Yes: "90125 Was A New Beginning For Us, Not Just Another Chapter"

In 1983 Yes stormed the charts with a new pop sound. Yet just months before, the band hadn’t even existed. This is the story of one of music’s least likely comebacks...

Yes portrait, 1983

By 1981, Yes had disappeared. As the new decade dawned, the line-up that had given us Drama the previous year had cracked and splintered. Keyboard player Geoff Downes and guitarist Steve Howe became founding members of Asia and enjoyed huge success in their own right. Vocalist Trevor Horn was on an upward trajectory as a producer. And that left bassist Chris Squire and drummer Alan White trying to find a cohesive musical direction.

“Atlantic, to whom Yes were signed, were determined to keep Alan and I working together,” recalls Squire. “We had tried to form a new band, XYZ, in 1981 with Jimmy Page, but that had fizzled out. And then in 1982 Trevor Rabin’s name came up. Brian Lane, our former manager, had actually played me some of his tracks in 1979 and I thought it was the new Foreigner album. But three years later, we agreed to meet up with him.”

While Squire and White contemplated where life might lead in the post-Yes era, multi-instrumentalist Rabin had been facing an exciting, albeit uncertain, future. After releasing three well-received but commercially disappointing solo albums, he relocated to Los Angeles from the UK after signing to Geffen.

“I went through an intense writing phase out there, when I effectively came up with the songs which would appear on 90125 ,” he explains. “But Geffen weren’t impressed, so they dropped me.”

After getting some interest from other labels, Rabin eventually agreed a deal with Atlantic, and it was Phil Carson, one of the most powerful men at the company, who put him in touch with Squire and White.

“He felt that I needed a rhythm section,” Rabin says. “So, the three of us agreed to meet at a sushi bar in London. Chris was late, which I was to discover was usual for him, but we eventually went back to his place and jammed. I have to say, it wasn’t a very good session. But there was clearly a chemistry between us which was worth pursuing.”

Squire is a little more blunt about that initial meeting. “We got pissed at my house, then thought it was a good idea to play together. After 10 minutes, we all knew it could work, even though the jam session was rubbish!”

They brought in former Yes keyboard player Tony Kaye to complete the line-up. “Trevor was great at playing guitar and keyboards, but he was something of a virtuoso,” reveals the bassist. “What we also needed was someone who could come in and play solid keyboards, to augment what Trevor did; someone very grounded who would add texture to the sound. And I thought immediately of Tony.”

The new quartet became Cinema. In spite of the fact that there were now three former members of Yes in the group, there was no way they were going to revive that band’s name. “I was totally against it,” admits Rabin. “I wanted this to be seen as a new project, and not the continuation of an extinct 70s band.”

Cinema spent eight months working on their material at John Henry’s Rehearsal Studio in North London. Rabin reveals: “What we ended up with was a combination of songs I had originally demoed to get the Geffen deal, plus some stuff Chris came in with, and other tracks we collaborated on from scratch.”

And it was then that Horn came into the picture. “He was actually approached about being the singer for the band,” recalls Rabin. “Chris thought we needed a frontman, someone who just sang. But Trevor and I just didn’t get on at all. In fact, things became very heated between us, and in the end it was decided not to bring him into the band.”

Squire concurs on the original reason they approached Horn. “I felt we needed a singer in the band, and I mentioned to Trevor Rabin that maybe the guy for the job was Trevor Horn, who of course I knew from the Drama period of Yes. So we met for lunch and I offered him the job of singing in Cinema. But Trevor was really making a name for himself at the time as a producer – he’d already had success with ABC and Dollar – so he didn’t want to give up this new career and join a band. However, Trevor did agree to produce our album, and I was delighted to have him on board.”

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However, Rabin didn’t exactly share Squire’s enthusiasm about Horn being the right man to produce the fledgling band’s album. “I remember thinking he was totally wrong for this project. He was a pop producer, and I was very sceptical about what he could actually do for us. But in the end, I have to admit that Trevor turned out to be exactly the right man for 90125 .”

Cinema and Horn went into London’s Sarm East Studios in November 1982 to record the album (they would also work over the next several months at AIR and Sunpark Studios, again in London). And they had virtually the entire album finished when the story took another twist, with the arrival of Jon Anderson.

“Phil Carson came down to Sarm East and liked what we were doing,” explains Squire. “But he kept on and on at us about changing the name to Yes. His logic was that if we were to use the ‘Yes’ tag then we’d have a ready-made audience and the album would be much bigger. He wanted me to call Jon and get him involved, and eventually – just to shut him up – I agreed to contact him.”

At the time, Anderson was working in the South of France on a project inspired by the artist Marc Chagall. But a fateful call from Squire would change all his plans. “I was in London for a weekend when Chris phoned me. He said he wanted to come over to my place in Knightsbridge and play me some of the music from his new band. We ended up sitting in his Rolls Royce listening to what Cinema had recorded so far and it blew me away. The sound was so fresh. I loved the vocal harmonies, and Trevor Horn’s production was great. I was a big fan of his production style anyway.

“Chris then asked me if I’d like to sing on the album and join the band. I told him that if I did that then effectively we were making a Yes album, and he replied, ‘Well, that’s the idea.’”

At this juncture, Rabin was unaware of plans to bring in Anderson, although he now appears very sanguine about what happened. “Obviously, the label didn’t think my vocals were strong enough. But the other guys in the band didn’t want to hurt my feelings so they never confronted me. However, recording had gone so far down the line that to replace all my vocals would have been a huge task. That’s why I sing lead vocals on some tracks, although I’d have been happy for Jon to have done them all.”

But the guitarist objected strongly to the band now being known as Yes. “I was still very much against it, but was outvoted.”

Despite coming on to the scene rather late, Anderson still had some input into the writing process. “I changed some of the choruses and added lyrics to certain songs as well. I only had about three weeks in the studio to do my parts, but found it to be a very rewarding experience. I loved working with Trevor Horn as he was always so receptive to any ideas I had.”

But Squire has a different take on the relationship between the returning vocalist and the producer. “Oh, they butted heads quite a lot. At times, there was major friction.”

To add to the melodrama in the studio, Kaye had his own problems with Horn. “They didn’t get on at all,” says Rabin. “So, he left the band before we’d finished the album, and I had to finish the keyboard parts.”

Squire, though, has an alternative version on what happened. “Tony actually completed all his work. So, because he wasn’t on good terms with Trevor Horn, we suggested he should go home to Los Angeles. But he was never fired from Yes, nor did he quit. The only reason we had Eddie Jobson feature in the video for Owner Of A Lonely Heart was because he was around when we shot it. We never talked to Eddie, or anybody, about replacing Tony.”

“We did hold discussions with Eddie about coming into the band for touring,” disagrees Rabin. “And we also considered Duncan Mackay. But we got Tony back in the end because he knew all the parts and with Horn not involved in touring, there was no chance of any of those problems rearing up again.”

Rabin recalls the studio sessions as running well behind schedule. “We had a very laissez‑faire attitude. There were times when I was in the studio with just one of the engineers doing my parts because Trevor was away working on Malcolm McLaren’s Duck Rock album. It was typical of the inefficient beast called Yes.”

And there were even problems with Horn’s final mix, as Squire recalls: “Trevor Rabin wasn’t satisfied and did a couple of his own remixes. But the label were very happy with the original mix, and we didn’t want to compromise and have a few Rabin mixes alongside the rest from Horn. So we went for the amazing sound that Trevor Horn got for us.”

So where did the idea for the album title originate? There’s no consensus on this, with both Rabin and Anderson claiming to have come up with the idea. But Squire has his own view. “The suggestion came from Garry Mouat, who designed the sleeve. We couldn’t come up with any suitable title and he thought of using the catalogue number. Actually, it was supposed to be called 89464. That was to be the album catalogue number. But we were two months late delivering the album [in July 1983], so the release date and the catalogue number changed.”

The success in 1983 of 90125 gave Yes a fresh impetus for a new era of achievement, which is something that Squire acknowledges: “We reinvented Yes,” he says. “Because the album was so fresh, we picked up a new audience. Some 70s diehards might have been upset by what we did. However, it gave us an extra dimension.”

“I was delighted with the reaction the album got,” adds Rabin. “The fact that Owner Of A Lonely Heart was a big hit gave us a new profile for the MTV age. I was determined this wouldn’t be seen as a continuation of Yes as they were in the 70s, and we got it right. It was a new beginning for Yes, not just another chapter.”

This article originally appeared in Prog 50.

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Malcolm Dome had an illustrious and celebrated career which stretched back to working for  Record Mirror  magazine in the late 70s and  Metal Fury  in the early 80s before joining  Kerrang!  at its launch in 1981. His first book,  Encyclopedia Metallica , published in 1981, may have been the inspiration for the name of a certain band formed that same year. Dome is also credited with inventing the term "thrash metal" while writing about the  Anthrax  song  Metal Thrashing Mad  in 1984. With the launch of Classic Rock magazine in 1998 he became involved with that title, sister magazine Metal Hammer, and was a contributor to Prog magazine since its inception in 2009. He died in 2021 . 

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YES's TREVOR RABIN Recalls How '90125' Touring Plans Were Put In Jeopardy Following Unfortunate Accident

In the latest issue of Rock Candy magazine, YES guitarist Trevor Rabin reveals the unbelievable story of how the band's 1983 tour in support of phenomenally successful comeback album "90125" and No. 1 U.S. hit "Owner Of A Lonely Heart" was put in jeopardy after an unfortunate accident.

"We were in a hotel swimming pool in Miami sipping champagne to celebrate the global success of 'Owner Of A Lonely Heart' ," Rabin told Rock Candy writer Malcolm Dome . "There was a water slide very close to me that I hadn't really noticed. Suddenly a very large woman came hurtling down the slide and crashed straight into me. The collision was so bad that it ruptured my spleen and put me in hospital. I needed an operation and was out of action for a few weeks. It sounds so bizarre now — almost laughable — but at the time, it was pretty scary and worrying."

In a massive 16-page cover story featuring two exclusive in-depth interviews with Rabin and YES vocalist Jon Anderson , Dome forensically unpicks YES 's return to prominence in the '80s

"When I was working in the studio on '90125', I definitely knew that what we were doing was taking the band into a new era," says Anderson . "This wasn't the '70s YES . It was a band that was built for the '80s. When the album was released, it became apparent that we were suddenly appealing to the MTV generation. We'd managed to get away from the idea that we were a big name from the previous decade that was no longer relevant — and I loved that.

"The whole idea behind '90125' was that no one would be able to say 'heard it all before,' confirms Rabin . "If that had happened, then the entire exercise would have been a creative failure."

Rock Candy is a 100-page, full-color bi-monthly rock magazine, created in the U.K. It covers the sights, sounds and smells from the greatest era in hard rock music, the '70s and '80s. Put together by respected U.K. rock journalists Derek Oliver , Howard Johnson and Malcolm Dome — all frontline writers for the legendary Kerrang! magazine in the golden era — Rock Candy is available in print format with a free digital download version for anyone who buys the mag online at www.rockcandymag.com .

90125 tour

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Yes - 90125 - 1984-09-23 - Irvine Meadows Amphitheatre (Marco)

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Ultimate Classic Rock

How Yes’ ‘90125’ Became the Password in a New Time-Traveling Book

There have been many interesting methods of fictional time travel, perhaps most memorably in a souped-up DeLorean . Add Yes ' bestselling album to the list.

" 90125 " is the secret word required to return to the present day from 1983 in Jeb Wright's Blast From the Past . That's just one of the classic rock connections in this delightfully funny new novel.

Many music fans will remember Wright from his 20-year history running Classic Rock Revisited . The site closed in early 2019, but his archives thankfully remain online. They showcase a lengthy run in which Wright talked to every rock star imaginable, from Ozzy Osbourne to members of Fleetwood Mac and Aerosmith .

Eventually, he felt that there was no classic rock stone left unturned, so Wright stepped away and focus on family and other interests. One of those interests was writing a novel. In the following conversation with UCR, Wright discusses Blast From the Past and how Yes became one of the "minor characters" in his story.

This is your first fiction novel. How did the idea of writing this book start to take root in your head? It is a fictional book. That’s the first thing everyone asks me, “Is this real?”  

But there’s a lot of reality in there, I can tell that. There is no character that’s going to sue me, because I wrote it as fiction, but there are moments of truth. And there are experiences that are written in a fictional way that were very close to some things that I experienced personally. The protagonist in the book is based on me – I mean, it really is. I did have a best friend that passed away, [though] it was different circumstances. There are seeds of truth and I will say this, it is not even based on a true story. That’s not the right tagline – this is fiction. But I grew up in the ’80s and I did all of the things. There’s one point though – now, the people are different, the characters are characters, they’re not the actual people – but I went to see the Yes 90125 tour and all of that shit happened that’s in the book. So if you don’t know what it is, read the book, because it’s funny.

I’ve always thought, “You know, I’d love to write a book about that, but it’s just this little piece of time. It’s 24 hours, you know, how am I going to do this? One day I decided, I’m going to tell it in a story and I’m going to figure out what comes before and what comes after – because the middle of the books [that I read], a lot of times for me, they lose me. I thought, [the Yes story] is going to be the middle because especially if you’re a classic rock fan, this is going to keep you interested. That’s how it started. The factual parts of this fictional book are that I live in a rural town in Kansas and I grew up here. It was also the 1980s! [Laughs] So there were some sex, drugs and rock 'n' roll type of [things]. That’s why we still do what we do, from the seeds that were sown then.

Then, I did have a friend die and though he died later in life, it was a way that I could kind of have conversations with him. He was a very, very close friend. I don’t think this is a spoiler alert, so I’ll talk about it: One of the ways you know that it’s fiction is that there’s a ghost. [Laughs] I don’t know about you, but I’ve never really had a ghost talk to me. But don’t think it’s a ghost story! That’s what makes this tale a little bit tricky is that I don’t have a super-defined genre, except to say that it’s a life story – a buddy story, almost. I used that ghost metaphor to kind of have us go back and forth in time. So my friend that died, who is Ash in the book, I really did have an emotional experience. It was emotional because I got to have conversations with him, back and forth in time, that I couldn’t ever have again, because he wasn’t here. Even though the circumstances were different, the more emotional parts of the book for me are those conversations. [It was also] one of my favorite things to write. But it all started because I wanted to talk about the fun night I had going to see Yes!

Watch Yes' 'Owner of a Lonely Heart' Video

As I read the book, that was one of the first things I wanted to ask you about, whether or not you believe that 90125 is the album , which is how you position it in the book. This is a hard question. I’m not just a prog guy. I like this much prog, but what I like, I like it a lot. Kansas , Yes, ELP , kind of the famous stuff. So I love Fragile and Close to the Edge . If I’m journalist Jeb, I’m going to say it’s the Steve Howe / [Rick] Wakeman [era], the classic lineup. That’s the band. What do I listen to most? I love the shit out of 90125 .

I was very surprised to read that. I love 90125 too, but not a lot of people will take that position. I love that album. I love every note of that album. I think what it is, we all have the nostalgic part to us, the fan part to us. It came out in 1983 and it’s right in the heart of my book – that’s the year. There’s a real nostalgic part that happened, with what was going on in my life and things like that, so that album is hooked into my memories. But you can’t go wrong with “ Owner of a Lonely Heart ” and “Hold On” and “It Can Happen” and “Leave It.” Those are the biggies. I love the whole thing, but I’m a big Trevor [Rabin] fan, too.

I chuckled at the idea that "90125" is the safe word when he wants to travel back and forth in time. I’m gonna give some credit where it’s due to a friend of mine whose name is Chad Sanborn. We grew up together and he is a writer. He’s sold a lot of books and he’s also kind of a writer coach. He does it for a living. He’s from this little town too, but he lives up in Kansas City. He’s a crime novelist, which is obviously not what this is, but he knew me back then. He didn’t write it for me, but he kind of guided me [through] some [of the process]. Because I was like, “How am I going to go back and forth?” He didn’t tell me. You know, he’s like, “Come up with something catchy.” It just was like, okay, the Yes album, again. The character loves that album and the key word to go back and forth through time is 90125 . I almost tried to make that album a minor character in a way.

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90125 tour

YES’s TREVOR RABIN Speaks to ‘90125’ Touring Plans Being Put in Jeopardy Following Accident

90125 tour

In the latest issue of  Rock Candy  magazine,  YES  guitarist  Trevor Rabin  reveals the unbelievable story of how the band’s 1983 tour in support of phenomenally successful comeback album  “90125”  and No. 1 U.S. hit  “Owner Of A Lonely Heart”  was put in jeopardy after an unfortunate accident.

“ We were in a hotel swimming pool in Miami sipping champagne to celebrate the global success of  ‘Owner Of A Lonely Heart’ , ”  Rabin  told  Rock Candy  writer  Malcolm Dome . “ There was a water slide very close to me that I hadn’t really noticed. Suddenly a very large woman came hurtling down the slide and crashed straight into me. The collision was so bad that it ruptured my spleen and put me in hospital. I needed an operation and was out of action for a few weeks. It sounds so bizarre now — almost laughable — but at the time, it was pretty scary and worrying.”

In a massive 16-page cover story featuring two exclusive in-depth interviews with  Rabin  and  YES  vocalist  Jon Anderson ,  Dome  forensically unpicks  YES ‘s return to prominence in the ’80s

“ When I was working in the studio on ‘90125’, I definitely knew that what we were doing was taking the band into a new era, ” says  Anderson . “ This wasn’t the ’70s  YES . It was a band that was built for the ’80s. When the album was released, it became apparent that we were suddenly appealing to the  MTV  generation. We’d managed to get away from the idea that we were a big name from the previous decade that was no longer relevant — and I loved that.

“The whole idea behind  ‘90125’  was that no one would be able to say ‘heard it all before, ‘ confirms  Rabin . “ If that had happened, then the entire exercise would have been a creative failure.”

Rock Candy  is a 100-page, full-color bi-monthly rock magazine, created in the U.K. It covers the sights, sounds and smells from the greatest era in hard rock music, the ’70s and ’80s. Put together by respected U.K. rock journalists  Derek Oliver ,  Howard Johnson  and  Malcolm Dome  — all frontline writers for the legendary  Kerrang! magazine in the golden era —  Rock Candy  is available in print format with a free digital download version for anyone who buys the mag online at  www.rockcandymag.com .

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90125 tour

IMAGES

  1. YES

    90125 tour

  2. YES

    90125 tour

  3. Chris Squire on Yes' 90125 Tour 1984

    90125 tour

  4. Yes

    90125 tour

  5. Yes 90125 Tour. Not really that great a picture but it's the only one I

    90125 tour

  6. 90125 at 30

    90125 tour

VIDEO

  1. POV:Ronaldo is taking a penalty

  2. Yes 1984 (audio only) Captured live 1 & 2

  3. SOR-Owner of a Lonely Heart by Yes (Cover)

  4. 90125 at 40

  5. "Roundabout" Yes with Tony Kaye@The Fillmore Philadelphia 7/21/18

  6. YES . IT CAN HAPPEN . 90125 . I LOVE MUSIC

COMMENTS

  1. 90125

    90125 is the eleventh studio album by the English progressive rock band Yes, released in November 1983 by Atco Records. After Yes disbanded in 1981, following the Drama (1980) tour, bassist Chris Squire and drummer Alan White formed Cinema , and began recording an album with guitarist and singer-songwriter Trevor Rabin and original Yes ...

  2. YES

    YES - COMPLETE 90125 TOUR01 Intro HOLMDEL 09048402 Cinema EDMONTON 09288403 Leave It EDMONTON 09288404 Alan White Solo/Hold On HERSHEY 09018405 Your's is No...

  3. List of Yes concert tours (1980s-90s)

    "Run Through the Light" (Played on 16 October 1980) "The Fish (Schindleria Praematurus)" (Played on 5 September 1980, 16 October 1980) Tour dates 9012Live Tour Lineup:

  4. 40 Years Ago: Yes Makes Improbable Trip to the Top With '90125'

    The group's 11th LP, 90125, arrived on Nov. 7, 1983, the happy end result of a long series of twists and turns that included yet another flurry of lineup changes for the famously fluctuating...

  5. Yes: "90125 Was A New Beginning For Us, Not Just Another Chapter"

    Features Prog Yes: "90125 Was A New Beginning For Us, Not Just Another Chapter" By Malcolm Dome ( Prog ) published 7 November 2016 In 1983 Yes stormed the charts with a new pop sound. Yet just months before, the band hadn't even existed. This is the story of one of music's least likely comebacks... (Image credit: Getty Images)

  6. The Concert Database

    Dedicated to live performances and their respective recordings, along with details. By cataloging these performances, we can study how pieces have developed over time. To learn about small nuances hidden within the performances.

  7. Yes Concert Map by tour: 90125 Tour

    Heaven & Earth Tour (49) In the Present (144) Keys to Ascension (3) Magnification (70) Masterworks (31) Open Your Eyes (149) Relayer (91) Rite of Spring (21) Tales from Topographic Oceans (79) Talk (78) The Album Series: Drama + Tales From Topographic Oceans 1 & 4 (45) The Album Series: Fragile + Drama (25) The Classic Tales of Yes Tour (26)

  8. Official website for the progressive rock band YES

    Close To The Edge 50th Anniversary Tour 2022

  9. YES's TREVOR RABIN Recalls How '90125' Touring Plans Were Put In

    In the latest issue of Rock Candy magazine, YES guitarist Trevor Rabin reveals the unbelievable story of how the band's 1983 tour in support of phenomenally successful comeback album "90125" and ...

  10. Yes Live at Capitol Centre, Landover, MD May 15, 1984

    Complete performance of last show from US leg of the 90125 tour. Pro-shot 2 hrs 25 mins.1.01 Cinema1.02 Leave It1.03 Yours Is No Disgrace1.04 White Solo / Ho...

  11. 90125

    Yes - 90125 - 1984-03-06 - Five Seasons Centre Arena - Cedar Rapids by Yes. Publication date 1984-03-06. Yes Live in Cedar Rapids Iowa USA at the Five Seasons Center Arena March 6th 1984 *PCM Personal Favorite* This I would have to say is the best recording of Yes I have. Also the most dynamic

  12. Yes

    Great show and recording from the end of the 90125 tour. Funny how the set list got longer as the tour progressed, usually it's the other way around. I didn't go to this show as i saw the show in San Diego in March. They added Our Song and Gimme Some Lovin'. Unfortunately the last song Lovin' is cut short but still a very nice show. Enjoy! Brian.

  13. How Yes' '90125' Became the Password in a New Time-Traveling Book

    Add Yes ' bestselling album to the list. " 90125 " is the secret word required to return to the present day from 1983 in Jeb Wright's Blast From the Past. That's just one of the classic rock ...

  14. 90125

    90125 is the eleventh studio album by the English progressive rock band Yes, released in November 1983 by Atco Records. After Yes disbanded in 1981, following the Drama tour, bassist Chris Squire and drummer Alan White formed Cinema, and began recording an album with guitarist and singer-songwriter Trevor Rabin and original Yes keyboardist Tony Kaye, who had been fired in 1971.

  15. Yes

    About "90125". The reunion of Yes after the 1981 breakup, this album features both the return of Jon Anderson, who had not appeared since 1978's Tormato, and Tony Kaye, who had not appeared ...

  16. Yes Concert Setlists

    Artist: Yes , Tour: The Classic Tales of Yes Tour , Venue: Village Lawn at The Meritage Resort and Spa , Napa, CA, USA. Set Times: Doors: 5:30 PM. The Young Person's Guide to the Orchestra. Going for the One. It Will Be a Good Day (The River) Machine Messiah. I've Seen All Good People. America.

  17. Yes

    #1 tug_of_war likes this. rancher Unmade Bed Location: Ohio I saw shows on both tours as a teen in the 80's, but have never really gone back to watch videos, though. I Liked the 90125 tour better, really, a little more energy and uniqueness to me rancher, Jan 18, 2019 #2 tug_of_war likes this. Thoughtships Forum Resident Location: Devon, UK

  18. YES's TREVOR RABIN Speaks to '90125' Touring Plans Being Put in

    In the latest issue of Rock Candy magazine, YES guitarist Trevor Rabin reveals the unbelievable story of how the band's 1983 tour in support of phenomenally successful comeback album "90125" and No. 1 U.S. hit "Owner Of A Lonely Heart" was put in jeopardy after an unfortunate accident. " We were in a hotel swimming pool in Miami ...

  19. Yes's 1984 Concert & Tour History

    Yes is a British progressive rock band which formed in London, United Kingdom in 1968. They are best known for 1970's "I've Seen All Good People", the 1972 9-minute US Top 20 smash "Roundabout" and their 1983 #1 hit "Owner of a Lonely Heart".

  20. Yes Setlist at Merriweather Post Pavilion, Columbia

    Get the Yes Setlist of the concert at Merriweather Post Pavilion, Columbia, MD, USA on September 6, 1984 from the 9012Live Tour and other Yes Setlists for free on setlist.fm!

  21. Yes Setlist at NEC Arena, Birmingham

    Get the Yes Setlist of the concert at NEC Arena, Birmingham, England on July 14, 1984 from the 9012Live Tour and other Yes Setlists for free on setlist.fm!

  22. Yes Average Setlists of tour: 90125 Tour

    Average setlist for tour: 90125 Tour No suitable data do calculate an average setlist. Most likely all setlists for this selection are still empty. View average setlists, openers, closers and encores of Yes for the tour 90125 Tour!

  23. Yes Tour Statistics: 90125 Tour

    View the statistics of songs played live by Yes. Have a look which song was played how often on the tour 90125 Tour!