A Complete Guide to Scotty From Star Trek

The Enterprise's redoubtable Chief Engineer is one of Star Trek's most beloved characters. Here's everything you need to know about Montgomery Scott.

Few Star Trek characters are more beloved than Montgomery Scott. With his immense engineering skills and propensity for jury-rigged solutions, he spent much of The Original Series at the heart of the action, and even took command of the Enterprise when Kirk and Spock were busy on some planet's surface. And while it was never used in precisely those terms, the phrase "beam me up Scotty" became one of Star Trek's first tag lines: referring to his uncanny operation of the ship's transporters.

Along the line, he experienced multiple reboots and updates, and like his fellow OG characters, he's always a welcome presence regardless of the project. He served as inspiration for subsequent Star Trek engineers -- notably Miles O'Brien from Star Trek: The Next Generation and Star Trek: Deep Space Nine -- and yet his in-universe origins remain surprisingly murky. His arrival on Star Trek: Strange New Worlds may change that, in addition to generating renewed interest in the character and his rich Star Trek history.

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Scotty's Origins

The character's origins lie with actor James Doohan, who played him for over 30 years and who remains more closely associated with Scotty than any other. According to David Gerrod's 1973 reference guide The World of Star Trek , Doohan played a huge role in the character's creation. He delivered a variety of accents while auditioning for the show's second pilot, "Where No Man Has Gone Before." When asked which accent he himself would use, the actor suggested Scottish because Scots were "renowned for having great engineering skills." That established the core of the character more or less on the spot.

Doohan always played Scotty as utterly devoted to the ship, to the point of considering it his property. That was often played for laughs: notably in Season 2, Episode 14, "The Trouble with Tribbles," when he started a bar fight with a group of Klingons after they disparaged the Enterprise's honor. He could solve any problem with the warp drive -- or any other part of the ship's systems -- which gave the show a natural ticking clock whenever it needed one. Scotty would invariably fix the malfunction with seconds to spare, allowing the Enterprise to escape by the skin of its teeth.

Scotty in The Original Star Trek

Scotty appeared in 65 of The Original Series' 79 episodes, as well as the first seven Star Trek movies and all but one entry in Star Trek: The Animated Series . That established his modus operandi: diligent, plain-spoken, and given to simple but accurate assessment of the problem du jour. It also cemented his unwavering loyalty to Captain Kirk, and his steadfast ability to hold the line in the face of trouble. That arose most often during his stints in the captain's chair, which helped define the character alongside his last-minute repairs and timely use of the transporter.

The Star Trek movies largely relegated him to support duties, though they found quiet ways to develop his character. A cut subplot from Star Trek II: The Wrath of Khan introduced his nephew among the Enterprise's new cadets, who's killed in Khan's first sneak attack. The brief sequences further connected Scotty to the ship's redshirts, as well as shedding light on his family and background. He played a more lightweight role in Star Trek III: The Search for Spock when he sabotaged the Excelsior in anticipation of the crew's theft of the Enterprise. Star Trek IV: The Voyage Home similarly let him flash his comedic chops, notably while dealing with a 1980s-era personal computer.

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Scotty in Later Star Trek

Doohan made a memorable cameo as Scotty in The Next Generation Season 6, Episode 4, "Relics," which also revealed details about his final years. After becoming a captain in The Search for Spock he remained the Enterprise's Chief Engineer until the end of Star Trek VI: The Undiscovered County . One year later, he embarked on the U.S.S. Jenolan en route to retirement in the Federation colony of Norpin. The ship crashed on a colossal alien structure called a Dyson Sphere, and he survived in the transporter's pattern buffer until the Enterprise-D revived him a century later. Picard gave him one of the ship's shuttlecraft, and he departed for points unknown. That presumably marks the end of the character's life, at least as far as canon is concerned.

A holographic version of the character also appeared in Star Trek: Prodigy Season 1, Episode 6, "Kobayashi." He was one of multiple classic figures recreated by Dal aboard to holodeck to assist him with his Kobayashi Maru test . The production used dialogue previously recorded by Doohan to bring him back for the episode. (Doohan himself passed away in 2005 at the age of 85.)

Scotty in The Kelvinverse

2009's Star Trek movie entailed a massive reboot, resulting in a new alternate timeline dubbed "The Kelvinverse" by fans. Scotty was memorably played by comic actor Simon Pegg, who revised the role in the next two Kelvinverse films. The changes in continuity resulted in a slightly different version of the character: relegated to a remote outpost before joining the Enterprise crew mid-emergency. In practical terms, it allowed Pegg to pursue his own take on Scotty without altering Doohan's. (Pegg has always expressed the highest respect for his predecessor.)

Besides playing up the character's funnier side, Pegg infused him with slightly wilder qualities: making him more willing to take risks than Doohan's version. The actor also developed a non-canon backstory for his Scotty, which shifted his birthplace to Glasgow among other things. (Dialogue in The Original Series Season 2, Episode 7, "A Wolf in the Fold" implied that he was from Aberdeen.) The Kelvinverse also gave Scotty a sidekick: the diminutive alien Keenser, played by Deep Roy. It gave him someone to play off of, further enhancing his status as the series' comic relief.

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Montgomery Scott

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Captain Montgomery Scott – often referred to as " Scotty " by his shipmates – was a male Human Starfleet officer who lived during the 23rd and 24th centuries .

For a period of nearly thirty years, he served as the chief engineer of both the USS Enterprise and the USS Enterprise -A , both under the command of Captain James T. Kirk . ( TOS : " Where No Man Has Gone Before "; Star Trek VI: The Undiscovered Country ; TNG : " Relics ", et al.)

With his reputation as a " miracle worker ", he was a man of superior technical and engineering skill, experience, and ingenuity. ( TOS : " The Doomsday Machine "; Star Trek III: The Search for Spock , Star Trek IV: The Voyage Home ; TNG : " Relics "; SNW : " Hegemony ")

  • 1 Early life
  • 2.1 Starfleet Academy
  • 2.2.1 Service aboard the Stardiver
  • 2.3.1 The five-year mission
  • 2.3.2 Refitting the Enterprise
  • 2.3.3 Battle with Khan
  • 2.3.4 Stealing the Enterprise
  • 2.4 Traveling back to 1986
  • 2.5.1 The Sybok incident
  • 2.5.2 Stopping a conspiracy
  • 2.6.1 Maiden voyage of the Enterprise -B
  • 2.6.2 En route to the Norpin colony
  • 2.6.3 Reemergence in the 24th century
  • 3.1 Klingon attack destroys Enterprise
  • 3.2 Party on the Enterprise
  • 4.1 Friendships
  • 4.2 Romantic relationships
  • 5 Holograms
  • 6 Alternate timeline
  • 7 Key dates
  • 8 Memorable quotes
  • 9.1 Appearances
  • 9.2 Background information
  • 9.3 Apocrypha
  • 9.4 External links

Early life [ ]

Montgomery Scott was born in Scotland on Earth in 2222 . ( TNG : " Relics ") He spent part of his life in Aberdeen , once referring to himself as an "old Aberdeen pub-crawler." ( TOS : " Wolf in the Fold ") After having time travelled to 1986 , Scott was introduced in a cover story as being from Edinburgh . ( Star Trek IV: The Voyage Home ) Upon being asked how he adjusted to space travel, Scott once admitted, " I was practically born to it. " ( TOS : " The Lights of Zetar ")

Starfleet career [ ]

Starfleet academy [ ].

Scott joined Starfleet and began his engineering career in 2241 . ( TNG : " Relics ")

During his time at Starfleet Academy , he had Professor Pelia as an instructor, who considered him to be one of her best students. Nevertheless, he received some of the worst grades in her course, something he would remain embarrassed about well into his Starfleet career. ( SNW : " Hegemony ")

Early postings and assignments [ ]

Scott was commissioned as a Starfleet officer with the serial number SE 19754 T. ( TOS : " Wolf in the Fold ")

During his fifty-one-year career, he served on a total of eleven ships , including various freighters , cruisers and starships . ( TNG : " Relics ")

Over his career, Scott had experience working with PXK pergium reactors . The last time he had even seen one was in 2247 , that was, until he attempted to repair the reactor at the Janus VI colony twenty years later . ( TOS : " The Devil in the Dark ") For a time in his career, he had also served as an engineering advisor for the freighting-line base established in the Deneva system that operated between the Deneva colony and the outlying asteroid belts . ( TOS : " Operation -- Annihilate! ")

During the course of his career, Scott wrote several technical manuals , including one titled Operating Protocol - Flow Sensors . A copy of this manual was stored in the Engineering Systems Database aboard the USS Enterprise -D in 2366 . ( TNG-R : " Booby Trap ") He was also responsible for writing Starfleet Regulation 42/15 , entitled "Pressure Variances in IRC Tank Storage", which was part of the basic operational specifications for impulse engines . These specifications were admittedly written "a wee bit" conservatively. ( TNG : " Relics ")

Service aboard the Stardiver [ ]

As a lieutenant junior grade , Scott was stationed aboard the USS Stardiver when the Stardiver was attacked by the Gorn in the Shangdi system . As the sole survivor , he escaped by constructing a transponder using parts from the Stardiver 's Hubble K7C Stellar Assessment Array , which fooled the Gorn vessels into seeing his shuttle as one of their own. However, the shuttle had been damaged and Scott was forced to land on Parnassus Beta , in the adjacent system. Scott created a "Gorn trap" using faked human bio-signs and force fields to ensnare any Gorn in the area. Scott was later beamed aboard the Enterprise , where he was reunited with his former instructor Pelia . ( SNW : " Hegemony ")

Service aboard the Enterprise [ ]

The five-year mission [ ].

Montgomery Scott, 2265

Lt. Commander Montgomery Scott in 2265

By 2265 , Scott was assigned to the USS Enterprise where he served as chief engineer under Captain James Kirk . ( TOS : " Where No Man Has Gone Before ") The Enterprise was the first ship on which he was the chief engineer. ( TNG : " Relics ")

Montgomery Scott, 2266

Scott in 2266

His duties also included maintenance and operation of the Enterprise 's transporter systems. Three of his top engineers included Lieutenants Kyle , Leslie , and Gabler . He was understandably upset when Harper , an assistant engineer who was one of only twenty crewmembers selected to remain aboard the Enterprise during the M-5 multitronic unit test mission, was killed by an energy transfer beam used by the insane supercomputer to draw power directly from the ship's warp engines. ( TOS : " The Ultimate Computer "; TAS : " One of Our Planets Is Missing ", " The Terratin Incident ")

Scott also served as the ship's second officer , and often assumed command when both Kirk and Spock left the ship, or they both were incapacitated. Thus, he often faced critical diplomatic and military situations. ( TOS : " A Taste of Armageddon ", " Journey to Babel ", " Friday's Child ", " Bread and Circuses ", " A Piece of the Action ") In 2268 , Kirk noted him to commendation for his outstanding command performance without disobeying the Prime Directive and saving the landing party on planet 892-IV . ( TOS : " Bread and Circuses ") However in 2267 , Kirk jokingly "fired" Scott when he couldn't repair the ship's engines and break out of orbit around Gamma Trianguli VI . After the destruction of Vaal Kirk immediately "re-hired" him. ( TOS : " The Apple ") Despite being a capable command officer he never pursued his own command post because he "…never wanted to be anythin' else but an engineer." ( TNG : " Relics ")

By the late 2260s , Scott knew more about the warp engines aboard a Constitution -class starship than even the men who designed them. ( TOS : " The Apple ") Furthermore, Scott was diligent in keeping his professional skills up to date considering he was an avid reader of technical journals , which he considered his idea of relaxing. ( TOS : " The Trouble with Tribbles ") This knowledge and ability to save the ship in a jam eventually led to his reputation aboard the Enterprise as a "miracle worker." This was brought about by his reputation for being able to effect starship repairs faster than usually required. Scott later admitted that he often padded his estimates of time needed for repairs by a factor of four in order to appear that much faster. ( Star Trek III: The Search for Spock ; TNG : " Relics ") As he said to Geordi La Forge in the 24th century, " A good engineer needs to be a wee bit conservative, at least on paper. "

Montgomery Scott aboard the Botany Bay

Scott aboard the SS Botany Bay

In 2268, Scott stated that he knew the Enterprise better than Larry Marvick , the man who designed the starship. When Marvick visited the ship, escorting the Medusan Ambassador Kollos , Scott made a bet, that he wouldn't find his way around the engine room. When Scott allowed him access to the warp engine controls, Marvick, under the madness brought on by the sight of the Medusan, attempted to take over the vessel and hurled it into the void surrounding our galaxy . ( TOS : " Is There in Truth No Beauty? ")

Scotty's dead, Jim

Scott is pronounced dead by McCoy on the bridge of the Enterprise

In 2267, Scott was attacked and killed by Nomad , a probe originally launched from Earth in the early 21st century . Kirk was distraught by the death of his valued chief engineer, but Nomad informed Kirk that Scott could be "repaired" and the probe revived Scott in sickbay. Later, Scott assisted Kirk and Spock in beaming Nomad out into open space before it exploded from Kirk talking it to death . ( TOS : " The Changeling ")

Later in 2267, Scott was thrown against a bulkhead of the Enterprise during an explosion caused by a female crewmember . This resulted in a severe concussion and possible amnesia . He was ordered to take time off for therapeutic shore leave on the planet Argelius II . While on Argelius he got into "a wee bit of trouble," as he later described it, when he was accused of murdering an Argelian woman named Kara . Scott's situation worsened when he was accused of two more murders, those of another Argelian, Sybo , and fellow officer Karen Tracy . Scott was later acquitted of the murder charges, following the discovery of a non-humanoid lifeform called Redjac in the form of Mr. Hengist , who was found to be responsible for the murders, and who admitted to being Jack the Ripper and other serial killers in previous incarnations. ( TOS : " Wolf in the Fold "; TNG : " Relics ")

There will be no tribble at all

Kirk amused by Scott's beaming the tribbles aboard the Klingon ship

Scott explains that it's green

" Well, it's green . "

Scott was extremely proud of the Enterprise . In fact, he was so proud that he once started a bar fight aboard Deep Space Station K-7 when a Klingon named Korax suggested that the ship should be hauled away as garbage. As a result, he was confined to his quarters by Kirk. Scott smiled and told Kirk the punishment would give him a chance to catch up on technical journals he had not had time to read. Shortly after the incident at K-7, Scott managed to rid the Enterprise of the tribbles which had infested the ship. Much to the pleasure of Captain Kirk, Scott, in collaboration with Spock and McCoy , beamed the tribbles aboard the IKS Gr'oth where they would be " no tribble at all ". ( TOS : " The Trouble with Tribbles ")

In 2268, Scott helped Kirk, Spock and McCoy regain control of the Enterprise after the ship was invaded by agents of the Kelvan Empire and set on a course to the Andromeda Galaxy . Before leaving the Milky Way Galaxy , Scott and Spock devised a plan to destroy the Enterprise at the galactic barrier , but Kirk decided against it. Later Scott tried to incapacitate the Kelvan agent Tomar by drinking various alcoholic beverages with him. He got Tomar so drunk that the alien passed out, but his plan was foiled when Scott himself passed out before he could leave his quarters. ( TOS : " By Any Other Name ")

MARA access tube

Repairing his bairns

In the same year the Enterprise was hurled hundreds of light years away from a Kalandan outpost, and sabotage accelerated the ship to dangerously high warp speeds. Scott risked his life by entering the access crawlspace to the matter-antimatter reaction chamber to repair the fused matter-antimatter integrator , a procedure so dangerous that it was not to be undertaken while the integrator was in operation. When a faulty magnetic probe nearly ruined the procedure, Scott demanded that Spock eject him from the chamber into space, but Spock risked critical seconds to allow the engineer to successfully complete his task. ( TOS : " That Which Survives ")

Kara aims phaser at James T

Scott helplessly watching Kara aim a phaser at Kirk

In 2268 , Scott's position as second officer and chief engineer required him to participate in executing the auto-destruct sequence to prevent Bele from hijacking the Enterprise to return Lokai to the planet Cheron . ( TOS : " Let That Be Your Last Battlefield ") Scott also threatened the female Romulan Commander that he would use the auto-destruct to destroy the Enterprise and "as many of you as we can take with us" when it was surrounded by Romulan vessels during its espionage mission to appropriate the Romulans ' cloaking device . ( TOS : " The Enterprise Incident ")

Scott and dilithium crystal

Scott examining the Enterprise 's dilithium crystal

Also, in 2268, Scott prevented Garth of Izar from escaping the Elba II asylum to board the Enterprise when he challenged Garth, who, in the guise of Kirk, had attempted to order Scott to transport him to the ship, by requiring Garth to provide the countersign to the prearranged chess problem . ( TOS : " Whom Gods Destroy ")

Scott was romantically involved with Starfleet sciences division specialist Lieutenant Mira Romaine at least when she was aboard the Enterprise during its mission to Memory Alpha . Scott figured prominently in the successful attempt to prevent Romaine's body from being appropriated by the Zetarians . In carrying her occupied person to McCoy's decompression chamber , Scott insisted to Kirk, " Mira will not hurt me. " Nevertheless, he was thrown across the room by their influence. ( TOS : " The Lights of Zetar ")

Scott complained to Kirk that "one of those barefoot whaddyacallems " had entered engineering and "tried to incite my crew to disaffect". ( TOS : " The Way to Eden ")

In 2268, Scott was present in the transporter room along with Kirk, Spock and Lieutenant Dickerson when Presidential honors were rendered to the Excalbian who had taken the form of US President Abraham Lincoln . He scoffed in suggesting sarcastically that "Lincoln" would be followed by " …[King] Louis of France and [fourteenth-century King of Scots] Robert the Bruce ! " ( TOS : " The Savage Curtain ")

Refitting the Enterprise [ ]

Montgomery Scott, 2270s

Scott in 2273

In 2270 , Scott was promoted to the rank of commander and played a leading role in the massive eighteen- month Constitution II -class redesign and refit of the USS Enterprise while serving under Captain Will Decker . ( Star Trek: The Motion Picture )

Battle with Khan [ ]

In March 2285 , Scott was a participant in Saavik 's Kobayashi Maru scenario at Starfleet Training Command . Though not present on the bridge simulator , his voice was heard on speakers . After the scenario, he served aboard the Enterprise under the command of Captain Spock. He was the ship's chief engineer for a three week training cruise. Upon receiving a call for help from Regula I , Starfleet Command ordered an investigation by the Enterprise . With Rear Admiral Kirk assuming command, the cruise was cut short. The Enterprise became involved with Project Genesis and Khan Noonien Singh's attempt to steal the Genesis Device . Eventually, Kirk was able to stop Khan, but not before the latter had wrought extensive damage upon the Enterprise , requiring Captain Spock to sacrifice his life to save the ship. One of the casualties was Scott's nephew Peter Preston . Scott played the bagpipes at Spock's funeral. ( Star Trek II: The Wrath of Khan )

Stealing the Enterprise [ ]

With the Enterprise safely at Spacedock One , Scott was promoted to captain and reassigned to the USS Excelsior as Captain of Engineering during the ship's early test runs. Scott detested his assignment aboard the Excelsior, citing the ship as little more than a "bucket of bolts" and didn't particularly care for Captain Lawrence H. Styles either. When Admiral Kirk resolved to steal the Enterprise and take it to the Genesis Planet without authorization to retrieve Spock's body, Scott was instrumental in their successful escape. He sabotaged Excelsior 's transwarp computer system by removing critical components, rigged an automation system that would allow Enterprise to be operated by only a handful of bridge officers, and hacked the space doors of Spacedock into opening.

When arriving at the Genesis planet, a Klingon Bird-of-Prey ambushed the Enterprise and opened fire, disabling Scott's automation system and leaving the ship as "a sitting duck". Scott, along with Kirk and Chekov, initiated the Enterprise 's auto-destruct sequence to prevent it from falling into Klingon hands. The crew beamed down to the planet, where they watched their beloved ship burn up in the atmosphere. This would have a lasting impact on Scott in later life, as Enterprise was "his home and where he had a purpose". ( Star Trek III: The Search for Spock ; TNG : " Relics ")

Traveling back to 1986 [ ]

Montgomery Scott, 2286

Scott in 2286

In 2286 , Scott traveled back in time to 1986 along with the rest of the Enterprise crew to find a pair of humpback whales . In order to construct a water tank for them, he visited the Plexicorp facility as "Professor Scott" from Edinburgh . Making a deal with plant manager Nichols he gave him the formula of transparent aluminum in exchange for a sheet of plexiglass . When Dr. McCoy objected against "changing the future," Scott pointed out " How do we know he didn't invent the thing? ".

Chief engineer of the USS Enterprise -A [ ]

The sybok incident [ ].

After returning home, he was reassigned as chief engineer of the newly commissioned USS Enterprise -A. ( Star Trek IV: The Voyage Home ) For three weeks, after a shakedown cruise, the flaws in the starship's systems were being identified and repaired under the supervision of Scott. During this time, he regained his rank of captain, after temporarily reverting to a commander following the incident of stealing the original starship Enterprise . ( Star Trek V: The Final Frontier )

Stopping a conspiracy [ ]

Montgomery Scott firing phaser, 2293

Scott firing his phaser at Colonel West on Khitomer

In 2293 , after seven years of serving aboard the Enterprise -A, Scott, along with the rest of the Enterprise -A crew, were due to stand down. Scott played a role in exposing the Khitomer conspiracy . Upon beaming down to the surface of Khitomer , he shot Colonel West , who was about to assassinate the Federation president and kill Lieutenant Valeris , out of a window and several stories to his death. ( Star Trek VI: The Undiscovered Country )

Retirement [ ]

In 2293 , Scott obtained a boat in anticipation of his retirement from the Enterprise -A. ( Star Trek VI: The Undiscovered Country )

Maiden voyage of the Enterprise -B [ ]

Montgomery Scott, 2293

Scott in 2293

Scott appeared as a " guest of honor " along with his former commanding officer , James T. Kirk, and his old crewmate, Commander Pavel Chekov , for the maiden voyage of the new Excelsior -class USS Enterprise -B , commanded by John Harriman . When the Enterprise -B responded to the distress call from two El-Aurian transports , Scott assisted in beaming a small group of survivors on board – 47 out of a total of 150. When the Enterprise became trapped in the energy ribbon the transports were in, Scott formulated a theory to use an antimatter discharge to disrupt the ribbon long enough for the vessel to break away. After Captain Kirk modified the deflector relays to emit a resonance burst , Scott and Hikaru Sulu 's daughter Demora were able to get the Enterprise clear. However, a hull breach was created on the secondary hull by the ribbon on the ship's way out and Kirk was presumed to be blown out into space . Upon being asked by Commander Chekov if anyone was in the deflector control room on Deck 15 when it was hit, Scott stared out the breach into space and solemnly stated " Aye ". ( Star Trek Generations )

En route to the Norpin colony [ ]

In 2294 , following his retirement from Starfleet, Scott traveled aboard the USS Jenolan to the Norpin colony , where he planned to spend his retirement. The Jenolan , however, encountered a Dyson sphere en route, and while attempting to investigate it, the transport crashed on its surface. Scott and Ensign Matt Franklin were the only survivors. Knowing that they didn't have enough supplies to wait for the ship's distress call to be picked up, Scott rigged the Jenolan 's transporter systems, and existed for seventy-five years in the ship's transporter buffer . ( TNG : " Relics ")

Reemergence in the 24th century [ ]

Scott's farewell

Scott in 2369 saying farewell to the crew of the Enterprise -D

In 2369 , Montgomery Scott was rescued by the USS Enterprise -D , but due to phase inducer failure, Franklin's pattern was too degraded to be recovered.

After Scott helped rescue the Enterprise -D from the Dyson sphere, Captain Picard rewarded him with the Enterprise 's shuttlecraft Goddard . ( TNG : " Relics ")

Sometime before 2387 , Montgomery Scott discovered the necessary formulas enabling transwarp beaming , which Spock later gave to a younger Scott in 2258 of the alternate reality . ( Star Trek )

Anything but canon scenarios [ ]

Klingon attack destroys enterprise.

Bridge crew (Skin a Cat)

Scott with Arex during the Klingon attack

In an anything but canon account, a fleet of D7-class battle cruisers once attacked the USS Enterprise . Scott was present on the bridge of the ship when this was happening. The captain was attempting to give the crew orders that would help save them from the Klingon 's continuous assault , but unfortunately, he continued using figures of speech that angered various crewmembers .

As a result, the Enterprise exploded due to continuous bombardment from disruptor blasts . ( VST : " Skin a Cat ")

Party on the Enterprise

Scott on the drums

Scotty playing the drums

In another anything but canon account, in a nonsensical setting in which the crew of the USS Enterprise and the USS Cerritos were actors in cartoon shows ; a party honoring the fiftieth anniversary of Scotty and the TOS era crew's cartoon was being celebrated . D'Vana Tendi of the Cerritos was present.

Although there was brief argument between the old cartoon and the new cartoon, but as William T. Riker and Hikaru Sulu left the turbolift and walked onto the bridge to join the party, the tension settled down and the party resumed, and the crew used their singing voices and musical instruments to play a song in the style of a music genre that Riker called Post Mainframe Acid-Cardassian Ten Forwardcore . By the end, Scotty told Tendi that he loved her and her crewmates on her ship , and he apologizes for arguing with her, and he admited she was cool because she got to use all the newest tech . Tendi even told him that she thought he was " hot ." While they were still playing in the band , the ship was attacked by a fleet of D7 class battle cruisers , which causes an explosion on the bridge to occur. ( VST : " Walk, Don't Run ")

Family and personal life [ ]

Scott had at least one sister , whose youngest child, Peter Preston , served aboard the Enterprise in 2285 as a midshipman during a Starfleet Academy training cruise. Preston was killed when the Enterprise was attacked and severely damaged by the USS Reliant in a surprise attack by Khan Noonien Singh . Scott was grief-stricken after the tragedy. ( Star Trek II: The Wrath of Khan )

Montgomery Scott enjoying a glass of Scotch

Scott enjoying a glass of Scotch

Scott had a love for good Scotch whisky , often making references to drinking or frequenting drinking establishments on more than one planet, even referring to himself once as an "old Aberdeen pub-crawler." ( Star Trek V: The Final Frontier ; TOS : " Wolf in the Fold ") He considered Scotch a drink for real men as opposed to, for instance, vodka which he referred to as "soda pop" and "milk diet". ( TOS : " The Trouble with Tribbles "). He did not like synthehol Scotch. ( TNG : " Relics ")

He took shore leave reluctantly and ran into trouble during shore leave on at least three occasions: a fistfight on Deep Space Station K-7, ( TOS : " The Trouble with Tribbles ") an arrest for murder on Argelius, ( TOS : " Wolf in the Fold ") and a "wee bout" requiring Dr. McCoy's attention. ( Star Trek II: The Wrath of Khan )

He wore his Scottish Clan kilt on three occasions. ( TOS : " Is There in Truth No Beauty? ", " The Savage Curtain "; Star Trek II: The Wrath of Khan ) He also played bagpipes, most notably playing " Amazing Grace " at the funeral for Captain Spock in 2285 . ( Star Trek II: The Wrath of Khan ) Scott was fascinated to be handling an old-fashioned Scottish claymore . ( TOS : " Day of the Dove ")

Montgomery Scott in a kilt

Friendships [ ]

Despite his superior talents as an engineer, he was often the source of comic relief among the Enterprise crew , due to his use of the Scots language . ( TOS : " The Trouble with Tribbles ", " The Savage Curtain "; Star Trek III: The Search for Spock ; Star Trek V: The Final Frontier )

Romantic relationships [ ]

Although a gentleman at heart, life as an engineer for Scott was often lonely, as he often attempted to pursue hopeless relationships with much younger female officers that were often perceived as being out of his league.

Scott was first attracted to Carolyn Palamas and reacted bitterly to the Greek god Apollo 's infatuation with her. ( TOS : " Who Mourns for Adonais? ")

Scott was interested in Kara , prior to her murder . ( TOS : " Wolf in the Fold ")

While under the influence of Harry Mudd 's love potion crystals , Scott briefly became interested in M'Ress . After the effects wore off, he snapped at her during his hangover . ( TAS : " Mudd's Passion ")

Mira Romaine and Montgomery Scott

Scott and Romaine

Scott later became infatuated with the newly transferred Mira Romaine in 2269 . ( TOS : " The Lights of Zetar ")

Years later, Commander Uhura began to show some romantic interest in Scott while she was under Sybok 's influence. Scott politely declined her advances, mindful of her condition. ( Star Trek V: The Final Frontier )

Holograms [ ]

Montgomery Scott (Kobayashi Maru hologram)

Holographic Scott

During Dal 's many attempts at the Kobayashi Maru scenario , he requested that the computer select a new chief engineer for the recently departed Jankom Pog . He was given a holographic Scott as a replacement. Scott was the rank of captain and appeared as he did during the early 2290s . ( PRO : " Kobayashi ")

Alternate timeline [ ]

In an alternate timeline in which Captain Christopher Pike remained in the command of the Enterprise and avoided the accident that exposed him to delta radiation , Scott was serving aboard the Enterprise during the Neutral Zone Incursion . When he and Spock were working on restoring to phaser control to working order, he stated to Spock that he was "an engineer, not a miracle worker.". ( SNW : " A Quality of Mercy ")

Key dates [ ]

Montgomery Scott and crew in Enterprise-A engineering

Scott and his engineering staff on the Enterprise -A

  • 2222 : Montgomery Scott was born in Scotland, Earth
  • 2242 : Began his Starfleet career
  • 2259 : Rescued from Parnassus Beta by Christopher Pike and taken aboard the USS Enterprise ; rank: lieutenant junior grade
  • 2265 : Assigned as chief engineer of the USS Enterprise ; rank: lieutenant commander
  • 2270 : Assigned to refit crew of the USS Enterprise ; rank: commander
  • 2285 : Promoted to captain while assigned to the USS Excelsior ; remained the rank of captain following theft of the Enterprise and hijacking of HMS Bounty
  • 2286 : Assigned as chief engineer of the USS Enterprise -A
  • 2293 : Guest of honor aboard the newly-commissioned USS Enterprise -B
  • 2294 : Retired from Starfleet with the rank of captain ; lost aboard USS Jenolan on Dyson sphere
  • 2369 : Discovered by the crew of the USS Enterprise -D

Memorable quotes [ ]

" I cannae change the laws of physics! I've got to have thirty minutes! " ( TOS : " The Naked Time ")

" Of course I could treat them to a few dozen photon torpedoes. " ( TOS : " A Taste of Armageddon ")

" Diplomacy! [derisive snort] The best diplomat I know is a fully activated phaser bank! " ( TOS : " A Taste of Armageddon ")

" Aye, the haggis is in the fire for sure. " ( TOS : " A Taste of Armageddon ")

" It's armed now. Press this one – thirty seconds later, poof. Once it's activated, there's no way to stop it. "

" Before they went into warp I transported the whole kit 'n' kaboodle into their engine room… where they'll be no tribble at all. " ( TOS : " The Trouble with Tribbles ")

" You mind your place, mister, or you'll be wearing concrete galoshes. " ( TOS : " A Piece of the Action ")

" It's… uh… [sniffs contents of bottle] Well, it's green . " ( TOS : " By Any Other Name ")

" All right, you lovelies. Hold together. " ( TOS : " The Paradise Syndrome ")

" That Vulcan won't be satisfied until these panels are a puddle of lead! " ( TOS : " The Paradise Syndrome ")

" Oh, my bairns! My poor, poor bairns… " ( TOS : " The Paradise Syndrome ")

" The Enterprise takes no orders, except those of Captain Kirk. And if you make any attempt to board or commandeer the Enterprise , it will be blown to bits along with as many of you as we can take with us! " ( TOS : " The Enterprise Incident ")

" I'll not take that, Mr. Spock! That transporter was functioning perfectly! Transport me down right now and I'll explain to those… gentlemen… " ( TOS : " The Mark of Gideon ")

" President Lincoln indeed! No doubt to be followed by Louis of France and Robert the Bruce. " ( TOS : " The Savage Curtain ")

" Mad! Loony as an Arcturian dogbird! " ( TOS : " The Savage Curtain ")

" Admiral, we have just finished eighteen months redesigning and refitting the Enterprise . How in the name of hell do they expect me to have her ready in twelve hours?! " ( Star Trek: The Motion Picture )

" It's borderline on the simulator, captain. I cannae guarantee that she'll hold up! " ( Star Trek: The Motion Picture )

" Give the word, admiral! " " Mr. Scott, the word is given. " " Aye, sir! "

" The more they overthink the plumbing, the easier it is to stop up the drain. " ( Star Trek III: The Search for Spock )

" Up your shaft… "

" Hello, computer! " ( Star Trek IV: The Voyage Home )

" A keyboard. [in disgust] How quaint. " ( Star Trek IV: The Voyage Home )

" Why? How do we know he didn't invent the thing ? "

" Give me one more day, sir. Damage control's easy – reading Klingon, that's hard! "

" Admiral! There be whales here! "

" Don't you worry, captain. We'll beat those Klingon devils, even if I have to get out and push! " ( Star Trek V: The Final Frontier )

" I know this ship like the back o' me hand! " (at which point Scott knocks himself out cold on a low hanging pipe) ( Star Trek V: The Final Frontier )

" Whattaya standing around for?! Ye not know a jailbreak when ye see one?! "

" Borgus Frat! 'Let's see what she's got,' said the captain! And then we found out, didn't we? "

" USS Enterprise shakedown cruise report. I think this 'new' ship was put together by monkeys. Oh, she's got a fine engine, but half the doors won't open, and guess whose job it is to make it right? "

" That suits me, I just bought a boat. " ( Star Trek VI: The Undiscovered Country )

" Mr. Scott? " " Aye, sir? " " Did you find the engine room? " " Right where I left it, sir. "

" I'll bet that Klingon bitch killed her father! " ( Star Trek VI: The Undiscovered Country )

" Synthetic scotch, synthetic commanders… "

" N-C-C 1-7-0-1. No bloody A, B, C, or D. " ( TNG : " Relics ")

" I have spent my whole life trying to figure out crazy ways of doing things. " ( TNG : " Relics ")

" Starship captains are like children. They want everything right now and they want it their way. The secret is to give them what they need, not what they want. "

" The tank can't handle that much pressure. " " Where'd you get that idea? " " It's in the impulse specifications. " " Regulation 42/15: 'Pressure Variances in IRC Tank Storage'? " " Right. " " Oh, that. Forget it. I wrote it! "

" A good engineer is always a wee bit conservative, at least on paper. "

" I may be captain by rank… but I never wanted to be anything else but an engineer. " ( TNG : " Relics ")

Appendices [ ]

Appearances [ ].

  • " Where No Man Has Gone Before "
  • " The Corbomite Maneuver "
  • " Mudd's Women "
  • " The Enemy Within "
  • " The Man Trap " (voice only; uncredited)
  • " The Naked Time "
  • " Balance of Terror "
  • " The Galileo Seven "
  • " The Menagerie, Part I "
  • " The Squire of Gothos "
  • " Tomorrow is Yesterday "
  • " The Return of the Archons "
  • " A Taste of Armageddon "
  • " Space Seed "
  • " The Devil in the Dark "
  • " The City on the Edge of Forever "
  • " Operation -- Annihilate! "
  • " Catspaw "
  • " Metamorphosis "
  • " Friday's Child "
  • " Who Mourns for Adonais? "
  • " The Doomsday Machine "
  • " Wolf in the Fold "
  • " The Changeling "
  • " The Apple "
  • " Mirror, Mirror "
  • " The Deadly Years "
  • " I, Mudd "
  • " The Trouble with Tribbles "
  • " Bread and Circuses "
  • " A Private Little War "
  • " The Gamesters of Triskelion "
  • " Obsession "
  • " The Immunity Syndrome "
  • " A Piece of the Action "
  • " By Any Other Name "
  • " Return to Tomorrow "
  • " Patterns of Force "
  • " The Ultimate Computer "
  • " Assignment: Earth "
  • " Spectre of the Gun "
  • " Elaan of Troyius "
  • " The Paradise Syndrome "
  • " The Enterprise Incident "
  • " And the Children Shall Lead "
  • " Spock's Brain "
  • " Is There in Truth No Beauty? "
  • " The Empath "
  • " The Tholian Web "
  • " For the World is Hollow and I Have Touched the Sky "
  • " Day of the Dove "
  • " Plato's Stepchildren "
  • " Wink of an Eye "
  • " That Which Survives "
  • " Let That Be Your Last Battlefield "
  • " Whom Gods Destroy "
  • " The Mark of Gideon "
  • " The Lights of Zetar "
  • " The Cloud Minders "
  • " The Way to Eden "
  • " Requiem for Methuselah "
  • " The Savage Curtain "
  • " All Our Yesterdays " (voice only)
  • " Turnabout Intruder "
  • " Beyond the Farthest Star "
  • " Yesteryear "
  • " One of Our Planets Is Missing "
  • " The Lorelei Signal "
  • " More Tribbles, More Troubles "
  • " The Survivor "
  • " The Infinite Vulcan "
  • " The Magicks of Megas-Tu "
  • " Once Upon a Planet "
  • " Mudd's Passion "
  • " The Terratin Incident "
  • " The Time Trap "
  • " The Ambergris Element "
  • " The Eye of the Beholder "
  • " The Jihad "
  • " The Pirates of Orion "
  • " The Practical Joker "
  • " Albatross "
  • " How Sharper Than a Serpent's Tooth "
  • " The Counter-Clock Incident "
  • Star Trek: The Motion Picture
  • Star Trek II: The Wrath of Khan
  • Star Trek III: The Search for Spock
  • Star Trek IV: The Voyage Home
  • Star Trek V: The Final Frontier
  • Star Trek VI: The Undiscovered Country
  • Star Trek Generations
  • Star Trek Beyond (picture only)
  • " Trials and Tribble-ations " (archive footage)
  • " Kobayashi " (hologram)
  • " A Quality of Mercy " (voice only)
  • " Hegemony "
  • " Skin a Cat "
  • " Walk, Don't Run "

Background information [ ]

Montgomery Scott was played by actor James Doohan in all of the character's television and cinematic appearances set in the "prime" universe. An alternate timeline version of Scott was voiced by Matthew Wolf in SNW : " A Quality of Mercy " and portrayed by Martin Quinn in SNW : " Hegemony ".

The character of Montgomery Scott mostly originated from James Doohan himself. Doohan was asked by Director James Goldstone , to whom he had auditioned for another role only ten days prior, to come in and read a few lines from the script of TOS : " Where No Man Has Gone Before " for him, Gene Roddenberry , Robert H. Justman , Joseph D'Agosta , and Morris Chapnick . The role he was proposed for was an unnamed Chief Engineer. When Goldstone asked him to do some accents, Doohan did several ones, including Irish, Scottish, English, Russian, etc. Roddenberry asked him which one he would choose, and he said Scottish, due to Scotsmen being renowned for having great engineering skills. Thus, the character became Scottish, and it was apparently Doohan who named him "Scotty". ( The World of Star Trek ), [3]

Gene Roddenberry nearly dropped Scott from the series after the second pilot. He informed Doohan's agent, Paul Wilkins, that "we don't think we need an engineer in the series." Wilkins became irate and met with Roddenberry that day, and insisted on returning Doohan to the Enterprise , which turned out to be a favorable decision. ( Inside Star Trek: The Real Story , pp. 152-153)

NBC 's early- 1966 press brochure about Star Trek described Scott thus:

In the final draft script of TOS : " Mudd's Women " (dated 26 May 1966 ), Scott was described as "40… very military type." This suggests he was born in 2226 .

Although Scott does not appear in "The Menagerie, Part II", he did feature in the script for that episode. At the end of the teaser , he accompanied McCoy into the Enterprise 's hearing room, without having any lines of dialogue, eager to help Captain Kirk but unable to. Then, when the hearing-room screen abruptly came on in the first act of the script, Scott was ordered, by a Talosian projection of Commodore Mendez , to turn the screen off. Despite trying to do so with a remote control , he found that the screen wouldn't go off. Scott also appeared in a deleted scene from "The Menagerie, Part II". In it, after again accompanying McCoy into the hearing room, he announced that, thanks to McCoy, they had managed to determine which computers Spock had jammed in order to lock the ship on a course to Talos IV. As Scott explained, this discovery would allow the Enterprise officers to " safely cross-circuit that series out, return the vessel to manual control. " [4]

The series writer's guide (third revision, dated 17 April 1967 ) described Scott thus:

Although Doohan had lost the middle finger on his right hand during the Allied invasion of Normandy on D-Day, Scott had a right middle finger within the Star Trek storyline; any time a closeup was seen of Scott's right hand (working the transporter controls, etc.), someone else's hands were used, and when Scott appeared in wide shots, he usually hid his right hand from the camera. His loss was most evident in TNG : " Relics ", where the missing finger can be clearly seen in wide shots while talking to Captain Picard on the holodeck recreation of the original Enterprise bridge and in Star Trek V: The Final Frontier , when Scott is holding a bag of food. There is also a scene in TOS : " The Trouble with Tribbles " in which his missing digit is briefly seen as he holds a giant armful of tribbles. Star Trek: The Animated Series 's animation also depicted Scott as having all his fingers.

There was much debate, especially in Scotland, as to which Scottish city Montgomery Scott was born in. The character once described himself as an "Aberdeen pub crawler" in TOS : " Wolf in the Fold ". Confusing the matter was a 1970s interview with James Doohan in which he stated his belief that Scott came from Elgin, a town forty miles west of Aberdeen. Linlithgow, twenty miles west of Edinburgh has also been vocal in its claim, citing D.C. Fontana 's novel Vulcan's Glory . If either of these claims were correct, it would imply Scott had a relatively genteel upbringing, as the regional accent of Aberdeenshire was far more coarse and Gaelicised than Scott's. On the death of James Doohan, the local West Lothian Council announced plans to open a memorial exhibition for James Doohan in Linlithgow to commemorate his contribution to the Star Trek universe and make the town's claim to be the future birthplace of Montgomery Scott concrete. The exhibition, held at Annet House, Scott's "official" future childhood home opened in the summer of 2007. It was worth noting that in the non-canon story published in the UK comic magazine TV21 & Joe 90 #21 in 1970, Scott described his ancestors as " highlanders ". According to Who's Who in Star Trek #2 (DC Comics, April 1987), Scott was born in Glasgow. His actual accent implied he was raised in or near Edinburgh.

Simon Pegg , who portrayed Scott's alternate self in 2009 's Star Trek and its sequels (and was a Star Trek fan long before being cast in the role), concocted his own backstory for the character to settle the debate over the character's accent. [5]

One inconsistency that involved Scott was that, when the USS Enterprise -D rescued him from the transporter buffer of the USS Jenolan in "Relics", Commander William T. Riker said that he was from the "USS Enterprise ". Hearing this, Scott assumed "Jim Kirk himself" had arrived to find him; however, the film Star Trek Generations established that, before Scott embarked on his trip on the Jenolan , he witnessed Kirk get blown off the Enterprise -B, and though not known to him, into the Nexus , so he should have known Kirk wasn't alive to be able to find him. This was caused by the fact that the movie Star Trek Generations was filmed after "Relics", causing a retcon . (In what may have been an attempt to address the discrepancy, in the novel Star Trek Generations , Guinan tells Chekov that Kirk is , in fact, alive within the Nexus, though this information may not have reached Scott.) According to Ronald D. Moore , who wrote both "Relics" and Generations , Scott was included in the latter, despite the inconsistency, out of affection for the character. ( Star Trek Chronology )

Another minor inconsistency could be spotted in Star Trek IV: The Voyage Home , where Scott wears uniforms with commander's insignia instead of captain's.

In an ultimately omitted line of dialogue from the final draft script of "Relics", Scott remarked, " Even starships are retired… some are just lucky enough to die in action. "

Evidently, Scott was obliquely referred to in the final draft script of ENT : " Fallen Hero ". A statement made by Charles Tucker III , regarding the warp reactor aboard Enterprise , was attributed to him in the scripted stage directions. The dialogue was, " I've given you all she's got, Captain! There's no more power! " A scene description about this section remarked, " His words foreshadow another fabled Starfleet engineer. "

In the unfilmed Star Trek: The First Adventure script, Scott was depicted as working with George Kirk on an experimental dilithium-fuelled warp jump before his disappearance.

Apocrypha [ ]

The nineteenth issue of the IDW comics series Star Trek: Ongoing reveals the alternate reality Scott's full name to be Montgomery Christopher Jorgensen Scott. Since Scott was born before the timeline split, he would therefore have the same full name in the prime universe.

With the introduction of Scott's origin story in the alternate reality , several novels set in the prime reality detail Scott's origins there:

According to Star Trek II: Biographies , Scott was born in 31 August 2121 in Aberdeen, Scotland to parents Robert Burns Scott and Mary Darnley. He has a brother named James McNeil Scott and a sister named Mary Darnley Scott.

According to Who's Who in Star Trek 2 , Scott was born in Glasgow, Scotland and has a sister named Fran. He spent a year working aboard the SS Deirdre before applying to Starfleet Academy. He became the Enterprise 's chief engineer after the previous chief engineer Hoyt retired.

The short story Bum Radish: Five Spins on a Turquoise Reindeer names his mother Arlyne Jorgensen Scott and his sister Kristen Scott.

The video game Star Trek: Starship Creator gives his parents' names as Mary and Vaughn Scott. His sister is named Linda Preston.

In the novel The Kobayashi Maru , Cadet Scott less-than-voluntarily entered the Command School at Starfleet Academy , but was reassigned to engineering after a Kobayashi Maru attempt in which he defeated a Klingon squadron using a tactic which he knew the the computer would believe to be viable even though field testing that he had participated in had disproved the theory on which the tactic was based. His position as captain in the scenario was arranged by an instructor who knew that Scott wanted to be in Engineering rather than Command to justify transferring Scott to engineering school.

In the D.C. Fontana novel Vulcan's Glory , in 2253 , Lieutenant Scott signed aboard the Enterprise as a junior engineer under Lieutenant Commander Caitlin Barry. In his early days aboard the ship, he set up a still in main engineering for producing Engine Room Hooch . Despite the popularity of the beverage, it was produced by an illegal still, and Scott along with the other engineers were warned never to produce the beverage again.

In the novel Enterprise: The First Adventure , by 2264 , Scott assumed the responsibilities of being chief engineer and was promoted to lieutenant commander under the command of Captain James T. Kirk . Scott was fiercely loyal to Captain Christopher Pike and initially he did not warm up to Kirk as he felt that the young captain could place the ship in jeopardy. Over time, the two officers put their initial differences behind them and became close friends.

In the comic issue Retrospect , Scott had an on-again, off-again relationship with a woman he'd known all his life named Glynnis Campbell ( β ). The comic tells the story of how they met and fell in love, went their separate ways, and eventually got married years later. They married shortly before the events of Star Trek II: The Wrath of Khan , and she died in a shuttle accident during the Enterprise crew's period of exile on Vulcan . The Star Trek: Department of Temporal Investigations novel Forgotten History gives her credit for inspiring him to grow a mustache.

By the novel Ship of the Line , Scott has become a teacher at Starfleet Academy , but stands in as a temporary chief engineer aboard the USS Enterprise -E for its inaugural voyage under Morgan Bateson .

The novel Star Trek has Spock revealing that the Prime Scott was also stationed at Delta Vega , which Roberto Orci and Alex Kurtzman stated on the film's audio commentary were meant to be for the same reasons.

In the Starfleet Corps of Engineers novels , Scott was given command of the unit sometime after his retrieval from the Jenolan .

In Star Trek Online , players encountered Scott on Drozana Station in the year 2265 , helping him protect the station from an infestation of Devidians . He plays a major role in the "Agents of Yesterday" expansion pack, in which he is voiced by James Doohan's son Christopher Doohan , who had previously played the role in the fan series Star Trek Continues . 23rd century Starfleet characters first encounter him on the Enterprise during the time of the Babel Conference , where he discovers a temporal transponder left behind by an older Pavel Chekov . In the mission "Ragnarok", Scott finds himself in the 26th century , arriving aboard the USS Enterprise -J during the Battle of Procyon V ; he explains that he still carried Chekov's transponder at the time he was rescued from the Jenolan . Working together with Chekov, Scott installs the Tox Uthat aboard the Enterprise -J, which allows the Federation and its allies to defeat the Sphere-Builders . After the battle, Chekov returns Scott to the 24th century, but not before going back to the 23rd to see "their" Enterprise one last time.

In Star Trek Cats , Scott is depicted as a Scottish Fold cat .

In the novel Indistinguishable from Magic , Captain Scott commanded an SCE testbed ship, the USS Challenger . His crew included Lieutenant Commander Reginald Barclay , Lieutenant Commander Nog (chief of security), Dr. Alyssa Ogawa (CMO) and Dr. Leah Brahms as a civilian adviser. When called on to investigate the disappearance and reappearance of the starship Intrepid two hundred years prior, he requested a temporary transfer to his crew: Commander Geordi La Forge. The crew fought off an attempt by former DaiMon Bok of the Ferengi to hijack the Intrepid and use it to time travel and prevent his son from being killed by Captain Picard and solved the Intrepid mystery by discovering a powerful lifeform capable of traveling easily between galaxies and drawing starships with it. Scott was severely injured during the mission and developed a fatal condition. With his first officer dead, Scott named La Forge as his successor as captain. He stayed behind in the other galaxy that they were drawn to in order to ensure that the rest of the Challenger crew (and some Romulans who were also pulled there) got home. As the Challenger exploded, he set the transporter to potentially send himself to safety. His current fate is unknown.

External links [ ]

  • Montgomery Scott at StarTrek.com
  • Montgomery Scott at Memory Beta , the wiki for licensed Star Trek works
  • Montgomery Scott at Wikipedia
  • Montgomery Scott at the Star Trek Online Wiki
  • 2 ISS Enterprise (NCC-1701)

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Them season 1 ending explained: what happens to the emory family in the amazon prime video show, 10 harsh realities of rewatching mash, 51 years later.

WARNING: Contains SPOILERS for Star Trek: Strange New Worlds' Season 2 finale.

  • Martin Quinn makes his debut as the fifth version of Star Trek's Chief Engineer, Scotty, in the season 2 finale of Star Trek: Strange New Worlds.
  • It is uncertain if Martin Quinn's Scotty will be a regular in season 3, but he may be groomed as a replacement for Commander Pelia before Captain Kirk takes command.
  • Martin Quinn is the first Scottish actor to play the iconic Star Trek character, and his character's knowledge of Gorn technology may play a crucial role in resolving the season 2 cliffhanger.

Star Trek: Strange New Worlds ' season 2 finale introduces Martin Quinn as the fifth version of Star Trek 's legendary Chief Engineer, Scotty. Originally played by Canadian actor James Doohan, the Starfleet engineer from Linlithgow, Scotland, played an integral role aboard the USS Enterprise. In Strange New Worlds ' season 2 finale, "Hegemony", Scotty gets his first trip aboard the Enterprise when he's rescued by Captain Christopher Pike (Anson Mount) from the surface of the Gorn-ravaged colony planet, Parnassus Beta.

It's currently unclear if Martin Quinn's Scotty will be a fully-fledged regular in Star Trek: Strange New Worlds season 3 . It seems likely that he'll be groomed as an eventual replacement for Commander Pelia (Carol Kane) prior to Captain James T. Kirk (William Shatner) assuming command of the USS Enterprise. The first Scottish actor to play Starfleet's most famous Scotsman, Martin Quinn joins an exclusive club as only three other actors have played the five versions of the character in Star Trek 's long history.

5 Scotty In Star Trek: The Original Series, Movies & TNG

James Doohan played Scotty in three seasons of Star Trek: The Original Series from 1966 to '69. Mr Scott was responsible for keeping the USS Enterprise's engines running. Scotty was also in charge of the Enterprise when Kirk and Spock were both incapacitated or on away missions, which happened more often than some might think. Scotty loved the Enterprise and even defended the starships honor in a bar brawl with a Klingon in Star Trek: TOS ' classic comedy , "The Trouble with Tribbles".

After the Enterprise was decommissioned, Scotty was promoted to Captain as part of the great transwarp experiment. Working on the USS Excelsior was never as satisfying for Scotty as his work on the Enterprise. Luckily, or unluckily for Scotty, he was assigned to the USS Enterprise-A, its numerous flaws keeping him busy until its decommissioning. Scotty also got to visit both the Enterprise-B and Enterprise-D thanks to a life-saving transporter trick that kept him in stasis until the mid 2300s.

4 Scotty In J.J. Abrams’ Star Trek

Simon Pegg played Scotty in J.J. Abrams' Star Trek movies, playing a slightly more comic version of the character, complete with alien sidekick. However, Scotty also got to investigate some nefarious Section 31 activities in Star Trek Into Darkness . In Star Trek Beyond , Scotty was vital in getting the antiquated USS Franklin back up and running to save the USS Yorktown. Scotty and Captain James T. Kirk (Chris Pine) were just as close friends in the Kelvin Timeline movies as they were in the Prime Timeline.

Interestingly, Kirk and Scotty met the Prime Timeline Spock (Leonard Nimoy), who gifted them the secrets of Prime Scotty's transwarp beaming innovation. Scotty had been marooned on the barren ice planet Delta Vega as a punishment for apparently losing Admiral Archer's prize beagle. While this doesn't quite fit with the Star Trek: Enterprise timeline, it is funny to think of Montgomery Scott meeting Jonathan Archer (Scott Bakula) and infuriating the Starfleet legend.

3 Hologram Scotty In Star Trek: Prodigy

When Dal R'El (Brett Gray) discovered the holodeck aboard the USS Protostar in Star Trek: Prodigy , he decided to attempt the Kobayashi Maru simulation. Assembling a crew of Star Trek legends to assist him, Dal was joined by - among others - a hologram of Montgomery Scott. The hologram was based on Scotty in the Star Trek: TOS movies, and the voice was made up of pre-recorded dialog from James Doohan in previous Trek appearances. It was a fun nod to the previous generations of Starfleet legends in the youth-orientated Star Trek show.

2 Scotty (Voice) In Strange New Worlds Season 1 Finale

Scotty's Star Trek: Strange New Worlds return almost happened a year earlier in the season 1 finale. In the alternate timeline created by Pike's attempt to avoid his tragic future, Scotty was serving aboard the USS Enterprise in "A Quality of Mercy". Scotty wasn't seen on screen, but an unnamed actor voiced him in some brief dialog as Spock sought a staus update from the Chief Engineer during their battle with the Romulans. When Pike was returned to his own time, he kept his eye on Kirk's career, but didn't seem all that interested in Mr. Scott.

1 Scotty In Strange New Worlds Season 2 Finale

Pike eventually meets Lt. Montgomery Scott (Martin Quinn) in Star Trek: Strange New Worlds ' season 2 finale when his away team discover the survivors of the Gorn Hegemony's attack. Scotty was the only survivor of the USS Stardiver, which had been caught up in the destruction of Parnassus Beta. Forced to use his wits and engineering skills, Scotty was able to craft traps and learn all he could about the Gorn's strengths and weaknesses. He was also able to build a Gorn transponder to mask himself from their sensors, something which could be the key to the Enterprise resolving the season 2 cliffhanger.

Scotty actor Martin Quinn is the first Scottish actor to play the legendary Star Trek character in the franchise's 57-year history. Born and raised in Paisley, Quinn is only an hour's train ride away from the fictional Scotty's birthplace of Linlithgow. It's unclear if Martin Quinn's Scotty will be a regular or a recurring character in Star Trek: Strange New Worlds season 3, but the signs are positive. As he and Commander Pelia attempt to adapt his Gorn tech for the Enterprise, he'll play a vital role in saving the day in the season 3 premiere.

All episodes of Star Trek: Strange New Worlds season 2 are streaming now on Paramount+.

  • Star Trek: Strange New Worlds (2022)
  • Star Trek: The Original Series (1966)

Kirk Thatcher Talks ‘Star Trek IV,’ Working With Leonard Nimoy, and Getting to Write Scotty’s Computer Joke

Thatcher also talks about how you don’t have to be a ‘Star Trek’ fan to enjoy the movie and playing the punk on the bus.

Multihyphenate Kirk Thatcher has been involved with a vast range of iconic movies and television over the past 40 years. From his first job, on Star Wars: Return of the Jedi no less, Thatcher has been crafting beloved stories that reach into all corners of fandom as a writer, director, producer, actor, and visual effects coordinator. Though much of his career centers around his work with Jim Henson on the Muppets franchise, Thatcher has also worked on projects like Star Trek , Gremlins , Spiderman: Homecoming , and many more. Recently Collider's own Editor-in-Chief, Steve Weintraub sat down with Thatcher to discuss his work on the highly acclaimed smash hit MCU television special, Werewolf by Night .

During their conversation, Weintraub made sure to get the scoop from Thatcher on his work on Star Trek , particularly Star Trek IV: The Voyage Home . Having hit theaters in 1986, Star Trek IV, a.k.a. the one with the whales, is widely beloved and considered one of the best feature films in the franchise. The movie sees Captain Kirk ( William Shatner ), Spock ( Leonard Nimoy ), and the whole Enterprise crew on a mission to the past — San Francisco, 1986, to be exact — to prevent a future catastrophe. Thatcher served as an associate producer and also had a cameo in the movie as the now iconic "punk on the bus." Thatcher recently made a cameo, reprising his role as "the punk on the bus" in Season 2 of Star Trek: Picard which also heavily featured time travel to prevent a future disaster.

One of the reasons Star Trek IV is so beloved is that it's almost a romantic comedy wrapped up in a Star Trek movie. Weintraub asked Thatcher if he had any idea the movie would be such a hit while they were making it, and while he was quick to say "well, you never know," Thatcher pointed out that he was drawn to the same thing that has given the movie such staying power, its comedy. "What I liked about it was the humor," Thatcher told Collider. "I loved Star Trek growing up. I was a huge Trek fan, and I liked the fun between the characters." Thatcher continued:

"I knew it was special and that it was fun. But you never know, I didn't know that the punk was going to haunt me for the rest of my life. I mean, it was a fun little gag. It was more like an Easter egg, like, "Oh, that was associate producer." It wasn't like, 'This is going to be this huge moment.'"

RELATED: New ‘Star Trek: Picard’ Season 3 Trailer Reveals the Return of Moriarty and Lore

Kirk Thatcher On Working With Leonard Nimoy and Star Trek IV 's VFX

In discussing Star Trek IV , Thatcher explained that when he was hired by Leonard Nimoy, he was brought on to make sure the effects were good so that Nimoy could focus on the story. As Thatcher put it:

"He said, 'I want you to deal with all the technical stuff with effects and sets, and all that, because I want to focus on the story.' He said the thing that made Star Trek resonate, in his mind, was the relationship between Kirk, Spock, and Bones — and the other characters — but that triumvirate, which was not revelatory at that point, but he said, 'I want to focus on those relationships, and I want the effects, and I want it to look good, but I don't want to have to worry about that. So that's why you're here.' I got all this responsibility to make decisions on stuff as long as he approved it. Because he really wanted to focus on telling that story. It was an amazing job, and he gave me a lot of freedom to do that."

As he continued on Thatcher explained that Nimoy knew early on that this was not like the Star Trek movies they'd made so far. "I think Leonard knew that it was going to be different. I think he knew that II was for the Trek fans, diehard sci-fi fans. III was kind of him cutting his teeth, and it had a classic bad guy." He went on to say, "I was on a panel with [Nick Meyer] about Star Trek IV , and he said, 'It's the only Star Trek that doesn't have a villain,' a Star Trek movie. I mean, you could say a V`ger's the villain in the first one, but there's no bad guy. The bad guy is human ignorance, and so it was very Star Trek in that way."

Thatcher went on to say that working on Star Trek was an "amazing job," particularly thanks to the faith Nimoy had in him at such a young age. He explains that he got to do a little bit of everything while working on Star Trek IV :

"I got to write dialogue and got to play the punk, and did a computer voice, the computer at the beginning where it says, 'Logic is the cement of our civilization with which we ascend from chaos using reason as our guide.' That's me and I wrote those questions. I was 23, and the fact that Leonard just gave me this sort of carte blanche to do stuff. He knew I was a science nerd, and Harve Bennett, too, was the producer, and the writer of all the Star Trek -era or the 23rd Century stuff. They just were like, 'Hey, do you want to do this because it's just gobbledygook, but it has to be Star Trek .' I'm like, 'Sure.' I know, it's kind of amazing. I don't know what star I was born under, or what pheromones my brain, my head, gives off, but they were trusting me. They trusted me way more than the studios do now, I will say. You work for Disney, they're so all over you about everything and I'm like, 'God, I was spoiled with Jim Henson.'"

You Don't Have to be a Star Trek Fan to Enjoy The Voyage Home

Star Trek IV serves as an excellent entry point for the now massive Star Trek franchise because "you didn't have to be a Star Trek fan" to enjoy it and that's what makes it such a successful movie. Thatcher explained:

"You could have just a tertiary knowledge of like, "'Oh, Kirk and Spock, and they're in space,' and still enjoy the movie. Whereas Khan , Wrath of Khan II , which is a great Star Trek movie, [but] if you don't know who that is, you're like, 'Why is this guy with his shirt open yelling and so over the top?' And I think that was it. It was a great movie, not just a great Star Trek movie."

Another boon to the movie's success is the fact that the characters are sent back in time. Most of the Star Trek timeline is set in the future, with the Vulcans not making first contact on Earth until 2063, and the events of The Original Series taking place another 200 years after that. But Star Trek IV sends Captian Kirk and company back to 1986, which is a little more fathomable for a wider audience. As Thatcher put it, the time travel elements of Star Trek IV made it more "relatable." He said:

" The time travel element, going back to the time that it was filmed in, really helps because, again, that made it relatable. 'Oh, they're in today, there's a punk.' It was much more relatable, and there's a sea park and all the things we have in our world. But the sense of humor, Nick Meyer is very dry, cutting, like, 'Judging by the pollution and content of the atmosphere, I believe we have landed somewhere in the latter half of the 20-' Just these little digs at our society, I think made it super popular. While we were filming it, I don't think anyone knew this was going to be the breakout movie. I just thought they thought this is a fun movie with great character stuff in it."

The Staying Power of Star Trek IV 's Comedy

During their conversation Weintraub pointed out that it's the little moments of Star Trek IV also add to the film's staying power, making it such a beloved movie among Star Trek and sci-fi fans. Thatcher revealed that the particular joke they're discussing — a moment when Scotty tries to talk to an Apple computer because that's how you interface with a computer on the Enterprise — is one that he contributed to the film. As he puts it:

"I wrote that gag, that he talks to the mouse, because I had just gotten an Apple 512 Mac, and so the whole thing was, they said, 'Well we're going to have the design thing done on a Macintosh because it's a graphic computer.' I said, 'Well, then Scotty should sit down,' — because I'm a Trek fan — I said, 'He should talk to the computer because he doesn't know. He'd just be like, 'Hello computer,' it doesn't do anything.' And then Alex Henteloff goes, 'Well use the mouse.' So he thinks it's a microphone because they look like a microphone. So that was my gag that got in the movie, and Leonard loved it."

Werewolf by Night is available to stream on Disney+. You can watch Star Trek IV: The Voyage Home right now on Paramount+ and check out the trailer down below.

Star Trek IV: The Voyage Home Stardate: 8390.0

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Giant Freakin Robot

Giant Freakin Robot

Star Trek Breaks The Prime Directive In Its Best Movie

Posted: May 2, 2024 | Last updated: May 3, 2024

<p>Star Trek IV: The Voyage Home is possibly the most accessible media featuring the original series cast. It takes place on Earth in the present—well, the ’80s, so close enough—and it’s light and breezy without a lot of Star Trek technobabble gumming up the dialogue and putting non-Trekkies to sleep. And while it’s considered the best Star Trek movie by many, it’s also where Kirk and Co. commit the most grievous violations of the prime directive ever depicted on camera.</p>

Star Trek IV: The Voyage Home is possibly the most accessible media featuring the original series cast. It takes place on Earth in the present—well, the ’80s, so close enough—and it’s light and breezy without a lot of Star Trek technobabble gumming up the dialogue and putting non-Trekkies to sleep. And while it’s considered the best Star Trek movie by many, it’s also where Kirk and Co. commit the most grievous violations of the prime directive ever depicted on camera.

<p>Okay, that’s an exaggeration. Obviously, with over 800 hours of combined content between the movies and shows, there’s probably a more blatant example of someone ignoring the Prime Directive. That still doesn’t change the fact that the crew of the USS Enterprise wiped their collective behinds with the Federation’s biggest rule when they went back in time to save the whales.</p><p>Just to be clear, I’m not questioning the crew’s motives. If we had to break an intergalactic law to stop Earth from being completely annihilated, I would do it in a heartbeat. I’m pointing it out because as much as fans love Star Trek IV, no one seems to mention how often it breaks the Prime Directive.</p>

Star Trek IV Shatters The Prime Directive

Okay, that’s an exaggeration. Obviously, with over 800 hours of combined content between the movies and shows, there’s probably a more blatant example of someone ignoring the Prime Directive. That still doesn’t change the fact that the crew of the USS Enterprise wiped their collective behinds with the Federation’s biggest rule when they went back in time to save the whales.

Just to be clear, I’m not questioning the crew’s motives. If we had to break an intergalactic law to stop Earth from being completely annihilated, I would do it in a heartbeat. I’m pointing it out because as much as fans love Star Trek IV, no one seems to mention how often it breaks the Prime Directive.

star trek captain

Starfleet’s Prime Directive

For anyone unfamiliar with it, the Prime Directive is a guiding principle that all members of Starfleet must follow. The Directive states: 1. Serve the public trust, 2. Protect the innocent, 3. Uphold the la—oh, sorry, those are the Prime Directives from RoboCop.

Starfleet’s prime directive states: “Starfleet crew will obey the following with any civilization that has not achieved a commensurate level of technological and/or societal development, a) No identification of self or mission. b) No interference with the social, cultural, or technological development of said planet. c) No reference to space, other worlds, or advanced civilizations.”

<p>Basically, members of Starfleet are forbidden from interfering with the natural progression of society on any planet considered technologically inferior to the worlds of the United Federation of Planets. For the Enterprise crew, that means that 20th-century Earth—a planet practically stone-age compared to their 23rd-century Earth—should be off limits. Instead, Kirk and his friends spend the bulk of Star Trek IV walking around San Fransisco, stomping on every metaphorical butterfly they can find like it’s their job.</p>

No Regard For Preserving The Past

Basically, members of Starfleet are forbidden from interfering with the natural progression of society on any planet considered technologically inferior to the worlds of the United Federation of Planets. For the Enterprise crew, that means that 20th-century Earth—a planet practically stone-age compared to their 23rd-century Earth—should be off limits. Instead, Kirk and his friends spend the bulk of Star Trek IV walking around San Fransisco, stomping on every metaphorical butterfly they can find like it’s their job.

<p>The first violation comes from Scotty and Bones’s mission to acquire a tank big enough to hold two humpback whales and strong enough to survive a trip a few hundred years into the future. The duo can’t simply buy the materials they need because they have no 20th-century money. Instead, Scotty offers the head of a San Francisco-based plexiglass manufacturer the formula for transparent aluminum in exchange for plexiglass that is thick enough to hold the whales.</p>

The Adventures Of Scotty And Bones

The first violation comes from Scotty and Bones’s mission to acquire a tank big enough to hold two humpback whales and strong enough to survive a trip a few hundred years into the future. The duo can’t simply buy the materials they need because they have no 20th-century money. Instead, Scotty offers the head of a San Francisco-based plexiglass manufacturer the formula for transparent aluminum in exchange for plexiglass that is thick enough to hold the whales.

<p>To be fair, McCoy does try to warn Scotty by mentioning that giving the factory manager the formula means they’re “altering the future,” to which Scotty glibly responds, “How do we know he didn’t invent the thing?” The novelization of Star Trek IV goes out of its way to say that the man was the inventor, so Scotty didn’t actually hurt anything, but c’mon, that’s the novelization.</p><p>The novelization of Return of the Jedi claims Jabba the Hutt is bald because he lost all of his hair to a disease. Movie-tie in books are seldom canon. Going by just what’s on screen, Scotty gives no indication that he knows, nor cares if the guy he just gave a secret future mathematical formula to was supposed to have it or not.</p>

Novelizations Are Not Canon

To be fair, McCoy does try to warn Scotty by mentioning that giving the factory manager the formula means they’re “altering the future,” to which Scotty glibly responds, “How do we know he didn’t invent the thing?” The novelization of Star Trek IV goes out of its way to say that the man was the inventor, so Scotty didn’t actually hurt anything, but c’mon, that’s the novelization.

The novelization of Return of the Jedi claims Jabba the Hutt is bald because he lost all of his hair to a disease. Movie-tie in books are seldom canon. Going by just what’s on screen, Scotty gives no indication that he knows, nor cares if the guy he just gave a secret future mathematical formula to was supposed to have it or not.

<p>And that’s just one of the ways the Star Trek gang breaks the Prime Directive in the film. McCoy later gives a random hospital patient a miracle drug that causes her to grow a new kidney instantly. That one is especially egregious because the woman’s health had absolutely no bearing on their mission to save Earth. It is worth pointing out, though, that McCoy is a doctor, and it’s possible that the Hippocratic Oath outweighs the Prime Directive in his mind.</p>

Bones Made A Choice

And that’s just one of the ways the Star Trek gang breaks the Prime Directive in the film. McCoy later gives a random hospital patient a miracle drug that causes her to grow a new kidney instantly. That one is especially egregious because the woman’s health had absolutely no bearing on their mission to save Earth. It is worth pointing out, though, that McCoy is a doctor, and it’s possible that the Hippocratic Oath outweighs the Prime Directive in his mind.

<p>Do you know who isn’t a doctor, though? James T. Kirk, the man who not only tells a marine biologist flat out that he’s from the future but also takes her away from her primitive (to him) 20th-century existence and deposits her in the 23rd century. Kirk’s shenanigans break all kinds of protocols, from the Prime Directive to the Temporal Directive to everything in between. Considering that he begins the movie already a fugitive from Starfleet and traveling aboard a stolen Klingon Bird of Prey, Star Trek IV clearly represents Kirk at his most defiant.</p><p>I realize that all of the rule-breaking in Star Trek IV is for a higher purpose and ends up saving billions of lives in the 23rd century. I think it’s funny that no one ever points out that in order to do so, the crew of the Enterprise breaks their most sacred rule not just once but multiple times.</p>

Kirk Breaks Every Rule

Do you know who isn’t a doctor, though? James T. Kirk, the man who not only tells a marine biologist flat out that he’s from the future but also takes her away from her primitive (to him) 20th-century existence and deposits her in the 23rd century. Kirk’s shenanigans break all kinds of protocols, from the Prime Directive to the Temporal Directive to everything in between. Considering that he begins the movie already a fugitive from Starfleet and traveling aboard a stolen Klingon Bird of Prey, Star Trek IV clearly represents Kirk at his most defiant.

I realize that all of the rule-breaking in Star Trek IV is for a higher purpose and ends up saving billions of lives in the 23rd century. I think it’s funny that no one ever points out that in order to do so, the crew of the Enterprise breaks their most sacred rule not just once but multiple times.

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Published Jul 12, 2023

Kelvin Timeline | 5 Signs You're Like Scotty

Over the course of three films, Simon Pegg gifted us with a fresh take on the iconic engineer.

Illustrated banner featuring Star Trek (2009)'s Scotty, played by Simon Pegg

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James Doohan's tenure as Montgomery "Scotty" Scott shall forever remain unrivaled, as no one could ever replace the beloved Canadian actor's charm.

Facing the difficult challenge of reimagining the character, Simon Pegg expertly focused on blazing a unique path and injecting his own humor into the Kelvin Timeline's miracle worker. Over the course of three films, Pegg's respect for Doohan's role and dedication to his craft have gifted us with a fresh take on the iconic engineer. Let's see if you possess any traits that might match up with the personality Pegg bestowed upon Kelvin Scotty .

1. Have You Experienced Bad Luck Around Water?

A soaking wet Scotty (Simon Pegg) stands between Kirk and Spock with a security officer behind him on the bridge of the Enterprise in Star Trek (2009)

Scotty just can't catch a break when it comes to aquatic adventures. Once Ambassador Spock provided the engineer with the equation for transwarp beaming, developed by his Prime reality counterpart, in Star Trek (2009) , the Scotsman and James T. Kirk employed the data to transport themselves onto the U.S.S. Enterprise . Kirk arrived safely in the Engineering section, but Scotty took a detour through water-filled pipes that almost deposited him into an unfortunately sharp-looking turbine. Saved by Kirk, Scott had to endure damp clothes during his first moments on the prized starship.

Scotty went on to express his displeasure with now-Captain Kirk's decision to hide the Enterprise underwater during the crew's mission to Nibiru in Star Trek Into Darkness . Rather than ask how Kirk and Dr. McCoy felt following a perilous cliff jump, the engineer's first words to his captain voiced his concern pertaining to salt water corrosion. A giant fish that swam passed the vessel's bridge did little to assuage Scott's grumpy mood. Interestingly enough, Doohan's Scotty suffered his own sodden ordeal in Star Trek IV: The Voyage Home , when he briefly became trapped in a Klingon Bird-of-Prey's flooded hold after the ship plummeted into San Francisco Bay.

2. Do You Have the Soul of a Poet?

Scotty looks over Admiral Spock's shoulders as he punches in the formula for transwarp travel on Delta Vega in Star Trek (2009)

Many accomplished poets hailed from Scotland, so Scott's knack for verbal wizardry should come as no surprise. Even after Ambassador Spock assured the engineer that transwarp beaming could be accomplished, Scotty remained skeptical. "The notion of transwarp beaming is like... trying to hit a bullet with a smaller bullet, whilst wearing a blindfold, riding a horse," the Scotsman emphatically explained. Only Montgomery Scott could describe a seemingly impossible task in such exquisite detail.

A similar situation arose when Kirk and Khan intended to cross a debris field and shoot through a tiny airlock as a means to infiltrate the U.S.S. Vengeance . Already behind enemy lines, Scotty examined the opening's dimensions and assessed the chances for a survivable entry. "It's gonna be like... jumping out of a moving car, off a bridge, into your shot glass," the engineer concluded. Kirk and Khan managed to navigate through the hole, but their rough landing on the Vengeance 's deck demonstrated the truth behind Scott's apprehension.

3. Are You Protective of Your Work Space?

Scotty expresses disproval of the torpedoes as he stands in front of a security officer while in the presence of Carol Marcus and Keensar in Star Trek Into Darkness

From the moment Scotty first expressed his interest in the Enterprise on Delta Vega, the engineer's admiration for the starship never wavered. "I like this ship! You know, it's exciting," was Mr. Scott's reaction during his initial visit to the futuristic Bridge. Scotty developed a protectiveness over the vessel, as demonstrated by his concern for its exposure to salt water on Nibiru and his willingness to quit rather than risk its destruction by approving Admiral Marcus's mysterious torpedoes in Star Trek Into Darkness . After stowing away on the Vengeance , the engineer became dismayed when he learned about the Enterprise 's low power levels due to the damage it sustained in his absence.

All good things must come to an end, and Krall's fleet brought the relationship between Scotty and the Enterprise to a tragic conclusion. However, despite significant damage and insurmountable odds, Scott did all he could to keep the starship alive during the Battle of Altamid. While ultimately unsuccessful, Scotty's effort demonstrated his tireless devotion to protecting the vessel that he had learned to call home.

4. Do You Have A Compassionate Spirit?

Scotty appeals to Jaylah as she assesses her rifle in Star Trek Beyond

The Enterprise received Scott's unconditional devotion, but the engineer held more than enough compassion for others in his heart. As Scotty spoke to Kirk and Ambassador Spock about his attempt to beam Admiral Archer's beagle from one planet to another, he mentioned the remorse he felt over the fact that the canine had yet to reappear. During the battle between the Enterprise and the Vengeance , Scotty even offered his apologies to a private security officer before sending him flying through an airlock.

The friendship Scott fostered with Jaylah on Altamid epitomized the Starfleet officer's kind spirit. With no family or friends, Jaylah survived alone by relying upon her intelligence and fighting skills. Scotty recognized the solitude that the young woman experienced, convincing her that he and the other Enterprise crew members would never abandon her. The engineer even presented Jaylah with the option to join Starfleet and become an official member of their space-faring family.

5. Have You Always Stuck by Your Best Friend?

Scotty (Simon Pegg) stands by his best friend Keenser on their remote base in Star Trek (2009)

First introduced to audiences on Delta Vega, Scott's pal Keenser has stuck with the engineer through thick and thin. Upon Nero's defeat, the Scotsman brought Keenser to join the Enterprise crew. When Scotty resigned his position as chief engineer due to a disagreement with Kirk over Admiral Marcus ' torpedoes, Keenser followed his trusted friend and also left the ship.

Back aboard for the showdown at Altamid, Scott and Keenser became separated during Krall's attack. During the crew's reunion on the U.S.S. Franklin , the pair almost hugged out of pure joy when they saw each other. While the future remains to be seen, I imagine Keenser will be by Scotty's side in engineering on the U.S.S. Enterprise-A .

This article was originally published on January 4, 2019.

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Jay Stobie (he/him) is a freelance writer, author, and consultant who has contributed articles to StarTrek.com, Star Trek Explorer, and Star Trek Magazine, as well as to Star Wars Insider and StarWars.com. Learn more about Jay by visiting JayStobie.com or finding him on Twitter, Instagram, and other social media platforms at @StobiesGalaxy.

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Star Trek IV: The Voyage Home

Star Trek IV: The Voyage Home

  • [ faced with a 20th century computer ]
  • Scotty : Computer! Computer?
  • [ He's handed a mouse, and he speaks into it ]
  • Scotty : Hello, computer.
  • Dr. Nichols : Just use the keyboard.
  • Scotty : Keyboard. How quaint.
  • [ Spock is still learning how to use profanity correctly ]
  • Spock : They like you very much, but they are not the hell "your" whales.
  • Dr. Gillian Taylor : I suppose they told you that.
  • Spock : The hell they did.
  • Punk on bus : [ Playing loud music on the bus ]
  • Kirk : Excuse me.
  • Punk on bus : [ He ignores him ]
  • Kirk : Excuse me. Would you mind stopping that noise?
  • Punk on bus : [ He turns it up louder ]
  • Kirk : [ louder and firmer ] Excuse me! Would you mind stopping that damn noise?
  • Punk on bus : [ He flips him off ]
  • Kirk : [ He looks at Spock ]
  • Spock : [ He gives the punk the Vulcan neck-pinch, followed by the delighted applause of the grateful bus passengers ]
  • Kirk : Spock, where the hell's the power you promised?
  • Spock : One damn minute, Admiral.
  • [ after landing and cloaking a Klingon spaceship in Golden Gate Park ]
  • Kirk : Everybody remember where we parked.
  • Scotty : Admiral, there be whales here!
  • Dr. Gillian Taylor : Don't tell me! You're from outer space.
  • Kirk : No, I'm from Iowa. I only work in outer space.
  • McCoy : [ 1:24:46 ] Tearing of the middle meningeal artery...
  • Doctor #1 : What's your degree in, dentistry?
  • McCoy : How do YOU explain slowing pulse, low respiratory rate and coma?
  • Doctor #1 : Fundascopic examination!
  • McCoy : Fundascopic examination is unrevealing in these cases!
  • Doctor #1 : A simple evacuation of the epidural hematoma will relieve the pressure!
  • McCoy : My God man, drilling holes in his head is not the answer! The artery must be repaired! Now, put away your butcher's knives and let me save this patient before it's too late!
  • Kirk : [ Explaining Spock's odd behavior ] Oh, him? He's harmless. Back in the sixties, he was part of the free speech movement at Berkeley. I think he did a little too much LDS.
  • Dr. Gillian Taylor : LDS?
  • Dr. Gillian Taylor : Sure you won't change your mind?
  • Spock : Is there something wrong with the one I have?
  • Kirk : Mr. Spock, have you accounted for the variable mass of whales and water in your time re-entry program?
  • Spock : Mr. Scott cannot give me exact figures, Admiral, so... I will make a guess.
  • Kirk : A guess? You, Spock? That's extraordinary.
  • Spock : [ to Dr. McCoy ] I don't think he understands.
  • McCoy : No, Spock. He means that he feels safer about your guesses than most other people's facts.
  • Spock : Then you're saying...
  • Spock : It is a compliment?
  • McCoy : It is.
  • Spock : Ah. Then, I will try to make the best guess I can.
  • McCoy : Please do.
  • [ about 20th Century America ]
  • Kirk : This is an extremely primitive and paranoid culture.
  • Elderly patient : [ 1:27:07 ]
  • [ 1:27:07 ]
  • Elderly patient : The doctor gave me a pill, and I grew a new kidney! The doctor gave me a pill, and I grew a new kidney!
  • Intern #1 : [ in disbelief, walking ahead of the patient ] Fully functional?
  • Intern #2 : [ incredulous ] Fully functional!
  • [ the crew is on a shuttlecraft pondering what their new starship will be ]
  • Sulu : ...I'm counting on the *Excelsior*.
  • Scotty : The *Excelsior*? Why in God's name would you want that bucket of bolts?
  • Kirk : A ship is a ship.
  • Scotty : Whatever you say so.
  • Scotty : Thy will be done.
  • [ the new starship USS *Enterprise* 1701-A emerges into view ]
  • Kirk : My friends.
  • Kirk : We've come home.
  • Spock : Your use of language has altered since our arrival. It is currently laced with, shall we say, more colorful metaphors, "double dumb-ass on you" and so forth.
  • Kirk : Oh, you mean the profanity?
  • Spock : Yes.
  • Kirk : Well that's simply the way they talk here. Nobody pays any attention to you unless you swear every other word.
  • Kirk : Out of the way...
  • Shore Patrolman : Sorry, Doctor, I have strict orders...
  • Dr. Gillian Taylor : [ Gillian moans in pain ]
  • McCoy : My God, man. Do you want an acute case on your hands? This woman has immediate postprandial, upper-abdominal distention. Now, out of the way! Get out of the way!
  • [ They enter the operating room ]
  • Kirk : What did you say she has?
  • McCoy : Cramps.
  • Ambassador Sarek : Do you have a message for your mother?
  • Spock : Yes. Tell her I feel fine.
  • Kirk : If we play our cards right, we may be able to find out when those whales are being released.
  • Spock : How will playing cards help?
  • Dr. Gillian Taylor : Don't tell me you don't use money in the 23rd Century.
  • Kirk : Well, we don't.
  • Dr. Gillian Taylor : Do you guys like Italian?
  • Spock : No.
  • Kirk : Yes.
  • Kirk : [ at Spock ] No, Yes.
  • Kirk : Yes, I love Italian...
  • [ looks at Spock ]
  • Kirk : And so do you.
  • Disgruntled guy in car : Hey, why don't ya watch where you're going, ya dumb-ass!
  • Kirk : Well, uh, double dumb-ass on you!
  • McCoy : [ 1:23:00 ] What's the matter with you?
  • Elderly patient : [ weakly ] Kidney
  • Elderly patient : dialysis.
  • McCoy : [ geniunely surprised ] Dialysis?
  • [ musing to himself ]
  • McCoy : What is this, the Dark Ages?
  • [ He turns back to the patient and hands her a large white pill ]
  • McCoy : Here,
  • McCoy : you swallow that, and if you have any more problems, just call me!
  • [ He pats her cheek and leaves ]
  • McCoy : You, ah, realize of course that if we give him the formula we're altering the future.
  • Scotty : Why? How do we know he didn't invent the thing?
  • Spock : To hunt a species to extinction is not logical.
  • Dr. Gillian Taylor : Whoever said the human race was logical?
  • Spock : [ in response to Kirk pawning his antique spectacles from The Wrath of Khan ] Excuse me, Admiral. But weren't those a birthday gift from Dr. McCoy?
  • Kirk : And they will be again, that's the beauty of it.
  • [ to the Antique Store Owner ]
  • Kirk : How much?
  • Antique Store Owner : Well, they'd be worth more if the lenses were intact. I'll give you one hundred dollars for them.
  • Kirk : [ pause ] Is that a lot?
  • Ambassador Sarek : As I recall, I opposed your enlistment in Starfleet. It is possible that judgment was incorrect. Your associates are people of good character.
  • Spock : They are my friends.
  • Dr. Gillian Taylor : Wait a minute. How did you know Gracie's pregnant? Nobody knows that.
  • Spock : Gracie does.
  • Spock : Admiral, if we were to assume these whales were ours to do with as we pleased, we would be as guilty as those who caused their extinction.
  • Chekov : [ to a policeman ] Excuse me, sir! Can you direct us to the naval base in Alameda? It's where they keep the nuclear wessels.
  • [ He pauses, looks at Uhura, and tries again ]
  • Chekov : *Nuclear wessels*.
  • Gillian : You're not from the military are you? Trying to teach whales to retrieve torpedoes or some dipshit stuff like that?
  • Kirk : No, ma'am. No dipshit.
  • Gillian : Well, good. That was one thing, I would have dropped you off right here.
  • Spock : Gracie is pregnant.
  • [ Gillian brakes to a sudden stop ]
  • Gillian : All right, who are you? And don't jerk me around anymore, I want to know how you know that!
  • Kirk : We can't tell you.
  • Gillian : But...
  • Kirk : Please, just let me finish. I can tell you that we're not in the military and that we intend no harm to the whales. In fact, we may be able to help - in ways that, frankly, you couldn't possibly imagine.
  • Gillian : Or believe, I'll bet.
  • Kirk : Very likely.
  • Klingon Ambassador : Vulcans are well-known as the intellectual puppets of this Federation!
  • Ambassador Sarek : Your vessel did destroy the USS Grissom, your men did kill Kirk's son. Do you deny these events?
  • Klingon Ambassador : We deny nothing. We have the right to preserve our race.
  • Ambassador Sarek : You have the right to commit murder?
  • Kirk : May fortune favor the foolish.
  • Federation Council president : The Council is now in session. If you will all take your seats. Bring in the accused.
  • [ Spock leaves his seat and he moves at side of Kirk ]
  • Federation Council president : Captain Spock, you do not stand accused.
  • Spock : Mister President, I stand with my shipmates.
  • Federation Council president : As you wish. The charges and specifications are: conspiracy, assault on Federation Officers, theft of Federation Property namely the Starship Enterprise, sabotage of the U.S.S. Excelsior, wilful destruction of Federation Property specifically the aforementioned U.S.S. Enterprise, and finally disobeying direct orders of the Starfleet Commander. Admiral Kirk, how do you plead?
  • Kirk : On behalf of all of us, Mister President, I am authorised to plead guilty.
  • Federation Council president : So entered. Because of certain mitigating circumstances, all charges but one are summarily dismissed. The remaining charge, disobeying orders of a superior officer is directed solely at Admiral Kirk. I'm sure the Admiral will recognise the necessity of keeping discipline in any chain of command.
  • Kirk : I do, sir.
  • Federation Council president : James T. Kirk. It is the judgment of this Council that you be reduced in rank to Captain, and that as a consequence of your new rank, you be given the duties for which you have repeatedly demonstrated unswerving ability: the command of a starship.
  • [ Chekov is being interrogated ]
  • FBI agent interrogating Chekov : Name.
  • Chekov : My name?
  • FBI agent interrogating Chekov : [ sarcastically ] No, my name.
  • Chekov : I do not know your name.
  • FBI agent interrogating Chekov : You play games with me, Mister, and you're through.
  • Chekov : I am? May I go now?
  • Chekov : Admiral. We have found the nuclear wessel.
  • Kirk : Well done, Team two.
  • Chekov : And Admiral... it is the *Enterprise*.
  • [ Kirk and Spock look at each other ]
  • Kirk : Understood.
  • Dr. Gillian Taylor : He's just gonna hang around the bushes while we eat?
  • Kirk : [ shrugs ] It's his way.
  • [ Kirk has just spoken very abruptly to Mr. Scott ]
  • Scotty : He's in a wee bit of a snit, isn't he?
  • Spock : He is a man of deep feelings.
  • Scotty : Aye, what else is new?
  • Scotty : Damage control is easy. Reading Klingon - that's hard.
  • Amanda : Spock, does the good of the many out weigh the good of the one?
  • Spock : I would accept that as an axiom.
  • Amanda : Then you stand here alive because of a mistake made by your flawed, feeling, human friends. They have sacrificed their futures because they believed that the good of the one - you - was more important to them.
  • Spock : Humans make illogical decisions.
  • Amanda : They do, indeed.
  • Spock : Are you sure it isn't time for a colorful metaphor?
  • Shore Patrolman : How's the patient, doctor?
  • Kirk : He's gonna make it.
  • Shore Patrolman : He? You came in with a she.
  • Kirk : One little mistake...
  • Kirk : You're not exactly catching us at our best.
  • Spock : That much is certain.
  • McCoy : [ 23:21 ] Really? So,you think this is it's way of saying, "hi there" to the people of the Earth?
  • Spock : [ looking annoyed ] There are other species on earth. Only human arrogance would assume the signal must be meant for mankind.
  • McCoy : [ Dr. McCoy is talking about Mr. Spock ]
  • McCoy : I don't know if you've got the whole picture, but he's not exactly working on all thrusters.
  • Lt. Saavik : [ to Kirk ] David died most bravely. He saved Spock. He saved us all. I thought you should know.
  • Vulcan Computer : What was Kiri-Kin-Tha's first law of metaphysics?
  • Spock : Nothing unreal exists.
  • McCoy : [ 18:57 ] Perhaps, we could cover a little philosophical ground. Life
  • McCoy : Death
  • McCoy : Life.
  • McCoy : Things of that nature.
  • Spock : I did not have time on Vulcan to review the philosophical disciplines.
  • McCoy : C'mon, Spock, it's me, McCoy. You really have gone where no man's gone before. Can't you tell me what it felt like?
  • Spock : It would be impossible to discuss the subject without a common frame-of-reference.
  • McCoy : You're joking!
  • Spock : A joke
  • Spock : is a story with a humorous climax.
  • McCoy : You mean I have to die to discuss your insights on death?
  • Spock : Forgive me, Doctor. I am receiving a number of distress calls.
  • McCoy : I don't doubt it.
  • McCoy : You sure this is such a bright idea?
  • Kirk : What do you mean?
  • McCoy : [ referring to Spock ] I mean him! Back at his post like nothing happened. I don't know if you got the whole picture or not, but he's not quite operating on all thrusters!
  • Kirk : It'll come back to him.
  • McCoy : Are you sure?
  • [ Kirk doesn't answer ]
  • McCoy : That's what I thought.
  • Spock : Ready to engage computer, Admiral.
  • Kirk : What's our target in time?
  • Spock : Late twentieth century.
  • Kirk : Can you be more specific?
  • Spock : Not with this equipment. I've had to program some of the variables from memory.
  • Kirk : What are some of the variables?
  • Spock : The availability of fuel components, mass of the vessel through a time continuum, and probable location of humpback whales - in this case, the Pacific Basin.
  • Kirk : And you programmed all that from memory?
  • Spock : I have.
  • McCoy : Angels and ministers of grace, defend us!
  • Spock : [ recognizing the quote ] Hamlet, Act One, Scene Four.
  • Kirk : [ smiling ] No doubt about your memory, Spock. Engage computers. Prepare for warp speed.
  • [ Gillian has just beamed aboard the Klingon ship for the first time ]
  • Kirk : Hello, Alice. Welcome to "Wonderland".

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Walter Koenig, Leonard Nimoy, William Shatner, James Doohan, DeForest Kelley, George Takei, and Nichelle Nichols in Star Trek IV: The Voyage Home (1986)

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The Funniest Moments In Star Trek History

Picard in Robin Hood garb

Odds are when you think of "Star Trek," humor isn't the first thing that springs to mind. At least, not intentional humor. You think of things like ridged alien foreheads, the pointy-eared Spock lecturing Dr. McCoy about logic, or officers shouting out diminishing shield percentages during spaceship battles. To many, "Star Trek" is only funny when it's not trying to be, like Captain Kirk slapping himself silly in the original series' "Plato's Stepchildren." Or the mugato from "A Private Little War," who is meant to horrify viewers but — because it's basically a white-haired monkey-lizard with a unicorn horn — inspires a completely different response.

But while the stories may be best known for their sci-fi concepts and dense technical jargon, "Star Trek" creators have proven they know how to turn on the funny ever since the early days of the franchise. Whether they're entire episodes, hilarious scenes, or little more than a couple of lines of dialogue, here's what we count as the funniest moments in the history of "Star Trek." 

By the way, since it's more of a comedy than any other "Trek" property, we figured it wouldn't be fair to include examples from "Star Trek: Lower Decks" — otherwise we could have mentioned almost nothing but that series. 

Odo gets a zinger in on Quark

One of the most fun conflicts to witness on "Star Trek: Deep Space Nine," is the back and forth between Constable Odo (René Auberjonois) and the scheming Ferengi Quark (Armin Shimerman). One of their funniest exchanges happens in Season 4's "The Way of the Warrior," just before the epic battle between the eponymous station and a fleet of Klingon ships. 

Finding Quark outside his bar, Odo tells him it's time to head to the emergency shelter, but Quark assures Odo he intends to defend his property. Quark isn't known for being able to defend himself against so much as a tribble, much less battle-hardened Klingon warriors, so Odo is understandably skeptical. The bartender produces a box that he thinks holds a disrupter pistol. When he opens the box, boldly claiming he'll "be ready for" the Klingons, rather than a weapon, there's a note inside. Without skipping a beat or asking permission, Odo grabs the note and reads it — it's from Quark's brother Rom, informing him he gutted his disruptor to fix their replicator.  

Snatching the paper from Odo, Quark yells, "I will kill him!" 

Odo, clearly satisfied with this turn of events, responds, "With what?"

Picard hams it up to save Lwaxana Troi

One of the funniest recurring characters ever to appear in "Star Trek" is Deanna Troi's intrusive and flirtatious mother Lwaxana, played by the late Majel Barrett . In her third appearance on "Star Trek: The Next Generation" — Season 3's "Ménage à Troi" — her predicament forces Captain Picard (Patrick Stewart) to deliver a speech so ridiculously over-the-top that even if you've never watched "TNG," you've likely seen the memes inspired by it.

After Will Riker (Jonathan Frakes), Deanna (Marina Sirtis), and Lwaxana are kidnapped by the Ferengi DaiMon Tog, Lwaxana succeeds in getting Riker and her daughter sent back to the Enterprise by promising to be Tog's lover. When the Enterprise contacts Tog, Lwaxana plays at not wanting to be rescued, and tells Picard that "it's over" between them. Deanna figures out what her mother is doing, and tells Picard he will have to fight for her. 

In a display so melodramatic it would even make William Shatner groan, Picard professes his love for Lwaxana, threatens Tog with annihilation, and recites famous lines from Shakespearean sonnets with as much grandiose flair as he can muster. Worf watches in disgust, looking like he's about to rage-puke. It's Picard like you've never seen him, and probably wouldn't want to see him again. 

The tribbles make their first appearance

One of the funniest episodes of "Star Trek" arrives in Season 2 of "Star Trek: The Original Series." In "The Trouble with Tribbles," things start off on a much more serious note. The Enterprise is already on its way to Deep Space Station K-7, but they put the pedal to the metal when they receive an alert that the station is under attack. The alert proves to be a false alarm but there is danger waiting at K-7: a domineering Federation bureaucrat, a Klingon spy, and a space trader named Cyrano Jones (Stanley Adams) who sells members of the Enterprise crew some of the most troublesome pets in the galaxy — tribbles.

"The Trouble with Tribbles" is a classic, and one of the first examples of a whimsically goofy "TOS" episode that makes a point of not taking itself too seriously. From the countless puffballs that multiply faster than a gremlin in a tropical storm, to the ridiculous barroom brawl between the Klingons and Enterprise crew members, to the peddler Cyrano Jones willing to risk life and limb in order to score a free drink, "The Trouble with Tribbles" is a great time.

Bashir and O'Brien plan Worf's death right before his wedding

In "You Are Cordially Invited," when Worf (Michael Dorn) and Jadzia (Terry Farrell) marry in Season 6 of "DS9," Worf invites Chief O'Brien (Colm Meaney) and Doctor Bashir (Alexander Siddig), among others, to the ritual of Kal'Hyah. Thinking they can expect the Klingon version of a bachelor party, they happily accept. But rather than drinking or exotic dancers, the path to Kal'Hyah involves fasting for four days and nights, being drained of blood, hanging from a pole over intense heat, and other creative tortures. 

When Worf abruptly cancels the wedding, Bashir and O'Brien are thrilled to cut their torment short and head straight to Quark's for a feast. But before they can sink their teeth in, Sisko (Avery Brooks) and Martok (J.G. Hertzler) arrive to let them know the wedding's back on, and when Quark takes their untouched food away, you can practically hear them whining like disappointed puppies.

After several vows from both friends that they're going to "kill Worf," the wedding finally arrives and part of the friends' duty — as part of Klingon tradition — is to attack Worf and Jadzia with blunted weapons called Ma'Stakas. While everyone else applauds the newlyweds' kiss, Bashir looks like Obi-Wan Kenobi waiting for a force field to come down, incessantly asking Martok, "Now?" When Martok finally gives the word, Bashir and O'Brien rush Worf and Jadzia with cries of rage and the credits roll to the sound of the mock battle.

Spock doesn't like Italian food

One of the best "Star Trek" films featuring the original crew is 1986's "Star Trek IV: The Voyage Home." In order to answer the call of an alien probe which is blindly triggering power losses and apocalyptic storms on Earth, Kirk (William Shatner) and his crew must go back in time to recover a humpback whale — a species extinct by the 23rd century. 

While "TOS" had plenty of instances of sending the heroes back in time, none of those stories feel as natural or believable as "Star Trek IV." Rather than facing any particular physical threat, the biggest challenge the heroes face is culture shock. They don't have money, when they try to use a bus they're stymied by the need for "exact change," and in particular they're confused by what Spock (Leonard Nimoy) calls "colorful metaphors," i.e. all the swearing.

One of the funniest scenes involves Kirk and Spock trying to earn the trust of the marine biologist Dr. Gillian Taylor (Catherine Hicks). Kirk is trying, and failing, to seem like the "normal" one compared to Spock. When Gillian asks them if they like Italian food, one of the most natural, adorably funny moments ever in "Star Trek" unfolds, as Kirk and Spock bicker like an angry old couple, with Spock insisting "no" and Kirk saying "yes" about a half dozen times each.

Worf is no merry man

Because of the machinations of the mischievous entity Q — one of the greatest "Star Trek" villains — Captain Picard, his senior staff, and Picard's old flame Vash find themselves transported to Sherwood Forest in Season 4's "Qpid."

There's little about "Qpid" that won't make you laugh. Picard and his senior officers are made up as Robin Hood's merry men, including Data (Brent Spiner), who bears the famous bald dome of Friar Tuck. Worf is, predictably, the most incensed by the situation, famously complaining to Picard, "Sir, I protest. I am not a merry man!" 

The most laugh-out-loud moment comes when Geordi (Levar Burton), much more comfortable in his role as Alan-a-Dale than Worf is as Will Scarlett, rests and plucks at his mandolin. Without comment or permission, Worf calmly walks over to Geordi, grabs the mandolin, and — in a wonderful homage to 1978's "National Lampoon's Animal House" — smashes the instrument against a nearby tree.

Kirk and Spock are hilarious as wiseguys

If you're a "Star Trek" fan, then you no doubt are familiar with the Prime Directive, which prohibits members of Starfleet from interfering with the natural progression of any society outside the United Federation of Planets . Serving as a comically dangerous example of why the Prime Directive exists is the "TOS" Season 2 episode, "A Piece of the Action." 

One hundred years before the events of the episode — before the Prime Directive is established — Sigma Iotia II is visited by the Earth ship Horizon. To help teach the planet's natives, the Horizon crew leaves behind a number of books, including a non-fiction book titled "Chicago Mobs of the Twenties." After the Horizon leaves, the Iotians come to see this book as a holy text and base their entire culture on it. When Kirk, Spock, and McCoy (DeForest Kelley) beam down to the planet, they find a world where just about every grown male dresses and speaks like tough guys in mobster movies, and people openly carry Tommy Guns up and down the street as if there was nothing strange about it.

Along with the episode's crazy premise, "A Piece of the Action" gets even funnier once Kirk and Spock get hold of their own mobster get-ups and Kirk starts doing his own impersonation of a Chicago gangster. Shatner wouldn't fool anyone on Earth, and it's tough to tell whether that's intentional, which just makes the whole thing funnier.

Star Trek made fun of itself in Trials and Tribble-ations

Early in Season 5 of "DS9," the series made television history with "Trials and Tribble-ations" in a way that only a "Star Trek" series could. Using technology that had been popularized with the 1994 film "Forrest Gump," the cast of the show is sent back in time to the 1967 "TOS" episode "The Trouble with Tribbles," and somehow manages to get more laughs than the earlier episode.

Along with perfectly recreating the sets, props and wardrobe of the earlier series, "Tribble-ations" uses the opportunity to poke fun at itself. O'Brien, the tireless engineer, is so lost on the Enterprise that when he tries to perform routine maintenance, he takes out all the nearby lights. Bashir gets hit on by a woman he becomes convinced is his great-grandmother, and afterward he considers the possibility that if he doesn't get involved with her, he might never be born. 

Hands down, the best moment comes when a waitress points out a table full of Klingons . Everyone but Worf is confused, because, of course, Klingons look a lot different in the original series. It's the first time in the franchise anyone acknowledges what always seems like a glaring inconsistency, and it comes off perfectly. 

Scotty gets drunk and gives dirty looks in Relics

In all of the examples of crossovers between "TNG" and "TOS," the funniest is "Relics," the Season 6 "TNG" episode in which the Enterprise crew saves Montgomery Scott (James Doohan) from his 75-year wait in a transporter buffer.

Often just as sad as it is funny, "Relics" finds Scotty trying to feel relevant in this new century, eventually pestering Geordi La Forge so much that the younger engineer loses it and yells at Scotty. With the surprising aid of Data, Scotty gets hammered with a drink the android can only identify with "it is green" — a hilarious callback to Scotty's own dialogue while attempting to drink an alien under the table in the Season 2 "TOS" episode "By Any Other Name." His slurred, annoyed exchange with the holodeck computer while trying to recreate the deck of the original Enterprise is wonderful. 

There's also a perfect, blink-and-you'll-miss-it moment at the end of the episode that perfectly reflects one of the biggest differences between "TNG" and "TOS." As Scotty is leaving the ship, sharing handshakes and kisses on the cheek with the different officers, his only farewell to the Klingon Worf is a quick but unmistakably dirty look.  

Scotty has trouble with a computer

Imagine being suddenly transported to the 23rd century and needing to use a computer more advanced than anything you'd ever seen. Well, in "Star Trek IV," Scotty and McCoy are confused not by how advanced a computer is, but how primitive . 

On their quest to bring 20th century humpback whales back to the 23rd century, Scotty, McCoy, and Sulu (George Takei) are tasked with figuring out a way to construct a makeshift aquarium aboard the Bounty. While Sulu secures an aircraft, Scotty and McCoy find a plexiglass manufacturer and pretend to be famous scientists with an appointment to tour the factory. At the end of the tour, Scotty plans to offer the head of the plant, Dr. Nichols, the futuristic formula to transparent aluminum, but he needs to use Nichols' computer to prove it can work. 

Twice, Scotty tries using the computer by saying "Computer," predictably without luck. Thinking he's figured it out, McCoy hands Scotty the mouse. Smiling widely, Scotty holds the mouse to his face like a walkie talkie and says, "Hello, computer." Finally Nichols, annoyed at this point, says, "Just use the keyboard." 

The Magnificent Ferengi is the best Ferengi episode

"DS9" enjoys a lot of great, and usually funny, Ferengi episodes. Arguably the best of them features a surprising amount of gallow's humor — Season 6's "The Magnificent Ferengi."

Quark's mother Ishka is kidnapped by the Dominion. To get her back, Quark arranges for a prisoner exchange. When Quark assembles the titular "magnificent" Ferengi, it feels like a farcical version of "Ocean's Eleven." Along with Quark is Rom, his nephew Nog, the usually villainous Liquidator Brunt, Quark's now penniless cousin Galia, and a new character — the assassin Leck. Together they transport the Vorta Keevan to DS9's abandoned twin station Empok Nor for the prisoner exchange, and things are going fine until Galia unintentionally kills Keevan.

With Keevan's death, the episode stops feeling like a parody of "Ocean's Eleven" and becomes a more thrilling, but still funny, version of "Weekend at Bernie's." Fitting Keevan's corpse with neural stimulators, Nog manages to manipulate Keevan's corpse just long enough to make it walk partway down the hall during the prisoner exchange, just long enough for the Ferengi to secure Ishka. Then the corpse turns and walks into a wall — continuing to try walk through it like a glitching video game character. For a cherry on top, the Vorta sent to collect Keevan — Yelgrun — is played by the godfather of punk himself, Iggy Pop .

Scotty knows this ship...

Considering it's arguably the worst "Star Trek" movie ever made, the fact that 1989's "Star Trek V: The Final Frontier" remains William Shatner's only turn as a "Trek" director — not counting his "Trek" documentaries — shouldn't come as a surprise. But the film isn't without its merits. It's one of the funnier entries in the franchise, though some of its detractors would argue that in part it's the movie's over-reliance on humor that weighs it down. But one easy, uncharacteristically slapstick moment in "Star Trek V" survives as one of the franchise's most uproarious gags.

After the forces loyal to Spock's fanatical brother Sybok seize control of the Enterprise, Kirk, Spock, and Dr. McCoy are imprisoned in the brig, but not for long. After Scotty frees them with explosives, the liberated trio make a plan to sneak their way to the emergency transmitter, but they're worried about search parties. Scotty gives them directions he's confident should steer them clear of Sybok's people. Before the trio rushes off, Kirk emphatically thanks Scotty and calls him "amazing."

Turning and walking in the other direction, Scotty mutters, "There's nothing amazing about it. I know this ship like the back of my hand." With a loud "BONG!" Scotty's forehead connects with a bulkhead he should have easily been able to avoid. He crashes to the ground, unconscious. It's perfectly timed and classic.

Keiko's second pregnancy scares Worf

If you understand the context, the single-word response Worf delivers to Quark in "Accession" — a Season 4 episode of "DS9" — should make you laugh hard enough to knock you out of any recliner, couch, or captain's chair. Dr. Bashir and O'Brien are sharing a drink in Quark's bar, discussing the news that O'Brien's wife Keiko is pregnant with another baby. It's just then that, behind Bashir and O'Brien, Quark runs into Worf and says, "Did you hear? Keiko's going to have another baby."

To understand what happens next, you need to know that five years earlier in the Season 5 "TNG" episode "Disaster," much of the Enterprise is rendered inoperable and most of the crew is stranded in different parts of the ship. This, of course, is when Keiko O'Brien — pregnant with her first baby — goes into labor while stuck in Ten Forward. As the most qualified crew member — but still with precious little medical knowledge — it's Worf who's forced to assist with Keiko's pregnancy, and it's clear for every second of it he'd rather be facing down an entire army of Romulans. 

So this is why, five years later in "Accession," when Quark delivers the news that "Keiko's going to have another baby," Worf's immediate reaction is to respond with a panicked "Now?!?"

IMAGES

  1. Scotty (Star Trek)

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  2. Scotty Character Profile

    star trek iv scotty

  3. Star Trek

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  4. Ingeniero Montgomery Scott

    star trek iv scotty

  5. Star Trek IV The Voyage Home (1986) Scotty and Bones Change The Past

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  6. Star Trek IV: The Voyage Home (1986)

    star trek iv scotty

VIDEO

  1. Star Trek's ‘Scotty’ Birth Plaque In Scotland

  2. Игра, в которой играешь за кота

  3. Scooter Tramp Scotty. Sturgis. Why We Come

  4. The Famous 4 SCOTS, The Highlanders Mounting the Guard at Edinburgh Castle on 19th May 2023

  5. Скоттиш Страйт, Уход и содержание, Породы кошек

  6. "Scotty, Throw the Switch!"

COMMENTS

  1. Scotty (Star Trek)

    Montgomery "Scotty" Scott is a fictional character in the science fiction franchise Star Trek. First portrayed by James Doohan in the original Star Trek series, Scotty also appears in the animated Star Trek series, 10 Star Trek films, the Star Trek: The Next Generation episode "Relics", and in numerous books, comics, and video games.. Simon Pegg has assumed the character and appeared in the ...

  2. Great Moments in Star Trek History

    From Star Trek IV: The Voyage HomeTrivia: Jimmy Doohan (Scotty) was at the Juno Beach invasion of Normandy on D-Day. That night he was hit by friendly fire, ...

  3. Star Trek 4: The Voyage Home (7/10) Movie CLIP

    Star Trek IV: The Voyage Home movie clips: http://j.mp/1J9zolDBUY THE MOVIE: http://amzn.to/t2YsYoDon't miss the HOTTEST NEW TRAILERS: http://bit.ly/1u2y6prC...

  4. Star Trek IV: The Voyage Home

    Scotty reports a new problem, informing Kirk and Spock the Klingon dilithium crystals have been drained by the time travel and are de-crystallizing. Unfortunately, even in the 23rd century, re-crystallization is not possible and Scott gives them 24 hours before they lose all power and become visible - and dead in the water. ... Star Trek IV ...

  5. A Complete Guide to Scotty From Star Trek

    Doohan made a memorable cameo as Scotty in The Next Generation Season 6, Episode 4, "Relics," which also revealed details about his final years.After becoming a captain in The Search for Spock he remained the Enterprise's Chief Engineer until the end of Star Trek VI: The Undiscovered County.One year later, he embarked on the U.S.S. Jenolan en route to retirement in the Federation colony of Norpin.

  6. Star Trek IV: The Voyage Home (1986)

    Dr. Nichols : Please. Scotty : [over the intercom] I'm ready, Spock! Let's go find George and Gracie! Kirk : You know, it's ironic, when man was killing these creatures, he was destroying his own future. Scotty : The beasties seem happy to see you, Doctor. I hope you like our little aquarium.

  7. Montgomery Scott

    Captain Montgomery Scott - often referred to as "Scotty" by his shipmates - was a male Human Starfleet officer who lived during the 23rd and 24th centuries.. For a period of nearly thirty years, he served as the chief engineer of both the USS Enterprise and the USS Enterprise-A, both under the command of Captain James T. Kirk.(TOS: "Where No Man Has Gone Before"; Star Trek VI: The ...

  8. All 5 Versions Of Scotty In Star Trek

    Simon Pegg played Scotty in J.J. Abrams' Star Trek movies, playing a slightly more comic version of the character, complete with alien sidekick.However, Scotty also got to investigate some nefarious Section 31 activities in Star Trek Into Darkness.In Star Trek Beyond, Scotty was vital in getting the antiquated USS Franklin back up and running to save the USS Yorktown.

  9. Star Trek IV: The Voyage Home

    Star Trek IV: The Voyage Home is a 1986 American science fiction film, the fourth installment in the Star Trek film franchise based on the television series Star Trek.The second film directed by Leonard Nimoy, it completes the story arc begun in Star Trek II: The Wrath of Khan (1982), and continued in Star Trek III: The Search for Spock (1984). Intent on returning home to Earth to face trial ...

  10. Star Trek IV The Voyage Home (1986) Scotty and Bones Change The Past

    Star Trek IV The Voyage Home (1986) Scotty and Bones Change The Past

  11. Star Trek 4: Kirk Thatcher on Leonard Nimoy & Writing Scotty ...

    Kirk Thatcher Talks 'Star Trek IV,' Working With Leonard Nimoy, and Getting to Write Scotty's Computer Joke. By Samantha Coley. Published Nov 26, 2022. Thatcher also talks about how you don ...

  12. star trek

    The Star Trek IV: The Voyage Home there is a moment when Scotty attempts to talk to a computer: ... Although not officially canon, remember that in Star Trek III Search for Spock, Scotty had been working on the Excelsior - the latest ship of the time. With the voice-activated computer interfaces in the Constitution refit, it would be logical to ...

  13. Star Trek IV: The Voyage Home (1986)

    Star Trek IV: The Voyage Home: Directed by Leonard Nimoy. With William Shatner, Leonard Nimoy, DeForest Kelley, James Doohan. To save Earth from an alien probe, Admiral James T. Kirk and his fugitive crew go back in time to San Francisco in 1986 to retrieve the only beings who can communicate with it: humpback whales.

  14. The Movie Transcripts

    Star Trek IV: The Voyage Home Stardate: 8390.0. Captain's log, stardate 8031 in the twenty-third century. As commanding officer of the U.S.S. Enterprise, I look back on our most recent adventure and realise I could not have asked for a more dependable ship or dedicated crew. Chekov, Doctor McCoy, Uhura, Scotty, Sulu, and our late comrade, Spock ...

  15. Star Trek Breaks The Prime Directive In Its Best Movie

    Star Trek IV: The Voyage Home is possibly the most accessible media featuring the original series cast. ... Scotty offers the head of a San Francisco-based plexiglass manufacturer the formula for ...

  16. Star Trek IV: The Voyage Home (1986)

    Dr. Nichols : Oh, that's easy. Six inches. We carry stuff that big in stock. Scotty : I, uh, noticed. Now suppose, just suppose, I were to show you a way to manufacture a wall that would do the same job, but be only one inch thick.

  17. Kelvin Timeline

    A giant fish that swam passed the vessel's bridge did little to assuage Scott's grumpy mood. Interestingly enough, Doohan's Scotty suffered his own sodden ordeal in Star Trek IV: The Voyage Home, when he briefly became trapped in a Klingon Bird-of-Prey's flooded hold after the ship plummeted into San Francisco Bay.

  18. Star Trek IV: The Voyage Home (1986)

    Spock: I would accept that as an axiom. Amanda: Then you stand here alive because of a mistake made by your flawed, feeling, human friends. They have sacrificed their futures because they believed that the good of the one - you - was more important to them. Spock: Humans make illogical decisions.

  19. The Funniest Moments In Star Trek History

    One of the best "Star Trek" films featuring the original crew is 1986's "Star Trek IV: The Voyage Home." ... Well, in "Star Trek IV," Scotty and McCoy are confused not by how advanced a computer ...

  20. Scotty, Beam Me Up!

    About Press Copyright Contact us Creators Advertise Developers Terms Privacy Policy & Safety How YouTube works Test new features NFL Sunday Ticket Press Copyright ...

  21. PDF rev. thru Apr. 10, 1986

    STAR TREK IV: THE VOYAGE HOME _____ Screenplay by: HARVE BENNETT & NICHOLAS MEYER Story by: STEVE MEERSON & PETER KRIKES THE WRITING CREDITS MAY NOT BE FINAL AND SHOULD NOT BE ... and Scotty's side of the dialogue will be photographed in the Cargo Bay Area. 5. Please note the readmission of Scenes 132 and 133. 6.

  22. Star Trek : The Movie Scripts

    Star Trek IV The Voyage Home Screenplay by HARVE BENNETT & NICHOLAS MEYER Story by STEVE MEERSON & PETER KRIKES REV. ... Please note that a new Scene 188A has been included and Scotty's side of the dialogue will be photographed in the Cargo Bay Area. ... and we begin to MOVE FORWARD. MAIN TITLES begin. And to the delight of Star Trek lovers ...