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uk to canada travel plug

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What is the plug for Canada? Before you travel, check the information below to make sure your electronic devices are compatible with the outlet type and voltage.

Electrical Summary

Canada uses outlet types A, B at a voltage of 120V and a frequency of 60 Hz.

Plug Compatibility: Type A, Type B

Voltage: 120V

Frequency: 60 Hz

Type A Outlet: A white electrical outlet with two sockets

Can North Americans use Electronics in Canada without an Adapter?

Yes! Americans and Mexicans do not need a travel adapter or transformer when traveling to Canada. Most device plugs will work with the outlet types in Canada. Also, the voltage in Canada is the same as in the United States and Mexico.  

Please note: an adapter will be needed if your device plug has a grounding pin and you are trying to use a Type A outlet. For this reason, we always recommend traveling with a universal travel adapter.

Can Europeans use Electronics in Canada without an adapter?

No! Europeans will need an adapter for the outlets and a transformer for the voltage when traveling to Canada. European device plugs will not work with the outlet types in Canada. Also, the voltage in Canada is different from European voltages.

What Outlet Does Canada Use?

Type A electrical plug sockets are used in North and Central America, including the United States, Canada, and Mexico. They have two flat pins and no grounding pin. These outlets are typically used with devices that have a voltage of 110-120V. This outlet is rated for 15 amps. Plug Type A is compatible with this socket. All other plug types (including Type B) will need an adapter.

Normal 0 false false false EN-US X-NONE X-NONE

Type B electrical plug sockets are used in North and Central America, including the United States, Canada, and Mexico. They have two round pins and a grounding pin. These outlets are typically used with devices that have a voltage of 110-120V. This outlet is rated for 15 amps. Plug Type A and Type B   are compatible with this socket. All other plug types will need an adapter.

Is it safe to drink water in Canada?

To be on the safe side, you can use common precautions such as boiling tap water for at least one minute, using water purification tablets, or drinking bottled water. It’s also important to note that ice may be made from tap water and that foods may be washed or prepared with tap water.

We recommend always packing a filtered water bottle when traveling:

Travel Essentials

Be sure to check our list of travel essentials before your trip!

Recommended Travel Essentials

Should I get travel insurance when traveling to Canada?

It is generally recommended to get travel insurance when traveling to a different country. Travel insurance can provide financial protection and peace of mind in case of unexpected events, such as medical emergencies, trip cancellations, lost or stolen baggage, or other travel-related mishaps.

Travel insurance can cover various expenses related to your trip, such as medical expenses, emergency medical transportation, trip cancellation or interruption, lost or stolen baggage or personal belongings, and other travel-related expenses.

Before purchasing travel insurance, it’s important to carefully review the policy details, including the coverage limits, exclusions, and any applicable deductibles or copays. You should also make sure that the policy covers any activities or destinations that you plan to participate in or visit during your trip.

Travel Summary

Canada is a vast and diverse country that offers something for every traveler. From the rugged beauty of the Rocky Mountains to the picturesque villages of the Maritimes, Canada is a land of natural wonders and cultural riches.

One of the top destinations in Canada is the Rocky Mountains. This region is home to some of the most spectacular mountain scenery in the world, with towering peaks, glaciers, and turquoise lakes. Visitors can enjoy hiking, skiing, and sightseeing in the national parks of Banff, Jasper, and Yoho.

Another must-see destination in Canada is Niagara Falls. This natural wonder is one of the most famous tourist attractions in the world, and for good reason. The falls are a breathtaking sight, and visitors can take a boat ride to the base of the falls or even take a helicopter tour for a bird’s eye view.

For a taste of Canadian culture, head to Quebec City. This charming city is the heart of French Canada, and it is home to the only fortified city walls in North America. Visitors can explore the charming cobblestone streets, sample delicious French Canadian cuisine, and learn about the city’s rich history.

Canada is also renowned for its natural beauty and wilderness, such as the Canadian Shield, home of the largest collection of lakes in the world and the boreal forest, the largest forest of its kind in the world, it’s a perfect spot for camping, fishing, and wildlife watching.

No trip to Canada would be complete without trying the delicious traditional Canadian food. From poutine, maple syrup, to fish and chips. Be sure to try the famous Canadian bacon, also known as back bacon, and of course, a Tim Hortons donut and coffee.

Whether you’re looking for outdoor adventure, culture, history, or just a relaxing vacation, Canada has something for everyone. With its friendly people, natural beauty, and endless attractions, it’s no wonder why Canada is such a popular travel destination.

Traveling to another country? Check out our Countries page for more info.

Which plug adaptor do I need when travelling from United Kingdom to Canada?

Search again

The table below summarises the plug types, voltage and frequency of electrical current in both United Kingdom and Canada.

Plug Adaptors

In United Kingdom there's more than one plug type in use.

What type of plug does your appliance have?

Your Appliance has Plug Type G

In Canada there's more than one socket type in use. You may require more than one adaptor.

Adaptor 1 of 2

Socket Type G (United Kingdom) to Plug Type A (Canada)

Adaptor 2 of 2

Socket Type G (United Kingdom) to Plug Type B (Canada)

Your Appliance has Plug Type D

Socket Type D (United Kingdom) to Plug Type A (Canada)

Socket Type D (United Kingdom) to Plug Type B (Canada)

Your Appliance has Plug Type M

Socket Type M (United Kingdom) to Plug Type A (Canada)

Socket Type M (United Kingdom) to Plug Type B (Canada)

The voltages found in United Kingdom and Canada are significantly different.

Some appliances are compatible with multiple voltages. To find out if your appliance is one of them, check the appliance label and/or instruction booklet.

See examples of appliance labels

Appliance label showing a voltage of 240 volts

Is your appliance compatible with the voltage used in Canada (120 V )?

If your appliance is not compatible with multiple voltages, you will need a transformer to adjust the voltage input when using your appliance in Canada.

Considerations

Frequency of electrical current.

The frequency of electrical current found in United Kingdom (50 Hz ) differs to that found in Canada (60 Hz ).

Most equipment is not affected by differences in frequencies. Some exceptions are:

  • Electric clocks: Some electric clocks use the frequency of electrical current to measure time. If the clock is designed for one frequency, but used with another, time shifts could be experienced.
  • Appliances using motors: If there is a motor load associated with an appliance, the frequency governs the speed in revolutions of the motor. This could mean that the motor will spin faster, or slower than intended and could have a detrimental effect in the appliance's operation. This is of particular concern in power tools and other machinery that uses motors, so if you must use these, you should seek access to a frequency converter .

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The Best Travel Adapters

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Small black rectangular device with various outlets for different types of plugs

Best Overall Ceptics World International Travel Plug Adapter Read more

Small pink rectangular device with an outlet for different types of plugs and additional ports on the side

Upgrade Pick Zendure Passport III Read more

Plug adapter

Budget Pick Epicka Universal Travel Adapter Read more

Plug adapters

Best Travel Adapter Set Ceptics Adapter Plug Set for Worldwide International Travel Read more

Whether you’re planning a country-hopping odyssey or a quick business trip, your journey will go more smoothly with the right kit. That includes good travel adapters so you can safely charge all of your gadgets wherever you land. We’ve tested several, and our favorites below will work in most parts of the world.

Adapters make great gifts for travelers , and be sure to check out our roundup of other travel essentials if you’re a frequent flier. Don't forget to pack USB-C charging cables .

Updated May 2024: We added the Satechi 4-Port GaN Travel Charger, Anker MagGo 3-in-1 Charging Station, and Ceptics 2000W Travel Voltage Converter, added a new tips section, photos, and updated prices.

Special offer for Gear readers: Get WIRED for just $5 ($25 off) . This includes unlimited access to WIRED.com , full Gear coverage, and subscriber-only newsletters. Subscriptions help fund the work we do every day.

Best Overall

Jet off to more than 200 countries with this compact adapter in your luggage, and you can charge up all your gadgets. The classic slider design pushes out EU, UK, and US plugs, and you can rotate the pins for sockets in Australia and China. I appreciate how securely the plugs lock into place, and you must press a side button to retract them. You have a universal input socket, and Ceptics has included three USB-A ports on the bottom and two USB-C ports on the side. The USB-A ports can deliver a maximum charging rate of 15.5 watts, while the USB-C ports offer up to 18 watts (one PD and one QC 3.0).

The main problem is the lack of any grounding, which is meant to reduce the risk of an electrical shock if there's a fault, such as a loose wire inside a device with a metal case. ( This video explains grounding really well. ) Thankfully, there's overload protection with an 8-amp fuse, and it comes with a spare, but you should not use this adapter with any device that has a third metal ground pin on its plug.

Upgrade Pick

Zendure's all-in-one travel adapter is what I toss in my bag first for every trip. It has a boxy design with sliding toggles to switch between US, European, and British plugs. (It covers more than 200 countries.) There’s an auto-resetting fuse to protect your gadgets from power surges, and the Passport III has a 10-amp limit. The latest version also sports a funky, translucent design with a metallic finish (purple is best). Sadly, there's no grounding, so you shouldn't use this adapter with any device that has a third metal grounding pin on its plug.

There are four USB-C ports alongside a single USB-A port and an AC socket, so you can charge six devices simultaneously. Using gallium nitride technology, Zendure was able to increase the power output of the USB-C port to 65 watts, capable of fully charging a 13-inch MacBook Pro in under two hours. That means you can leave your laptop's charging brick behind (if it charges via USB-C). There’s support for the Power Delivery (PD) and Programmable Power Supply (PPS) standards (Samsung uses PPS in its flagship range), so it can fast-charge almost any phone or tablet. This travel adapter will satisfy even the most gadget-laden of travelers.

★ A Good Alternative : The OneWorld 65 ($69) sports a very similar design, the same 65-watt charging rate, and support for more than 200 countries. But it has three USB-C and two USB-A ports. It comes in white and has a 10-amp fuse with a replacement included. WIRED readers can also get a discount with the code OneWorld65_15%Off .

Budget Pick

With the capability to work in more than 150 countries, this affordable adapter from Epicka will do the job for most people. It has sliders you push to reveal the three most common international plugs—EU, UK, and US—and you can rotate the pins for sockets in Australia or China. This plug can recharge your power-hungry devices, like laptops and camera batteries, but there are four USB-A ports on the bottom and a 15-watt USB-C port on the side for phones, tablets, smartwatches, and Kindles. It’s not as well constructed as our other universal adapter picks, but it's much cheaper.

Once again, there’s no grounding here, so don’t plug devices with a third metal ground pin into this adapter, but there is an 8-amp fuse for safety, and it comes with a spare. It is also certified by RoHS, CE, and FCC.

Best Travel Adapter Set

Universal adapters don't always work properly everywhere, and most do not have any grounding. The cheaper and more reliable alternative is to buy individual adapters. This international set from Ceptics is our favorite. It includes five types to cover most of the globe, and they are properly grounded. If you’re visiting only a single destination, just pack the relevant type. None of these adapters have any kind of USB ports, so you will need to bring the respective charging adapter for your gadgets.

This set is especially good for Europe, because it includes Type C, E/F, and G adapters (more on this below), so you’re covered for any socket. Ceptics offers an even cheaper and smaller five-piece set, but we don’t recommend it. The adapters are flimsy, there’s no grounding, and the European plug's design doesn’t work well with the recessed sockets you will sometimes encounter.The drawback of plug adapters is that they’re easy to lose, but at least Ceptics includes a small bag for storage.

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What I love about this sturdy, compact plug adapter is the lack of sliding pins or moving parts to worry about and that it stays put in the outlet. Offered in several versions (Type C, Type E/F, Type G), it enables you to charge up to six gadgets. I’ve been testing the Type G model in Scotland, and it plugs into a single outlet to give you three US outlets, a USB-C port, and two USB-A ports. The USB-C can put out up to 15 watts, and the USB-A ports are limited to 12 watts, not especially speedy but fine for overnight charging. The adapter is grounded and has various safety features.

On the downside, it can be tough to make use of all the outlets simultaneously as larger plugs, like the MacBook power adapter, tend to block one of the other US outlets. It does not offer surge protection, and the Type G adapter maxes out at 3,250 watts (250 volts, 13 amps), while the EU versions top out at 2,500 watts.

Small white electronic device with various outlets

For Charging Everything

This kit includes multiple plug attachments that slide and lock into place to keep you powered across most of the world. It is much larger than the average adapter, but provides two grounded US AC outlets. There is also a built-in USB-C cable, two USB-A ports, and two USB-C ports. The USB-A ports and built-in USB-C cable offer a combined maximum charging rate of 15 watts. The PD USB-C ports go up to 20 watts each. The top charging rate for all of them simultaneously is 55 watts.

There is built-in surge protection, but this is not a voltage converter, so don’t go plugging in hair dryers or other electronics that are not dual voltage. While the two AC outlets are handy, they are close together, so the shape and size of some plugs can make it tricky to use both. But with the ability to charge up to seven devices, this kit is handy. We also like the original Ceptics World Travel Adapter Kit ($35) , though it lacks the two USB-C ports.

Small black rectangular device with an outlet for different types of plugs and additional ports on the side

Fast Charging

With a familiar sliding pin design, this adapter also covers more than 200 countries. Taller and heavier than our top pick, this is OneAdaptr’s most powerful release to date, and it employs gallium nitride technology to deliver up to 100 watts. Aside from the universal AC outlet, you will find two USB-C ports and two USB-A ports on the bottom. Both USB-C ports offer 100-watt charging, and both USB-A ports are 18 watts, but 100 watts is the maximum in total, so when you plug in multiple devices, it divides between them.

Almost every charging standard you can think of is supported, including PD 3.0, QC 4+, FCP, SCP, AFC, PPS, and more, so there’s a good chance you can charge your phone at the fastest rate possible. There is no grounding, so don’t plug in any gadget with a third metal pin. But there is a 10-amp fuse with a spare included, and this adapter conforms to IEC 60884, CE, and FCC standards. If you want more power or feel you can make do with less, we also tested and liked the OneWorld135 ($109) and the OneWorld30 ($39) .

Note : We have tested OneAdaptr’s range extensively and found they work well, but the company has had issues fulfilling orders, and we are concerned about the volume of negative reviews online. The company assured us that it has recently taken steps to improve fulfilment and customer service, and we will continue to monitor the situation.

Small white cube shaped device with an outlet for different types of plugs

Safest Option

The OneWorld PD has sliding toggles on the side that cover the US/Canada, the UK, and Australia/China, and you can pop out a much smaller stand-alone European adapter. It promises to work in more than 150 countries. There are three USB-A ports on the bottom as well as a USB-C port that supports Power Delivery and Quick Charge 3.0 to deliver up to 18 watts. That's enough to fast-charge most phones and tablets, not so much a laptop. You can plug in your laptop's AC charger to speedily juice it back up, but that means carrying the heavy charging brick around.

What sets the AC plugs apart is that each one is earthed. Most universal travel adapters offer two-pin US plugs and make the third pin on the UK plug plastic, but the OneWorld PD provides fully grounded connections for every plug type to protect you from the risk of shock due to faulty wiring. It can handle up to 10 amps. Over-current protection automatically shuts down the power if there’s abnormal usage, and it resets via a button on the top. The rare British Standard 8546 compliance guarantees that the OneWorld PD has been fully tested and is one of the safest travel adapters you can buy. The downside? It's frequently out of stock.

Note : We have tested OneAdaptr's range extensively and found they work well, but the company has had issues fulfilling orders and we are concerned about the volume of negative reviews online. The company assured us that it has recently taken steps to improve fulfilment and customer service and we will continue to monitor the situation.

Thick grey rectangular device with various ports on the side beside additional adapters and a cloth bag

For Wired Charging

Most of us only take small gadgets when we travel, so a compact, multi-port wall charger, like this one from Satechi, could be the best way to pack light. It plugs directly into the wall and comes with four interchangeable travel adapters, covering the EU, UK, and Australia, with a mesh bag to store them in. There are four USB-C ports that you can plug your gadgets into, including laptops like the MacBook Pro, tablets, phones, and wearables. With support for Power Delivery 3.1, the first two ports can supply up to 140 watts, and the bottom two ports can supply up to 45 watts, but the total maximum output if you use all four ports simultaneously is 145 watts.

We took this on a recent trip for a wedding, and it kept all of our gadgets topped off. The adapters are very easy to slide on with a quick-release switch, and it was a real space saver. The only downside is that the bulk and weight may prove awkward at some outlets.

Two black flat squareshaped devices for wireless charging

For Wireless Charging

A few of the best wireless chargers can be good choices for travel. This modular system from RapidX is compact and capable of wirelessly charging two phones at up to 10 watts each, which makes it a good option for couples or families. The beauty is that you can add or remove pods, and a single charging cable can power up to five. They snap together magnetically and pull apart for easy packing. You can also get additional phone pods ($13) , and there’s a version with a phone pod and an Apple Watch pod ($30) .

You get a 30-watt US power adapter and a 5-foot USB-C cable in the box, so you will still want a travel adapter to pair with this system. If you plan to add pods, you will want a more powerful adapter. (RapidX recommends 65 watts or above for three or more devices.)

Anker MagGo Qi2 Travel 3in1 charger

For Apple and Qi2 Devices

Incredibly compact when folded flat, Anker’s MagGo 3-in-1 can charge up your iPhone or Qi2-certified phone at up to 15 watts, has a second pad for AirPods or other wireless earbuds, and sports a fold-out Apple Watch charger. You get a USB-C cable (around 5 feet) and a wall adapter with it, but pair it with something like the Zendure or Satechi above that can provide at least 40 watts, and you can leave the wall adapter at home. Only MagSafe iPhones and Qi2-certified Android phones have the magnets needed to use this as a stand, but I had no trouble charging an older Android phone by folding it flat (Qi2 is backward compatible). We recommend this Anker charger for travelers in our guide to the  best Apple 3-in-1 wireless chargers .

Type C outlets

International Plug Types and Universal Adapters

There are 15 plug types in use across the world. Type A and Type B are used in the US, Canada, Mexico, and Japan; Type C is common across Europe, South America, and Asia; Type E and Type F are found across Europe in places like Germany, Russia, and France; Type G is used in the United Kingdom, Ireland, and a handful of other places; and Type I is used in Australia, New Zealand, China, and Argentina. Universal adapters tend to cover all of these types.

Some countries are not usually covered by universal adapters, such as India ( Type D ), Israel ( Type H ), and South Africa ( Type M or N ). You'll need to buy specific plug adapters for those places. To avoid any surprises when you land, double-check what type you need before you travel.

If you're visiting just one destination, a basic plug adapter that caters to one plug type is all you need. For trips to multiple destinations or for frequent flyers, a universal travel adapter can prove more versatile. The universal adapters we recommend here have the bonus of including multiple USB ports for charging several mobile devices from a single outlet.

Black hair dryer large white power strip with a thick cord and multiple outlets and various adapters for different outlets

A Word on Voltage Converters

Voltage converters are big, heavy, and expensive, and they don’t always work, so it’s probably best not to buy one. The reason you might think you need one is that the AC sockets on all of our recommended travel adapters do not convert the voltage coming from the socket. This means plugging into a UK socket will deliver 220 volts at 50 hertz, which is very different from the 120 volts at 60 hertz you can expect in the US. Don't worry! Your gear won't get fried. You just need to make sure anything you plug into one of these universal travel adapters has something like this printed on it:

Input: 100–220V 50/60Hz .

That should include most modern gadgets. If your device or charger can’t handle a variable voltage, it’s probably best to leave it at home. Most places provide hair dryers , irons, and kettles, so there’s no need to take them with you. It's often cheaper to buy a set with the correct plug at your destination and save the luggage space and hassle.

If you are absolutely determined to try a voltage converter (again, we recommend you don’t), the Ceptics 2000W Travel Voltage Converter ($70) seems to work well. It has a special 2,000-watt outlet for hair dryers, but only ones that work via a mechanical switch (anything with an electronic circuit board for automatic switch-off or temperature control won’t work and is at risk of being fried if plugged in). It also has two outlets that go up to 200 watts, one USB-C port, and three USB-A ports, though the ports do not support fast charging.

Different adapters for a variety of plug types

Everything Else You Need to Know

Here are a few additional tips and answers to help ensure your trip goes as planned.

Test everything before you go : Seriously, nothing is worse than thinking you’re being very clever by packing light and getting to your hotel to discover that your gadgets refuse to charge. Between the adapter, cable, and your device, plenty can go wrong, so do a quick test with everything you are taking before you set off.

Can travel adaptors go in a suitcase? Yes, you can pack travel adapters in your suitcase. But it may be wise to take a travel adapter in your hand luggage for easy access should you need to charge up a device when you arrive at your destination. Devices like power banks with lithium batteries inside must go in hand luggage, not checked bags.

Can I buy travel adapters at the airport? Yes, you almost certainly can, but like everything else at the airport, they will be far more expensive than they should be, and your choice will be limited.

Do hotels have travel adapters? Sometimes hotels have travel adapters, and some hotels even have outlets for other countries, but most do not, so don’t bank on it. You could always check with your hotel or accommodation before you depart, but it’s safer to snag a travel adapter to take with you.

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The Best Travel Plug Adapter

Geoffrey Morrison

By Geoffrey Morrison

If you want to use electronic devices in a different country, you’ll probably need a travel plug adapter. After spending more than 30 hours researching and testing 14 options, we found the Epicka Universal Travel Adapter to be the best one. It fits four types of outlets, and it has more USB ports than any of its competitors, so it can can charge more devices at higher speeds.

Everything we recommend

uk to canada travel plug

Epicka Universal Travel Adapter

Best universal travel adapter.

With four plugs that will work in most countries, plus faster-charging USB ports (and more of them) than its competitors, this adapter is the best all-around choice.

Buying Options

You save $4 (17%)

uk to canada travel plug

Ceptics International Worldwide Travel Plug Adapter 5 Piece Set

The best plug adapter.

Individually, these tiny plug adapters are smaller, lighter, and cheaper than any universal travel adapter. To juice up multiple devices, though, you’d need a separate multiport charger too.

uk to canada travel plug

Ceptics Plug Adapter Set

Heavier, but sturdier.

The plugs in this set of five are bigger and heavier than our top pick for plug adapters, but more solidly built.

In a sea of almost-identical travel adapters, the Epicka Universal Travel Adapter stands out, combining the best of the features we were looking for. It contains the three most common international plugs and a US-style plug, which should cover you in the majority of countries around the world. It has the most USB ports—four of the standard USB-A and one USB-C—of any universal adapter we tested, and it could charge more of our devices faster. A replaceable fuse and an included spare should take the brunt of any accidental, unfortunate, or shockingly bad connections. The Epicka is fairly compact and well built, and it even comes with a nylon case.

However, no universal travel adapter is truly universal, and they’re all a lot bulkier and more expensive than simple plug adapters. If you want the smallest adapter possible, or if you’re going someplace where a universal adapter won’t work (more on that in a minute), then a plug adapter could be what you need.

The Ceptics tiny plug adapters are barely larger than the prongs they convert. Small, simple, and cheap, they’re perfect for someone who wants to carry only the adapter they’ll need and who already has a multiport USB wall charger they like. Like our universal adapter picks, this set contains the three most common international plugs and the US plug. However, it also includes a somewhat rarer plug used in some European countries that has two thick, cylindrical prongs. This means that the Ceptics will likely cover you in even more places—as long as you pack the appropriate plug adapter.

These plug adapters are bigger than our top pick for plug adapters, but this means they offer a larger surface for chargers to brace against, which makes them more stable and less likely to fall off the wall. (We’ll call these “ Ceptics White ” to minimize confusion and set them apart from our “Ceptics Black” top pick.) While you can purchase these as a five-pack, which contains basically the same assortment of plugs as the Ceptics Black set, the company also sells, in this same model line, three-packs for nearly a dozen specific regions. So if you’re headed to a country not covered by the so-called universal travel adapters (for example, Brazil , India , Israel , or South Africa ), or if you want to purchase multiple adapters for your gear, there’s probably an option available here.

A note up here, which we’ll discuss in detail below: All of these are adapters only . They do not convert voltage. The majority of your electronic devices only need adapters—the voltage converter is built into the charger itself. (If the device charges via USB, just about any USB port will suffice, though different ports may provide different charging speeds.) Check out Do you need a voltage converter? if you’re curious about these aspects.

The research

Why you should trust us, who should get this, how we picked, how we tested, our pick: epicka universal travel adapter, flaws but not dealbreakers, our pick: ceptics international worldwide travel plug adapter 5 piece set, runner-up: ceptics adapter plug set for worldwide international travel use, do you need a voltage converter, the competition.

In addition to my work here at Wirecutter, I also write about tech and travel for CNET, Forbes, and Wirecutter’s parent company, The New York Times . Perhaps more relevant to this guide, I usually spend a good chunk of each year (global pandemics aside) as a digital nomad, living months at a time in different countries all over the world. My current country count is 50, spread across six continents, and since I travel with a lot of electronics gear for work, being able to plug in is obviously crucial.

I’ve owned and used many different types of universal-style travel adapters, and several different companies’ worth of plug adapters, plus I’ve talked with countless travelers about what they like … or, more important, what they hate. We also got some advice from Wirecutter's Mark Smirniotis, who used to oversee our power devices section.

Do you travel? Are you going to travel sometime in the (near or far) future? Do you want to be able to charge or use electronic devices in a different country? If so, you’re probably going to need a travel plug adapter. There’s a variety of different outlet types around the world, not to mention different voltages and frequencies, so you can’t expect your phone charger to just plug in and work wherever you’re headed. Sure, Canada, Mexico, Japan, and many other countries use the same small pair of prongs as the US, but places like continental Europe, the UK, Australia, India, Russia, and pretty much everywhere else do not.

A front look at a wall outlet with two standard plugs in addition to a USB-A and USB-C port.

You have two main choices when it comes to travel plug adapters: the universal-style travel adapters (that’s one device with multiple sets of prongs that you extend and retract) and smaller, individual plug adapters that usually come in sets. Both have pros and cons.

Should you get a universal travel adapter or a simple plug adapter?

Universal travel adapters are for the person who wants one handy adapter that will work in just about every country. You can keep it next to your passport and toss it in your luggage when you’re packing. The ones we considered have USB ports, so you don’t need to worry about bringing a separate charger for anything that charges via USB (think  phones  and noise-cancelling headphones ). However, these are bulky, they have parts that can break, and even the best will take longer to charge your phone or tablet than will a good USB wall charger .

The alternative is small and simple plug adapters. These attach to the prongs of your current USB charger (whether it’s a multiport one or the charger that came with your device) to allow them to fit into a foreign outlet. These can work because nearly every modern charger can adjust to the available voltage in pretty much every country, as long as you can adapt the prongs to fit in the outlet. (More on this in Do you need a voltage converter? ) These are great for people who already have a multiport USB charger they like and don’t want to deal with the additional bulk of a universal travel adapter. Also, these are necessary if you’re traveling to a country that has outlets incompatible with any of the four types included in a universal adapter (which, as that sentence reveals, aren’t actually universal).

The choice between universal travel adapters and individual plug adapters ultimately comes down to personal preference. Both types work, and different people will like or dislike each. If you’re not sure which will be best for you, read each section here closely.

Here’s the big caveat: If you’re planning on bringing something with you that has a motor, a heating element, or a single power cord that leads directly from the plug to the device (i.e. there’s no power brick or wall wart ), it almost certainly won’t work with a travel plug adapter. Most people will only need one of the adapter choices we recommend, but very occasionally there’s a piece of gear that needs a voltage converter. For more on that topic, also check out the voltage converters section below.

Where in the world will your travel plug adapter work?

All universal travel adapters have four different sets of prongs, which cover most countries most Americans tend to travel to. First is the big, wide-blade UK-style plug (often designated "Type G”) . This will work in places like the UK, obviously, and also Ireland, Hong Kong, and some other parts of Asia and the Middle East.

A view of the slim outlets found in Italy.

Next is the round Europe-style plug, aka the Europlug (Type C) . However, this is where we run into complications. This plug should work in most of Europe—it was designed, in fact, to fit into a wide range of European outlet types. For instance, parts of Italy, Switzerland, and Denmark each use different plugs from one another. Should this double-round one work in those locations? Yes. Will it? Hard to say. I’ve stayed in places where my Europlug didn’t work, yet it did in the hostel before and the hotel after—all within the same small region of a country. With any luck, if this happens to you, the place you’re staying will have a power strip that will let you plug in, though there’s no guarantee of that.

Third is the angled small-blade style (Type I) found in Australia, New Zealand, Fiji and other parts of Oceania, and a few other areas. Some universal adapters have one set of blades for this and the US style—you just manually rotate the blades into the correct position depending on where you are. In our testing, we had no trouble getting them to work.

The last, the small US-style blades (Type A or B) , mean you could use our picks to visit the US and other countries that have the same plugs—if, that is, you’re reading this from outside the US.

What are the places not covered by these four styles? Some parts of Brazil, South Africa, India, and more. I’ve stayed in parts of Italy, for example, that should have Europlugs but only had something called Type L . I’ve stayed in houses in Brazil that had Type N , but the Europlug fit enough to work. In others, it wouldn’t.

To find out which plugs you might need while traveling, refer to the excellent Wikipedia article called Mains electricity by country that shows pictures of (almost) all the possible plugs and outlets, along with a list of the world’s countries and (almost all of) the style or styles they use. This is invaluable information to check before you leave. If multiple plug types are listed for a specific country and you’re staying in an older building, you should probably assume its outlets will require whatever plug isn’t on a universal travel adapter, since these only have the most common, newer varieties of plugs.

Which brings us to perhaps the most important fact: Getting your gear to work in different countries isn’t quite as simple as it should be, and there’s no single solution that’s guaranteed to work for everyone. Our picks should work for you, but you may have some random piece of equipment, or be traveling to some country, for which our “good for most” picks just won’t work. (Case in point: One Wirecutter editor visited Iceland recently. The house she stayed in had outlets unlike anything on Wikipedia’s chart, and the plug adapters she’d used elsewhere in Reykjavik didn’t fit at all. It turns out the mystery sockets belonged to an obscure Italian system from the 1960s that was popular in Iceland for a time. Luckily, the hosts had power strips in the house that her adapters fit into.) We’ll try to mention such potential caveats when we can, but the world is a big place, and when it comes to electricity and wall outlets, there’s a lot of variation. That’s important to keep in mind.

The collection of our outlet adapter picks arrayed on a table.

There are approximately 70 billion universal travel plug adapters on the Web. However, after spending 20 hours staring at them, I found there’s only about a dozen basic designs—and countless “companies” selling them. Among those dozen or so actually different products, I saw a few distinctions that helped narrow the field. Since most options had four USB ports, that seemed like a reasonable minimum to require. Their maximum power output, rated in amps, became a determining factor in our rankings. The higher the maximum output, the faster the port will charge your gear.

Some plugs came with a replaceable fuse, which seemed like a good idea, and a few included a replacement for said fuse, which seemed even better. This way, if either you plug the adapter into a sketchy outlet or a roommate at the hostel uses your adapter to plug in their completely necessary portable arc welder, the fuse will go, not your adapter. Then it’s just a matter of swapping in the included spare fuse and you’re good to go.

These fuses have a maximum power rating, and therefore the adapters have a maximum wattage rating. However, you shouldn’t be connecting anything with a high enough power draw to trip these fuses. Check out Do you need a voltage converter? for more information. The short version is that recharging portable electronic devices is fine, but powering anything that has a motor or heats up is not. Nearly every appliance or device has its power draw written on it somewhere , so worst case, you can compare that to what’s listed on the adapter. And so you don’t have to look it up, volts × amps = watts.

The other option we considered and tested is individual plug adapters. These small adapters attach to the prongs of your current charger so they’ll plug into a foreign outlet. In deciding which of these to test, we judged by size and available plug-type options. As you’ll see with our two picks, one is exceptionally small, and the other offers sturdier plugs that are available in a range of plug types that’s wide enough to cover you no matter where in the world you’re headed.

The universal travel adapters are far more similar to one another than they are different. However, getting in a dozen and playing with them for a while revealed that some felt better put together than others. After spending several minutes with each one, forcefully extending the various plugs, slamming them back in, and just being fairly rough with them, I found it easy to tell which felt like they’d last a few trips, and which wouldn’t. None felt like you’d own them for a lifetime. Since none are expensive, though, this didn’t seem like a major issue.

All had a US-style plug, so I tested each one in several outlets around my house—some new, some old. I didn’t find much difference in how they fit and worked. I connected several chargers and plugs to the output side of each adapter as well. Again, not much difference. Last, I checked how bright the LED on each was, since a too-bright LED keeping me awake has been a pet peeve of mine for years. Many USB chargers have LEDs bright enough to practically read from; I eliminated any universal adapter that had this problem.

For the plug adapters, I tried plugging in several devices, as well as inserting them into outlets around my house. I checked how tight the connections were and how they felt overall. Would they fall apart with simple use or perhaps hold up to being tossed around in bags for a few weeks or months?

In reality, the testing for all the adapter types didn’t reveal much variation in terms of performance. These are all remarkably similar products. How they felt to use and their different features played a far bigger role in establishing our final picks.

Our pick the Epicka sitting on a table by itself.

While all the universal travel adapters we tested included the same three types of plugs (plus the familiar US-style one), they differed in how many USB ports each had and how quickly they could charge—and that’s where the Epicka Universal Travel Adapter excelled. It has five USB ports: four of the standard USB-A size and one of the newer USB-C. (You may not have a USB-C device at the moment, but you likely will in the future.) These will let you charge, say, three phones, two tablets, and—via the adapter’s main plug—a camera battery that has its own wall charger, all at once.

In addition, and just as important, is the maximum power output: 5.6 amps. This was the highest of all the adapters we considered, which means you can charge more of your devices at higher speeds before hitting the max output.

Keep in mind that the maximum output per USB-A port is 2.4 amps, the max on the USB-C port is 3 amps, and if you’re using all five ports you won’t be able to charge every connected device at full speed—it’ll only give you that 5.6 amp output in total . The output is still far lower than what you can get from a decent USB charger combined with our pick for a simple plug adapter (more on that in the plug adapter section , below), but it’s significantly better than most universal travel adapters, which often max out under 3 amps total.

The Epicka has three sliders on one side, with a button on the other to lock/unlock your chosen plug in place. This arrangement feels more secure than the semi-locking or slide-locking system that some other universals use. However, this is plastic-on-plastic, so don’t expect a tank. As these things go, the Epicka feels sturdy. The US and Australia share a pair of prongs—you twist the prongs manually to set them up for an angled Australia-style outlet.

A look at the four USB-A ports on the underside of our pick.

The four regular USB plugs are all on one side, which is tidier than the “flailing gibbon” look of some other universal adapters.

The above details were what put the Epicka at the top of our list, but the adapter has a few other features that are the cherry on top, so to speak. For instance, it comes with a small nylon case and a USB cable with a split end, so it works with either Micro-USB or Lightning devices. While the adapter has an LED to show you it’s working, the glow isn’t so bright as to be a distraction at night.

A look at the adjustable sliders.

One last note. There are multiple Epicka universal adapters, and even Epicka can’t keep the names straight. We’ve seen this one called, variously, Universal Travel Adapter, International Travel Adapter, Travel Adapter-2, Universal USB Travel Power Adapter (2018), and even Universal Travel Adapter One Worldwide International Wall Charger AC Plug Adaptor with 5.6A Smart Power 3.0A USB Type-C for USA EU UK AUS Cell Phone Tablet Laptop (Grey). Best to follow the link above. Also, you may find another company selling a twin of this. The Epicka has the most reviews and offers free shipping with Prime. The other options we saw have few or no reviews, or charge outrageous shipping costs.

As with all of these adapters, I wouldn’t expect the Epicka to last forever. Given its locking design and case, it’s probably going to last longer than many others, but all of these are almost entirely inexpensive plastic devices. Just something to keep in mind.

While the prongs themselves felt secure, and being able to lock them into place was nice, it’s entirely possible that the size and weight of the adapter, plus whatever you’ve plugged into it, could pull it out of an outlet. That is, unfortunately, a risk with every universal adapter.

Another risk with any universal adapter—as we mentioned above—is that it’s not going to work where you’re headed. Epicka claims it will work in 150 countries, but there are more than 200 countries (the exact number is harder to pin down than you might realize) . And even in each of those 150 countries, there’s no guarantee that the adapter will work in every outlet in every building. Plug adapters are a somewhat safer bet to work specifically where you’re going, but they have their own downsides, which we’ll discuss below.

Also, while the Epicka is a little smaller than some of the others we tested, all universal adapters are much bulkier than plug adapters. As someone who has spent most of the past several years traveling, I feel plug adapters are far easier and less annoying to deal with. This is largely why we have two recommendations for that category.

A group of our adapter picks.

The Ceptics Plug Adapter set combines everything we were looking for in plug adapters: small size, solid build quality, and—well, small size is really the thing here. Each adapter is no larger than it needs to be to fit over the American-style prongs of your charger. The plastic feels solid and not flimsy. Each adapter has the region or countries it should be used in written on the side. The five plugs in the set are the same four as you’ll find on the universal adapters recommended above, plus the thicker, round European-style prongs used in parts of France, parts of Asia, and elsewhere.

Though the set comes with a small case, you probably wouldn’t be traveling with the entire set very often. Instead, you’d pack just the specific adapter or adapters you’d be using on each trip. These are for the person who wants to travel as light and as simply as possible. I myself, and my friends who travel frequently, swear by these small, inexpensive adapters. Also, if you have a USB multiport charger you like or a charger that’s especially fast, you can use that charger with just a tiny, almost weightless plug at the end.

However, plug adapters aren’t for everyone, and that’s why they’re not our main pick. For one thing, if you don’t already own a multiport USB wall charger, you’ll still have to get one if you don’t want to carry a charger for each device. Also, depending on what you’re connecting with these plug adapters, your charger or device could wobble and maybe fall out. The connections inside are solid enough that this shouldn’t happen, but it’s possible. Our universal-adapter picks, as well as the other Ceptics set we discuss below, have a larger “face” for your charger to brace against—more like that of a traditional outlet—so there’s less chance of gravity having its way with your gear.

Being small and inexpensive, plug adapters are not built for high-power, high-wattage items, though hopefully we’ve persuaded you to leave those at home . If you’re charging a battery, you should be fine. If you’re running a motor, probably not. Laptops, yes; mini-fridges, no.

A charger plugged into our adapter pick

Last, these things being so small, you could easily lose them in your bag or leave them behind in an outlet somewhere, if you’re the type of person who loses things. (That’s why I usually keep mine connected to my charger.)

For a hardcore traveler like me, these are my pick. They’re cheap, light, and small, and they work.

A group of our runnerup plugs

Though made by the same company as the Ceptics International Worldwide Travel Plug Adapter 5 Piece Set—and bearing a confusingly similar name—the plug adapters in the Ceptics Adapter Plug Set for Worldwide International Travel Use are, as you can see, a completely different design. They’re much larger than the other Ceptics (let’s call the previous set Ceptics Black and this one Ceptics White for simplicity). Nonetheless, they’re each smaller than a universal adapter, and they have one key benefit over our top plug-adapter pick: You can purchase them in multipacks for individual regions, including regions beyond those covered by the Ceptics Black set.

The Ceptics White are small, but not as small as the Ceptics Black. That extra size does offer one benefit, however: These adapters have more of a face on the output side, so there’s more surface for your charger to lean against. This means your charger is less likely to fall out. Again, neither set of plugs we tested had loose connections, but this is always a risk, as chargers vary. One other difference: In place of the two-pronged US plug we saw (type A) in our other picks, this set includes the three-pronged grounded version .

uk to canada travel plug

The real benefit to the Ceptics Whites, however, is not their physical characteristics. This range is one of your only options if you want to buy a plug adapter for a specific region or country. Headed to India or South Africa ? A universal adapter probably won’t work, but you can get a three-pack of Ceptics that will. You can also buy the offset three-prong and in-line three-prong for Switzerland and Italy, respectively, as well as plugs for Israel and Brazil , both the thin and the thick European plugs, and of course, Australia and UK versions too. They cost less than $10 per set. Any of those links will bring you to a page that lets you choose among plugs for different regions—definitely verify at checkout that you’ve picked the correct ones!

These adapters are ideal for someone headed to a country not covered by a universal adapter, or who has multiple chargers they want to plug in while traveling. They’re not quite as compact as the Ceptics Black adapters, but for most people, this difference in size won’t be an issue. I’ve traveled with these Ceptics plugs for many years, and they show no signs of wear.

Every adapter you see in this guide merely sends the current from the wall directly to whatever you plug into it. These are not voltage converters. Which is to say, if you’re in the UK, whatever you plug into the front of the adapter is going to get the UK’s 220 volts/50 hertz electricity, not the 120 volt/60 hertz that you’d get in the US. Travel plug adapters don’t convert the voltage; they only convert the plug . (Our universal picks do convert the local current to USB voltage, but only for the USB ports.)

However, for the vast majority of people, this is all you need. It’s exceptionally rare that anyone would need a voltage converter anymore. This is because most so-called wall warts, like on your phone charger or your camera’s battery charger, will convert the wall voltage into what it needs automatically.

Take a look at your charger. Somewhere, it should say “100–220V 50/60Hz.” This means it can accept anything between 100 V and 220 V, which covers domestic electricity pretty much everywhere, and either 50 Hz or 60 Hz, which again covers everything. If your charger doesn’t say this, it might not work with a travel adapter. If it only says "120V–60Hz," it will almost certainly not work—or not work correctly—with a travel adapter.

But here’s the other reason we don’t recommend buying a voltage converter: Your device might not work even with one. Anything with a motor (like hair dryers), anything with a heating element (like a clothing iron or a curling iron), or anything with a plug that goes directly to the device (as in no wall wart), probably won’t work in another country regardless of what kind of converter or adapter you bring . The good news is, pretty much every hotel, hostel, and Airbnb will have a hair dryer you can borrow. This is one of those times where we can’t cover everything you might want to bring, but for the vast majority of you, you don’t need a voltage converter. Either it’s not necessary, or the device that needs one won’t work anyway. Worst case, if it’s something cheap and you really need it—a hot pot or an electric kettle, say—consider buying one at your destination.

uk to canada travel plug

One occasional exception is electric razors. These often fall into the “single cable, no wall wart, has a motor” category. Which is to say, they probably won’t work without a voltage converter. (Again, check the fine print near the plug or on the device itself.) Many hotels have a shaver plug in the bathroom , with a US-style outlet and US-style 110 volt-or-so voltage. However, not every hotel will have these, and they’re very rare in hostels and Airbnbs. If you need one, best to call ahead and see if your hotel has them. Or use disposables on your trip.

It’s worth noting again for clarity, USB is USB, so if you’re just plugging in a USB cable , unless something is horribly wrong, one USB port’s voltage is the same as any other USB port’s voltage. How fast that port will charge your gear will vary (that’s related to amperage), but unless the charger is faulty, a USB port shouldn’t damage your gear.

We considered many more adapters than those listed here. However, the majority of travel adapters available boil down to just a dozen or so designs sold by myriad companies. We’ve listed two representatives of each of the most common designs, but in most cases, many more exist. Chances are, if it looks similar and has similar specs, it’s probably the same inside.

Universal travel adapters

Askali, Unidapt , others: Only 3.4 amps maximum output, which means it’ll take longer to charge all of your devices.

Bluegogo  (currently unavailable): Only two USB and slower-charging than our picks.

Bonaker: Formerly our runner-up pick, this travel adapter had the usual mix of four plug types to cover you in most countries, but its four USB-A ports were slower than our top pick’s, and it had no USB-C port at all. It’s also since disappeared from Amazon.

Bonazza , Urbo , others: Feels flimsy, even compared with others here. Two-piece design is more cumbersome than helpful. Only 3.4 amps maximum output.

Ceptics Travel Power Strip : The Travel Power Strip combines the interchangeable-plug aspect of the Ceptics Plug Adapter Set with a two-outlet power strip and short extension cord. It also has USB-A and USB-C outputs. If you have multiple non-USB items you want to charge at once—a laptop and a camera charger, for instance—this is a good option. But we think most travelers will prefer the more portable brick design of our picks over this power strip.

Conair Travel Smart : It has only one USB port, with a maximum of 1 amp, but with three outlets, it’s one of the few travel adapters that lets you plug in multiple non-USB devices.

Monoprice Compact Cube Universal Travel Adapter : I own one of these, and it’s fine, but if you’re going the universal route, our picks have USB charging for just a few dollars more. If you don’t need USB charging, our plug-adapter picks are probably better choices. Insten is a similar product but with, apparently, surge suppression built in. But as there’s no way to change the fuse, this is likely one-and-done if you plug in something too powerful.

Mu One (currently unavailable): The Mu offered a much higher power output than other travel adapters: 45 watts, enough to quickly charge even a big-battery device such as a MacBook Air. However, after trying and failing to launch a Mu Two in 2020, the company went out of business. The name and remaining assets were bought by a company called Discovery Club, which seems to be selling off the inventory.

Ougrand (green) : Same shape as the Unidapt, but with a USB-C in place of one of the regular USB connections; 3.4 amp max total.

Huanuo  (currently unavailable): A bit bulky, with three regular USB ports and one USB-C; 3.4 amps maximum.

WGGE , Jollyfit : Only 2.4 amps max, less than either of our picks.

Plug adapters

Bestek Grounded Universal Worldwide Plug : Likely made in the same factory as the Ceptics White plugs, the Bestek set looks the same and is roughly the same price. It offers a wide variety of plug types, but lacks the Type C Europlug that’s common in most adapter sets and usable across most of Europe. (The Europlug was invented to fit into a wide range of European outlet types.) If our Ceptics White pick is sold out, these will also work.

Lewis N. Clark Adapter Plug Kit  (currently unavailable): This kit looks fine, but it is more expensive and has one less plug compared with our Ceptics pick.

Insignia Global Travel Adapter Kit  (currently unavailable): The Insignia has a clever interlocking and compact design, akin to that of the old Flight 001 universal adapter (Flight 001, the specialty travel-gear retailer, is now no longer operating in the US), and the individual plugs feel solid. However, it is expensive compared with our picks, and it doesn’t offer anything that you couldn’t do with our picks just by connecting them end to end (if you wanted to).

This article was edited by Ria Misra and Christine Ryan.

Meet your guide

uk to canada travel plug

Geoffrey Morrison

Geoffrey Morrison is Wirecutter’s former AV editor, current editor-at-large, and a travel writer and photographer. He covers action cameras, gimbals, travel backpacks, and other gear. He has been to all 50 states and 60 countries, and he is the author of Budget Travel for Dummies and the sci-fi novel Undersea .

Further reading

Our pick for best portable power strip and surge protector with USB charging.

The Best Travel Power Strips and Surge Protectors With USB Charging

by Sarah Witman

The best power strip for travel in North America is the easily packable Tripp Lite Protect It 3-Outlet Surge Protector —our top pick for eight years running.

Various travel gear items laid out on a yellow background.

The Best Gear for Travel

by Wirecutter Staff

We put in another year and tens of thousands more miles of travel to test the best travel gear—and we stand by last year’s choices alongside a few new picks.

uk to canada travel plug

The Gadgets We Bring on Every Trip

by Haley Perry

You don't have to be a digital nomad to travel like one. Here are a few gadgets and accessories to make travel as painless as possible.

Our picks for the best USB-C cables and adapters.

The Best USB-C Cables and Adapters

While Cable Matters’s USB-C to USB-C Charging Cable is our favorite USB-C option, we also have recommendations for almost every need you could imagine.

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uk to canada travel plug

Travel Adaptors

Which travel adaptor do i need for....

You will need to consider what to pack, to ensure you can use your personal electrical appliances safely whilst abroad.

This normally includes the use of a travel adaptor, which is a device that simply allows you to plug any UK electrical appliance into a foreign electrical socket.

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For specific details about which travel adaptor you need for each country, please click on the country name below.

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Namibia | Nauru | Nepal | Netherlands | New Zealand | Nicaragua | Niger | Nigeria | Niue | North America | North Korea | Norway

Pakistan | Palau | Palestine | Panama | Papua New Guinea | Paraguay | People's Republic of Congo | Peru | Philippines | Poland | Portugal | Puerto Rico

Romania | Russia | Rwanda

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Guide To Using UK Electrical Appliances In Canada

Posted by Liam Witham | Wednesday, 10th August 2022 | Canada

Guide To Using UK Electrical Appliances In Canada

Should you ship UK electrical items to Canada? And how do you adapt UK electronic goods for the Canadian electric system? We provide all the answers…

When moving to Canada from the UK, understanding the differences in electrical systems is important so you can plan your move.

Moving from the UK to Canada will be an exciting time. However, a task on your to-do list may be on deciding which electrical goods to bring with you, and which to sell or give to friends and family.

Unlike New Zealand or Australia where electrical appliances can be expensive to replace, the good news when moving to Canada is that there are many stores that allow you to pick up cheap electrical replacements. For some appliances, however, it could be worthwhile to take them with you.

Canada has the same voltage, frequency and plug types as the USA so the same guidelines apply to using and adapting UK appliances apply to Canada as to the whole of North America including the United States and Mexico.

Lithium-Ion Batteries: Due to the increased fire risk, we cannot ship any lithium-ion batteries. They should be removed from all appliances before shipping.

Can you use UK electronics in Canada?

You can use UK electrical items in Canada, however, the UK voltage is different. The standard UK voltage is 240v, whereas, Canada’s standard voltage is 120v. Therefore, some products may not be suitable in Canada.

Devices that are dual voltage will work between 110v to 240v and will be suitable for usage in Canada as well as the UK.

This article will explain in more detail.

What Are the Differences Between the UK and Canada Electrical Systems?

The differences between the electrical systems in the UK and the Canadian system can be split into three different areas.

As we previously mentioned, the main difference is the voltage of the systems. In the UK, the standard voltage is 240V, while in Canada, the system is 120V. This difference is crucial because electrical products are designed to work at different voltages. For example, a UK device may operate at 230V and be suitable for the UK system but not for Canada. Similarly, A Canada-made device could operate at 110V and not be suitable for the UK. Some devices have dual voltage and work between 110-240V.

2. Frequency

A difference between the systems is in their frequency. In electrical systems, the frequency is measured in Hertz (Hz) and refers to the number of times that a sine wave travels around a positive-negative cycle in one second. Most international frequencies are either 50Hz or 60Hz. It just so happens that the UK has the former rating and Canada has the latter.

3. Type A and Type B Plugs

Electrics-Plug-Type-A

The other main difference between the two systems is seen in the electrical plugs in Canada. In the UK, we Canada a Type G plug which has three pins. In Canada, they Canada two different types of plugs, Type A and Type B.

One more interesting difference between UK and Canada outlets is the direction of the switch. Here in the UK, we push the switch down to turn the appliance on and the switch up to turn it off. Many Canadian buildings have outlets with the reverse function, i.e. up means on and down means off.

Adapting UK plugs to Canada’s system

Assuming the voltage will work in Canada it is easy to change plugs to Canada Type A or B, or alternatively to buy a travel adapter. You can also buy an extension lead adapter allowing a number of UK small appliances to be plugged in at the same time.

Understanding the Importance of Voltage

As you can see, the biggest difference between the two systems is in the voltage. Voltage is essentially the pressure that an electric charge is in Canada through a conducting loop. When an electric device is manufactured, it is made to work within a range of voltages. For example, some devices may say “200V-230V” on them and this means that it can only be used in the UK as it is above Canada’s electrical system (120V).

How to check the voltage of your appliances?

To find the voltage requirements of an electrical device, the first step is to look at the device itself. Many manufacturers will label their appliances with the requirements in the same way as the example above. Some other appliances may label them differently, such as laptops. On these devices, you may find the voltage displayed as “Input [Number]V”. Volts will always be referenced with a V. If you cannot see them on the device, consult a handbook or contact the manufacturer.

What would happen if you didn’t convert the voltage?

For UK relocators moving to Canada, a 230V device in a 110V system is likely to cause the device to work inefficiently, or it may work for a short time before dying. You can also damage the device permanently by doing this.

Therefore, it is important to use a converter as it will avoid some safety concerns. It generally would be a greater safety risk to plug in a low-voltage Canada appliance in a UK outlet.

How do you use UK electrical appliances in Canada?

Just because your current appliances may not fit the North American voltage system does not mean that you have to leave them behind. There are ways that you can convert your UK appliances to fit the Canadian system, such as using a voltage converter.

A voltage converter is a small device that can change the voltage – or ‘pressure’ – either up or down. For example, if you own a 230V kitchen appliance and wanted to relocate it with you and Canada it in Canada’s 110V system, you would need a step-up converter to increase the voltage.

This may sound counterintuitive, but remember, you are converting the voltage from the system and you are not converting the appliance itself. The converter will increase the voltage given to the appliance from 110 volts to the 230 volts the kitchen appliance requires to function safely.

To give perspective, someone moving from Canada to the UK would likely need to Canada a step-down converter to reduce the voltage of the UK’s system to match their Canada-made products operating at  110 volts.

Whether you choose to buy a converter for your appliance or choose to buy new when you arrive will depend on the cost of replacing it and the cost of buying a converter.

So, should you ship electrical appliances from the UK to Canada?

using-uk-electrical-kitchen-appliances-for-canada-

Sometimes it is not worth taking your appliances with you because buying a brand-new Canadian appliance is cheaper, especially when considering the shipping costs involved. However, the decision to take the appliance or leave it behind will depend on the type of appliance it is.

The general rule of thumb is that dual voltage appliances that work in both countries are worth shipping because you will only need an outlet adapter to make them work. Other electrical items are not likely to be worth the trouble and any item with a motor or heating element should not be shipped.

Will my UK TV work in Canada?

Shipping your UK television to Canada will not be worth the trouble and headaches that go with it unless it is dual voltage. Some modern televisions such as Samsung Multisystem TVs are designed to be Canada in a number of different countries.

If your TV is not dual voltage, the process of making it work in Canada can be complex, expensive and not guaranteed to be successful.

If you are still committed to bringing the TV with you, change your mind if the TV does not have an NTSC tuner; it will only make things even more difficult. The good news is those good TVs can be bought in Canada for prices often cheaper than in the UK.

Can I use a UK laptop in Canada?

Laptops have been made to be Canada around the world, which is why they are often dual voltage appliances. This means you will likely see that their voltage reading is 100-240V and made for both continents. Similarly, you will also see that the frequency of the devices covers both the UK and Canada systems at 50-60Hz.

In these instances, you will only need a plug adapter or to buy a new Canada charger for the device when you arrive. Double-check to see if your laptop is dual voltage before making a decision, but it shouldn’t be a problem.

Will UK game consoles work in Canada?

Your UK-bought Xbox or PlayStation may also have dual voltage and is therefore worth relocating from the UK to Canada with you. You will need a  Canadian outlet adapter to make it work in this case but may want to have the plug changed by a qualified electrician if you use it frequently. Again, before making a decision check the voltage requirements of your device.

What about small electric Items?

Smaller items are fine if they are dual voltage. However, for small items that require a converter, it is often best to leave them behind and buy inexpensive replacements upon arrival in Canada.

This is because the shipping costs combined with the cost of a converter will be more than buying new, not to mention the hassle involved. Any smaller item with a fan or motor such as a hairdryer will most likely not be worth taking.

Canada UK to Canada Travel Adapters

We recommend that you Canada a travel adaptor plug that can be purchased cheaply before you go. Make sure you check the voltage of your device and that they are compatible with Canada or they can be damaged or broken.

UK to Canada extension lead plug

Whilst ideal for short-term Canada, such as going on holiday to the States, travel adapters are not meant for long-term usage. Although these may be good to get you started, you should think about replacing plugs on items you Canada regularly and especially those that have a higher power load. But again, remember to check the voltage and it would be best to ask a qualified electrician to help you.

Another solution is to purchase the UK to Canada extension plug adapter which has multiple sockets. This is a safe and easy way to convert your UK electrical items and you’ll find it a lot cheaper to purchase a few of these online before you leave the UK.

The UK to Canada converters and transformers

If you have a particular need for larger appliances that use 240v e.g. specialist equipment, it is possible to take them to Canada by using a  converter such as a UK 240v to Canada 120v Step Down Transformer.

However, the appliances may still not work efficiently, as the UK is 50Hz compared to 60 Hz in Canada.

We suggest you research this area thoroughly if it is something you wish to consider.

Shipping Batteries from the UK to Canada

You may have not given much thought to the batteries you will take to Cabada, but there are strict regulations that you will need to know when shipping batteries internationally. This is because batteries can be a safety risk and be the cause of fires. Sending batteries by air freight and sea freight invoke different rules.

Sending Standard Batteries

NOTE: We recommend removing your batteries from any device before shipping – if they leak in transit, your item will be ruined. Sending standard lithium batteries such as AA or AAA batteries is not recommended when using sea freight. However, it is not against the law to do so when contained in a device with a hard plastic shell or within a hard plastic casing. When transporting these types of batteries by air freight, they can be placed inside their respective device and cannot be packaged in any other material or casing.

Sending Lithium-ion Batteries

Sending lithium-ion batteries is possible in both sea freight and air freight by leaving them in their devices or by placing them in a hard plastic case. However, there is an additional rule when transporting them by air freight in these situations, the lithium-ion battery in Canada has a watt-hours rating of less than 100.

NB: You can also only send a maximum of 4 by air, with a maximum of 2 per package.

Sending Batteries inside Power Tools

Sending batteries inside power tools is significantly different from Canadian air freight and Canadian sea freight. In the former, the batteries must be attached to the device and any spare can be packaged in a spare container made of hard plastic.

On the other hand, when sending these batteries by sea freight they can be placed in the same type of packaging but there is no restriction on how many can be placed in each box.

NB: For air freight, no pack can contain more than two batteries and no consignment can contain more than four. If you require more information about shipping batteries overseas read our blog Guide to Shipping Batteries Overseas .

Avoiding extra fees and charges when shipping

When migrating to Canada, you are of course permitted to bring whatever Canadian household appliances and furniture that you wish. As long as you meet the right visa or residency requirements, these items can arrive duty-free, so you do not have to pay any extras on top of your relocation costs.

However, there are some conditions. For example, the items you ship over to Canada have been in your possession for at least one year and you have the intention of keeping them yourself in your new residence. These rules also apply to electrical items being shipped.

You should speak to your shipping company first to ensure you meet the requirements and have all the correct cCanadatoms paperwork.

Shipping your electrical items and other Canadian household goods to Canada? Let PSS International Removals Help!

PSS International Removals have been helping UK expats move to Canada for years by providing a cost-effective international removal service .

You also ship items using our Canada box shipping service .

You will be assigned a moves manager who will help with moving your belongings to Canada from the UK and will be provided with assistance whether you are needing a large household removal or looking to ship a few boxes.

To get an estimated quote visit our website or call our team to receive more information on moving your belongings to Canada.

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Best travel adapter 2024: power up abroad

Forget spending a small fortune on a single adapter at the airport; these universal travel adapters are the way to go

The top three

  • 1. Best overall travel adaptor
  • 2. Best safe travel adaptor
  • 3. Best affordable travel adaptor
  • 4. Best versatile travel adaptor
  • 5. Best travel adaptor for South Africa
  • 6. Best travel adaptor for multiple devices

Best travel adaptor 2024: Jump Menu

traval adaptor

00. T3's top 3 ↴ 01. Best overall : Hyleton Worldwide Travel Adapter 02. Best safe : MyTravelPal Worldwide Universal 10A 03. Best affordable : Bestek Worldwide Travel Adaptor 04. Best versatile : Ceptics World Travel Adapter Kit 05. Best for South Africa : Skross World To South Africa 06. Best for multiple devices : Bestek 200W 

Planning a trip abroad? Wherever you plan on going, you need to bring the best travel adapter with you to stay fully charged and powered while you're away.

Technology defines travel. It used to be all about postcards, travel journals and finding yourself, but can you ever feel relaxed abroad without knowing you can charge up your stash of tech? A universal travel adaptor is essential for any and all trips abroad. Whether you're sharing your trip with a smartphone, tablet, laptop, headphones, camera or Bluetooth speaker (not forgetting toothbrush, curling irons and travel kettle), you might as well get a good one.

Don't be an idiot at the airport, where universal travel adaptors are expensive and basic. Get it sorted before you set off on your travels with our collection of the very best around. Basic adaptors are available that convert from one country to another, but it's better to invest in a universal travel adaptor that caters for everything. So what should you look for?

Check out our guide below on how to choose the best travel adapter below and our top picks.

Lizzie is T3's Home Staff Writer, also covering style, living and wellness. She works closely with Bethan Girdler-Maslen, T3's Home Editor, ensuring all the latest Home news, trends and recommendations are covered. Lizzie is lucky enough to travel internationally for work, so has an extensive amount of knowledge around the best travel adaptors. 

Hyleton Worldwide Travel Adapter

The best overall travel adaptor

If you've entered the world of USB-C, this is the travel adaptor for you. Its multi-function plug fits more than 150 countries with UK/AU/US plugs. The adapter also has built-in safety shutters to protect you from the direct touch of the live parts on the socket outlet. A pretty great all-rounder to begin with! 

Read more below

MyTravelPal Worldwide Universal 10A Travel Adapter

The best safe travel adaptor

There are a couple of reasons why this universal adaptor from MyTravelPal stands out. The first is that it claims to be the safest travel adapter in the world – it's one of the very few all-in-one travel adapters that has passed the very strict regulatory standard BS:8546. It's a great option that won't let you down.

Bestek Worldwide Travel Adaptor

The best affordable travel adaptor

Again, this is a decent quality charger for a great price, though it only comes with 2 USB ports instead of 4. There’s a universal socket and it’s fitted with USA, Australian, UK and European plugs for use in over 150 countries. 

Best travel adapters ranking 2023

Why you can trust T3 Our expert reviewers spend hours testing and comparing products and services so you can choose the best for you. Find out more about how we test .

The best travel adapter: Hyleton Worldwide Travel Adapter

1. Hyleton Worldwide Travel Adapter

Specifications, reasons to buy, reasons to avoid.

If you have permanently positioned yourself into the world of USB-C, this is the travel adaptor for you. Although it has four standard USB slots that can each refuel a tablet, smartphone and other low-power gadgets, the Hyleton also has a USB-C slot fitted to the side for fast-charging a smartphone.

Elsewhere this compact adaptor's multi-function plug fits more than 150 countries with UK/AU/US plugs. The adapter also has built-in safety shutters to protect you from the direct touch of the live parts on the socket outlet. I was huge fan of this adaptor, and have often found myself reaching for it when packing for a trip.

  • Back to the top ⤴

T3 Approved Award

2. MyTravelPal Worldwide Universal 10A Travel Adapter

There are a couple of reasons why this universal adaptor from MyTravelPal stands out. The first is that it claims to be the safest travel adapter in the world – it's one of the very few all-in-one travel adapters that has passed the very strict regulatory standard BS:8546. MyTravelPal's 4 plugs have a ground/earth connection, an essential safety feature for many electrical appliances, meaning you can use this adapter with high powered electricals such as computers, curling tongs, hairdryers, laptops, phones, etc without worry. 

There's also a push-button resetting fuse, which means you don't need to carry spare fuses with you or rush out to buy replacements when you're on holiday. MyTravelPal's protection system ensures that it will automatically shut down if it detects any abnormal usage. It's a great product that won't let you down whilst keeping you safe. 

Bestek Worldwide Travel Adaptor

3. Bestek Worldwide Travel Adaptor

Again, this is a decent quality charger that comes in at a great price, though it only comes with 2 USB ports instead of 4. There’s a universal socket and it’s fitted with USA, Australian, UK and European plugs for use in over 150 countries. 

Thanks to the embedded micro USB cable, my phone and tablet benefitted from fast charging, which was great for work trips. With safety features, including fire proof materials, protection against power surges and a safety plug lock, this is another great all-rounder that should do the job nicely. 

The best versatile travel adaptor

Ceptics World Travel Adapter Kit

4. Ceptics World Travel Adapter Kit

This is an excellent choice if you're a frequent traveller, especially if you jet set between one place and another. As it has six attachments, 2 USA outlets, 2 USB-A slots and a built-in USB-C cable, it's suitable for most electronic devices, giving you versatility to what you bring with you on your trip. 

I found it to be extremely lightweight and fast charging, which made it my first choice on two of my recent trips. I also liked the way it came with a travel pouch, meaning I was able to keep track of the attachments when visiting one or more countries. 

Unfortunately, the Ceptics World Travel Adapter Kit is only compatible with dual voltage products. This means it's perfect for phones and laptops, but won't work with 110V items such as hair clippers, hair dryers and hair straighteners. I found this slightly frustrating, but it's a common feature so it didn't affect my opinion too much. It should also be noted that the set doesn't include adapter plug for South Africa, so read below's listing if you're looking for one of those. 

The best travel adaptor for South Africa

Skross World To South Africa Travel Adapter

5. Skross World To South Africa Travel Adapter

If you're going to Africa, you're going to need to get to know the Type-M socket. Never heard of it? Unfortunately almost all so-called 'universal travel adapter' are nothing of the sort because they don't include large parts of Africa and Asia, where an archaic UK plug now called Type-M is still used. 

As well as being standard in South Africa, Namibia, Namibia, Botswana, Mozambique, Lesotho and Swaziland, Type-M is common in Nepal and Bhutan, too. Cue this simple, but essential travel adapter that converts from every other plug in the world –such as the US, UK, Europe, Australia, China and Brazil – to the Type-M. This Switzerland-made example from Skross doesn't convert voltage, but it does work with power-hungry devices including laptops and travel hairdryers.

The best travel adaptor for multiple devices

Bestek 200W Travel Adaptor

6. Bestek 200W Travel Adaptor

A voltage converter is required for devices that do not offer dual voltage, which makes this device incredibly handy if you’re heading to the states, where voltage is a lot lower than the UK. 

With 2 AC plugs and 4 USB ports you’ll have no problem charging multiple devices at once – just bear in mind that you cannot plug in high-powered devices, such as hair dryers or straighteners. The device comes in a handy case, which contains three international AC adaptors for use in over 150 countries. The downside is you can only plug in UK devices.

How to choose the best travel adapter

The best travel adapters have USB sockets, so charging up phones, tablets and other portable devices should be fairly convenient. However, they're not all equal. Most will have at least a couple of USB slots, but check if they're rated 2.4V first. This will refuel your phone faster, and means it can cope with a tablet as well.

Better still, look for Quick Charge 3.0 (QC 3.0), which does it ever faster. If you have a laptop that charges via USB-C, look for a travel adaptor with built-in USB-PD (USB Power Delivery), which can send 100W into a laptop.

Not all travel adaptors will transform voltage, so it’s always worth checking to see if you need to purchase a voltage transformer alongside the adapter. Many devices are dual voltage rated, so you may not even require a transformer; even so, it’s always best to check the book of words to double-check. 

Good news is, all EU countries have the same voltage as the UK, so it’s only the USA, South America, Asia, Australasia and Africa that you need to think about. As a rule, high-powered devices such as hairdryers and straighteners cannot be used with a travel adaptor, with the advice being to purchase cheap ones when you’ve arrived at your destination. 

Amazon is usually the best place to head for travel adaptors, as you can get hold of highly-rated products for sometimes a fraction of the high street price (and with Prime Delivery).

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Lizzie is T3's Home Staff Writer, also covering style, living and wellness. She works closely with Bethan Girdler-Maslen, T3's Home Editor, ensuring all the latest news, trends and recommendations are covered. Outside of T3, Lizzie can be found mooching around Bath, attempting (or at least trying to) a new DIY project or spending time with family and friends.

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The 6 Best Travel Adapters and Converters of 2024, Tested and Reviewed

Whether you prefer a set of specific adapters or something universal, these are the best options on the market.

uk to canada travel plug

In This Article

  • Our Top Picks
  • Other Options We Liked

Our Testing Process

  • Tips for Buying

Frequently Asked Questions

  • Why Trust T+L

Travel + Leisure / Alexander Huang

Travelers these days have all types of gear and gadgets that require power: cellphones, headphones, cameras, laptops, and even their toothbrushes. And, when venturing abroad, you’ll often find that not every hotel, airport lounge, or even public mode of transportation accommodates the U.S. plug, which means you likely need an adapter and/or converter for international trips. 

Our favorite adapters and converters are compact, work in multiple countries, have several ports including both USB and AC sockets, and, of course, power your essentials without frying them. As avid travelers, we tested an array of products on actual trips across the world and ranked them based on ease of use, effectiveness, and value to bring you the best picks for every scenario. Below, find our favorite easy-to-use adapters and converters for your next international journey.

Best Overall

Epicka universal travel adapter.

  • Ease of Use 5 /5
  • Effectiveness 4 /5

It’s able to charge six devices at once. 

This is not a converter, so you shouldn’t use it with high-power appliances like curling irons and hair dryers. 

Ready to use in more than 150 countries, this adapter from Epicka can charge six devices at the same time, as it comes with four USB-A ports, 1 USB-C port, and 1 AC socket. It works with all USB-enabled devices including iPhones and Androids, and can charge laptops, cameras, tablets, and power banks, too. It eliminates the need to purchase individual adapters for each trip, which makes it a great money-saving travel product . The adapter also has a built-in, double 8A fuse and safety shutters that keep children from trying to plug other items into the socket. The adapter comes in four different colors, and has a 1-year limited warranty. 

We love that it’s small and easy to pack, plus it’s simple to switch over to different prongs from country to country. The multiple USB ports are great for charging everything at once, and the adapter is super lightweight, so it isn’t adding much weight to your suitcase or carry-on either. We did find that the adapter was hard to fit in tight spots or use with older outlet styles in the UK and Hong Kong, but this didn’t happen often. 

The Details: 2.8 x 1.97 x 2.05 inches | 5.1 ounces | No converter | 6 ports | 1 AC, 4 USB-A, 1 USB-C | 240 volts

Travel + Leisure / Alexander Huang

Best for Apple Users

Apple travel adapter kit.

  • Effectiveness 5 /5

It’s exclusively for Apple products so you can trust it with those devices.

It only works with Apple's block-type power adapters.

This kit made by Apple, for Apple products, includes seven AC plugs that work for iPhones, iPods, iPads, and Mac laptops in North America, Japan, China, the UK, Europe, Korea, Australia, Hong Kong, and Brazil. Each one lists the regions the plug is compatible with, making it easy to grab what you need quickly. However, you will need Apple's power adapter brick to serve as a base; these tips work with Apple’s USB-C power adapters, MagSafe and MagSafe 2 power adapters, and 10-watt and 12-watt USB power adapters that come with devices (or can be purchased separately in a range of wattages including 12 watts , 35 watts, and 67 watts ).

We love this set because it’s an Apple-certified product, so we know our devices are safe. The adapters are also built to last, as one of our testers used the adapters for 10 years before having to replace some of them. The only thing we wish they added onto this set is a carrying case to hold all the pieces for traveling. 

The Details: 5.3 x 5.3 x 1.9 inches | 11.2 ounces | No converter | 1 port | 100-240 volts (10W, 12W, 30W, and 35W)

Most Compact

Ceptics travel adapter plug for south africa & botswana.

It comes with USB and AC outlet charging abilities in a compact plug. 

USB ports are on the bottom, instead of the top of the adapter. 

If you’re traveling through South Africa, Botswana, or Namibia, this compact adapter will allow you to charge up to three devices at once. The AC outlet allows you to plug your U.S. device into a Type M socket for South Africa, allowing you to charge up for safari adventures and more.  It works with cell phones, laptops, smart watches, tablets, and more, and we especially like that it has the ability for two- and three-prong AC input, as well as USB ports for added versatility. The style of adapter is a block shape, so you can tuck it into your backpack, purse, or carry-on without compromising on much space, and you can also buy similar adapters for Europe , India, Germany, Hong Kong, Switzerland, Brazil, and more. 

The Details: 1 x 1 x 1 inches | 2.5 ounces | No Converter | 3 ports | 2 USB-A , 1 AC | 250 volts

Best for Families

Bestek travel adapter and voltage converter.

  • Value 4.5 /5

You can power seven devices at one time. 

It’s bulkier than a lot of other adapters. 

With three AC outlets and four USB ports, you can charge up to seven devices at once on this charger, making it easy for the whole family to charge their phones, laptops, tables, and camera batteries. Three plug adapters are also included and work in more than 150 countries, meaning you can travel far and wide and, most likely, have the right adapter for what you need. We also love that this one is a converter, too, converting 220 volts to 110 volts for U.S. electronics but it’s still not recommended to use this device to power your hair dryer, curling iron, or straightener.

The adapter comes with overcurrent, overload, overheat, and short-circuit protections. We tested the adapter by charging a phone, battery pack, Apple watch, and Kindle all at once and found that all devices were nicely charged overnight with no issues. 

The Details: 7.4 x 6.8 x 1.8 inches | 1.15 pounds | Converter | 3 AC, 4 USB-A | 110-220 volts

Best Multipack

Ceptics european travel plug adapter.

  • Ease of Use 3 /5

It’s easy to use.

You'll need to use a separate plug for each item you're charging.

For a super affordable multipack for one destination, this one from Ceptics is a great choice, as it comes with three identical Type C adapters that will work across Europe, the Middle East, and South America. It accepts North American two- and three-prong plugs, and has a simple straightforward design. It’s worth noting though that this set won’t work in England, Ireland, or Scotland, but there are other three packs available that will work in those countries, plus India, China, Hong Kong, Australia, and more. 

The Details: 3 x 2 x 1 inches | 3.2 ounces | No Converter | 3 AC outlets | 100-240 volts

Best for Europe

Jarvania european travel plug adapter.

It works in both the EU and the UK. 

It’s a bit bulky as the UK adapter is separate. 

American travelers to Europe will most likely need an adapter that can handle numerous countries, and this one from Jarvania is great because it can be used with EU and UK outlets. It’s compatible with Type C (which also fits into Type E, F, H, J, K, L, and N outlets) to work in Italy, Denmark, Switzerland, Spain, and France and more. It also comes with a separate Type G plug adapter that will also work in the UK, so you’re getting an extra adapter, too. The main adapter has three ports (one AC, two USB), so you can charge up to three devices at once — a perk for the modern traveler carrying a phone, laptop, camera, and more. 

The Details: 2.7 x 2.1 x 2.2 inches | 3.8 ounces | No Converter | 3 ports | 1 AC, 2 USB-A | 110-250 volts

Other Travel Adapters We Liked

Two adapters we tested couldn’t quite earn a spot on our list but had standout features that may meet the needs of some travelers. 

Tessan Type G Adapter : This adapter with two AC outlets plus two USB ports works in countries such as Scotland, Ireland, the UK, Hong Kong, UAE, Singapore, and various African countries. However, we found the AC outlets are too close together on the adapter to always be useful. 

Tessan Type E F Adapter : With five total ports (USB and AC) that work in numerous countries, this is a great adapter, but we think the two pack is a bit much, as one adapter already has five ports, meaning lots of travelers wouldn’t need a second adapter. This adapter is also wider than other adapters so it can take up more unnecessary space. 

The T+L team tested 12 different adapters and converters in various countries across the world. We noted what countries we were in while using the adapters or converters, and how easy it was to use each one. We also ranked them based on effectiveness, meaning how well they charged our devices, and value in terms of price versus performance. 

Tips for Buying Adapters and Converters

Research your destination.

Before leaving on your trip, be sure to check out what types of outlets are used in the countries you’re visiting, and buy adapters and converters accordingly. The last thing you’ll want is to accidentally fry your device while abroad. Some hotels provide USB ports inside hotel rooms, but it’s best to make sure they’re available before arriving empty-handed.

Consider a kit

If you’re visiting numerous countries and are in a rush, it’s sometimes easier to simply buy a kit with several adapters for multiple different destinations, which can save you money instead of buying numerous adapters. Lots of kits are small enough to tuck away in your bag or carry-on, so just be sure that you take along the ones you need.

Read the fine print

Always be sure to read the instructions that come with your adapter or converter, and be sure to pay attention to the power details. You may think a converter is safe for your styling tools or appliances when it's actually not, and you could fry your device, or blow a fuse, if the adapter doesn’t convert voltage.

An adapter is used when you need to plug a specific type of prong into a different socket. It allows you to plug your U.S.-style prong into an outlet in another country that uses a different type of plug. A converter is different in that it changes the voltage of an outlet to match the voltage of the item being plugged in. Some countries use 110/120 volts, while others use 220/240 volts. If you don’t use a converter, you could ruin your device, or even risk a fire.

If your destination has a different prong type than your outlets at home, then you’ll need an adapter. But if the voltage is different in the place you’re traveling than it is at home, you’ll need a converter to convert that voltage. Some products have dual voltage, which means the device can handle voltages from all over the world.

Most of Europe uses Type C plugs, which also fit into Type E, F, H, J, K, L, and N sockets that may replace Type C in places such as Denmark, Switzerland, and Italy. (England and the rest of the U.K. uses Type G.) Always double check exactly which one you’ll need before your departure.

Why Trust Travel + Leisure

For this article, the T+L team tested and reviewed numerous adapters and converters to find the best of the best for countries across the world. Freelance writer and world traveler Amanda Ogle further researched travel adapters to add additional insights to this list. 

Love a great deal? Sign up for our T+L Recommends newsletter and we'll send you our favorite travel products each week.

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Cellet Universal Travel Adapter: Seamless Plug Conversion for International Travelers AC Wall Power Adapter to Convert China, UK, AU, EU & Other Plugs to US Plug Socket (2PACK)

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Cellet Universal Travel Adapter: Seamless Plug Conversion for International Travelers AC Wall Power Adapter to Convert China, UK, AU, EU & Other Plugs to US Plug Socket (2PACK)

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TYPE-C (4 USB PORT)

TYPE-A (US & CANADA)

TYPE-B (US, CANADA & MEXICO)

TYPE-C (EUROPE & ASIA)

TYPE-G (UK HK)

About this item

  • Effortlessly converts a variety of international plug types to the US socket
  • Compact and portable design, perfect for on-the-go travelers
  • Compatible with plugs from China, UK, AU, EU, and many other regions
  • Ensures reliable and secure connections for all your electronic devices
  • Ideal for use with smartphones, laptops, cameras, and other electronic gadgets
  • Designed with durable materials for long-lasting use and durability
  • A must-have accessory for frequent travelers and globetrotters
  • Offers a convenient solution for charging devices during international trips
  • Provides peace of mind by eliminating the need for multiple chargers
  • Simplifies your travel experience by ensuring seamless connectivity worldwide

Similar items that may ship from close to you

4 Pack Universal Adapter, Europe to US Plug Travel Adapters (White)

Product Description

bluetooth wireless headphones earbuds universal black small easy to carry

  • Convert China, UK, AU, EU & other plugs to US plug socket

Adapter to Convert China, UK, AU, EU & other Plugs to US Plug Socket

Travel AC Wall Power Adapter

  • Hassle-free power plug conversion
  • Smooth transition from your home plugs to US plug socket
  • Crafted for durability and longevity
  • Ensures your devices always have the power they need when traveling
  • Max Capacity Up to 3000 Watt (max 250 Volt, 13 A)
  • Standard: Type B plug, US, Japan, Canada Mexico CEE 7/16.

Adapter to Convert China, UK, AU, EU & other Plugs to US Plug Socket

Compact and Portable

  • Compact design
  • Small and lightweight
  • Convenient to carry when traveling
  • Easily fit into your travel bag or pocket
  • Perfect for use with appliances/equipment

Convert China, UK, AU, EU & other Plugs to US Plug Socket

2-pack Bundle

  • Includes two travel adapters
  • 2-pack bundle is tailored to meet all your charging needs
  • 2-pack bundle ensures you'll have all your devices covered
  • Having a spare adapter can be a lifesaver in unexpected situations
  • Ideal for family vacations or group travels, 2-pack ensures that everyone's devices stay charged

Style: USA/Japan-Type A The adapter Type A can be used in the following countries:

American Samoa, Antigua & Barbuda, Aruba, Bahamas, Barbados, Belize, Bermuda, Brazil, Canada, Cayman Islands, Colombia, Costa Rica, Cuba, Ecuador, El Salvador, Guam, Guatemala, Haiti, Honduras, Jamaica, Japan, Liberia, Mexico, Micronesia, Monserrat, Nicaragua, Okinawa, Panama, Peru, Philippines, Puerto Rico, Saint Kitts & Nevis, Tahiti, Taiwan, Thailand, Trinidad and Tobago, USA, Venezuela, Virgin Islands (Exceptions may occur).

The input is a universal receptacle that accepts all types of connectors (Including: 2-Prong US "polarized", 3-Prong US grounded, European, UK, AUS and India plug standards. But not the large South African plug).

This adapter does not change the Voltage. Please check the voltage standard for the travel destination and use a Voltage converter with the adapter if needed. (example, Europe use mainly 230 Volts).

Many electrical devices such as AC/DC chargers for Laptops, cameras etc. allow a multi range Voltage (110-240 Volts) and eliminate the need of a Voltage converter.

Sometimes electrical device have a switch for either 120 or 230 Volts (remember to set back!). Please check the specifications on your equipment. Powering a 120 Volts device with 230 Volts can destroy the equipment and cause fire.

Compatible with:

  • Apple iPhone 15, 15 Pro Max, 15 Pro, 15 Plus 14, 14 Plus, 14 Pro, 14 Pro Max, 13 Pro, Max, SE Mini, 13, 12 Pro, 12 Pro Max, 12 Mini, 11 Pro Max, 11 Pro,11, SE 2020, XS Max, XR, X, Xs, 8, 8 Plus, 7, 7 Plus, 6, 6s, 6 Plus, 6s Plus, 2016, 5s, 5, 5c
  • Samsung Galaxy Z Fold, Z Flip S23, S23 Plus, S23 Ultra, 22, Ultra, S22+, S22, S21, S20, Galaxy Note20, Note20 Ultra, Note10, S10, S9, A14 XCover6 Pro A23 A13 A53 A12
  • GOOGLE Pixel 8 Pro, 8, 7, 7Pro, 6a, 6 Pro, 6, 5 XL, 5, 5a
  • MOTO razr razr+ moto g Stylus, edge, edge+, moto g, moto g power, g play
  • Asus Zenfone Flip, Zenfone, ROG Phone
  • T-Mobile REVVL 5G, 4+, 4 Orbic Magic 5G Myra 5G Journey V, L
  • Microsoft Surface Duo
  • OnePlus Open Nord N30 11 Nord N300 10T
  • Nokia C210 G310 XR21 C300 C110 G100

Compatible Tablets

  • Apple iPad iPad Pro 12.9-inch iPad Pro 11-inch iPad Pro 10.5-inch iPad Pro 9.7-inch iPad 9.7-inch iPad Mini (5 4 3 2 1) iPad (8th 7th 6th 5th 4th 3rd 2nd 1st Generation) Air (3 2 1) and All iPads
  • Samsung Galaxy Tab S9 S8 S7 Plus S6 S5e S4 Tab 4 S3 Tab S2 Tab S Tab A 10.5 Tab A 8.0 Tab E Galaxy Book Tab S3 9.7 Tab A 10.1 9.7 8-Inch 7.0 Tab E 9.6 4 10.1 7.0 8.0 S2 9.7 8.0 Note 10.1 Edition 2014 Tab 3 Lite Kids Edition
  • G Pad F2 8.0 HP Elite X2 1012 G1 Microsoft Surface Go 2
  • Amazon Fire HD 8, Fire HD 10, HD 6 HDX 7, Fire HD 6 Kids Edition, Kindle Fire, Paper white Kindle E-reader Kindle Oasis Fire 7 Dragon Touch X10 Y88X Plus X9 A1X Plus II 10.1
  • Asus Zenpad 3S 10 Z500KL 3 8.0 Z581KL Z10 ZT500KL 3S 10 Z500M Z8 Z300C 10 10 Z300M Z170C 7-inch Z8s 8.0 Z380M MeMO Pad 10 ME103K Transformer Pad TF103C
  • Acer Iconia Tab 10 A3-A40 A3-A30 10 Iconia One 10 B3-A10 Lenovo P11 Pro Tab 4 10 Plus Tab 4 8 Plus Tab3 8 Plus TAB A10-70 Tab 2 A10-70 Tab 2 A7 7-Inch Moto Tab Yuntab V101H 10.1-inch
  • Google ChromeBook Pixel Book
  • Switch Tablet Sony Z4 10.1 iRULU eXpro X1a 9-inch Walknbook 2 en 1 Tablet 10.1 HTC Google Nexus 9 7 NeuTab Air7 N7S Pro 7 inch
  • Astro Tab A935 9 Verizon Gizmo Tab Verizon Ellipsis 8 HD

List of TYPE-A use countries

American Samoa, Anguilla, Antigua, Aruba, Bahamas, Bangladesh, Barbados, Bermuda, Bolivia, Brazil, Cambodia, Canada, Cayman Islands, China (without holes in blades and slightly shorter blades), Colombia, Costa Rica, Cuba, Ecuador, El Salvador, Guam, Guatemala, Guyana, Haiti, Honduras, Jamaica, Japan, Laos, Lebanon, Liberia, Maldives, Mexico, Micronesia, Montserrat, Netherlands Antilles, Nicaragua, Nigeria, Okinawa, Panama, Peru, Philippines, Puerto Rico, St. Vincent, Saudi Arabia, Tahiti, Taiwan, Thailand, United States, Venezuela, Vietnam, Virgin Islands (U.S.& British), Yemen

Technically known as the NEMA 1-15 (North American 15 A/125 V ungrounded), this simple plug has two flat parallel pins, or blades. Early designs allowed the blades to be inserted either way, but more modern plugs make the neutral blade wider than the live blade so that a polarized plug can only be inserted one way. New polarized Type A plugs will not fit in old Type A sockets, but both old and new Type A plugs will fit into new Type A and Type B sockets. A similar plug and socket are commonly found in Japan, the JIS C 8303, Class II (Japanese 15 A /100 V ungrounded). It is basically identical to the North American, but incorporates stricter dimensional requirements for the plug housing, marking, and mandatory testing and approval. Japanese plugs should be able to fit North American outlets, but North American polarized plugs may require adapters or replacement non-polarized plugs in order to connect to older Japanese outlets..

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Donald Trump Is Banned from 37 Countries as Convicted Felon, Including Major Allies Like Canada and U.K.

If elected president again, Trump would need special permission to enter several key countries for maintaining foreign relations

Donald Trump may face travel restrictions with his newfound felon status , potentially complicating his presidency if he were to win another term in office.

Thirty-eight nations, counting the United States, bar felons from entry, according to World Population Review . Those bans stand regardless of whether someone is allowed to retain their passport after conviction.

Countries that turn felons away include several of the United States' strongest allies, like the United Kingdom, Australia and Canada — the final of which will host the G7 summit of world leaders in 2025. The list also includes a number of nations at the center of pressing foreign policy issues, such as China, Israel and Mexico.

AP Photo/Alex Brandon

International governments can, and in some cases would, choose to make an exception for Trump if he requested special permission as president to make a visit.

George W. Bush , who was arrested for drunk driving in the 1970s, ran into issues with Canadian travel restrictions during his presidency while planning an official state visit and, after applying for a special waiver, he was ultimately allowed to enter.

Win McNamee/Getty

In Bush's case, which still proved tedious, the circumstances were a bit different: the crime happened decades earlier, was only categorized as a misdemeanor and was never tried in a court of law (Bush admitted to driving under the influence upon arrest and got off with a fine and temporary license suspension). It's hard to say whether Trump's new 34 felony convictions would be dealt with in a similar manner.

Countries That Deny Entry to Felons

  • Dominican Republic
  • New Zealand
  • Philippines
  • South Africa
  • South Korea
  • United Arab Emirates
  • United Kingdom
  • United States

If Trump were elected to another term in the White House and chose to apply for special travel waivers, the irony would not go unnoticed.

The former president has often characterized foreigners as "criminals," and has campaigned on a promise to tighten U.S. travel restrictions, which would include shutting down the border and instating travel bans on people of certain nationalities and ideologies.

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Donald Trump’s felony conviction now means he’s banned from a host of countries including Canada and UK

There are nearly 40 countries that bar felons from entering, even to visit., article bookmarked.

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Now that Donald Trump is a convicted felon, his list of countries to visit has gotten much shorter.

Trump was found guilty on Thursday of 34 counts of falsifying records in an effort to keep adult film star Stormy Daniels quiet about an affair that occurred in the 2000s. That means certain freedoms Mr Trump once enjoyed may be out of his reach — and could have a serious effect on his ability to carry out his presidential duties, including travelling to foreign countries.

Nearly 40 nations - including Canada and the UK - have strict policies when it comes to allowing individuals with criminal records across their borders, and barring a special accommodation, Trump would be held to those same standards. It’s unclear if he would be allowed to visit if he wins the presidential election in November, but remains a felon.

Here are just five of the over 35 nations that can now ban Trump from entry now that he's a felon:

Former President Donald Trump may not be allowed to enter nearly 40 countries now that he’s a convicted felon

Despite Trump once retweeting someone who referred to him as the "King of Israel" and bragging that he moved the US embassy in Israel to Jerusalem, Trump may not be able to visit the nation now that he's a felon.

Israel reserves the right to refuse entry to anyone with a criminal record, including felonies. Border control forces in Israel have the authority to bar entry for anyone suspected of committing a crime or with a record, and Trump meets both of those qualifiers.

According to the Canadian government's tourist hub, any "US Citizen or permanent resident that has a felony conviction on their criminal record may be deemed inadmissible to Canada for the purposes of immigrating, or even if they're merely coming to Canada to visit."

Canada even retains the right to bar individuals "arrested or accused of a felony crime ... even though you have not been convicted," meaning Trump would have faced issues visiting the US's northern neighbor the moment he faced charges.

The government notes that "a felony will likely result in inadmissibility."

Then-president Donald Trump talks with Canada’s Prime Minister Justin Trudeau during the plenary session of the NATO summit in 2019

Japan is fairly strict with its immigration and visitation rules, including laws preventing convicted criminals from entry.

Under Japanese law anyone convicted of a violation of "any law of regulation" of any country and who has been sentenced to "imprisonment with or without work for one year or more, or to an equivalent penalty" can be barred from entry.

Japanese law does note that individuals convicted of a "political offence" are not subject to those rules. In Trump's mind, at least, he could qualify to visit under those terms. It's unclear if Japan would buy his version of events.

Under UK law, a felon can visit England, Wales, Northern Ireland, and Scotland with some restrictions and requirements in place. However, Britain can bar access to convicted felons.

Unless an “Immigration Officer is satisfied that admission would be justified for strong compassionate reasons,” they can refuse access to any convicted felon so long as the crime they committed would also be punishable by imprisonment in the UK.

In 2019, British Prime Minister Theresa May, Prince of Wales Prince Charles, Queen Elizabeth II, President Donald Trump and First Lady of Melania Trump attended the D-day 75 Commemorations on June 05 in Portsmouth, England.

China has strict policies when admitting anyone over its borders. Chinese officials conduct character assessments for anyone applying for a visa, and that includes a criminal history check, including felonies.

Even minor offences can get someone barred from entering China, so Mr Trump may not be able to chide the Chinese in person if he were ever so inclined.

Countries and territories that restrict visits from felons

  • Dominican Republic
  • New Zealand
  • Philippines
  • South Africa
  • South Korea
  • United Arab Emirates
  • United Kingdom

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classe oasis

GETTING ONBOARD

Required travel documents.

GETTING ONBOARD WITH

THE RIGHT TRAVEL DOCUMENTS

It’s your responsibility to ensure you have all the proper documentation to board the ship and enter each of the countries your cruise visits. We’ll require government-issued identification to board. And government authorities may require you to have a visa or meet other requirements.

Select your departure port below to find out exactly what you need. But be aware – government requirements may change.

Don't Get Caught Without The Right Travel Doc

Passport

Passports are Best A passport is the best ID document for travel. Make sure yours doesn't expire for 6 months after your cruise ends. Learn more

Birth certificate

Caution: Birth Certificates U.S. Citizens can cruise with a U.S. birth certificate on most sailings from the U.S. But your birth certificate needs to meet the requirements. Learn more

Names Must Match

Names Must Match If you've had a name change, and the name used across your documents does not match, you will need to take an extra step. Learn more

Children and Guardians

Cruising With Kids That Aren't Yours When a minor (age 17 and under) travels without their legal guardian, an accompanying adult must present a notarized form signed by the child's guardian. Learn more

Visa May be Required

Visas May Be Required Some countries require an entry visa or electronic visa based on your nationality. Learn more

Don't Pack your Docs

Don't Pack Your Docs Please keep all travel documents on your person at the terminal; you’ll need to present them at check-in.

Select where you're sailing from

Popular homeports:, full list of all homeports:, travel document requirements for sailings from u.s. homeports (excluding honoulu, hawaii & seward, alaska).

Here are the current requirements for our guests sailing from the U.S. Booked guests will be provided the latest full details prior to sailing. Please select the citizenship options below to learn the right requirements:

USA Flag

Accepted Identification for U.S. Citizens & Permanent Residents

Note: U.S. Cruises that visit Colombia or Panama If your sailing visits Colombia or Panama, see your protocols here .

In order to sail, a guest must meet the requirements of ONE of the check boxes below.

All documents must be original – no photocopies. Your name must match across documents. What if I had a name change?

  • U.S. Passport Book OR U.S. Passport Card
  • Royal Caribbean strongly recommends that all guests travel with a valid passport. Learn why a passport is best.
  • Passports must be valid at least 6 months after your cruise ends
  • Read more about passport requirements.
  • U.S. Birth Certificate AND Valid Government Issued ID (State ID Card, Driver’s License OR Military ID)
  • U.S. Birth Certificates must be the original or an official document issued by the government.
  • Read more about birth certificate requirements.
  • Guests age 15 and under are NOT required to have a photo ID, just the birth certificate.
  • Permanent Resident Card (Alien Resident Card "ARC" OR Green Card) AND Valid Passport from Country of Citizenship
  • Guests must bring their physical Permanent Resident Card and it must be original – no photocopies.
  • Passports must be valid at least 6 months after your cruise ends.
  • Guests age 16 and older whose ARC has no photo must present a valid government issued photo ID
  • Barbados & Martinique require ARC guests to provide a valid passport.
  • Any additional requirements are the responsibility of the guest.
  • U.S. Naturalization Certificate AND Valid Government Issued ID (State ID Card, Driver’s License OR Military ID)
  • Original U.S. Naturalization Certificate or a certified copy.
  • Enhanced Driver’s License (EDL) that is not expired
  • Enhanced Driver's Licenses are only available from the following states: Michigan, Minnesota, New York, Vermont and Washington State.
  • An Enhanced Driver’s License is different from a REAL ID compliant id. An EDL will have a flag on the front.
  • U.S. Passport Book
  • Visa may be required based on Passport Country of Origin. Learn More

Additionally, visas or travel permits may be required to enter some countries.

  • Electronic Travel Authorization will be required based on disembarkation port.
  • Learn more about visa requirements.

Accepted Identification for Canadian Citizens

  • Canadian Passport Book – Required if traveling to the U.S. by air
  • Enhanced Driver's Licenses are only available from the following Provinces: British Columbia, Manitoba, Ontario, and Quebec.
  • Guests age 14 and under may present a passport as noted above OR one of the documents below:
  • Original Naturalization Certificate OR Original Valid Canadian Citizenship Card OR Original Birth Certificate Issued by Canada.
  • Read more about birth certificate requirements

In order to sail, a guest must meet the requirements below.

  • Canadian Passport Book

Accepted Identification for Other Nationalities

  • Valid Passport from Country of Citizenship

Additionally, visas or travel permits may be required to enter some countries. Please check requirements for your own nationality. Common visas are noted below.

  • The United States may require a Electronic System for Travel Authorization (ESTA) or Visa depending on nationality.
  • Please check requirements for your own nationality .
  • Electronic Visa Update System (EVUS) is required for Chinese Nationals.
  • Sailings with a Canadian Port of Call (ex. Alaska sailings) may require a Canadian Visitor’s Visa.

Travel document requirements for sailings from Australian homeports

Here are the current requirements for our guests sailing from Australia. Booked guests will be provided the latest full details prior to sailing. Please select the citizenship options below to learn the right requirements:

Australia Flag

Accepted Identification for U.S. Citizens

  • U.S. Passport Book AND Australian Electronic Travel Authority (ETA)
  • All visitors are required to get an Australian ETA to travel to Australia.
  • Read more about passport requirements

Additionally, visas or travel permits may be required to enter some countries. Please check requirements for your own nationality.

  • New Zealand Electronic Travel Authority (NZeTA)
  • All visitors are required to get a NZeTA to travel to New Zealand.

Accepted Identification for U.K. Citizens

  • Passport Book

Accepted Identification for Australian Citizens

  • Australian Passport Book
  • Australian Driver's License OR Government-issued, laminated photo ID
  • Cruise itinerary must call only on Australian ports of call.
  • If an itinerary leaves Australia, then guests must use a Passport.
  • Guests age 17 and under may present one of the documents below:
  • Medicare Card - Can be used as the only identification for children when all guests share the same last name.
  • Original (or Certified) Birth Certificate - If the parent's name differs from the child.

* Sailings that originate and end in ports within Australia that do not include a visit to an overseas port outside of Australia. (Note that Queensland cruises that include Willis Island are considered domestic cruises) . If an itinerary leaves Australia, then guests must use a Passport.

  • Passport Book AND Australian Electronic Travel Authority (ETA)
  • For Transpacific sailings, the United States may require a Electronic System for Travel Authorization (ESTA) or Visa depending on nationality.

Travel document requirements for sailings from Canadian homeports

Here are the current requirements for our guests sailing from Canada. Booked guests will be provided the latest full details prior to sailing. Please select the citizenship options below to learn the right requirements:

Accepted Identification for U.S. Citizens & Permanent Residents

  • U.S. Passport Book - If traveling to Canada by air
  • U.S. Passport Card - Can be used if traveling to Canada by ground/car or by sea
  • U.S. Birth Certificate AND Valid Government Issued ID (State ID Card, Driver’s License OR Military ID) - Can be used if traveling to Canada by ground/car or by sea
  • Original U.S. State Certified Birth Certificate or a certified copy; or an original Consular Birth Abroad Certificate from the U.S. State Department.
  • Permanent Resident Card (Alien Resident Card "ARC" OR Green Card) AND Valid Passport from Country of Citizenship - If traveling to Canada by air, ground/car or by sea
  • Passports must be valid for at least 6 months after your cruise ends.
  • Guests age 16 and older whose ARC has no photo must present a valid government issued photo ID.
  • Enhanced Driver’s License (EDL) that is not expired - Can be used if traveling to Canada by ground/car or by sea

Accepted Identification for Canadian Citizens & Permanent Residents

  • Canadian Permanent Resident Card AND Valid Passport from Country of Citizenship
  • Guests age 14 and under may also present either:
  • Canada may require an Electronic Travel Authorization (eTA) or Visa depending on nationality.

Travel document requirements for sailings from European homeports (excluding Southampton, England; Haifa, Israel & Istanbul, Turkey)

Here are the current requirements for our guests sailing from Europe. Booked guests will be provided the latest full details prior to sailing. Please select the citizenship options below to learn the right requirements:

UK Flag

Additionally, visas or travel permits will soon be required to enter European Union countries.

  • Traveling to Europe
  • Coming Soon - All visitors will soon be required to get an European Travel Information and Authorization System (ETIAS) to travel to Europe.
  • Sailings that have a European Union Port of Call
  • For Transatlantic sailings, the United States may require a Electronic System for Travel Authorization (ESTA) or Visa depending on nationality.

Accepted Identification for European Citizens

  • Guests are responsible for any requirements a country may have.
  • Royal Caribbean strongly recommends that all guests travel with a valid passport. Learn why a passport is best
  • EU Government ID
  • Cruise itinerary must call only on countries within the Schengen Region .
  • EU Government ID must be valid at least 3 months after your cruise ends.
  • A Multi-Entry Schengen Visa may be required
  • Coming Soon - European Travel Information and Authorization System (ETIAS)
  • Some nationalities will soon be required to get an European Travel Information and Authorization System (ETIAS) to travel to Europe.
  • A Schengen Visa may be required
  • European Travel Information and Authorization System (ETIAS)
  • Coming Soon - Some nationalities will soon be required to get an European Travel Information and Authorization System (ETIAS) to travel to Europe.

Travel document requirements for sailings from Dubai

Here are the current requirements for our guests sailing from Dubai. Booked guests will be provided the latest full details prior to sailing. Please select the citizenship options below to learn the right requirements:

Europe Flag

  • U.K. Passport Book

Travel document requirements for sailings from Central & South American homeports

Here are the current requirements for our guests sailing from Central and South America. Booked guests will be provided the latest full details prior to sailing. Please select the citizenship options below to learn the right requirements:

  • Australian citizens cruising to and from Buenos Aires, Argentina and Valparaiso, Chile require additional documentation.

Travel document requirements for sailings from Singapore

Here are the current requirements for our guests sailing from Singapore. Booked guests will be provided the latest full details prior to sailing. Please select the citizenship options below to learn the right requirements:

Singapore Flag

  • U.S. Passport Book AND Singapore Arrival Card (SGAC)
  • All visitors are required to get an Singapore Arrival Card to travel to Singapore.

Accepted Identification for Singaporean Citizens

  • Singaporean Passport Book
  • Passport Book AND Singapore Arrival Card (SGAC)

Travel document requirements for sailings from Japanese homeports

Here are the current requirements for our guests sailing from Japan. Booked guests will be provided the latest full details prior to sailing. Please select the citizenship options below to learn the right requirements:

Japanese Flag

Accepted Identification for Japanese Citizens

  • Japanese Passport Book

Travel document requirements for sailings from Chinese homeports

Here are the current requirements for our guests sailing from China. Booked guests will be provided the latest full details prior to sailing. Please select the citizenship options below to learn the right requirements:

China Flag

Accepted Identification for Chinese Citizens

  • Chinese Passport Book

Travel document requirements for sailings from Istanbul, Turkey

Here are the current requirements for our guests sailing from Istanbul, Turkey. Booked guests will be provided the latest full details prior to sailing. Please select the citizenship options below to learn the right requirements:

  • U.S. Passport Book AND Turkish Visa
  • All visitors are required to get a Turkish Visa to travel to Turkey.
  • Passport Book AND Turkish Visa

Travel document requirements for sailings from Haifa, Israel

Here are the current requirements for our guests sailing from Haifa, Israel. Booked guests will be provided the latest full details prior to sailing. Please select the citizenship options below to learn the right requirements:

  • All visitors will soon be required to get an European Travel Information and Authorization System (ETIAS) to travel to Europe.

Travel document requirements for sailings from Seward, Alaska

Here are the current requirements for our guests sailing from the Seward. Booked guests will be provided the latest full details prior to sailing. Please select the citizenship options below to learn the right requirements:

  • Canada may require a Visa depending on nationality.

Travel document requirements for sailings from Southampton, England

Here are the current requirements for our guests sailing from Southampton. Booked guests will be provided the latest full details prior to sailing. Please select the citizenship options below to learn the right requirements:

Additionally, visas or travel permits will soon be required to enter the U.K. and European Union countries.

  • Entering the U.K.
  • Coming Soon - All visitors will soon be required to get an U.K. Travel Authorization (ETA) to travel to the U.K.

Travel document requirements for sailings from Oahu (Honolulu), Hawaii

Here are the current requirements for our guests sailing from the Honolulu. Booked guests will be provided the latest full details prior to sailing. Please select the citizenship options below to learn the right requirements:

  • Australian Electronic Travel Authority (ETA).

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Aerial View of South Beach, Miami, Florida

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United Kingdom

In the United Kingdom, power plugs and sockets (outlets) of type G are used. The standard voltage is 230 V at a frequency of 50 Hz.

  • Yes, you need a power plug travel adapter for sockets type G in the United Kingdom.
  • You also need a voltage converter.
  • Be extra careful with certain devices because of the difference in frequency.

Do your power plugs fit in the United Kingdom?

In the United Kingdom, they use power sockets (outlets) of type G. In Canada, you have plugs A and B. You need a power plug adapter in the United Kingdom for sockets type G. The plugs of your electric devices don't fit without.

Buy a power plug (travel) adapter

We don't sell power plug adapters. We refer you to Amazon, where you will find a great selection of travel adapters.

  • Find travel adapters at AMAZON.CA

You need to look for a power plug adapter for sockets type G. Alternatively, choose a world travel adapter that fits multiple sockets, in case you travel more often. Because you need a voltage converter as well (see below), you might want to use a combined travel adapter/voltage converter.

Voltage converter needed in the United Kingdom?

The standard voltage in the United Kingdom (230 V) is much higher than the voltage level your devices typically operate at in Canada (120 V). Without a converter, you risk serious damage to your devices. Additionally, be aware that the frequency in the United Kingdom differs.

  • You need a voltage converter in the United Kingdom to protect your devices!
  • Try to find a voltage converter that can also change the frequency.

A voltage converter will ensure a safe input voltage level for your devices in the United Kingdom. You can find voltage converters at Amazon. Because you also need a power plug adapter, you might want a combined plug adapter/voltage converter.

  • Find voltage converters at AMAZON.CA
  • Find combo plug adapters/converters at AMAZON.CA

Be warned if your converter cannot change the frequency. It is not advisable to use your devices. But if you do (at your own risk), exercise special caution with motorized devices and those containing electronic chips, such as clocks, shavers, and medical devices.

To be sure, check the label on your devices. Some devices never need a converter. If the label states 'INPUT: 100-240V, 50/60 Hz' the device can be used in every country in the world. This is common for devices with chargers like tablets/laptops, photo cameras, cell phones, toothbrushes, etc. For these devices you will only need a power plug adapter.

Need anything else?

Check if you have packed everything for your trip at our TRAVELER'S CHECKLIST !

Frequently asked questions

uk to canada travel plug

Two dozen United Airlines passengers fell ill on flight, had been on cruise

uk to canada travel plug

Around two dozen passengers fell ill on a United Airlines flight from Vancouver, Canada to Houston, Texas on Friday.

Approximately 25 people traveling in a group of 75 had nausea, according to Capt. Sedrick Robinett of the Houston Fire Department. HFD evaluated three passengers upon the plane’s arrival at George Bush Intercontinental Airport but none were transported to the hospital, he said.

“Several passengers who had been on the same cruise and did not feel well were on United Flight 1528 from Vancouver to Houston Friday night,” United told USA TODAY in an emailed statement. The airline did not answer a question about what cruise line or ship the flyers had been traveling on before their flight.

“United Airlines is actively coordinating with health authorities to address the situation,” the airline’s statement continued. “As a precautionary measure, the aircraft will be removed from service and go through a deep cleaning before returning to service. Ensuring the health and safety of our passengers and crew remains our top priority.”

Is there a doctor on board?: Usually, yes. Here's why.

The Houston Health Department referred a request for comment to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

"Public health officers from CDC’s Houston Port Health Station worked with EMS to evaluate ill passengers on board," a CDC spokesperson said in an emailed statement. "Most of the ill passengers reported mild GI symptoms. No passengers were noted to have a fever during the flight or upon public health assessment at landing. No passengers met CDC criteria for further public health follow-up. Passengers from the flight continued with their travel plans."

The news comes after dozens of passengers on a Condor flight from Mauritius to Frankfurt, Germany mysteriously became sick with nausea and vomiting last month.

Nathan Diller is a consumer travel reporter for USA TODAY based in Nashville. You can reach him at [email protected].

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Knicks 2024 NBA Mock Draft Roundup: Guard Tyler Kolek linked with New York

The Knicks will have an interesting offseason as they have free agents to potentially sign and a lot of draft capital to trade for a star to pair with Jalen Brunson .

But the Knicks are still in a positon to add to the roster via the NBA Draft. Team president Leon Rose and the rest of the organization have two picks in the first round of this year's draft and could draft a player rather than trade the selection. They have the No. 24 pick (via Dallas ) and the No. 25 pick in the first round and the No. 38 pick (via Utah) in the second round.

For this year, the draft will be held over two days, with day one on Wednesday, June 26 and day two on Thursday, June 27. Both days will be at the Barclays Center in Brooklyn .

With the NBA Draft fast approaching, here's who the experts think the Knicks will select in the first round of their latest mock drafts...

David Cobb, CBS Sports

No. 24: Center Yves Missi (Baylor)

Height : 6-foot-11

Weight : 229 pounds

Missi is a lanky, athletic big man with great upside as a defender and lob threat. He's still learning the game, and 3-pointers aren't even close to being a part of his arsenal. But if he can hone a push shot/floater, he could find a home in an NBA rotation as a defense-first center.

No. 25: Shooting Guard Kyshawn George ( Miami )

Height : 6-foot-7

Weight : 209 pounds

Miami unearthed a gem in signing George, who came from Switzerland as an unheralded prospect. He developed into a key part of the Hurricanes' rotation as the season progressed, with his 3-point shooting becoming an impressive asset. He also ranked as Miami's top defender, per evanmiya.com, which makes him an appealing two-way wing prospect.

Jonathan Wasserman, Bleacher Report

No. 24: Power forward Ryan Dunn (Virginia)

Height : 6-foot-6

Weight : 214 pounds

The Knicks felt the payoff of having a big-wing defender like OG Anubody . Dunn could give them another one whose court coverage and play-disrupting around the basket led to some wild steal and block rates.

The New York native already worked out for the Knicks and has a big workout next week in Portland against projected first-rounders Ron Holland , Tijane Salaun and Keyshawn George .

No. 25: Guard Tyler Kolek (Marquette)

Height : 6-foot-1

Weight : 197 pounds

Miles McBride became a key member of New York's rotation, but Tyler Kolek would give it some needed playmaking/facilitating behind Jalen Brunson.

Underwhelming measurements (6'1", 6'3" wingspan) and athletic testing will keep teams' vision of Kolek as a backup. But that could still be enough to draw first-round interest, particularly from playoff teams who'll see a guard who can instantly provide pick-and-roll offense, spot-up shooting and toughness.

Gary Parrish, CBS Sports

No. 24: Center Zach Edey (Purdue)

Height : 7-foot-4

Weight : 299 pounds

As incredible as Edey was at Purdue over the past two years, he remains a divisive NBA prospect with what appears to be a pretty big range. He could go in the lottery or slip into the 20s. Either way, Edey would be a nice option for the Knicks if he's still available at this point in the draft considering they could be on the verge of losing Isaiah Hartenstein in free agency.

No. 25: Forward Justin Edwards (Kentucky)

Edwards was the highest-ranked prospect in Kentucky's top-ranked recruiting class but was largely disappointing all season. He finished sixth on the team in points, sixth on the team in scoring and averaged roughly as many turnovers as assists. Is he worth a flier at this point in the draft by a New York franchise with back-to-back picks? Sure. But Edwards did very little at UK to suggest he should be selected anywhere close to where most had him projected six months ago.

Sam Vecenie, The Athletic

No. 24: Guard Tyler Kolek (Marquette)

Kolek is a crafty guard. I’m not convinced he can even dunk, but he knows exactly how to play off two feet and is an elite distributor in ball screens. He made a big leap as a shooter this past season, drilling 38.8 percent from 3 while looking much more confident pulling up when opportunities arose. Kolek must prove he has the foot speed to hold up on defense in the NBA, and he’ll need to prove he can create separation with the ball in his hands against better defenders. But any team looking for a backup guard could plug Kolek in early.

No. 25: Forward DaRon Holmes (Dayton)

Height : 6-foot-9

Weight : 220 pounds

Holmes had an outstanding season at Dayton, winning All-American honors by averaging 20.4 points, 8.5 rebounds, 2.6 assists and 2.1 blocks while hitting 54.4 percent from the field and 38.6 percent from 3. He’s a versatile big who has a lot of answers for opponents’ ball-screen coverages. He can pick-and-pop, short roll to pass, short roll to finish himself or dive all the way to the rim to catch a lob. Defensively, he’s a good shot blocker and has flashed potential to stick with guards for a couple of slides on the perimeter.

John Marshall, AP

No. 24: Center Kyle Filipowski (Duke)

Weight : 248 pounds

New York is loaded with Duke fans and Filipowski could be an instant favorite. The sturdy center may not be an elite rim protector nor a consistent 3-pointer shooter, but he has good footwork and plays hard. The Knicks had a solid run into the second round of the playoffs and Filipowski could be another piece to help push them deeper.

The Knicks have one bucket-getter in Brunson and Kolek could be an option to help take some of the pressure off. The 6-3 guard is a steady hand at the point who can score at multiple levels. The two-time All-American could also become a fan favorite at the Garden with his scrappy play and ability to score in bunches when needed.

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COMMENTS

  1. How to use plugs from United Kingdom in Canada

    A hair-dryer can consume up to 2000 Watts, like the one in the picture above, due to the high power they usually work in one voltage system; this one is suitable for 220-240 Volts systems. You will need a step down voltage converter a device that can be plugged to 120 volts and it provides an outlet with 230 volts for your United Kingdom' device.

  2. Plug For Canada: What You Need To Know

    Yes! Americans and Mexicans do not need a travel adapter or transformer when traveling to Canada. Most device plugs will work with the outlet types in Canada. Also, the voltage in Canada is the same as in the United States and Mexico. Please note: an adapter will be needed if your device plug has a grounding pin and you are trying to use a Type ...

  3. Which plug adaptor do I need when travelling from United Kingdom to Canada?

    The table below summarises the plug types, voltage and frequency of electrical current in both United Kingdom and Canada. United Kingdom. Canada. Plug Types. G, D, M. A, B. Voltage. 230 V. 120 V.

  4. Travel Adaptor for Canada

    This normally includes the use of a travel adaptor, which is a device that simply allows you to plug any UK electrical appliance into a foreign electrical socket. It is important to note that it does not convert the voltage or frequency. For Canada there are two associated plug types, types A and B. Plug type A is the plug which has two flat ...

  5. Canada

    A. B. 120 V. 60 Hz. In Canada, power plugs and sockets (outlets) of type A and type B are used. The standard voltage is 120 V at a frequency of 60 Hz. Yes, you need a power plug travel adapter for sockets type A and B in Canada. You also need a voltage converter. Be extra careful with certain devices because of the difference in frequency.

  6. The 11 Best Travel Adapters (2024): Plug Adapters and Universal ...

    Ceptics World Travel Adapter Kit 2. This kit includes multiple plug attachments that slide and lock into place to keep you powered across most of the world. It is much larger than the average ...

  7. Your ultimate international travel plug adapter guide

    A European plug will typically be type C, whereas a US plug type will typically be type A. However, in Asia you will find that different plug types are used across different countries. These are broad rules and to be safe and prepared you are better off understanding exactly which plug type is used in the region you are travelling to. Check out ...

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    Travel Plug Adapter, International Plug Adapter with 4 AC Outlets 2 USB Ports (2 USB C Port), Type C Power Adaptor Charger for The US to Europe Iceland Spain Italy France Germany ... European Adapter, AC Outlet Plugs for UK/EU/AU/US/Asia Travel (0 Reviews) $29.87. $29.87. SAVE $20. Marketplace seller. ... Some countries, like Canada and the US ...

  9. The Best Travel Plug Adapter of 2024

    Ougrand (green): Same shape as the Unidapt, but with a USB-C in place of one of the regular USB connections; 3.4 amp max total. Huanuo (currently unavailable): A bit bulky, with three regular USB ...

  10. Canada

    In Canada, power plugs and sockets (outlets) of type A and type B are used. The standard voltage is 120 V at a frequency of 60 Hz. For more information, select the country you live in at the top of this page. Buy a power plug (travel) adapter. We don't sell power plug adapters. We refer you to Amazon, where you will find a great selection of ...

  11. Travel Plug Adaptor for Canada

    Best UK to Canada Travel Adaptors 2024 - You will need a type A/B plug adaptor. In stock and available from £5.49. #8226 Local socket type: A / B & #8226 voltage: 120 V & #8226 frequency: 60 Hz. ... Travel Plug Adaptor for Canada The electrical sockets used in Canada are type A and type B. These are 2 variants of the same socket - one earthed ...

  12. Travel Adaptors

    You will need to consider what to pack, to ensure you can use your personal electrical appliances safely whilst abroad. This normally includes the use of a travel adaptor, which is a device that simply allows you to plug any UK electrical appliance into a foreign electrical socket.

  13. Go Travel UK to USA, Canada and South America Adaptor

    Designed for UK travellers visiting the Americas, this travel adaptor converts British 3-pole earthed plugs to fit American sockets. Sleek, compact and light, it is simple to use and easy to pack. £1.50 or free if you spend £15 or more from your choice of 1,800 stores. £3.95 or free when you spend £25 or more.

  14. Guide To Using UK Electrical Appliances In Canada

    You can use UK electrical items in Canada, however, the UK voltage is different. The standard UK voltage is 240v, whereas, Canada's standard voltage is 120v. Therefore, some products may not be suitable in Canada. Devices that are dual voltage will work between 110v to 240v and will be suitable for usage in Canada as well as the UK.

  15. Best travel adapter 2024: power up abroad

    00.T3's top 3 ↴01. Best overall: Hyleton Worldwide Travel Adapter 02. Best safe: MyTravelPal Worldwide Universal 10A 03. Best affordable: Bestek Worldwide Travel Adaptor 04. Best versatile ...

  16. The 6 Best Travel Adapters and Converters of 2024 ...

    Best for Families: Bestek Travel Adapter and Voltage Converter at Amazon ($38) Jump to Review. Best Multipack: Ceptics European Travel Plug Adapter at Amazon (See Price) Jump to Review. Best for ...

  17. Best travel adapter 2021: Plug in Samsung, Apple, USB-C devices abroad

    OneAdaptr all-in-one world adapter with USB-C & 3 USB charger. You can plug five devices into this all-singing, all-dancing adapter which has three USB ports, a USB C port and the ability to do ...

  18. Canadian Guide to International Power Adapters

    Plug types tend to vary from region to region. In Canada, we use type A and B…. A is two-pronged and B is three-pronged. The standard voltage here is 120 V. Luckily, both North and Central America use the same plug types as us so you don't need a power adapter. But if you are travelling to other regions such as Asia, Europe or the UK, you ...

  19. Departing from Canada? Electric adapters for your trip here

    Ok, you are in Canada, you use power plugs/outlets similar to the following picture (s): (includes Ottawa, Vancouver, Montréal, Toronto, Québec, Calgary, Halifax.) Plug Type A. Plug Type B. Outlet Type A. Outlet Type B. Voltage used in Canada is 120V and the electrical frequency is 60Hz. (more details after you choose where you are going.)

  20. Cellet Universal Travel Adapter: Seamless Plug Conversion for

    Bates- Universal Adapter, 2 Pack, Travel Adapter, UK to US Plug Adapter, Universal Plug Adapter Plug, Universal Travel Adapter, European to American Plug Adapter, Europe to US Plug Adapter ... Standard: Type B plug, US, Japan, Canada Mexico CEE 7/16. Compact and Portable . Compact design; Small and lightweight; Convenient to carry when traveling;

  21. Donald Trump Can't Travel to 37 Countries as Convicted Felon: See Which

    Donald Trump Is Banned from 37 Countries as Convicted Felon, Including Major Allies Like Canada and U.K. If elected president again, Trump would need special permission to enter several key ...

  22. Donald Trump now banned from Canada and UK as convicted felon

    There are nearly 40 countries that bar felons from entering, even to visit. Now that Donald Trump is a convicted felon, his list of countries to visit has gotten much shorter. Trump was found ...

  23. Travel Documents & Requirements

    Passports are Best. A passport is the best ID document for travel. Make sure yours doesn't expire for 6 months after your cruise ends. Learn more. Caution: Birth Certificates. U.S. Citizens can cruise with a U.S. birth certificate on most sailings from the U.S. But your birth certificate needs to meet the requirements.

  24. Average Cost Of Travel Insurance 2024

    The average cost of travel insurance is 5% to 6% of your trip costs, according to Forbes Advisor's analysis of travel insurance rates. For a $5,000 trip, the average travel insurance cost is ...

  25. 'Planet parade' 2024: How to view the astronomical event

    Get ready skywatchers, another astronomical event will take place on June 3. A planetary alignment, or a "planet parade" according to the internet, where we'll see six planets - Jupiter, Mercury ...

  26. United Kingdom

    In the United Kingdom, power plugs and sockets (outlets) of type G are used. The standard voltage is 230 V at a frequency of 50 Hz. Yes, you need a power plug travel adapter for sockets type G in the United Kingdom. You also need a voltage converter. Be extra careful with certain devices because of the difference in frequency.

  27. United Airlines passengers fell ill during flight after a cruise

    Two dozen United Airlines passengers fell ill on flight, had been on cruise. Around two dozen passengers fell ill on a United Airlines flight from Vancouver, Canada to Houston, Texas on Friday ...

  28. Knicks 2024 NBA Mock Draft Roundup: Guard Tyler Kolek linked with New

    Height: 6-foot-1. Weight: 197 pounds. Age: 23. Miles McBride became a key member of New York's rotation, but Tyler Kolek would give it some needed playmaking/facilitating behind Jalen Brunson ...