadiers) +39"

2023 Tour de France: General Classification standings after Stage 19

  • Jonas Vingegaard (DEN, Jumbo-Visma) 75h 49'24"
  • Tadej Pogacar (SLO, UAE Team Emirates) +7:35"
  • Adam Yates (GBR, UAE Team Emirates) +10:45"
  • Carlos Rodriguez Cano (ESP, Ineos Grenadiers) +12:01"
  • Simon Yates (GBR, Team Jayco AlUla) +12:19"
  • Pello Bilbao (ESP, Bahrain - Victorious) +12:50"
  • Jai Hindley (AUS, BORA - hansgrohe) +13:50"
  • Felix Gall (AUT, AG2R Citroën Team) +16:11"
  • Sepp Kuss (USA, Jumbo-Visma) +16:49"
  • David Gaudu (FRA, Groupama) +17:57"

Matej Mohoric crosses the finish line to win stage 19 at the 2023 Tour de France

Cycling - Tour de France - Stage 19 - Moirans-En-Montagne to Poligny - France - July 21, 2023 Team Bahrain Victorious' Matej Mohoric crosses the finish line to win stage 19

Thursday 20 July: Stage 18 - Moûtiers - Bourg-en-Bresse, flat, 184.9 km

Kasper Asgreen surprised the sprinters and claimed stage 18 of the Tour de France after a long day in the breakaway.

Following several mountain stages in the Alps, a flatter stage awaited the peloton on Thursday. A breakaway of four rider with Kasper Asgreen , Jonas Abrahamsen , Victor Campenaerts, and later Pascal Eenkhoorn managed to just stay clear of the sprinters that were breathing down their necks on the finish line.

Asgreen of Denmark proved to be the fastest of the riders in the breakaway, and he secured his team Soudal Quick Step their first stage win of this year’s Tour de France.

Jonas VIngegaard held on to the leader's yellow jersey and maintains his 7:35 advantage to Tadej Pogacar .

2023 Tour de France: Stage 18 Results - Thursday 20 July

Moûtiers to bourg-en-bresse, flat, 184.9 km.

  • Kasper Asgreen (DEN, Soudal - Quick Step) 4h 06'48"
  • Pascal Eenkhoorn (NED, Lotto Dstny) +0"
  • Jonas Abrahamsen (NOR, Uno-X Pro Cycling Team) +0"
  • Mads Pedersen (DEN, Lidl - Trek) +0"
  • Jordi Meeus (BEL, BORA - hansgrohe) +0"
  • Matteo Trentin (ITA, UAE Team Emirates) +0"
  • Christophe Laporte (FRA, Jumbo-Visma) +0"
  • Luca Mozzato (ITA, Team Arkéa Samsic) +0"

2023 Tour de France: General Classification standings after Stage 18

  • Jonas Vingegaard (DEN, Jumbo-Visma) 67h 57'51"

Kasper Asgreen claimed stage 18 of the Tour de France 2023 after a long day in the breakaway.

Cycling - Tour de France - Stage 18 - Moutiers to Bourg-En-Bresse - France - July 20, 2023 Soudal–Quick-Step's Kasper Asgreen celebrates as he crosses the finish line to win stage 18 REUTERS/Stephane Mahe

Wednesday 19 July: Stage 17 - Saint-Gervais Mont-Blanc - Courchevel, high mountains, 165.7 km

Felix Gall claimed a dramatic queen stage of the Tour de France 2023, where Jonas Vingegaard cracked Tadej Pogacar to gain more than five and a half minutes on the Slovenian. The Dane is now seven minutes and 35 seconds clear in the overall lead, and looks very likely to win his second consecutive Tour de France.

The stage winner Gall attacked his breakaway companions with six kilometres remaining of the final climb Col de la Loze. Simon Yates tried to chase down Gall, but the AG2R Citroën Team rider managed to maintain a small gap to the Brit, and he crossed the finish line solo.

The general classification leader Vingegaard dropped Pogacar 7.5 kilometres from the summit of Col de la Loze, and while the Slovenian tried to limit his losses, last year’s winner did what he could to gain as much time as possible. His lead seems unassailable with four stages remaining.

2023 Tour de France: Stage 17 Results - Wednesday 19 July

Saint-gervais mont-blanc to courchevel, high mountains, 165.7 km.

  • Felix Gall (AUT, AG2R Citroën Team) 4h 49'08"
  • Simon Yates (GBR, Team Jayco AlUla) +34"
  • Pello Bilbao (ESP, Bahrain - Victorious) +1:38"
  • Jonas Vingegaard (DEN, Jumbo-Visma) +1:52"
  • David Gaudu (FRA, Groupama - FDJ) +2:09"
  • Tobias Halland Johannessen (NOR, Uno-X Pro Cycling Team) +2:39"
  • Chris Harper (AUS, Team Jayco AlUla) +2:50"
  • Rafał Majka (POL, UAE Team Emirates) +3:43"
  • Adam Yates (GBR, UAE Team Emirates) +3:43"
  • Wilco Kelderman (NED, Jumbo-Visma) +3:49"

2023 Tour de France: General Classification standings after Stage 17

Felix Gall claimed the biggest victory of his career, as he crossed the finish line first on the queen stage of the Tour de France 2023.

Cycling - Tour de France - Stage 17 - Saint-Gervais Mont Blanc to Courchevel - France - July 19, 2023 AG2R Citroen Team's Felix Gall celebrates as he crosses the finish line to win stage 17 REUTERS/Stephane Mahe

Tuesday 18 July: Stage 16 - Passy - Combloux, individual time trial, 22.4 km

Jonas Vingegaard took a big step toward reclaiming his Tour de France title, as the Danish rider triumphed on this year’s lone time trial.

The yellow jersey wearer gained an astonishing one minute and 38 seconds to his biggest rival Tadej Pogacar , who finished second on the stage.

Before Wednesday’s queen stage, the Dane now has an advantage of 1:48 to his Slovenian rival.

2023 Tour de France: Stage 16 Results - Tuesday 18 July

Passy to combloux, individual time trial, 22.4 km.

  • Jonas Vingegaard (DEN, Jumbo-Visma) 32:26
  • Tadej Pogacar (SLO, UAE Team Emirates) +1:38"
  • Wout van Aert (BEL, Jumbo-Visma) +2:51"
  • Pello Bilbao (ESP, Bahrain - Victorious) +2:55"
  • Simon Yates (GBR, Team Jayco AlUla) +2:58"
  • Rémi Cavagna (FRA, Soudal - Quick Step )+3:06"
  • Adam Yates (GBR, UAE Team Emirates) +3:12"
  • Mattias Skjelmose (DEN, Lidl - Trek) +3:21"
  • Mads Pedersen (DEN Lidl - Trek) +3:31"
  • David Gaudu (FRA, Groupama - FDJ) +3:31

2023 Tour de France: General Classification standings after Stage 16

  • Jonas Vingegaard (DEN, Jumbo-Visma) 63h 06'53"
  • Tadej Pogacar (SLO, UAE Team Emirates) +1:48"
  • Adam Yates (GBR, UAE Team Emirates) +8:52"
  • Carlos Rodriguez Cano (ESP, Ineos Grenadiers) +8:57"
  • Jai Hindley (AUS, BORA - hansgrohe) +11:15"
  • Sepp Kuss (USA, Jumbo-Visma) +12:56"
  • Pello Bilbao (ESP, Bahrain - Victorious) +13:06"
  • Simon Yates (GBR, Team Jayco AlUla) +13:46"
  • David Gaudu (FRA, Groupama) +17:38"
  • Felix Gall (AUT, AG2R Citroën Team) +18:19"

Jonas Vingegaard won the lone time trial of the Tour de France 2023 on stage 16.

Cycling - Tour de France - Stage 16 - Passy to Combloux - France - July 18, 2023 Team Jumbo–Visma's Jonas Vingegaard wearing the yellow jersey crosses the finish line after stage 16 REUTERS/Benoit Tessier

Sunday 16 July: Stage 15 - Les Gets les Portes du Soleil - Saint-Gervais Mont-Blanc, mountain stage, 179 km

Wout Poels took the first Tour de France stage win of his career, as he crossed the finish line alone at Saint-Gervais Mont-Blanc on stage 15.

The 2016 Liège-Bastogne-Liège winner dropped his breakaway companions Wout van Aert and Marc Soler 11 kilometres from the finish and managed to maintain his advantage.

Jonas Vingegaard and Tadej Pogacar fought another alpine duel, but neither rider could get the better of the other, and they crossed the finish line together.

The yellow leader’s jersey therefore remains with Vingegaard. His advantage to Tadej Pogacar is 10 seconds.

2023 Tour de France: Stage 15 Results - Sunday 16 July

Les gets les portes du soleil to saint-gervais mont-blanc, mountain stage, 179 km.

  • Wout Poels (NED, Bahrain - Victorious) 4:40:45
  • Wout van Aert (BEL, Jumbo-Visma) +2:08"
  • Mathieu Burgaudeau (FRA, TotalEnergies) +3:00"
  • Lawson Craddock (USA, Team Jayco AlUla) +3:10"
  • Mikel Landa (ESP, Bahrain - Victorious) +3:14"
  • Thibaut Pinot (FRA, Groupama - FDJ) +3:14"
  • Guillaume Martin (FRA, Cofidis) +3:32"
  • Mattias Skjelmose (DEN, Lidl - Trek) +3:43"
  • Simon Guglielmi (FRA, Team Arkéa Samsic) +3:59"
  • Warren Barguil (FRA, Team Arkéa Samsic) +4:20

2023 Tour de France: General Classification standings after Stage 15

  • Jonas Vingegaard (DEN, Jumbo-Visma) 62h 34'17"
  • Tadej Pogacar (SLO, UAE Team Emirates) +10"
  • Carlos Rodriguez Cano (ESP, Ineos Grenadiers) +5:21"
  • Adam Yates (GBR, UAE Team Emirates) +5:40"
  • Jai Hindley (AUS, BORA - hansgrohe) +6:38"
  • Sepp Kuss (USA, Jumbo-Visma) +9:16"
  • Pello Bilbao (ESP, Bahrain - Victorious) +10:11"
  • Simon Yates (GBR, Team Jayco AlUla) +10:48"
  • David Gaudu (FRA, Groupama) +14:07"
  • Guillaume Martin (FRA, Cofidis) +14:18"

Wout Poels claimed the first Tour de France stage win of his career.

Cycling - Tour de France - Stage 15 - Les Gets Les Portes Du Soleil to Saint-Gervais Mont-Blanc - France - July 16, 2023 Team Bahrain Victorious' Wout Poels celebrates as he crosses the finish line to win stage 15 REUTERS/Stephane Mahe

Saturday 15 July: Stage 14 - Annemasse - Morzine Les Portes du Soleil, mountain stage, 151.8 km

Carlos Rodriguez claimed the biggest victory of his career, marking the second consecutive win for his team INEOS Grenadiers, on stage 14 of the 2023 Tour de France after crossing the finish line alone in Morzine.

The 22-year-old Spaniard took advantage of the mind games between Jonas Vingegaard and Tadej Pogacar, who were the strongest riders during the ascent on the Col de Joux de Plan.

The Slovenian secured second place, beating his Danish rival, but now trails Vingegaard, who picked up an extra bonus second, by 10 seconds.

2023 Tour de France: Stage 14 Results - Saturday 15 July

Annemasse - morzine les portes du soleil, mountain stage, 151.8 km.

  • Carlos Rodriguez Cano (ESP, Ineos Grenadiers) 3:58:45
  • Tadej Pogacar (SLO, UAE Team Emirates) +5"
  • Jonas Vingegaard (DEN, Jumbo-Visma) +5"
  • Adam Yates (GBR, UAE Team Emirates) +10"
  • Sepp Kuss (USA, Jumbo-Visma) +57"
  • Jai Hindley (AUS, Bora-Hansgrohe) +1:46"
  • Felix Gall (AUT, AG2R Citroën Team) +1:46"
  • Pello Bilbao (ESP, Bahrain - Victorious) +3'19"
  • Simon Yates (GBR, Team Jayco AlUla) +3'21"
  • Guillaume Martin (FRA, Cofidis) +5'57"

2023 Tour de France: General Classification standings after Stage 12

  • Jonas Vingegaard (DEN, Jumbo-Visma) 46h 34'27"
  • Carlos Rodriguez Cano (ESP, Ineos Grenadiers) +4:43"
  • Jai Hindley (AUS, BORA - hansgrohe) +4:44"
  • Adam Yates (GBR, UAE Team Emirates) +5:20"
  • Sepp Kuss (USA, Jumbo-Visma) +8:15"
  • Simon Yates (GBR, Team Jayco AlUla) +8:32"
  • Pello Bilbao (ESP, Bahrain - Victorious) +8:51"
  • Felix Gall (AUT, AG2R Citroën Team) +12:26"
  • David Gaudu (FRA, Groupama) +12:56"

Carlos Rodriguez celebrates as he crosses the finish line in Morzine Les Portes Du Soleil to win stage 14 at the 2023 Tour de France

Cycling - Tour de France - Stage 14 - Annemasse to Morzine Les Portes Du Soleil - France - July 15, 2023 Ineos Grenadiers' Carlos Rodriguez celebrates as he crosses the finish line to win stage 14

Friday 14 July: Stage 13 - Châtillon-sur-Chalaronne - Grand Colombier, mountain stage, 137.8 km

Michael Kwiatkowski of INEOS Grenadiers secured a remarkable solo victory on stage 13 of the 2023 Tour de France, conquering the iconic Grand Colombier.

The Polish rider made a decisive move with 11km to go annd successfully maintained his lead over the pursuing riders, securing his third career stage win at La Grande Boucle.

Tadej Pogacar launched a late but blistering attack to finish third and narrow the gap to overall leader Jonas Vingegaard , with the Danish rider now leading by just nine seconds.

2023 Tour de France: Stage 13 Results - Friday 14 July

Châtillon-sur-chalaronne - grand colombier, mountain stage, 137.8 km.

  • Michal Kwiatkowski (POL, INEOS Grenadiers) 3:17:33
  • Maxim Van Gils (BEL, Lotto Dstny) +47"
  • Tadej Pogacar (SLO, UAE Team Emirates) +50"
  • Jonas Vingegaard (DEN, Jumbo-Visma) +54"
  • Thomas Pidcock (GBR, INEOS Grenadiers) 1'03"
  • Jai Hindley (AUS, Bora-Hansgrohe) 1'05"
  • James Shaw (GBR, EF Education-EasyPost) 1'05"
  • Harold Tejada (COL, Astana Qazaqstan Team) 1:05"
  • Simon Yates (GBR, Team Jayco AlUla) 1'14"
  • Adam Yates (GBR, UAE Team Emirates) 1'18"
  • Tadej Pogacar (SLO, UAE Team Emirates) +9"
  • Jai Hindley (AUS, Bora-Hansgrohe) +2:51"
  • Carlos Rodriguez Cano (ESP, Ineos Grenadiers) +4:22"
  • Adam Yates (GBR, UAE Team Emirates) +5:03"
  • Simon Yates (GBR, Team Jayco AlUla) +5:04"
  • Pello Bilbao (ESP, Bahrain - Victorious) +5:25"
  • Tom Pidcock (GBR, INEOS Grenadiers) +5:35"
  • David Gaudu (FRA, Groupama) +6:52"
  • Sepp Kuss (USA, Jumbo-Visma) +7:11"

Michal Kwiatkowski celebrates win on stage 13 of the 2023 Tour de France

Cycling - Tour de France - Stage 13 - Chatillon-Sur-Chalaronne to Grand Colombier - France - July 14, 2023 Ineos Grenadiers' Michal Kwiatkowski celebrates as he crosses the finish line to win stage 13

Thursday 13 July: Stage 12 - Roanne - Belleville-en-Beaujolais, medium mountains, 168.8km

Ion Izagirre of Cofidis claimed a stunning solo victory on stage 12 of the Tour de France 2023. The 34-year-old Spaniard made a daring move from the breakaway 30 kilometres before the finish line and successfully fended off the chasing pack to claim his second stage win in the prestigious French grand tour. The Basque won his first stage in 2016.

Mathieu Burgaudeau took the second spot on the stage, while Matteo Jorgenson was third.

Jonas Vingegaard maintained his hold on the yellow leader's jersey, with the Danish rider maintaining a 17-second lead over  Tadej Pogacar in second place.

2023 Tour de France: Stage 12 Results - Thursday 13 July

Roanne to belleville-en-beaujolais, medium mountains, 168.8km.

  • Ion Izagirre (ESP, Cofidis) 3:51:42
  • Mathieu Burgaudeau (FRA, TotalEnergies) +58"
  • Matteo Jorgenson (USA, Movistar Team) +58"
  • Tiesj Benoot (BEL, Jumbo-Visma) +1:06"
  • Tobias Halland Johannessen (NOR, Uno-X Pro Cycling Team +1:11"
  • Thibaut Pinot (FRA, Groupama - FDJ) +1:13"
  • Guillaume Martin (FRA, Cofidis) +1:13"
  • Dylan Teuns (BEL, Israel - Premier Tech) +1:27"
  • Ruben Guerreiro (POR, Movistar Team) +1:27"
  • Victor Campenaerts (BEL, Lotto Dstny) +3:02"
  • Tadej Pogacar (SLO, UAE Team Emirates) +17"
  • Jai Hindley (AUS, Bora-Hansgrohe) +2:40"
  • Pello Bilbao (ESP, Bahrain - Victorious +4:36"
  • Adam Yates (GBR, UAE Team Emirates) +4:41"
  • Simon Yates (GBR, Team Jayco AlUla) +4:46"
  • Tom Pidcock (GBR, INEOS Grenadiers) +5:28"
  • David Gaudu (FRA, Groupama) +6:01"
  • Sepp Kuss (USA, Jumbo-Visma) +6:47"

Ion Izagirre claimed stage 12 of the Tour de France 2023.

Cycling - Tour de France - Stage 12 - Roanne to Belleville-En-Beaujolais - France - July 13, 2023 Cofidis' Ion Izagirre Insausti celebrates as he crosses the finish line to win stage 12 REUTERS/Stephane Mahe

Wednesday 12 July: Stage 11 - Clermont-Ferrand - Moulins, flat, 179.8km

Jasper Philipsen secured his fourth stage win of this year’s Tour de France, as the Belgian once again proved to be the fastest rider of the peloton in a bunch sprint.

The green jersey wearer Philpsen won ahead of Dylan Groenewegen and Phil Bauhaus .

Jonas Vingegaard is still in the yellow leader’s jersey, after a stage that saw no changes in the top ten of the general classification.

2023 Tour de France: Stage 11 Results - Wednesday 12 July

Clermont-ferrand to moulins, flat, 179.8km.

  • Jasper Philipsen (BEL, Alpecin-Deceuninck) 4:01:07
  • Dylan Groenewegen (NED, Team Jayco AlUla) +0"
  • Phil Bauhaus (GER, Bahrain - Victorious) +0"
  • Bryan Coquard (FRA, Cofidis) +0"
  • Alexander Kristoff (NOR, Uno-X Pro Cycling Team) +0"
  • Peter Sagan (SLK, TotalEnergies) +0"
  • Wout van Aert (BEL, Jumbo-Visma) +0"
  • Sam Welsford (AUS, Team dsm - firmenich) +0"

2023 Tour de France: General Classification standings after Stage 11

  • Carlos Rodriguez Cano (ESP, Ineos Grenadiers) +4:24"

Jasper Philipsen claimed his fourth stage win at the 2023 Tour de France.

Cycling - Tour de France - Stage 11 - Clermont-Ferrand to Moulins - France - July 12, 2023 Alpecin–Deceuninck's Jasper Philipsen celebrates as he crosses the finish line to win stage 11 REUTERS/Gonzalo Fuentes

Tuesday 11 July: Stage 10 - Vulcania - Issoire, medium mountains, 167.2km

Pello Bilbao of Bahrain-Victorious claimed the first Spanish Tour de France stage win in five years as he outsprinted his breakaway companions in a thriliing finale on stage 10.

Prior to the sprint finish, Krists Neilands of Israel-Premier Tech was caught just three kilometres from the finish line after the Latvian tried to go solo 30 kilometres earlier.

Several riders from the breakaway attacked in the final, where Bilbao broke free with Georg Zimmermann of Intermarché-Circus-Wanty. Ben O'Connor of AG2R Citroën Team managed to bridge accross right before Bilbao launched his sprint.

Neither Zimmerman nor O’Connor could respond, and the 33-year-old Spaniard could take his first-ever Tour de France stage win. A victory he dedicated to his former teammate Gino Mäder, who tragically lost his life last month after a crash at the Tour de Suisse.

In the general classification, Jonas Vingegaard crossed the finish line alongside the other favourites, and he retains his 17-second advantage over Tadej Pogacar in second place. Bilbao advanced from 11 th to fifth position in the overall standings.

2023 Tour de France: Stage 10 Results - Tuesday 11 July

Vulcania to issoire, medium mountains, 167.2km.

  • Pello Bilbao (ESP, Bahrain - Victorious 3:52:34
  • Georg Zimmermann (GER, Intermarché - Circus - Wanty) +0"
  • Ben O'Connor (AUS, AG2R Citroën Team) +0"
  • Krists Neilands (LAT, Israel - Premier Tech) +0"
  • Esteban Chaves (COL, EF Education-EasyPost) +0"
  • Antonio Pedrero (ESP, Movistar Team) +3"
  • Mattias Skjelmose (DEN, Lidl - Trek) +27"
  • Michał Kwiatkowski (POL, INEOS Grenadiers) +27"
  • Warren Barguil (FRA, Team Arkéa Samsic) +30"
  • Julian Alaphilippe (FRA, Soudal - Quick Step) +32"

2023 Tour de France: General Classification standings after Stage 10

  • Jonas Vingegaard (DEN, Jumbo-Visma) 42h 33'13"
  • Pello Bilbao (ESP, Bahrain - Victorious +4:34"
  • Adam Yates (GBR, UAE Team Emirates) +4:39"
  • Simon Yates (GBR, Team Jayco AlUla) +4:44"
  • Tom Pidcock (GBR, INEOS Grenadiers) +5:26"
  • Sepp Kuss (USA, Jumbo-Visma) +6:45"

Pello Bilbao dedicated his stage win to the late Gino Mäder.

Cycling - Tour de France - Stage 10 - Vulcania to Issoire - France - July 11, 2023 Team Bahrain Victorious' Pello Bilbao Lopez celebrates as he crosses the finish line to win stage 10 REUTERS/Benoit Tessier

Sunday 9 July: Stage 9 - Saint-Léonard-de-Noblat - Puy de Dôme, 182.4km

The iconic finish at Puy de Dôme , a 13.3 km stretch at 7.7% average gradient, returned to the race for the first time since 1988.

The stage was forecast to be a battle between overall leader Jonas Vingegaard and Tadej Pogacar but it turned into a heartbreaking loss for Matteo Jorgenson. The U.S. rider who was stung by a wasp and needed to be attended to by the race doctor with 72km to go, produced a brave 50km solo effort and was caught 450m from the finish by Canada's Michael Woods.

Meanwhile, Pogacar gained eight seconds on Vingegaard. 

2023 Tour de France: Stage 9 Results - Sunday 9 July

Saint-léonard-de-noblat to puy de dôme, 182.4km.

Michael Woods (CAN, Israel Premier Tech) 4:19:41

Pierre Latour (FRA, TotalEnergies) +28

Matej Mohoric (SLO, Bahrain - Victorious) +35

Matteo Jorgensen (USA, Movistar) +35

Clement Berthet (FRA, AG2R Citroën) + 55

Neilson Powless (USA, EF Education-EasyPost) +1:23

Alexej Lutsenko (UKR, Astana Qazaqstan Team) + 1:39

Jonas Gregaard (DEN, Uno-X Pro Cycling Team) +1:58

Mathieu Burgaudeau (FRA, TotalEnergies) + 2:16

David de la Cruz (SPA, Astana Qazaqstan Team) + 2:34

2023 Tour de France: General Classification standings after Stage 9

  • Jonas Vingegaard (DEN, Jumbo-Visma) 38h 37'46"
  • Romain Bardet (FRA, Team DSM - Firmenich) +6:58"

Saturday 8 July: Stage 8 - Libourne - Limoges, hilly, 200.7km

Mads Pederson held off triple stage winner Jasper Philipsen and Wout van Aert to clinch stage eight of the Tour de France in 4:12:26.

Van Aert had looked to be in a position to take the stage but was forced to apply the brakes after getting blocked by his own Jumbo-Visma teammate Christophe Laporte . The Belgian was able to recover to catch third.

Earlier in the race, joint record holder for stage wins Mark Cavendish was forced to abandon his 14th and expected last Tour after he was caught in a crash with 63km to go.

The Manx Missile appeared to have injured his shoulder after a touch of wheels in the peloton forced him off his bike and onto the tarmac.

It's been a heartbreaking 24 hours for Cavendish who was denied a record win yesterday (Friday) after suffering a mechanical issue in his sprint showdown with Philipsen.

In the GC, Jonas Vingegaard retained the yellow jersey, while Great Britain's Simon Yates slid two places into sixth following his crash with just 5km of the race left to go.

2023 Tour de France: Stage 8 Results - Saturday 8 July

Libourne to limoges, hilly, 200.7km.

  • Mads Pederson (DEN, Lidl - Trek) 4:12:26
  • Jasper Philipsen (BEL, Alpecin - Deceuninck) +0"
  • Dylan Groenewegen (NED, Jayco AlUla) +0"
  • Nils Eekhoff (NED, Team DSM - Firmenich) +0"
  • Jasper De Buyst (BEL, Lotto Dstny) +0"
  • Rasmus Tiller (NOR, Uno-X Pro Cycling Team) +0"
  • Corbin Strong (NZL, Israel - Premier Tech) +0"
  • Tadej Pogacar (SLO, UAE Team Emirates) +0"

2023 Tour de France: General Classification standings after Stage 8

  • Jonas Vingegaard (DEN, Jumbo-Visma) 34h 10'03"
  • Tadej Pogacar (SLO, UAE Team Emirates) +25"
  • Jai Hindley (AUS, Bora-Hansgrohe) +1:34"
  • Carlos Rodriguez Cano (ESP, Ineos Grenadiers) +3:30"
  • Adam Yates (GBR, UAE Team Emirates) +3:40"
  • Simon Yates (GBR, Team Jayco AlUla) +4:01"
  • David Gaudu (FRA, Groupama - FDJ) +4:03"
  • Romain Bardet (FRA, Team DSM - Firmenich) +4:43"
  • Thomas Pidcock (GBR, INEOS Grenadiers) +4:43"
  • Sepp Kuss (USA, Jumbo-Visma) +5:28"

Friday 7 July: Stage 7 - Mont-de-Marsan - Bordeaux, flat, 169.9km

Jasper Philipsen of Alpecin-Deceuninck got his hat-trick, as he claimed his third sprint victory on stage 7 of the 2023 Tour de France.

The points classification leader won ahead of Mark Cavendish of Astana Qazaqstan Team and Biniam Girmay of Intermarché - Circus - Wanty.

A breakaway tried to challenge the peloton for the stage win, but it was inevitable that the sprinters were going to battle it out in the end.

The GC favourites, including Jonas Vingegaard , crossed the finish line in the peloton, and the Jumbo-Visma rider retained the yellow leader’s jersey.

2023 Tour de France: Stage 7 Results - Friday 7 July

Mont-de-marsan to bordeaux, flat, 169.9km.

  • Jasper Philipsen (BEL, Alpecin-Deceuninck) 3hr 46'28"
  • Mark Cavendish (GBR, Astana Qazaqstan Team) +0"
  • Biniam Girmay (ERI, Intermarché - Circus - Wanty) +0"

2023 Tour de France: General Classification standings after Stage 7

  • Jonas Vingegaard (DEN, Jumbo-Visma) 29h 57'12"
  • Simon Yates (GBR, Team Jayco AlUla) +3:14"

Jasper Philipsen has won all three sprint finishes so far at the 2023 Tour de France.

Cycling - Tour de France - Stage 7 - Mont-De-Marsan to Bordeaux - France - July 7, 2023 Alpecin–Deceuninck's Jasper Philipsen celebrates as he crosses the finish line to win stage 7 REUTERS/Stephane Mahe

Thursday 6 July: Stage 6 - Tarbes to Cauterets-Cambasque, high mountains, 144.9km

Tadej Pogacar of UAE Emirates won the mountainous stage 6 in the Pyrenees ahead of reigning Tour de France champion Jonas Vingegaard , who took over the leader’s jersey.

The first part of the stage was dominated by Jumbo-Visma and Vingegaard, who put pressure on the penultimate climb Col du Tourmalet. First, overnight leader Jai Hindley  was dropped by the pace of Sepp Kuss (Jumbo-Visma).

Shortly after, Vingegaard attacked on climb, and only Pogacar could follow. The Dane’s teammate Wout van Aert got into the early breakaway and was waiting on the descent to pilot his captain into the final kilometres of the last climb - Cauterets-Cambasque.

Defending champion Vingegaard attacked again on the final climb with 4.5 kilomtres to the finish, but Pogacar stayed in his wheel. Two kilometres later, the Slovenian opened up a gap to the Dane. The two-time Tour de France winner managed to stay and claim his tenth Tour de France stage win.

In the GC, Vingegaard now leads by 25 seconds to Tadej Pogacar in second place.

2023 Tour de France: Stage 6 Results - Thursday 6 July

Tarbes to cauterets-cambasque, high mountains, 144.9km.

  • Tadej Pogacar (SLO, UAE Team Emirates) 3hr 54'27"
  • Jonas Vingegaard (DEN, Jumbo-Visma) +24"
  • Tobias Halland Johannessen (NOR, Uno-X Pro Cycling Team) +1:22"
  • Ruben Guerreiro (POR, Movistar Team) +2:06"
  • James Shaw (GBR, EF Education-EasyPost) +2:15"
  • Jai Hindley (AUS, Bora-Hansgrohe) +2:39"
  • Carlos Rodríguez (SPA, INEOS Grenadiers) +2:39"
  • Simon Yates (GBR, Team Jayco AlUla) +2:39"
  • Adam Yates (GBR, UAE Team Emirates) +3:11"
  • Romain Bardet (FRA, Team dsm - firmenich) +3:12"

2023 Tour de France: General Classification standings after Stage 6

  • Jonas Vingegaard (DEN, Jumbo-Visma)
  • Romain Bardet (FRA, Team dsm - firmenich) +4:43"

Tadej Pogacar claimed stage six of the 2023 Tour de France.

Cycling - Tour de France - Stage 6 - Tarbes to Cauterets-Cambasque - France - July 6, 2023 UAE Team Emirates' Tadej Pogacar celebrates as he crosses the finish line to win stage 6 REUTERS/Stephane Mahe

Wednesday 5 July: Stage 5 - Pau to Laruns, high mountains, 162.7km

General Classification podium contender Jai Hindley of BORA-Hansgrohe claimed the first mountain stage of the 2023 Tour de France. He also took over the leader’s yellow jersey from Adam Yates . Australian rider Hindley had sneaked into a big breakaway, where he attacked on the last categorised climb, Col de Marie Blanc. Hindley managed to maintain a gap to the GC favourites to take his first ever Tour de France stage.

Behind the stage winner, reigning champion Jonas Vingegaard had dropped two-time Tour de France winner Tadej Pogacar and others on the last steep climb, and the Dane started the final descent with a 40-second advantage to the Slovenian.

Vingegaard crossed the finish line in fifth place, 34 seconds behind Hindley but gained more than a minute on his biggest rival for the overall win, Pogacar. Last year’s winner moves up to second place in the GC, 47 seconds behind Hindley, who was awarded 18 bonus second on the stage. Pogacar is in sixth place, 1:40 behind the leader’s jersey.

2023 Tour de France: Stage 5 Results - Wednesday 5 July

Pau to laruns, high mountains, 162.7km.

  • Jai Hindley (AUS, Bora-Hansgrohe) 3hr 57'07"
  • Giulio Ciccone (ITA, Lidl - Trek) +32"
  • Felix Gall (AUT, AG2R Citroën Team) +32"
  • Emanuel Buchmann (GER, BORA - hansgrohe) +32"
  • Jonas Vingegaard (DEN, Jumbo-Visma) +34"
  • Mattias Skjelmose (DEN, Lidl - Trek) +1:38"
  • Daniel Felipe Martínez (COL, INEOS Grenadiers) +1:38"
  • David Gaudu (FRA, Groupama - FDJ) +1:38"
  • Carlos Rodríguez (ESP, INEOS Grenadiers) +1:38"

2023 Tour de France: General Classification standings after Stage 5

  • Jai Hindley (AUS, Bora-Hansgrohe) 22hr 15'12"
  • Jonas Vingegaard (DEN, Jumbo-Visma) +47"
  • Giulio Ciccone (ITA, Lidl - Trek) +1:03"
  • Emanuel Buchmann (GER, BORA - hansgrohe) +1:11"
  • Adam Yates (GBR, UAE Team Emirates) +1:34"
  • Tadej Pogacar (SLO, UAE Team Emirates) +1:40"
  • Simon Yates (Team Jayco AlUla) +1:40"
  • Mattias Skjelmose (DEN, Lidl - Trek) +1:56"
  • Carlos Rodriguez Cano (ESP, Ineos Grenadiers) +1:56"
  • David Gaudu (Groupama - FDJ) +1:56"

Jai Hindley claimed the first mountain stage of the 2023 Tour de France.

Cycling - Tour de France - Stage 5 - Pau to Laruns - France - July 5, 2023 Bora–Hansgrohe's Jai Hindley celebrates as he crosses the finish line to win stage 5 REUTERS/Stephane Mahe

Tuesday 4 July: Stage 4 - Dax to Nogaro, flat, 181.8km

Jasper Philpsen of Alpecin-Deceuninck sprinted to his second consecutive stage win on stage four of this year's Tour de France. In a close sprint finish, the Belgian threw his bike at the finish line to win right ahead of the Australian Caleb Ewan (Lotto Dstny).

A few crashes on the final kilomtres did not change anything among the GC favourites. Adam Yates crossed the finish line within the peloton, and the UAE Emirates rider retained the yellow leader's jersey.

2023 Tour de France: Stage 4 Results - Tuesday 4 July

Dax to nogaro, flat, 181.8km.

  • Jasper Philipsen (BEL, Alpecin-Deceuninck) 4hr 25'28"
  • Caleb Ewan (AUS, Lotto Dstny) +0"
  • Danny van Poppel (NED, BORA - hansgrohe) +0"
  • Luka Mezgec (SLO, Team Jayco AlUla) +0

2023 Tour de France: General Classification standings after Stage 4

  • Adam Yates (GBR, UAE Team Emirates) 9hr 09'18"
  • Tadej Pogacar (SLO, UAE Team Emirates) +6"
  • Simon Yates (GBR, Team Jayco Alula) +6"
  • Victor Lafay (FRA, Cofidis) +12"
  • Wout van Aert (BEL, Jumbo-Visma) +16"
  • Jonas Vingegaard (DEN, Jumbo-Visma) +17"
  • Jai Hindley (AUS, Bora-Hansgrohe) +22"
  • Michael Woods (CAN, Israel-Premier Tech) +22"
  • Mattias Skjelmose (DEN, Lidl - Trek) +22"
  • Carlos Rodriguez Cano (ESP, Ineos Grenadiers) +22"

Jasper Philipsen sprinted to victory on stage three of the 2023 Tour de France.

  • Jul 3, 2023 Foto del lunes del pedalista del Alpecin–Deceuninck Jasper Philipsen celebrando tras ganar la tercera etapa del Tour de Francia REUTERS/Stephane Mahe

Monday 3 July: Stage 3 - Amorebieta-Etxano to Bayonne, flat, 193.5km

Jasper Philipsen of Alpecin-Deceuninck claimed the first sprint stage finish of the 2023 Tour de France, as the peloton left Spain to finish in Bayonne, France. It was the third Tour de France stage win for the Belgian sprinter.

The leader's yellow jersey stayed with Adam Yates, who came through the stage unscathed. He has a six-second lead to UAE Emirates teammate Tadej Pogacar.

2023 Tour de France: Stage 3 Results - Monday 3 July

Amorebieta-etxano to bayonne, flat, 193.5km.

  • Jasper Philipsen (BEL, Alpecin-Deceuninck) 4hr 43'15"
  • Fabio Jakobsen (NED, Soudal - Quick Step) +0"
  • Dylan Groenewegen (NED, Team Jayco AlUla) +0

2023 Tour de France: General Classification standings after Stage 3

  • Mikel Landa (ESP, Bahrain Victorious) +22"

Remco Evenepoel: Top facts you might not know about Belgium's cycling phenom

Sunday 2 july: stage 2 - vitoria-gasteiz to saint-sébastien, hilly, 208.9km.

Frenchman Victor Lafay (Cofidis) timed his attack to perfection pulling away from the peloton with a kilometre left to sprint to a maiden Tour de France stage win in Saint-Sébastien.

Lafay’s brave sprint to the finish gave Cofidis their first win since 2008 with Wout van Aert finishing a few bike lengths behind him in second place.

Tadej Pogacar , bidding for a third yellow jersey after losing his title to Jonas Vingegaard last year, again crossed the line in third place for second in the general classification.

First-stage winner, Adam Yates , held onto the yellow jersey finishing the stage in 21st place, one spot behind brother Simon .

2023 Tour de France: Stage 2 Results - Sunday 2 July

Vitoria-gasteiz to saint-sébastien, medium mountains, 208.9km.

  • Victor Lafay (FRA, Cofidis) 4hr 46'39"
  • Thomas Pidcock (GBR, Ineos Grenadiers) +0"
  • Pello Bilbao Lopez (ESP, Bahrain Victorious) +0"
  • Michael Woods (CAN, Israel - Premier Tech) +0"
  • Romain Bardet (FRA, Team DSM - Firmenich) +0"
  • Dylan Teuns (BEL, Israel - Premier Tech) +0
  • Jai Hindley (AUS, Bora - Hansgrohe) +0"
  • Steff Cras (BEL, Totalenergies) +0"

2023 Tour de France: General Classification standings after Stage 2

Saturday 1 july: stage 1 - bilbao to bilbao, medium mountains, 182km.

Britain's  Yates twins  pulled away from the lead group inside the last 10km of the Grand Départ with  Adam  easing clear of  Simon  inside the final kilometre to take his first Tour de France stage win in Bilbao.

Tadej Pogacar , bidding for a third yellow jersey after losing his title to  Jonas Vingegaard  last year, won the sprint for third and punched the air as he celebrated gaining a four-second time bonus on his rivals as well as a stage win for his UAE Team Emirates colleague in northern Spain.

Thibaut Pinot  was fourth with reigning champion Vingegaard safely in the lead group in ninth place.

2023 Tour de France: Stage 1 Results - Saturday 1 July

Bilbao to bilbao, medium mountains, 182km.

  • Adam Yates (GBR, UAE Team Emirates) 4hr 22'49"
  • Simon Yates (GBR, Team Jayco Alula) +4"
  • Tadej Pogacar (SLO, UAE Team Emirates) +12"
  • Thibaut Pinot (FRA, Groupama-FDJ) +12"
  • Michael Woods (CAN, Israel-Premier Tech) +12"
  • Jai Hindley (AUS, Bora-Hansgrohe) +12"
  • Skjelmose Mattias Jensen (DEN, Lidl-Trek) +12"
  • Jonas Vingegaard (DEN, Jumbo-Visma) +12"
  • David Gaudu (FRA, Groupama-FDJ) +12"

Tour de France 2023: General Classification standings after Stage 1

  • Simon Yates (GBR, Team Jayco Alula) +8"
  • Tadej Pogacar (SLO, UAE Team Emirates) +18"
  • Thibault Pinot (FRA, Groupama-FDJ) +22"

Men's Road Race - Cycling Road | Tokyo 2020 Replays

Day-by-day route of the 2023 tour de france.

  • Saturday 1 July: Stage 1 - Bilbao-Bilbao (182km)
  • Sunday 2 July: Stage 2 - Vitoria-Gasteiz - Saint-Sebastian (208.9km)
  • Monday 3 July: Stage 3 - Amorebieta - Etxano-Bayonne (187.4 km)
  • Tuesday 4 July: Stage 4 - Dax - Nogaro (181.8 km)
  • Wednesday 5 July: Stage 5 - Pau - Laruns (162.7 km)
  • Thursday 6 July: Stage 6 - Tarbes - Cauterets-Cambasque (144.9 km)
  • Friday 7 July: Stage 7 - Mont-de-Marsan - Bordeaux (169.9 km)
  • Saturday 8 July: Stage 8 - Libourne - Limoges (200.7 km)
  • Sunday 9 July: Stage 9 - Saint-Léonard-de-Noblat - Puy de Dôme (182.4 km)
  • Monday 10 July: Rest Day
  • Tuesday 11 July: Stage 10 - Vulcania - Issoire (167.2 km)
  • Wednesday 12 July: Stage 11 - Clermont-Ferrand - Moulins (179.8 km)
  • Thursday 13 July: Stage 12 - Roanne - Belleville-en-Beaujolais (168.8 km)
  • Friday 14 July: Stage 13 - Châtillon-sur-Chalaronne - Grand Colombier (137.8 km)
  • Saturday 15 July: Stage 14 - Annemasse - Morzine Les Portes du Soleil (151.8 km)
  • Sunday 16 July Stage 15 - Les Gets les portes du soleil - Saint-Gervais Mont-Blanc (179 km)
  • Monday 17 July: Rest Day
  • Tuesday 18 July: Stage 16 - Passy - Combloux (22.4 km individual time trial)
  • Wednesday 19 July: Stage 17 - Saint-Gervais-Mont-Blanc - Courchevel (165.7 km)
  • Thursday 20 July: Stage 18 - Moûtiers - Bourg-en-Bresse (184.9 km)
  • Friday July 21: Stage 19 - Moirans-en-Montagne - Poligny (172.8 km)
  • Saturday July 22: Stage 20 - Belfort - Le Markstein Fellering (133.5 km)
  • Sunday July 23: Stage 21 - Saint-Quentin-en-Yvelines - Paris Champs-Élysées (115.1 km)

How to watch the Tour de France 2023

The Tour de France will be shown live in 190 countries. Here is a list of the official broadcast partners across different territories.

  • Basque Country - EiTB
  • Belgium - RTBF and VRT
  • Czech Republic - Česká Televize
  • Denmark - TV2
  • Europe - Eurosport
  • France - France TV Sport and Eurosport France
  • Germany - Discovery+ and ARD
  • Ireland - TG4
  • Italy - Discovery+ and RAI Sport
  • Luxemburg - RTL
  • Netherlands - Discovery+ and NOS
  • Norway - TV2
  • Portugal - RTP
  • Scandinavia - Discovery+
  • Slovakia - RTVS
  • Slovenia - RTV SLO
  • Spain - RTVE
  • Switzerland - SRG-SSR
  • United Kingdom - Discovery+ and ITV
  • Wales - S4C
  • Canada - FloBikes
  • Colombia - CaracolTV
  • Latin America & Caribbean: ESPN
  • South America - TV5 Monde
  • United States - NBC Sports and TV5 Monde

Asia Pacific

  • Australia - SBS
  • China - CCTV and Zhibo TV
  • Japan - J Sports
  • New Zealand - Sky Sport
  • South-East Asia - Global Cycling Network and Eurosport

Middle East and Africa

  • The Middle East and North Africa - BeIN Sports and TV5 Monde
  • Subsaharan Africa - Supersport and TV5 Monde

Tadej POGACAR

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Results have arrived, tour de france explained: how you win & how it really works.

What do the yellow, green, and polka-dot jerseys mean? How do you win? How do teams work? Who are the favorites? We explain bike racing in this guide to the Tour de France.

in tour de france what is gc

Written by: Spencer Powlison & Bruce Lin

Published on: Jun 22, 2023

Posted in: Features

Did you just get bitten by the  road bike  bug? Did you watch Tour de France: Unchained and feel hungry for more? Or have you always been puzzled by the daily deluge of Tour de France news? Then this beginner’s guide is for you.

We’ll cover the fundamentals of how this “game” is played. Also, we’ll delve into cycling’s paradoxical balance between being simultaneously a team sport and an individual sport, and many ways riders and teams play to win. 

If you’re a seasoned cycling fan, please feel free to share this with your curious in-laws who always email you questions about pelotons, yellow jerseys, and more. We’ve all been there before!

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How The Tour de France Works

The tour de france: infographic.

Tour de France explained inforgraphic guide

What is the Tour de France

  • The Tour de France is the world's most prestigious bike race which has been running for over 100 years. 
  • The Tour takes riders all across France, through the Alps and the Pyranees, and finishes in Paris. 
  • This year it will take place: July 1 - July 23, 2023
  • The total race distance this year: 3,404 Km / 2,115 Mi 
  • The Grand Départ - The Tour de France often starts somewhere outside of France so other cities and countries can experience the excitement of the Tour. This year, the Tour will start in Bilbao, Spain. 

Key Details 

  • 22 pro cycling teams will compete with 8 riders each ( 176 riders total )
  • The race is split into 21 stages
  • Riders race 1 stage per day
  • Each stage has a stage winner. Winning a single stage at the Tour is a big deal. 
  • On average, racers will ride over 100 miles per stage .
  • Riders will get 2 rest days , one after the first week, and another after the second week.  
  • The overall winner of the Tour de France is the rider with the fastest time after all 21 stages . 

How To Win The Tour de France - Yellow Jersey

The Tour de France's yellow jersey

The winner of the Tour de France is the rider who has the fastest time after all 21 stages. Every stage is timed from start to finish, and every second counts toward the race's General Classification (GC). Every day, the current leader of the race will wear the yellow jersey so they are easy to spot. The rider wearing the yellow jersey when the race reaches the last stage Paris is the winner . 

Riders to watch:  2022 winner Jonas Vingegaard, 2020 & 2021 winner Tadej Pogačar, David Gaudu, Romain Bardet.

[newsletter]

Other Ways to "Win" at the Tour de France

The Yellow Jersey is the biggest prize, but there are multiple secondary prizes on offer too. Some teams and riders don’t even bother racing for the yellow jersey and instead focus on these prizes . 

Just like the yellow jersey, each day, the current leader in each classification wears a special jersey color so they're easy to spot.

Points Classification - Green Jersey

Tour de France sprinter's green jersey

Also known as the sprinter’s jersey , this award goes to the rider who scores the most points throughout the race. Points are earned by finishing in the top-15 in a stage.

This classification favors “pure” sprinters (riders who don't compete on mountain stages), and more points are offered for winning flat stages. Riders can also earn points in mid-stage sprints that are usually stationed in towns to please the fans.

Riders to watch:  Wout van Aert, Fabio Jakobsen, Jasper Philipsen, Mads Pedersen, and Dylan Groenewegen.

King Of The Mountains Classification - Polka-Dot Jersey

Tour de France polka-dot King of the Mountains jersey

The Tour gives the polka-dot “ King of the Mountains ” jersey to the rider who collects the most points over the course of the race by reaching the summit of categorized climbs first.

The climb categorization system is opaque and subjective. What you need to know is that there are five climb categories. From easiest to hardest they are: category 4,  category 3,  category 2,  category 1, and hors category (HC - French for “beyond categorization”). Riders get more points on harder climbs. Riders also get more points on mountaintop stage finishes, especially if they win.

Riders to watch:  This one is tough to call until you reach the high mountains. Often anyone who’s in contention for the yellow jersey is a good bet.

Other Prizes

Tour de France best young rider jersey, team classification, and combativity award

Best Young Rider Classification - White Jersey

This classification works the same way as the yellow jersey but is awarded to the highest-placed rider under 26 years of age. On rare occasions, a phenomenal young rider will win both the yellow and white jerseys. 

Riders to watch: Tadej Pogačar, Jonas Vingegaard.

Best Team Classification - Yellow Helmets

Like the yellow or white jerseys, this award is given based on overall time in the race and the team with the lowest overall time wins this prize . Each team tabulates the finish times of its three best riders on every stage. The team leading this classification usually wears yellow helmets, helping them stand out in the bunch.

Most Aggressive Rider - Red Number

Also known as the Combativity Award , this is likely the most mysterious prize in the Tour. In every stage (except time trials), a jury decides which rider in the race was most aggressive — usually, that means attacking a lot or gambling on a breakaway. Late in the broadcast, the announcers usually note which rider was given the combativity prize. If you spot a rider with a red number on their jersey, then he was named most aggressive the stage prior. At the end of the Tour, one rider gets the Super Combativity award.

How Cycling Is Actually a Team Sport... Sort Of

Teamwork in the Tour de France

Why are there teams if only one rider can win the Tour de France? Professional road cycling has a curious tension between the team and the individual. The key thing to remember is this: If a cyclist wins a stage or holds one of the leader’s jersey for a single stage, it is viewed as a team success . 

So if only one rider “wins,” what do the other seven riders on the team do to contribute to this elusive concept of teamwork? Here are some ways a group of individual cyclists comes together as a team to support their leader:

  • Getting into breakaways (small groups that attack off the front of the main group) — that way his team doesn’t have to work to chase the breakaway down.
  • Chasing down breakaways — to give the leader a chance to win or place well.
  • Retrieving food and water for the leader or other key riders — bottle service on the road … what could be more luxurious!
  • Pacing the leader up key climbs — although drafting isn’t as crucial, it can be a psychological advantage to have a teammate at your side.
  • Pacing the leader back to the peloton in the event of a crash, mechanical, or split in the group — without teammates to draft, it might be nearly impossible to rejoin the peloton on some fast-paced stages.
  • Giving the leader their bike or a wheel in the event of a mechanical — this can often be quicker than waiting for a team car or neutral support to show up with a spare.

What Types of Riders Make Up a Team? 

GC (general classification) riders - These are the riders vying for the Tour de France overall win. They need to be solid all-rounders who are good climbers and time trialists. They are usually the team leader and the rest of the team works to support them. 

Sprinters - Sprinters don’t contend for the overall win, and are more interested in winning individual stages. They often wait to attack at intermediate sprints and the finish line of each stage. Some teams are built entirely around a sprinter and focus on winning stages or the green jersey. 

Climbers - Climbing specialists excel at going uphill. Climbers compete for stage wins on the tough mountain stages or work to support their GC leader in the mountains. 

Domestiques - Most riders on the team will work as “domestiques” to support their team leader. They allow their leader to draft behind them to conserve energy, pace them up climbs, carry food and water, and provide support in case of crashes or mechanicals. 

Time Trialists - Some riders specialize in time trialing. They can compete for wins on time trial stages or work as powerful domestiques on flat and hilly stages  

What Types of Stages Are in the Tour?

The Tour de France route is different every year. Each stage is unique and offers different challenges to the riders. Here are the types of stages riders will contend with over three weeks:

Flat Stages - Flat stages are the ideal hunting ground for sprinters. Teams with sprinters will often work to keep the peloton together on flat stages, to ensure it ends in a bunch sprint where their sprinter has the best chance of winning. 

Hilly Stages - Hilly stages mix it up with rolling hills that make it more difficult for the peloton to stay together. These types of stages can be won by sprinters, climbers, or breakaway specialists. 

Mountain Stages - This is often where the Tour de France is won and lost. Mountain stages climb up into the high mountains in the Alps and the Pyrenees and it's where GC contenders will fight to gain time on their rivals.  

Time Trials - The Tour de France always features at least a couple of time trial stages. Riders set off individually to set the fastest time on a set course. With no riders to draft, it’s less about race tactics and more about pure speed and power.

Strategies and tactics

Tour de France strategy and tactics

So we just covered some team dynamics, rider types, and stage types. How does it all fit together? Teams often settle on strategies prior to the race. They assess their strengths and weaknesses and find ways to succeed — whether that means winning the yellow jersey or simply wearing a King of the Mountains jersey for just one stage. Here are some examples of how teams might set their strategies, and how they might execute them with the right tactics:

Team with a top GC rider: Naturally, they’ll try to win the yellow jersey. This means surviving inconsequential flat and rolling stages to conserve energy for key mountain stages and individual time trials. The leader’s teammates will try to get into breakaways so that their team won’t spend energy chasing all day. They’ll also set up the team leader to attack on key climbs or at least follow his rivals to defend his position.

Team with top sprinter: To win the green jersey, they’ll target the flat stages. This means controlling the peloton and chasing down breakaways to set up a sprint finish. Like the GC team, they might also put a rider in the breakaway to ease the burden on the team, forcing rival sprint teams to chase. On mountain stages, the team might have to call riders back from the peloton to help pace their sprinter to the finish so he doesn’t get time-cut.

Team with top climber: Winning the King of the Mountains (KOM) classification is often less of an obvious team effort. These pretenders to the throne tend to be opportunistic. However, it is advantageous to have a teammate in the breakaway on a key mountain stage when points are up for grabs. Also, when defending the polka-dot jersey, teammates can contest the climbs and finish ahead of KOM rivals to spoil their attempt to take over the classification lead by scoring points.

Smaller team without top leader: These are the teams that always try to put a rider in the day’s breakaway. This could earn them the Combativity Prize, or if they play their cards right, a stint in a leader’s jersey or even a stage win. This strategy requires constant attacking in the early kilometers of the race — something most fans rarely see on the broadcast. It is a hectic, painful part of the stage, but it’s crucial in establishing a break. Meanwhile, a breakaway rider’s teammates might patrol the front of the peloton to disrupt the chase.

Three Tips To Watch Like A Pro

Watching the Tour de France as a fan

Now that you understand the basics of how the Tour de France is raced, what do you, the new cycling fan do? There are daily stages for three weeks. That’s a lot of cycling!

Even if you don't have a way to watch the TV broadcast, it's easy to find highlights and extended highlights on YouTube. Fortunately, you don’t have to put your life on hold to watch the Tour de France. There are some reliably important stages you can focus on to catch the key action.

Can’t watch daily? Pick the key mountain stages. There are usually about 5-8 key mountain stages when the overall race is won and lost. Most of them are summit finishes, and they’re split between France’s two key mountain ranges: the Alps and Pyrenees. The first few ordinarily come in stages 6-9 before the first rest day, and the second round is often scheduled for the final week of racing. Occasionally, another summit finish, such as Mont Ventoux in Provence, will be on the list of important stages.

Watching daily? Tune in when things really heat up. On most flat stages, you can wait until the final 20 kilometers to tune in and see the sprinters fight it out. Some rolling stages might be entertaining in the final 50-60 kilometers if late breakaways occur. On mountain stages, it’s best to start watching as early as possible because sometimes, crazy things happen on the day’s first climbs.

Watching a LOT of TDF? Look for the nuances. If you’re going to have the race on all day, every day, you’ll need to dig a little deeper to enjoy the subtleties of the race. Try keeping track of riders who are often making the breakaway. Watch the sprint teams work together — or not — to chase an escape. Who looks to have strength in numbers, and who is not present at the front of the race? Are the GC riders staying out of trouble or tail-gunning at the dangerous back of the peloton? Usually, at any given time in the race, any given rider is positioned where they are for a specific reason. Look for clues to sort out what is happening.

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The Tour de France Glossary

Flamme rouge ? Hors catégorie ? If you’ve ever wondered what Tour announcers are saying, we’ve got you covered.

CYCLING-FRA-TDF2018-POSTCARD-FANS-PACK

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But don’t worry: We’ve got you covered with this Tour de France glossary. Use it as a guide help you navigate what the commentators are saying and why.

Arrière du peloton - French for “rear of the peloton,” or those riders at the back of the main group. See: peloton.

Attack - An aggressive, high-speed jump away from other riders.

Bidon - French for “water bottle.” Riders go through several a day. While grabbing one from the team car, riders can often receive a “sticky bidon”—that is, they hold onto the bottle for a few seconds as the driver accelerates, thus towing them along and giving them a brief pull.

Cycling: 102nd Tour de France / Stage 13

Blocking - Legally impeding the progress of riders in the pack to allow teammates a better chance of success (see: soft-pedal).

Blow up - To suddenly be unable to continue at the required pace due to overexertion.

Break, breakaway - A rider or group of riders who escaped the pack.

Bridge, bridge a gap - To catch up with a rider or group that has opened a lead.

Broom wagon ( voiture balai) - A van that follows the race each day, picking up riders who have dropped out and giving them a ride to the stage finish. It also signals the end of the race itself, meaning local authorities are free to open the roads to traffic.

US David Zabriskie (CSC/Den) leaves the

Categorized climb - Most of the Tour’s major ascents are ranked according to certain guidelines, though it’s not all set in stone. In decreasing order of difficulty, official climbs are rated 1, 2, 3, and 4, though the toughest climbs are considered “beyond category” (see: hors catégorie ).

Champs-Élysées - The famous cobbled boulevard in downtown Paris that hosts the finish of the final stage of the Tour de France. Riders make several laps of a circuit that takes them around the Arc de Triomphe, through the Place de la Concorde, and up and down both sides of the Champs.

Christian Prudhomme - A former journalist who is now the general director of the Tour de France. As head of the sport’s biggest and most important race, Prudhomme is one of the most powerful people in cycling.

Cycling: 5th La Course 2018 - by Le Tour de France

Directeur sportif - A French term essentially meaning head coach. The DS is responsible for planning team strategy on each stage and throughout the overall race. He’s usually the one directly answerable to sponsors, so he also operates as PR director, chief corporate liaison, head cook, and bottle washer.

Domestique - A French term for those riders willing to sacrifice their own ambitions for the sake of their teams. Domestiques do things like grab water bottles, ride into the wind to give their leader a draft (see: drafting), or pace their leader back to the peloton in the event of a flat tire .

Doping - Originally meant in reference to blood doping, or withdrawing blood to re-inject it later on to boost red blood cell count and oxygen uptake. Now meant to include any performance-enhancing substances, most of which are banned from competitive use and only some of which are testable.

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Drafting - Tucking in closely behind another rider to escape the wind, therefore saving you energy. See: slipstream.

Dropped - To be left behind by the rest of the field. Also known as “off the back” or “out the back.”

Echelon - A form of paceline in which following riders angle away from the leader to get maximum draft in a crosswind.

L’Équipe - A French daily newspaper covering sports. Used to be called l’Auto and serve as chief sponsor of the Tour.

Feed zones - A designated point on a stage where team personnel can pass food (often little pastries or finger sandwiches) and water bottles to riders. Huge groups of kids will wait after the feed zones because riders tend to toss away empty bottles and musettes once they’re done chowing down.

Cycling: 105th Tour de France 2018 / Stage 19

Field sprint - The dash for the finish line by the main group of riders. Also known as a bunch sprint or pack finish.

Flamme rouge - A red flag that hangs from an inflatable banner 1K from the end of each stage to let the riders know the finish is approaching. For sprinters, the flamme rouge indicates when they should launch their final dash for the line. For climbers, it means the pain will end soon.

Full tuck - An extremely crouched aerodynamic position used to achieve maximum speed on descents.

General Classification (GC) - The ranking of riders from first to last according to their total elapsed time, with the first rider boasting the lowest or fastest time. The yellow jersey goes to the GC leader at the end of each day.

Green jersey ( maillot vert) - First awarded in 1953, it goes to the leader of the Points Classification. Riders can earn these points at stage finishes and certain mid-stage sections (see: intermediate sprint). Flat stages award the most green jersey points, which is why field sprinters often win the competition.

CYCLING-FRA-TDF2018-LINE

Grand Départ - French for “great departure,” it’s the start of the Tour de France. This often takes place in France itself, but has increasingly gone to foreign cities to generate international interest in the race.

Grand Tours: The three most prestigious road races in professional cycling, each held annually over the course of three weeks: the Tour de France in July, the Giro d’Italia in late spring, and the Vuelta a España in late summer.

Grupetto - Large groups of dropped riders that often form at the back of the race on mountain stages. Grupettos are generally filled with sprinters and riders who have finished working for their team leaders.

Hors catégorie - French for “beyond category,” a rating reserved for the most challenging climbs, such as the Alpe d’Huez.

Hors délai - See: time limit.

Intermediate sprint - Found in the middle of each stage, this section awards points in the Tour’s green jersey competition. The first 15 riders to cross the line at these locations earn points.

King of the Mountains (KoM) - A competition for the best climber, which runs on a points system like the green jersey. The leader wears the polka dot jersey .

Lanterne rouge - The last rider in the General Classification. The term, which means “red lantern,” originated in the early days of the Tour, when a car bearing a red lantern would follow the last rider, signifying the back end of the race.

Cycling: 105th Tour de France 2018 / Stage 1

Leadout - A race tactic in which a rider accelerates to maximum speed for the benefit of a teammate in tow. The second rider then leaves the draft and sprints past at an even greater speed.

Lieutenant - The team leader’s right-hand man who helps keep things organized during the stage. The lieutenant also plans and executes strategy, like chasing down breakaways or setting up the final sprint.

Musette - A small cloth bag filled with snacks and water bottles that riders pick up while passing through feed zones. They’re notorious for causing crashes after they’ve been discarded, making feed zones—and the sections immediately following them—some of the most dangerous moments on each stage.

Le Tour de France 2012 - Stage Ten

Off the back/out the back (OTB) - See: dropped.

Paceline - A group formation in which each rider takes a turn breaking the wind at the front before pulling off, dropping to the rear position, and riding the others’ draft until he reaches the front again.

Pau - Only Paris and Bordeaux have hosted more Tours de France than Pau, a city at the foot of the Pyrenees that the race visits almost annually.

Peloton - The largest cluster of riders on the road at any given time. Also called the bunch, group, pack, or field.

Cycling: 105th Tour de France 2018 / Stage 19

La Planche des Belles Filles - One of the newer summit finishes, found in the Vosges. With an average gradient of almost 9 percent and several pitches that hit 20 percent, the climb always serves as an early indicator of the Tour’s true overall contenders.

Polka dot jersey - First given in 1975, it goes to the leader of the King of the Mountains competition. Riders earn points at the top of each categorized climb.

Cycling: 105th Tour de France 2018 / Stage 21

Poursuivant - French for “pursuer,” it refers to those riders who break away from the peloton to chase the race leaders (see: “ Tête de la course”).

Prologue - A short stage held as the opener of the Grand Tours. It’s usually less than 5 miles long and designed mainly as a showcase kick-off (and a way to get the yellow jersey on someone’s back right away).

Publicity caravan - A huge procession of vehicles that traces the day’s route before the pack. Each Tour sponsor has at least one car, making the caravan bigger than the race itself in terms of personnel.

Pull (pull through) - To take a turn at the front.

Pull off - To move over after riding in the lead so another rider can come to the front.

Pyrenees - A mountain range on the border between France and Spain.

Rollers - An indoor bike trainer that works like a treadmill for bikes. (Also, a series of short hills.) Tour riders use them to warm up prior to a stage.

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Slipstream (draft) - The pocket of calmer air behind a moving rider. See: drafting.

Soft-pedal - To pedal without actually applying power. If a rider is in a solo break, his teammates will impede the chase effort by soft-pedaling at the front of the pack. If a racer in a break doesn’t want to take his pull, he’ll soft-pedal.

Soigneur - Team staffers that basically take care of anything not covered by the directeur sportif or the team mechanics. That includes things like finalizing hotel arrangements, assembling the day’s musettes, giving massages, doing laundry, and countless other necessary, thankless tasks.

Summit finish - Stages that end atop a categorized climb are called summit finishes. Time gaps here are usually large as climbs separate riders into groups, with often one rider winning alone or “solo.”

TOPSHOT-CYCLING-FRA-TDF2017-LINE

Switchback - A 90-degree or greater turn.

Take a flyer - To suddenly sprint away from a group.

Team time trial (TTT) - A race against the clock with two or more riders on a given team working together. See: time trial.

Tête de la course - French for “head of the race,” it refers to the rider or riders in the lead at any given point on a stage.

Time bonus - Awarded to the first three finishers at the end of each stage (besides the time trials). Bonuses of 10, six, and four seconds count toward each rider’s place on the General Classification. Time bonuses of eight, five, and two seconds are also awarded at special sprints near the end of key stages.

Time limit - Riders must finish each stage within a certain time limit, calculated based on difficulty, average speed, and the winning rider’s finishing time. Those who fail to finish within that time are considered hors délai, or “beyond the limit,” and must leave the race.

Time trial (TT) - A race against the clock in which riders start at set intervals and cannot give or receive a draft. Racers may use aero bars and helmets, which aren’t allowed in ordinary stages.

Le Tour de France 2018 - Stage Twenty

Le Tour - Whenever someone says le Tour , it’s plain they mean the Tour de France. No other race gets this treatment.

Tourmalet - First appearing in 1910, the Tourmalet has been climbed more than any other ascent in Tour history. Located in the heart of the Pyrenees, it can be approached from two equally difficult sides.

Union Cycliste Internationale (UCI) - The official governing body of professional cycling worldwide.

Vosges - A mountain range in eastern France.

White jersey ( maillot blanc) - Created in 1975, it recognizes the Tour’s Best Young Rider, or the rider under age 26 with the highest position on the General Classification.

Yellow jersey ( maillot jaune) - First awarded midway through the 1919 Tour, it identifies the rider currently leading the General Classification.

Since getting hooked on pro cycling while watching Lance Armstrong win the 1993 U.S. Pro Championship in Philadelphia, longtime Bicycling contributor Whit Yost has raced on Belgian cobbles, helped build a European pro team, and piloted that team from Malaysia to Mont Ventoux as an assistant director sportif. These days, he lives with his wife and son in Pennsylvania, spending his days serving as an assistant middle school principal and his nights playing Dungeons & Dragons.

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Virtual L’Etape du Tour de France Series Announced

Eric Schlange

L’Etape du Tour de France is one of the biggest amateur Gran Fondos in the world, with over 16,000 participants each year. Riders return year after year to take on a full Tour de France mountain stage, and Zwift has a history of working with L’Etape as a training partner.

This year, Zwift is hosting a creative and challenging Virtual L’Etape du Tour de France series which is sure to be very popular with riders. Whether you’re training for the IRL L’Etape or just looking to get some hard racing in, you’ll want to add these events to your calendar!

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All the details for the series are below, although some links are not yet active and will be updated as Zwift updates their sites.

Schedule and Routes

This is a monthly series, with events scheduled one week per month. Shorter Prologue races happen midweek, with Grand Fondos on the weekend. Events are scheduled every two hours for maximum availability ( see upcoming events ).

  • Going Coastal 1 lap (18.7 km/11.6 miles, 63 m/207′)
  • Big Foot Hills , 1 Lap (69.9 km/43.4 miles, 707 m/2,320′)
  • Greater London Flat 1 Lap (17.3 km/10.75 miles, 45 m/148′)
  • The London Pretzel 1 Lap (56.1 km/34.8 miles, 531 m/1,742′)
  • Neon Flats 1 Lap (15 km/9.3 miles, 72 m/236′)
  • Country to Coastal 2 Laps (67 km/41.7 miles, 548 m/1,798′)
  • R.G.V. 1 Lap (25.1 km/15.6 miles, 107 m/351′)
  • Petit Boucle 1 Lap (62 km/38.5 miles, 430 m/1,411′)

Note: there are no make-up weeks in this series.

in tour de france what is gc

See all upcoming L’Etape du Tour events >

These are race events, not group rides. But there are no categories, so everyone will start together and ride together until gaps open up and packs form. Pace yourself accordingly!

ZwiftPower GC

You can treat these events as one-off races, competing in them whenever you’d like. However, some riders will compete for the time-based general classification, which ranks riders based on their total time for each stage.

Each month will have a GC competition on ZwiftPower (look under “Leagues”) based on that month’s Prologue and Main Stage events. There will also be an overall GC which includes all four months.

February GC on ZwiftPower > Overall GC on ZwiftPower >

Official Kit Unlock

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Complete any of the Gran Fondo events to unlock the virtual Santini L’Etape du Tour de France official event kit in game!

Climb of the Month: Col de la Couillole

This series takes a break in June for obvious reasons, but while we’re on break, the Climb of the Month in the Climb Portal will be Col de la Couillole, the final climb of the IRL L’Etape du Tour de France. At 15.7 kilometers with a rock-steady 7.1% gradient, this is also the finishing climb for stage 2 of the 2024 Tour de France!

L’Etape du Tour de France is already sold out for 2024, but you could win a spot!

Complete one Prologue ride and one Gran Fondo every month between February and April, and you will be entered for a chance to win a trip to participate in the L’Etape du Tour de France live. Read the terms and conditions >

Questions or Comments?

Check out Zwift’s L’Etape FAQ , or post below!

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L’Étape de Tour to ‘bring a bit of the Tour de France’ to Killarney

Saturday, september 7th date set for popular cycling sportive series that is coming to ireland for the first time.

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Irish cyclists Dan Martin and Imogen Cotter pictured at the launch of L’Etape Ireland, a sanctioned race of the Tour de France that will be hosted for the first time in Ireland this September in Killarney. Photograph: Dan Sheridan/Inpho

The popular L’Étape de Tour cycling sportive series is coming to Ireland for the first time, the new event set to start and finish in Killarney on Saturday, September 7th.

Originally started back in 1993 to allow amateur cyclists ride a stage of the Tour de France , typically on the Tour rest day, there are now 33 L’Étape events worldwide, across 25 countries and five continents.

Organised by the Amaury Sport Organisation (ASO), who also organise the Tour de France, the mass participation event takes place on mostly closed roads, featuring stage timing and various classifications, plus an official podium presentation with Tour de France jerseys.

The Tour de France L’Étape typically sells out a year in advance.

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Although the exact stage details of L’Étape Ireland have yet be confirmed, there will be a 135km and 100km option around Killarney, plus a 5km family ride, with about 1,590m of uphill gradient climbing.

Both routes will have three timed mountain stages taking in climbs across Molls Gap, Ballaghbeama Pass and Caragh Lake to compete for the title of king and queen on the mountain and a polka dot jersey. There will also be a sprint section where participants can battle it out for a Tour De France green jersey.

Both routes will be on closed or partially closed roads and the race and its participants will be monitored by safety officials throughout.

Speaking at the event launch in Dublin on Wednesday, former Irish professional Dan Martin said part of the appeal of L’Étape is bringing a flavour of the Tour de France to Ireland.

“It will be huge for the country from a tourist aspect, in terms of bringing people here,” said Martin. “But also getting Irish people on bikes and becoming part of the Tour de France family, it will be a great experience and what an incredible part of Ireland to be actually showcasing, using the race to showcase Kerry as a county and the incredible roads that are down there.

“It is multi-faceted the benefits it can bring to the country and the sport of cycling in Ireland. It’s open to everybody. There’s a family route as well and it’s for all levels, it’s not about riding it quickly, I’m sure there will be plenty riding it quickly but it’s about enjoying the day and the scenery and the experience.

“It’s all about the atmosphere, about bringing a little bit of the Tour de France to Kerry.

“It’s a destination, people will be coming from all over the world to ride this event, and so it is also about creating an experience over the weekend rather than just a one day event.”

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Ian O'Riordan

Ian O'Riordan

Ian O'Riordan is an Irish Times sports journalist writing on athletics

IN THIS SECTION

Dan martin: ‘the more people we get on bikes, the safer the roads will become’, sam bennett pipped at the line in france but looking stronger for 2024 season, competitors in this year’s rás tailteann will face 18 ascents along a challenging 784.9km route, irish team pursuit squad continue olympic qualification hunt, when he named a brand of jacket associated with the criminal fraternity, i lost all sympathy for him, miriam lord: td hits boiling point amid claims of ‘talking down’ to ‘a female deputy’, ‘single and fabulously fertile was how i was. in a loving relationship and painfully infertile is how you find me’, row breaks out between two oireachtas committees investigating rté, irish scientists discover why people with long covid can suffer ‘brain fog’, latest stories, israel set to send negotiators to paris for gaza ceasefire and hostage release talks, funding remains top challenge for start-ups and growing companies, survey finds, ireland misses out on bid to host new eu anti-money laundering agency, ireland braced for a stern test in italy, year of living dangerously — frank mcnally on the madness that was britain in 1974.

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Tour de France 2024

Latest news from the race.

Roglic predicts 'beautiful' Tour de France matchup with Vingegaard, Pogacar and Evenepoel

Roglic predicts 'beautiful' Tour de France matchup with Vingegaard, Pogacar and Evenepoel

‘I’m not delusional but I’m not under-ambitious’ - Sepp Kuss clarifies his Tour de France ambitions

‘I’m not delusional but I’m not under-ambitious’ - Sepp Kuss clarifies his Tour de France ambitions

'This is not our project' – Tour de France director claims One Cycling reforms doomed to failure

'This is not our project' – Tour de France director claims One Cycling reforms doomed to failure

2024 tour de france information.

The 111th edition of the Tour de France starts in Florence, Italy, on Saturday, June 29 and ends three weeks later in Nice on Sunday, July 21. It is the first time the Tour starts in Italy and the first time it finishes in Nice to avoid the preparations for the 2024 Paris Olympics Games, which begin just a week later.

The route of the world's biggest race covers a total of 3,492km with some 52,320 metres of overall elevation, passing through four nations – Italy, San Marino, France, and Monaco. It features two individual time trials for a total of 59km, four mountain-top finishes, a series of gravel sections on stage 9, and a final hilly time trial to Nice. The official route was unveiled on October 25 in a special ceremony in Paris.

Tour de France champion  Jonas Vingegaard  (Jumbo-Visma) won his second GC title last year and will be back to defend his title against top rival Tadej Pogačar (UAE Team Emirates), who finished second overall. Vingegaard is likely to face a huge challenge from not just Pogačar, but also Remco Evenepoel (Soudal-QuickStep) and former teammate turned rival Primož Roglič (Bora-Hansgrohe).

Join Cyclingnews' coverage of the 2024 Tour de France with live coverage, race reports, results, photo galleries, news and race analysis.

  • Tour de France 2024 route

The 2024 Tour de France includes 52,230 metres of vertical gain across 3,492km of climbs, sprints and time trialling from Italy into France, with fewer high climbs than in the past and shorter stages. 

It is a balanced three weeks of racing that includes eight flat stages, four mountain-top finishes and two individual time trials, the final test against the clock is a hilly time trial to Nice that could create suspense. The race has 25km of racing above 2,000 metres and 27 mountains classified as second, first, or HC.

Florence, Italy, will host the team presentation, and stage 1 will roll out from Piazzale Michelangelo to open the Grand Tour for the first time. The first two stages are just over 200km each and include climbing, with the third day in Italy a flatter affair at 225km from Piacenza to Turin. 

Stage 4 heads into France and straight away to the Alps, with climbs across Sestriere, the Col de Montgenèvre and the Col du Galibier before a fast descent to Valloire. After two days with opportunities for breakaways and fast finishers, the first time trial comes on stage 7 at 25km. The first week ends with back-to-back stages ending in the champagne capital of Troyes to the southeast of Paris, including stage 9, which is a far tougher day due to the 14 sectors of gravel.

Week two of the 2024 Tour starts with a four-day ride south to the Pyrenees via the Massif Central and the rural France Profonde, with stages to Saint-Amand-Montrond, Le Lioran, Villeneuve-sur-Lot and then Pau. The Tour celebrates the Bastille Day holiday weekend in the Pyrenees with consecutive mountain finishes - stage 14 finishes in Pla d'Adet after climbing the Col du Tourmalet and the Hourquette d’Ancizan while stage 15 climbs the Portet d'Aspet and the Col d’Agnes for the finish up to Plateau de Beille.

Following the second rest day in Gruissan on the Mediterranean coast near the border with Spain on Monday, July 15, the final week leads into the Alps. The contenders should face a final shakeout once the race reaches stage 20, as the 2,802-metre high Cime de la Bonette and final ascent to Isola 2000 will be decisive. The final stage of the 2024 Tour is a 34km hilly time trial from Monaco to Nice.

Check out all the details of the 2024 Tour de France route .

  • There's no way to Jumbo-proof the Tour de France - 2024 route analysis
  • ‘I think it’s a good parcours for me’ - Jonas Vingegaard keen on 2024 Tour de France route
  • Mark Cavendish: 'It might be the hardest route I've ever seen at the Tour de France'
  • Jasper Philipsen sees 'a very difficult end' for sprinters in 2024 Tour de France
  • Tour de France 2024 gravel stage 'increases chance of bad luck' says Plugge
  • Remco Evenepoel tempted by 2024 Giro d'Italia-Tour de France combo
  • Regal reveals for Tour de France, Tour de France Femmes 2024 routes - Gallery
  • As it happened: All the information about the 2024 Tour de France route unveiled
  • Tour de France 2024 routes – All the rumours ahead of the official presentation

Tour de France 2024 Contenders

Defending Tour de France champion  Jonas Vingegaard will again have a strong Jumbo-Visma team to support his quest for a third title, but this time, former team leader Primož Roglič has turned to rival as he looks to give Bora-Hansgrohe top billing. Vingegaard will also face huge challenges from Tadej Pogačar (UAE Team Emirates) and Remco Evenepoel (Soudal-QuickStep). 

In the flat stages, look for last year's green jersey victor Jasper Philipsen (Alpecin-Deceuninck) to contest for another title against Fabio Jakobsen , now with Team dsm-firmenich, and Caleb Ewan , now with Jayco-AlUIa. And fastman Mark Cavendish (Astana Qazaqstan) is back for an 18th pro season to mix it up in the sprints, on the hunt for a record-breaking 35th Tour de France stage victory.

And there will be opportunities across the three weeks for breakaway riders to shine, including the likes of Julian Alaphilippe (Soudal-QuickStep), Wout van Aert (Jumbo-Visma) and Mathieu van der Poel (Alpecin-Deceuninck).

Tour de France 2024 stages

  • Tour de France past winners
  • Stage 1 | Florence - Rimini 2024-06-29 205km
  • Stage 2 | Cesenatico - Bologna 2024-06-30 200km
  • Stage 3 | Piacenza - Turin 2024-07-01 225km
  • Stage 4 | Pinerolo - Valloire 2024-07-02 138km
  • Stage 5 | Saint-Jean-de-Maurienne - Saint-Vulbas Plaine de l'Ain 2024-07-03 177km
  • Stage 6 | Mâcon - Dijon 2024-07-04 163km
  • Stage 7 | Nuits-Saint-Georges - Gevrey-Chambertin (ITT) 2024-07-05 25km
  • Stage 8 | Semur-en-Auxois - Colombey-les-Deux-Églises 2024-07-06 176km
  • Stage 9 | Troyes - Troyes 2024-07-07 199km
  • Rest Day 1 | Orléans 2024-07-08
  • Stage 10 | Orléans - Saint-Amand-Montrond 2024-07-09 187km
  • Stage 11 | Évaux-les-Bains - Le Lioran 2024-07-10 211km
  • Stage 12 | Aurillac - Villeneuve-sur-Lot 2024-07-11 204km
  • Stage 13 | Agen - Pau 2024-07-12 171km
  • Stage 14 | Pau - Saint-Lary-Soulan (Pla d'Adet) 2024-07-13 152km
  • Stage 15 | Loudenvielle - Plateau de Beille 2024-07-14 198km
  • Rest Day 2 | Gruissan 2024-07-15
  • Stage 16 | Gruissan - Nîmes 2024-07-16 187km
  • Stage 17 | Saint-Paul-Trois-Châteaux - Superdévoluy 2024-07-17 178km
  • Stage 18 | Gap - Barcelonnette 2024-07-18 179km
  • Stage 19 | Embru - Isola 2000 2024-07-19 145km
  • Stage 20 | Nice - Col de la Couillole 2024-07-20 133km
  • Stage 21 | Monaco - Nice (ITT) 2024-07-21 34km

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Groupama-FDJ announce first four riders for 2024 Tour de France

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'If nothing goes wrong, Tadej is boss’ - Adam Yates on the Tour de France and life with Pogacar

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Tim Wellens: If anybody can do the Giro-Tour double, it’s Tadej Pogačar

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Tour de France

Tour de france stage 13: grand colombier turns up gc heat on bastille day, the tour's third big summit finish could reshuffle the gc..

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Stage 13 — Friday, July 14 Châtillon-sur-Chalaronne to Grand Colombier Distance: 137.8km (85.6 miles) Profile: Mountaintop finish

Stage 13: A big test for the best climbers

To underline the fact that this Tour is very climbing-oriented, all five major French mountain ranges have been included this year.

After the Pyrénées and the Massif Central in the opening week, and before the upcoming stages in the Alps and Vosges, stage 13 heads into the Jura, where the riders will take on the Grand Colombier.

It’s not a high altitude climb, but at 17.4 kilometers it’s one of the longer climbs this year, and though the average grade is 7.1 percent, there are three pitches as steep as 14 percent and a double-digit finishing stretch.

Stage favorites: Pogačar, Vingegaard, or a surprise?

in tour de france what is gc

In 2020, the same summit finish resulted in a close sprint between Tadej Pogačar and Primož Roglič, while the top six riders finished within 15 seconds of each other.

Three years later, will Tadej Pogačar (UAE Team Emirates) or Jonas Vingegaard (Jumbo-Visma) take command, or will this Fourteenth of July national holiday inspire one of the French climbers Romain Bardet (Team DSM-Firmenich), David Gaudu or Thibaut Pinot (Groupama-FDJ) to cause an upset? Pinot showed signs of improving form on stage 12, but will have something left in the tank one day later?

Grand Colombier and a curious mountains jersey link

Châtillon-sur-Chalaronne may have a population of just 5,000, but it has a handball, football and archery scene, as well as a history of big cycling events. This first-time Tour stage town has already hosted the Critérium du Dauphiné, Paris-Nice, the Tour de l’Ain and the Tour de l’Avenir on several occasions.

Last year it was the start of a stage in the Tour de l’Ain won by Jake Stewart (Groupama-FDJ). Ten years previously Dutch rider Moreno Hofland triumphed there on stage 2 of the 2012 Tour de l’Avenir. Decades earlier, the 1906 Tour de France field included Charles Perraud, a rider born in the town.

Stage end location Grand Colombier is the highest point of the Bugey region, located in the south of the Jura mountain range. Described by Tour organizers ASO as ‘on the way to becoming one of the classic climbs’ of the event, it was only scaled for the first time in the 2012 Tour.

It has been ridden during four Tour stages in all, with Thomas Voeckler first to the top in 2012, Rafal Majka summiting ahead of the other riders in 2016 and Warren Barguil doing likewise the following year.

The first summit finish there was in 2020, when Tadej Pogačar triumphed. Interestingly, those four riders all went on to win the King of the Mountains in those editions of the Tour.

The climb was also used in the 1980 Tour de l’Avenir, with the Russian rider Sergei Soukhoroutchenkov proving best. Five stages in all in the Tour de l’Ain have ended at the summit. Thibaut Pinot was the winner the last two occasions, being best in 2011 and 2019.

in tour de france what is gc

Culture and food

Châtillon-sur-Chalaronne’s small size doesn’t seem to impact too much culturally; it hosts shows as part of the larger La Ronde des Mots festival each year, has the National Festival of Contemporary Amateur Theatre, plus the Musicales du Parc des Oiseaux shows in August and September.

The wider region around Grand Colombier is also busy. Events include a snow festival in January, the fêtes des “fours banaux” (old bread ovens dating from the Middle Ages and the Renaissance), concerts and shows as part of the Summer in Château de Clermont and a Nomade Reggae Festival in August.

In terms of food, Châtillon-sur-Chalaronne is known for the Painillon de Châtillon delicacy, a saffron-flavoured delicacy made by the town’s Ursuline nuns and reputed to have anti-malarial properties. The tweaked modern recipe includes almond cream and is coated with chocolate.

Grand Colombier’s offerings include Bugey truffle, savoury (a walnut and onion tart), plus the Tome de Belley, Pavé d’Affinois, and Comté in Arvière-en-Valromey cheeses.

in tour de france what is gc

Start time (13.45 CET, 7.45 a.m. EST, 4.45 a.m. WST), estimated finishing time (17.22 CET, 11.22 a.m. EST, 8.22 a.m. WST)

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  1. General classification in the Tour de France

    The general classification of the Tour de France is the most important classification of the race and determines the winner of the race. Since 1919, the leader of the general classification wears the yellow jersey ( French: maillot jaune pronounced [majo ʒon] ). History

  2. The final GC standings of the 2023 Tour de France

    The final GC standings of the 2023 Tour de France By Laura Weislo last updated 23 July 2023 Jonas Vingegaard claims his second consecutive title Tour de France 2023: Jonas Vingegaard...

  3. Tour de France jargon buster: all the cycling terms you ...

    Don't know your bidon from your lanterne rouge? BikeRadar's glossary of Tour de France terms is here to help

  4. The final GC standings in the 2022 Tour de France after stage 21

    Jonas Vingegaard was crowned the 2022 Tour de France champion in Paris on stage 21 of the race, rolling over the line in procession with his Jumbo-Visma teammates - 51 seconds behind stage...

  5. What do the Tour de France leaders jerseys mean? Yellow, green, polka

    Yellow, green, polka dot and white jerseys explained - BikeRadar What do the yellow, green, polka dot and white jerseys mean at the Tour de France? And who are the previous winners?

  6. What Is A General Classification Rider

    What Is A General Classification Rider - How Does A Cyclist Win The Tour De France? Global Cycling Network 3.15M subscribers Subscribe Share 127K views 9 years ago What does a pro cyclist...

  7. What does it take to be a Tour de France GC contender?

    The Tour de France is an almighty undertaking. This year's edition packs in 3,404km over 21 stages, with an accumulated elevation total in excess of 56,000 metres.

  8. Tour de France

    Winning the General Classification (GC) means you get to wear The Maillot Jaune, aka The Yellow Jersey. To win the GC the leader of a race team must complete all the stages with the lowest overall time. This means that a GC contender should be a solid all-rounder, equally at home on the mountains as they are in time-trial stages.

  9. Top cycling terms you need to watch the Tour de France

    Also known as the maillot jaune, the yellow jersey is worn by the rider who is the General Classification (GC) leader, riding the race in the least amount of time. Green - points leader The green jersey, or maillot vert, is worn by the rider that has accrued the most points during the race.

  10. What Is A General Classification Rider

    A general classification rider is a pro cyclist who competes for the biggest prizes in cycling. Each year, the general classification specialists take the biggest wins in the sport at the Grand Tours and are usually contenders at the World Championships and hillier one-day races too. But, what makes a true Grand Tour contender?

  11. Tour de France 2023: Daily stage results and general classification

    Two kilometres later, the Slovenian opened up a gap to the Dane. The two-time Tour de France winner managed to stay and claim his tenth Tour de France stage win. In the GC, Vingegaard now leads by 25 seconds to Tadej Pogacar in second place. 2023 Tour de France: Stage 6 Results - Thursday 6 July Tarbes to Cauterets-Cambasque, high mountains ...

  12. List of Tour de France general classification winners

    List of Tour de France general classification winners The Tour de France is an annual road bicycle race held over 23 days in July. Established in 1903 by newspaper L'Auto, the Tour is the best-known and most prestigious of cycling's three "Grand Tours"; the others are the Giro d'Italia and the Vuelta a España. [1]

  13. Preview: Your guide to the 2022 Tour de France GC contenders, sprinters

    It's that time of year again. Time for the biggest race of them all: the Tour de France. As we gear up for the 109th edition of La Grande Boucle - which starts on Friday July 1 in Copenhagen - let's talk about the contenders for the race overall, the sprinters, and other riders you'll want to keep an eye on.. If you haven't already, be sure to have a read of our stage-by-stage ...

  14. Here's Who Won the 2023 Tour de France

    Jonas Vingegaard (Jumbo-Visma) took over the lead of the 2023 Tour de France after an eventful Stage 6 that saw the GC contenders battle it out for the stage win and crucial seconds.

  15. Tour de France Tactics Masterclass: Insider's Guide to the Strategies

    GC contenders are riders with the capacity to maintain consistency throughout the three-week duration, thus having the best potential of securing overall victory in the Tour de France. They tend to excel on mountainous stages and during time trials, where there is the most potential to gain (or lose) significant time gaps.

  16. Tour de France Explained: How You Win & How It Really Works

    How The Tour de France Works The Tour de France: Infographic. What is the Tour de France. The Tour de France is the world's most prestigious bike race which has been running for over 100 years. The Tour takes riders all across France, through the Alps and the Pyranees, and finishes in Paris. This year it will take place: July 1 - July 23, 2023

  17. Tour de France: How the GC favorites fared through all-action ...

    Hilly opening stages leaves Ineos Grenadiers chasing time as Roglič, Pogačar, Alaphilippe set tone with early aggression.

  18. Tour de France Glossary

    The 2023 Tour de France starts on July 1, and these days you have a variety of legal, dependable ways to watch it live or on demand. But knowing when and how to tune in is only half the battle ...

  19. Official website of Tour de France 2024

    Tour de France 2024 - Official site of the famed race from the Tour de France. Includes route, riders, teams, and coverage of past Tours

  20. Tom Pidcock learns the hard way in his Tour de France GC quest: 'I felt

    The bombastic Brit will leave the Tour without a stage win or standout GC placing, but with a rich bank of experience to draw from in his quest to become a grand tour great. "This year I learned," Pidcock said after his second-straight day in the break Saturday. "I've come away with nothing but I've come away with everything.

  21. Tour de France star Vingegaard already the rider to beat in O Gran

    The double ascent of the category 2 Alto de San Pedro de Lincora, the second time around peaking out just a handful of kilometres away from the finish in Chantada, could make this another major GC ...

  22. Virtual L'Etape du Tour de France Series Announced

    L'Etape du Tour de France is one of the biggest amateur Gran Fondos in the world, with over 16,000 participants each year. Riders return year after year to take on a full Tour de France mountain stage, and Zwift has a history of working with L'Etape as a training partner. ... Each month will have a GC competition on ZwiftPower (look under ...

  23. Tom Pidcock Confirms 'Full Focus' on Tour De France GC

    Tom Pidcock began a belated and shortened cyclocross campaign on Saturday, allocating himself just ten events because of a clear season goal. Stage winner at Alpe d'Huez in 2022 and 13th overall in last year's Tour de France, he has set his sights firmly on a big ambition in France. "I want to prove myself in the Tour," the 24-year-old ...

  24. L'Étape de Tour to 'bring a bit of the Tour de France' to Killarney

    Wed Feb 21 2024 - 14:52. The popular L'Étape de Tour cycling sportive series is coming to Ireland for the first time, the new event set to start and finish in Killarney on Saturday, September ...

  25. Tour de France 2024: Results & News

    The 2024 Tour de France includes 52,230 metres of vertical gain across 3,492km of climbs, sprints and time trialling from Italy into France, with fewer high climbs than in the past and shorter ...

  26. Mark Cavendish eyes Tour de France record as Red Bull set to join ...

    Mark Cavendish has won 35 Tour de France stages, a record he shares with Belgium's Eddy Merckx Mark Cavendish's final season in the saddle is already off to a winning start, and his bid for Tour ...

  27. 2024 Tour de France

    Dates. 29 June-21 July 2024. ← 2023. 2025 →. The 2024 Tour de France will be the 111th edition of the Tour de France. It will start in Florence, Italy on 29 June, and will finish in Nice, France on the 21 July. The race will not finish in (or near) Paris for the first time since its inception, owing to preparations for the Paris 2024 ...

  28. Tour de France stage 13: Grand Colombier turns up GC heat on Bastille

    Decades earlier, the 1906 Tour de France field included Charles Perraud, a rider born in the town. Stage end location Grand Colombier is the highest point of the Bugey region, located in the south of the Jura mountain range. Described by Tour organizers ASO as 'on the way to becoming one of the classic climbs' of the event, it was only ...