travelling to japan with a seafood allergy

Food Allergies in Japan: How to Enjoy Traveling Safely with a Food Allergy or Intolerance

Food allergies in Japan can impose a large degree of anxiety for food allergy sufferers. This is especially in a country like Japan which does not tend to list ingredients using a Western script. Meanwhile, many Japanese do not understand the life-threatening seriousness that food allergies can impose. This article serves to present key information on how to explain what food allergy someone has, tips on reading food and other product labels, insight into what products can contain what kinds of allergies, and what to do in case of an allergic response.

Traveling with Food Allergies in Japan

Labelling in japan: japanese food labels, how to read japanese food labels, common food allergens in japan, traveling with a milk/dairy allergy in japan, traveling with an egg allergy in japan, traveling with a crustacean shellfish allergy in japan, traveling with a peanut allergy / nut allergy in japan, traveling with a sesame allergy in japan, traveling with a soy / soybean allergy in japan, lactose and gluten intolerance, special concerns, how to inform of any food allergies and ask about ingredients, what to do in case of an allergic reaction in japan, final thought: japanese food labels reader app.

In the US, eight ingredients account for most of the serious allergic reactions: Milk, Eggs, Fish (e.g., bass, flounder, cod), Crustacean shellfish (e.g., crab, lobster, shrimp), Tree nuts (e.g., almonds, walnuts, pecans), Peanuts, Wheat, and Soybeans. Travelers with food allergies can still experience and enjoy Japan, though certain precautions may have to be taken. (The same goes especially for traveling with a soy allergy.)

Labelling in Japan: Japanese food labels

The food labeling system in Japan has different requirements and only 7 core allergens are required to be labelled. A list of allergenic foods in Japan is: eggs, milk, wheat, buckwheat, peanuts, shrimp and crab. Some allergens can be listed using very different forms, such as 落花生 and ピーナッツ - both of which refer to peanuts. Note that ready-made food at outdoor stalls and vendors, small restaurants and izakayas, and many hand-made and packaged products will not be labeled. Take extra caution when choosing to consume such products as the ingredients could have come in contact with or be made in environment with allergens, even if it’s directly in the product. While large companies often do proper labeling, many tiny businesses may not. If you do not see a label or have any questions, ask the staff. Be prepared to wait patiently as oftentimes, staff will make multiple calls and check the content meticulously to assure accuracy.

Typical Japanese food label. Note that emulsifiers may be synthetic or made from natural ingredients, including soy or pork.

Under Japanese law, most food packaging of a certain size must be labeled. Ingredients are typically listed on the reverse or side of a package. Look for the phrase 原材料名 - "product ingredients" - to start reading for allergens.

travelling to japan with a seafood allergy

Products with a larger package area may also display an allergen table (or icon) indicating which allergens the food contains. If you are concerned about potential cross-contamination, located toward the bottom of many packages there will also be a phrase similar to the following: 本製品工場で は、 乳 、 卵 、 ピーナッツ 、 小麦な どを含む製品を生産しています。 (" Manufactured in a facility that also processes dairy , eggs , peanuts and wheat .”)

Milk & Dairy (乳, にゅう; nyuu): ● Variants: 生乳(seinyu, raw milk), 牛乳 (gyunyu, cow’s milk), 生クリーム (heavy cream). Many products, even powdered or instant soups, crackers, and bread have dairy in them. In recent years, soy and other non-dairy type milks and yogurts have been stocked on shelves at convenient stores and supermarkets . Luckily, many traditional Japanese dishes such as udon , ramen , tempura , and the like do not have dairy in them as dairy itself was not introduced to Japan until recent centuries. Still, with the western influence in modern Japanese food , it’s best to stay cautious and pay attention to ingredients. ● Found in: creamy pastas and soups, salad toppings and dressings, desserts, crackers, creamy broth for nabé, egg omelette, egg custard, egg sandwich (which includes mayonnaise), potato salad (also mayo), many Japanese hamburger buns, white bread and pastries, and can be in skincare products that are creamy and white.

Eggs (卵, たまご; tamago) Egg is commonly a topping that isn’t listen on the menu, such as boiled egg on top of salads, a raw egg (safe to eat in Japan) on top of rice for a traditional Japanese breakfast, and in light soups. While these dishes are more distinct and easy to tell from the looks, there are many dishes in which egg is not as visually apparent. This includes many fried dishes (usually ending in -katsu ) which use eggs and flour in the batter. Other foods in which a shape is formed (hardened) often use egg and flour in its process to do so. Make sure to check extensively. ● Found in: Sushi (tamago-yaki sushi and chirashi bowls), chikuwa , okonomiyaki (batter), chawan-mushi (savory egg custard dish), tempura (batter), tonkatsu (batter). Fish Examples: Salmon (サーモン, samon; さけ, sake), tuna (まぐろ, maguro) Very commonly in soup broths, food flavorings, seasonings, and toppings. Ask extensively about ingredients as it’s often hidden and unacknowledged even by vendors. ● Found in: Ramen , onigiri, bento boxes, some salads and dressings, certain crackers, appetizers served at izakayas, fish cakes , and satuées.

Crustacean shellfish (貝類, kairui; 甲殻類, kokakurui) Examples: crab (蟹, かに; kani) / shrimp (海老, えび; ebi) Similar to fish, crustacean shellfish is found in flavoring from snacks to seasonings and toppings. ● Found in: hot pot , fish cakes , kappa ebisen and other flavored chips and crackers

Tree nuts (木の実, kinomi) Examples: Almonds (アーモンド, amon-doh) / pecans (ピカン, pi-kan) and Peanuts (落花生, らっかせい; rakkasei or ピーナッツ, piinattsu). Nut allergies seem to be much more common and even a norm to some level in the west. However, it’s still on the rare side to come across a Japanese person with peanut or other nut allergies. Be extra cautious of crushed nuts as salad toppings, or to the recent boom of almond milk in Japan. ● Found in: Essential and cooking oils, raw; nut oils may be found in certain beauty products, such as shampoos, soaps and conditioners.

Sesame (ごま; goma) Sesame is a very common decorative or hidden flavor. Sesame oil is used in majority of the deep fried and pan fried Japanese and Chinese dishes as well as an alternative oil to canola, olive, etc. Dumplings, fried rice sautéed vegetables are often cooked with sesame oil. Many dishes, such as salad and sashimi bowls, will be sprinkled with sesame on top for decoration and extra flavor, and often will not be listened on the ingredients on the menu so make sure to ask about it before your dish comes out with a surprise. Sesame, especially black, is often an ingredient in desserts such as red bean paste anman (steamed dumpling) and regional soft serve ice cream. ● Found in: sesame oil, salad dressings and toppings, rice bowl and noodle toppings, dipping sauces for shabu shabu or nabé, black sesame ice cream and other sweet dessert dishes. Wheat (小麦, こむぎ; komugi) Wheat is another common ingredient with very limited alternatives to it in Japan at this point. Soba noodles, made of buckwheat, despite its name is a delicious and safe bet, but take caution: those that are not made with 100% buckwheat may include wheat in them. Gluten free is not common and most dishes have wheat in them, from noodles to fried dishes. As wheat is also an ingredient in soy sauce, read below to find out more about the use of soy sauce in Japan. ● Found in: (mugi) tea, fried dishes which use panko, tempura , gyoza , dumplings, imitation crab, soy, ponzu, teriyaki (taré), and eel sauces

Soybeans (大豆, だいず; daizu) Soy, especially soy sauce, is found a majority of flavorings as Japan’s staple. Avoid soup broths such as ramen , udon , and sometimes even curry . Yakisoba sauce, tonkatsu sauce, and other dipping sauces may also have soy sauce so be sure to ask for alternatives, or plain. Vegetables, egg, and meat are sometimes boiled in flavoring with soy sauce included. Chicken skewers ( yakitori ) and other grilled food options come either salted or with sauce called taré which includes soy so make sure to always choose salt. ● Found in: Edamame, tofu , natto, miso, yuba, okara, kinako, red bean paste, rice crackers, inari-zushi, tamago-yaki (egg omelette), boiled eggs (with the dashi packet) and vegetables, onigiri, pickled vegetables (tsukemono), dango, soy sauce, soy milk, soy yogurt, teriyaki (taré) and eel sauce. *Note that emulsifiers (乳化剤) may contain soy as well; typically these will be labeled as "乳化剤、大豆由来" (Emulsifier, soy derived).

(e.g. Milk & Dairy, pastas, ramen , udon , breads, imitation crab, fish cakes , wheat-based snacks, seasonings such as soy sauce) Although celiac disease and wheat allergies aren’t common among the Japanese, there is a “Gluten-Free” trend similar to the west. There are some cafés advertising gluten-free menus as well. Check extensively as many dishes are still prepared in mixed-allergen environments.

Special Concerns

Be extra cautious when going to or buying food at the locations listed below: Night markets and street food: there are no ingredients lists, many are mom and pop owned stands or run by staff with little knowledge of every single item on the menu. Night market stands also use large, wide pan tables where all the ingredients are cooked and mixed without divisions. Avoid eating that may have hidden ingredients, or ask using an allergy card, but still take personal caution even if the vendor will tell you that it’s safe to eat. Cross-contamination: the above scenario makes it clear that cross-contamination is highly likely, in street food as well as restaurants. Many of the older ramen shops and izakayas cook in small areas with barely any separate uses between kitchenware. Be sure to ask about possibilities of cross contamination, and to let the shop know if using the same cooking ware and pans/bowls would affect your health . Note that while nut oils are typically not used to deep-fry or fry food in Japan, it is better to ask up front. Ryokan and hotels with food service: Having a ryokan experience where food is brought to your room is a dream for many who travel to Japan. It can be done, and most lodgings are quite good with food allergies, but be sure to check with the ryokan or booking agent before you make the reservation to see they can accommodate for dietary restrictions. Have the server also explain every dish in front of you at the time of service to ensure all safety. Many hotels also have buffets and room service that may not be so cautious about cross-contamination and allergies. Depending on your sensitivity, always be sure to contact lodging before the trip to make sure they are able to accommodate all needs, or be on the safe side by bringing some easy-to-cook meals with you on the road. Hidden flavorings: As mentioned below many key allergens, hidden flavorings are everywhere. Japan is a land that prides itself on the attention to flavor, from dashi to umami. With any dishes that look like it has a lot of ingredients mixed in (such as fish cakes ), or any dipping sauces and broths, it’s better to assume there are hidden flavorings from soy, fish, sesame, or any other. Double check with staff about the hidden ingredients. If they are not 100% certain and cannot get an answer, it’s best to avoid the dish. Bento boxes: Bento boxes are another part of the memorable experiences while in Japan. They are sold in convenient stores, around town, and at train stations as eki-ben (station bento , designed to be eaten on train lines with tray tables such as the Shinkansen). Bentos most commonly have a little bite of everything, from salmon to boiled vegetables, pickled vegetables, rice, and meat. As bentos tend to be, they are enhanced in flavor with ingredients such as sugar, soy and may contain fish stock as well. If this would be if concern, stick to the simpler bentos such as an onigiri set or rice bowl.

How to Inform of Any Food Allergies and Ask About Ingredients

Insider Tip: Order International Allergy Cards Before Departure The best way to assure correct communication is to create and carry around an international allergy card. This can be created on sites such as www.foodallergy.org. Cards for food and drug allergies, dietary restrictions, intolerances such as Gluten and Lactose, and medical emergencies can be easily ordered online in any languages needed. Choose to have cards printed in Japanese and English, or any other desired languages. These cards allow communication with food service and medical personnel quickly, especially in times of impeding response needs. It is also important to know what to do in case of an emergency, when asking for help from persons nearby may not be the most accessible option. Insider Tip: Be Aware of Hidden Ingredients Dietary restrictions (e.g. Veganism, religious reasons) are still commonly misunderstood in Japan. Animal products can be hidden in flavorings or seasonings without thorough examination and communication by food services. As a tip from longtime foreign residents of Japan, it can be of favor to simply imply restrictions as allergies. By doing so, food services are more likely to do a thorough check of all ingredients in their dishes.

If in need of medical assistance, immediately call 119 for an ambulance. Have the address or landmark to state immediately, and be ready to provide as much information as possible such as: name, gender, age, and the reason for immediate medical assistance. While ambulances are generally free and medical costs reasonable, it is very wise and important to purchase travel insurance that includes medical needs in case of such emergencies and unforeseen hospital visits. Insider Tip: Be Cautious of Japan’s Bystander Effect Although in no relation to the true kind and hospitable spirit of Japanese citizens, there is a chance of the bystander effect during any emergency situation. Do not be shocked if citizens walk by even in times of medical emergencies, because it is a cultural norm and unspoken rule to avoid situations because helpers must take full responsibility of the people in need of help until the situation is resolved.

As of April 2019, there is an app available in English called "Payke" which allows you to scan barcodes on packages in Japan and receive food ingredients and other details in English.

Disclaimer: Although every effort has been taken to ensure accuracy, the information provided on this page is given in good faith and is not meant to substitute for good medical advice provided by a medical professional prior to travel.

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Boutique Japan

Traveling to Japan with Food Allergies and Dietary Restrictions

Japanese cuisine is a huge reason so many of our travelers visit Japan, but what about traveling through the country if you have serious dietary restrictions or food allergies?

Japanese food is astoundingly varied and overwhelmingly healthy, but traveling around Japan with special dietary requirements — whether you’re vegan, have celiac disease, or adhere to a kosher or halal diet — is no easy feat.

The good news is that it’s definitely possible, with proper advance planning. To help you get more out of your trip we’ve put together this introduction to exploring Japan if you have unique dietary needs.

Originally written in 2016, this post was updated and republished on Dec. 20, 2022.

cold soba or zaru soba in japan

Dietary Restrictions Are Not Always Accommodated in Japan

Let’s get the bad news out of the way first.

Apart from the challenge of looking out for ingredients you may not be familiar with (and the fact that you probably don’t speak or read Japanese ), one of the main obstacles you can expect to face as you travel around Japan is that dietary needs are simply not always catered to.

If you’re from the US or Australia, or any other country where dietary restrictions are common, this may come as a surprise.

But it’s true: Unfortunately, special dietary requirements – even serious food allergies – will not always be accommodated in Japan.

(If you’re accustomed to having your dietary needs catered to wherever you go, it can be hard to wrap your mind around this.)

One of the main reasons for this is that food allergies and dietary restrictions are not widely discussed in Japan.

In Japan, it is far less common for people to have or voice special dietary needs. Because of this, fewer people are familiar with special diets that may be common in your home country (for example, eating vegan or gluten-free).

In cities like Los Angeles and Sydney, if you inform your server that you don’t eat gluten or animal products, chances are that your message will come across loud and clear, and you’ll receive guidance on which options you can safely eat.

But while awareness of dietary requirements has increased in recent years, particularly in cities like Tokyo and Kyoto, it’s far from common knowledge in Japan, and even less understood in rural parts of the country.

vegetables outside a traditional wooden restaurant in kyoto, japan

Explaining Your Dietary Needs in Japan

As you explore Japan, you may find yourself in the position of having to explain your dietary requirements more often, and in more detail, than you’re used to.

Simply stating that you have celiac disease, or don’t consume animal products, likely won’t suffice. A greater degree of explanation is required to clearly convey specifically what you can and cannot eat or drink.

If you don’t speak Japanese, this can be a challenge, and it’s helpful to learn some key words and phrases to help you along the way.

Our free digital Japanese phrasebook includes useful general words and phrases, such as “ I can’t eat ___ ” and “ I’m allergic to ___ “:

Boutique Japan Tiny Phrasebook with translations for travelers with dietary restrictions

Allergens Commonly Found in Japanese Foods

To help fill in the blanks, it’s a good idea to become acquainted with some of the foods and ingredients you may need to avoid during your Japan trip.

Ubiquitous Japanese Ingredients: Dashi and Soy Sauce

The two most common Japanese ingredients that come up as potential issues for our travelers are dashi and shoyu (soy sauce).

Dashi (出し or だし) and soy sauce (醤油 or しょうゆ) are found throughout Japanese cuisine, and avoiding them requires special effort.

Dashi stock, which is made from kombu (kelp) and katsuobushi (bonito) fish flakes, is particularly problematic for vegans and strict vegetarians.

Even if you’ve never heard of dashi, chances are you’ve consumed it, as it’s found in countless Japanese dishes, including miso soup.

As for soy sauce, travelers with celiac disease know all too well that most soy sauce contains wheat, and is thus off the table.

healthy japanese food including rice, miso shiru (soup) and vegetables

7 Common Food Allergens in Japanese

Along with dashi and shoyu, here is a short list of other common allergens you can expect to encounter in Japan.

Learning the Japanese translations of your allergens can go a long way toward helping you find packaged foods and menu items that may be safe for you to eat.

If you have time to practice before your trip, it can also be helpful to learn the pronunciation of your allergens, though showing the written words in Japanese also comes in handy when you’re unsure whether or not an ingredient will be present in your meal.

Japanese Etiquette and the Importance of Providing Advance Notice

Advance notice may not be possible if you’re grabbing a meal on the fly. But for special meals and ryokans (Japanese-style inns), it’s essential that you voice your dietary needs at the time of booking.

As explained in our article on sushi etiquette , “ If you have any special dietary requests, you need to inform the sushi shop at the time of making reservations – not on the day of your meal. ”

This rule applies not only to sushi, but also to other restaurants, izakayas , and ryokans.

Typically these establishments plan their menus in advance, with great care. By explaining your needs when you make the reservation, you are giving them the opportunity to accommodate your needs.

Be aware that because ingredients such as dashi and soy sauce are fundamental to so much of Japanese cuisine, not all restaurants or ryokans are able to alter their menus to fully exclude them.

If your request is declined, it may be that dashi or soy sauce (or another “problem” ingredient) is simply an inextricable part of the menu, and cannot be excluded or substituted for another.

Despite the challenges, an increasing number of restaurants, izakayas , and ryokans are happy and willing to do their best to accommodate a variety of dietary needs.

It’s true that there is a possibility your reservation may be declined if the chef feels they can’t properly accommodate your request. On the other hand, failing to inform them would be extremely inconsiderate, and a major etiquette faux pas .

preparing ramen noodles at a ramenya in tokyo, japan

Additional Resources

Traveling through Japan with dietary restrictions is harder than most people expect, but most travelers will agree it’s worth the effort. To help you on your trip, here are some additional culinary resources.

Visiting Japan with Celiac Disease

If you have celiac disease, by far the best resource we’ve seen is The Essential Gluten Free Guide to Japan , by the insightful Jodi Ettenberg of Legal Nomads.

Legal Nomads also offers an indispensable Gluten Free Restaurant Card in Japanese .

Traveling Through Japan as a Vegan or Vegetarian

It’s quite possible to enjoy delicious meals and find vegan and vegetarian restaurants, particularly in urban centers like Tokyo and Kyoto.

However, Japan’s deep connection to the sea means that many of its most well-known dishes contain seafood. Ingredients like dashi (see above) and bonito (fish flakes) are common Japanese staples.

While not necessarily “foolproof,” one wonderful type of cuisine to seek out is shojin ryori (traditional Buddhist food). A typical shojin ryori meal is virtually certain to be vegetarian, though it’s not always strictly vegan.

If you need a quick solution on the go, convenience stores (such as 7-11, Family Mart, and Lawson) typically carry a variety of prepared foods and packaged snacks, many of which may suit your dietary needs.

Helpful Links

To complement our tips above, here are some helpful links for travelers who eat vegetarian, vegan, kosher, and halal:

  • Health Food, Vegetarian & Vegan Restaurants in Japan
  • How To Eat Like A Buddhist Monk
  • Kyoto’s Best Vegetarian Restaurants
  • A list of kosher foods, and their Japanese names
  • Halal Food in Japan (Basics for Muslim Travelers in Japan)

We hope this introduction to traveling around Japan with dietary requirements helps you prepare for, and better enjoy, your trip to Japan!

Looking for Authentic Japanese Culinary Experiences?

Every traveler (and trip!) has a unique blend of bucket-list experiences, must-try foods, and destinations to explore. We have resources that can help you plan a once-in-a-lifetime trip – so you can enjoy Japan’s extraordinarily varied and delicious cuisine. 

Start by checking out our sample travel itineraries and learning about our process of crafting customized trips for travelers seeking unique, authentic experiences.

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travelling to japan with a seafood allergy

I am travelling to japan next year and would like advice on getting the most out of the Japanese experience with a shellfish allergy. I am anaphylactic but can eat at Japanese restaurants in Australia if I am careful to avoid shellfish. Will the same generally apply when actually in japan? I appreciate any and all help and advice :)

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Even if you don’t see seafood in your dish chances are they are in your food. This is because in Japan the food is base on dashi (and dashi have fish and sometimes shellfish) so it is like culantro and garlic in many latin american food. Also it is not standard to avoid cross contamination as everything can be fried in the same oil or grill in the same surface. With that say....I starved some times because most places will not have anything safe to eat. McDonalds cook its shrimp burgers near the regular ones, so the only safe thing on the menu are their french fries. At the Japanese burger chain MOS you can have burgers but not french fries as they fry shrimp on the same oil.

Vegetarian food is your best bet! Curry houses are fine, and any Japanese zen Shojin ryori cuisine should be safe. Be careful with desserts I love dango but you should not eat the salty/soy ones as they can contain dashi (dashi has always seafood), the sweet flavors are fine.

Beware of steak houses, I had a reaction after having lunch at one (I could controlled it with 2 Benadryl) they cook the meat and shellfish in the same surfaces and even if you ask them to be extra careful as my guide did, it just didn’t worked. Foods you should not eat are: miso soup,fried food, okonomiyaki, about street foods (yakitori can have shellfish on the sauce, little round things some times are baby octopus which I am sure taste delicious.)

Go to a convenience store or a supermarket and get basic sandwich meat, cheese and regular bread (don’t get fancy with ingredients you don’t know it can cost you) and prepare some sandwiches to take with you in case you can’t find anything to eat.

Please do tons of research about the area you are going to, contact your hotel if is small to make them aware, tell your guides, look in happycow.com for vegetarian restaurants in the area you’ll be staying on. Japan is a lovely country and Japanese people are extremely nice.

travelling to japan with a seafood allergy

Help us out - How do you handle this in Australia?

Japanese soups are out, as is sushi.

You can always find string cheese and fruit juice at convenience stores. Many convenience stores also have vegetable sticks, cucumbers, and hard-boiled eggs. Some of their salads and sandwiches include fish. Nothing is labeled in English.

This topic has been closed to new posts due to inactivity.

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travelling to japan with a seafood allergy

Study Abroad

How to handle a fish allergy in japan.

Shelfish Restaurant in Japan!

Of all the different gaijin (foreigner) moments that I faced in Japan there was one in particular which stayed with me. Traveling around Japan with a fish allergy wasn’t exactly the easiest thing I have ever done, but it didn’t turn out to be as difficult as it could have been. Japan uses fish in most of their recipes, and it’s extremely common to find fish hidden in some of the dishes. A lot of the fish look totally different than ours, and you wouldn’t even expect a certain dish to contain the fish it does. I had to be extremely careful with my choices in food while out to eat, and luckily I had the support system around to help with that.

My professor as well as my Teaching Assistant knew Japanese, and so they would identify certain ingredients. Throughout our first week or so I had learned what usually contains fish, and what was a safety net for me. Unfortunately, I was not able to play around with tons of new foreign foods, but I was able to eat quite a lot more than I thought. I always carried my epi pen with me, and I would recommend that anyone else with this issue do so as well. I felt ten times better knowing that if I did have an allergic reaction, I would be okay. I ran into 3 different cases where I almost ate fish, but I realized it before I took the next step due to the knowledge I had been taught by my professors.

Being in a country where the food is amazing, and allergies are basically unheard of was difficult for me. There were so many things I would have loved to try, but I just couldn’t. At times I was upset because everyone was being adventurous with the food, and I would be stuck with a few things I knew, but then I realized that there were tons of foods I loved. Once I found my favorites I would still try new things, but I would also eat my favorites at different places because in Japan spices are different everywhere you go. I found my love for Rice, Seaweed, and Miso soup in this beautiful country. I bought a rice cooker when I arrived back to the United States, and even a ton of Japanese ingredients! I found my love for interesting things such as Sweet Potato, Sesame, and Grape ice cream.

Traveling with an allergy is not awesome, but it doesn’t have to be as big of an issue as it could be. Carry your epi pen, bring some Benadryl, and be prepared for a reaction, but also be smart. It’s okay to try new things, but be aware of how to say the ingredient/ food you are allergic to in their language. Learn how to ask ahead of time, and you won’t face as many obstacles. Let go of your worries, and put yourself out there! Eat the weird stuff, but be aware of the common ingredients that change from culture to culture.

Categories: Asia, Japan, World Languages and Literature, Global and International Studies, Food, Allergies, Self care, Diet/Eating schedule, Recipes, Restaurant culture, Summer I.

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Common Food Allergens in Japan and How to Spot Them

  • May 04, 2021
  • Japanese food

Common Food Allergens in Japan and How to Spot Them

For anyone with allergies shopping for food (especially food with foreign packaging) can be difficult. We provide English translations for all the items we include in our Care Packages, but want to make sure that you are informed as possible as you continue to explore the vast world of Japanese cuisine. 

The most common allergens to watch out for in Japanese food are:

  • Fish and shellfish - can be found in broths and even pastries.
  • Soy - An essential ingredient in soy sauce, you may also find soy in soups, marinades and sauces. 
  • Wheat - Found in the majority of Japanese noodles, gluten can also be found in soy sauce and grain teas such as mugicha (barley tea). 

Common Food Allergens in Japan and How to Spot Them

In Japan, the Ministry of Agriculture, Forestry, and Fishery (MAFF) has created a legal requirement that all food manufacturers must indicate the following seven foods if they are included as an ingredient: 

  • Buckwheat (蕎麦/そば)
  • Egg (卵,  たまご)
  • Peanuts (落花生/ピーナッツ)
  • Shrimp (エビ)

In addition to these seven ingredients, MAFF has also created a list of twenty ingredients that they recommend (not require) to be highlighted on product labels.

Here is a full list of the 27 allergens (the 7 required allergens are highlighted in red) commonly listed on Japanese foods:

These allergens can sometimes be found listed on packages in a separate box and can be identified with the Japanese: " 本製品のアレルギー物質 " (Allergens in this product)

Learn more about how to read   nutrition labels in Japan .

Miriam Weiss

12 Responses

Kokoro Care Packages

Kokoro Care Packages

August 16, 2023

Hi Rebecca! Thank you for your question. Without knowing the exact ingredients of these products it would be hard for us to even guess but all our snacks and sweets are all natural and may be worth giving a try!

Rebecca

Hey I’ve noticed when my friends have brought me back Japanese sweet treats, I have an allergic reaction to them. One example is a grape juice drink, and another time my friend brought back candies from a souvenir shop from Fuji. both caused me to break out in hives. it seems to be only sweet snacks. any idea on what it could be?

July 15, 2023

Hi Sharon! Thank you for your question and we hope your son has a wonderful trip to Japan. It may make sense for him to carry a card that says “I have a severe allergy to peanuts. Does this contain peanuts?" which we have translated into Japanese for you: 私は重度のピーナッツのアレルギーがあります. ピーナッツは入っていますか?Let us know if there’s anything else we can do to help!

Sharon

My son has a severe peanut allergy- and does carry an epipen but will be travelling allow, can you give any advice on how to check if a product is safe to eat in a restaurant/shop , how do you say I have a severe peanut allergy, does this contain peanuts ? Thankyou so much.

April 18, 2023

Hi Galit! Thank you for your question. We’re not entirely familiar with those letters but it’s possible they may be the manufacturer’s identification (ID) code that corresponds to a specific production facility. Hope this helps!

Galit

we noticed the letters + B E K on expiry date labels or sometimes + Y O K. can you please advise what this means?

March 19, 2023

Hi Sely! Thank you for your comment. As with traveling anywhere with allergies, it’s best to be prepared. It may make sense to let people know “my daughter has an allergy to peanuts, treenuts and sesame. And my son has an allergy to salmon” which we have translated into Japanese for you: “娘は落花生、木の実、ごまにアレルギーがあります。息子はサーモンにアレルギーがあります。” Enjoy your trip to Japan and let us know if we can be of help!

Sely

Hi, my daughter has a Anaphylactic allergy to peanuts, treenuts and sesame. And my son has an allergy to salmon. We will be carrying an Epipen during our travels In Japan. As you can imagine I am very nervous about dining around in Tokyo where we will be mainly be travelling. Do you think it would be difficult and risky to eat in Japan safely? I am particularly concerned about the sesame content in Japanese cuisine. Any advice would be greatly appreciated.

July 24, 2022

Thank you for your Holly! We’re excited about your trip to Japan and hope our Care Packages can bring you a taste of what’s to come!As with traveling anywhere with allergies, it’s best to be prepared. It may make sense to carry a card that says “I have a severe allergy to nuts (peanuts in particular) and shellfish.” which we have translated into Japanese for you: 私は重度のナッツ(特にピーナッツ)と甲殻類のアレルギーがあります。Enjoy your trip to Japan and let us know if we can be of help!

Holly Churchman

Holly Churchman

I am looking at travelling to Tokyo next year. I carry epipens and have a severe allergy to nuts (peanuts in particular) and shellfish. I can quite happily eat other fish though e.g. salmon, tuna etc. Do you think it would be too difficult to eat safely in Tokyo? I’m trying to do some research around this. Any help would be greatly appreciated!

May 07, 2021

Thank you for your comment gregory miyata. MSG isn’t one of the allergens required or recommended to be listed by the MAFF but is one we ensure is not in any of our products

gregory miyata

gregory miyata

You omitted one very common seasoning that most Japanese foods contain—-MSG…monosodium glutamate. My mom used it all the time when growing up. Sad to say, our daughter has an allergy to it as it gives her migraine headaches for a day…and I hear many younger generation of kids also suffer from that allergy

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Travelling in Japan with a severe allergy to fish and nuts - Tokyo Forum

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' class=

I have a severe allergy to all fish, shellfish and nuts. I've travelled abroad with the allergy many times before and know the drill - get the right insurance, take my epipens, use a translation card.

- Have other people with allergies travelled in Japan, how was your experience?

- Any restaurant recommendations? ( Tokyo , Osaka , Kyoto )

- Any particularly ingredients or foods to be aware of? (for example, I'm aware dashi is a common stock that contains tuna)

' class=

You may find this useful:

http://www.fukushihoken.metro.tokyo.jp/shokuhin/allergy/files/allergy_sheet(English_French_Spanish).pdf

travelling to japan with a seafood allergy

I have a severe allergy to Fish. I am curious if you have traveled yet and if you have any recommendations for me. I will be there in June. I have two epipens and Benedryl that I will carry with me.

We bought a lot of sushi take out food from Aeon supermarket and similar places, and also from the station takeaways. He mostly stuck to plain rice, and sushi - where he could see what was in the food as much as possible - and avoided noodle dishes and anything with broth in it. We did have the writtten down words in Japanese for peanuts/nuts with us at all times and tried to check where we saw ingredients printed on a packet. We found people helpful and understanding whenever we asked questions about the food.

We didn't eat in restaurants, apart from once or twice, mainly due to our concerns about hidden allergens, but also because we were too busy sightseeing (and it was too hot in July/August to want to eat much). He did eat in one of the restaurants on the top floor of Luminere Est in Shinjuku where the waiter knew all about allergies and was really helpful - if I can find the name of it, I'll post again.

I'm a vegetarian, so between my son's allergies and my dietary choices, we were pretty much resigned to not eating out before our visit, but we didn't starve and are going to Japan again this summer!

With regards to ingredients of snack food such as green tea KitKats - my son googled the ingredients, found he could eat them, and did so - a lot!

We also checked with Japanese customs that we could take all our medication with us without special documentation and took a letter from the GP and copies of prescriptions.

I'm sure you'll have a great trip.

Further to my last post: My son ate at 'Smile' burger place on the 7th floor of Lumine Est (which is basically a really nice 'food court' area, which seems very popular in the evening). It's not exactly a high-end restaurant but made a change from eating in and the waiter was really knowledgeable about allergies. He'd have gone again if we'd had the time!

' class=

One of the big problems you will have with a severe allergy is cross contamination. Even if you explain carefully, you need to make it really clear. (really really clear) For example, they might cook a vegeterian (fish/nut free) dish for you on the same grill as everything else and then add bonito flakes before you can say "arrrgh", and then chop up the pork/shrimp/squid okonomiyaki with the same utensils as your "plain" vege/no-fish version.

(The above example comes from this week, after cafefully explaining and asking for a vegeterian option. Fortunately the bonito was not an allergy issue and while there were some anguished facial expressions, also some pragmatism based on some of our earlier meals. It was delicious.)

In your case or someone else with a potential severe reaction, I would not have even have suggested that particular restaurant as an option because of the common cooking surface.

It was pretty heart-breaking for me to see all this wonderful food everywhere we went and not be able to eat it. However, as my vegetarianism is a matter of personal preference, a couple of times I ate out with my allergy-free younger son. On one occcasion, I wasn't completely sure my delicious noodles didn't have a fishy element but it wasn't an issue for me because I'm not allergic, but for someone with allergies, it could have been a very different matter.

We knew that we would have difficulties eating out before we went, so we focused on everything else - the festivals, wonderful country-side, the culture, the shopping - we all loved our visit so much that we are going again this year!

Staying somewhere with cooking facilities is probably the best option so that self-catering is possible.

Incidentally, the Japan Times is a good resource for travelers in things like weather or stuff that might impact travel. Lots of hotels will hand out the Japan Times for free, but it also free on the web.

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travelling to japan with a seafood allergy

Mayo Clinic

Shellfish allergy

S hellfish allergy is an atypical response by the body's immune system to proteins in certain marine animals. Marine animals in the shellfish category include crustaceans and mollusks. Examples are shrimp, crabs, lobster, squid, oysters, scallops and snails.

Shellfish is a common food allergy. Some people with shellfish allergy react to all shellfish, while others react to only certain kinds. Reactions range from mild symptoms -- such as hives or a stuffy nose -- to severe and even life-threatening.

If you think you have shellfish allergy, talk to your health care provider. Tests can help confirm the allergy so you can take steps to avoid future reactions.

Shellfish allergy symptoms generally start within minutes to an hour after eating or having contact with shellfish. They may include:

  • Itchy, irritated skin
  • Nasal stuffiness (congestion)
  • Swelling of the lips, face, tongue and throat, or other parts of the body
  • Wheezing or trouble breathing
  • Coughing and choking or a tight feeling in the throat
  • Belly (abdominal) pain, diarrhea, nausea or vomiting
  • Dizziness, lightheadedness or fainting

Anaphylaxis

Allergies can cause a severe, potentially life-threatening allergic reaction known as anaphylaxis. It can occur within seconds to minutes after exposure to something you're allergic to -- and worsens quickly.

An anaphylactic reaction to shellfish is a medical emergency. Anaphylaxis requires immediate treatment with an epinephrine (adrenaline) injection and a follow-up trip to the emergency room. If anaphylaxis isn't treated right away, it can be fatal.

Anaphylaxis causes the immune system to release a flood of chemicals that can cause you to go into shock. Signs and symptoms of anaphylaxis include:

  • A swollen throat or tongue or a tightness in the throat (airway constriction) that makes it difficult for you to breathe
  • Coughing, choking or wheezing with trouble breathing
  • Shock, with a severe drop in your blood pressure and a rapid or weak pulse
  • Severe skin rash, hives, itching or swelling
  • Nausea, vomiting or diarrhea

When to see a doctor

Seek emergency treatment if you develop signs or symptoms of anaphylaxis.

See a health care provider or allergy specialist if you have food allergy symptoms shortly after eating.

All food allergies are caused by an immune system overreaction. Your immune system identifies a harmless substance as being harmful. This substance is called an allergen. In shellfish allergy, your immune system mistakenly identifies a certain protein in shellfish as harmful. Your immune system is how your body protects itself, so it produces immunoglobulin E (IgE) antibodies to protect against this allergen. The next time you come in contact with the shellfish protein, these antibodies signal your immune system to release chemicals such as histamine into your bloodstream. This causes a reaction that leads to the symptoms of an allergic reaction.

Types of shellfish

There are several types of shellfish, each containing different proteins:

  • Crustaceans include crabs, lobster, crayfish, shrimp and prawn
  • Mollusks include squid, octopus, mussels, snails, clams, oysters, abalone and scallops

An allergy to crustaceans is the most common type. Some people are allergic to only one type of shellfish but can eat others. Other people with shellfish allergy must avoid all shellfish.

An allergy to fish -- such as salmon, tuna or catfish -- is a different seafood allergy from an allergy to shellfish. Some people who are allergic to shellfish may still be able to eat fish, or they could be allergic to both. Your health care provider can help you determine what is safe to eat.

Risk factors

You're at increased risk of developing shellfish allergy if allergies of any type are common in your family.

Though people of any age can develop shellfish allergy, it's more common in adults. In fact, shellfish allergy is the most common food allergy in adults. Among adults, shellfish allergy is more common in women. Among children, shellfish allergy is more common in boys.

Complications

In severe cases, shellfish allergy can lead to anaphylaxis, a dangerous allergic reaction that can be life-threatening.

When you have shellfish allergy, you may be at increased risk of anaphylaxis if you have:

  • Allergic reactions to very small amounts of shellfish (extreme sensitivity)
  • History of food-induced anaphylaxis
  • Strong family history of allergy

Anaphylaxis is treated with an emergency injection of epinephrine (adrenaline). If you are at risk of having a severe allergic reaction to shellfish, you always should carry injectable epinephrine (Auvi-Q, EpiPen, others).

If you have shellfish allergy, the only way to avoid an allergic reaction is to avoid all shellfish and products that contain shellfish. Even trace amounts of shellfish can cause a severe reaction in some people.

Avoiding shellfish

  • Be cautious when dining out. When dining at restaurants, always check to make sure that the pan, oil or utensils used for shellfish aren't also used to prepare other foods, creating cross-contamination. It might be necessary to avoid eating at seafood restaurants, where there's a high risk of cross-contamination.

Read labels. Cross-contamination can occur in stores where other food is processed or displayed near shellfish and during manufacturing. Shellfish may be in fish stock or seafood flavoring. Read food labels carefully.

Shellfish is not usually a hidden ingredient. Companies are required to label any product that contains crustacean shellfish or certain other foods that often cause allergic reactions. However, these regulations don't apply to mollusks.

  • Keep your distance. You may need to completely avoid places where shellfish are prepared or processed. Some people react after touching shellfish or inhaling steam from cooking shellfish.

Be prepared

If you have shellfish allergy, talk with your health care provider about carrying emergency epinephrine and how to use it.

Consider wearing a medical alert bracelet or necklace that lets others know you have a food allergy.

Iodine or radiocontrast dye

One thing you don't need to worry about is if you'll also be allergic to iodine or radiocontrast material that's used in some imaging tests. Even though shellfish contain small amounts of iodine, shellfish allergy is unrelated to the reactions some people have to radiocontrast material or iodine.

To find out if you have shellfish allergy, your health care provider will ask about your symptoms and do a physical exam to find or rule out other medical problems.

A history of allergic reactions shortly after exposure to shellfish can be a sign of shellfish allergy. But the symptoms could also be caused by something else, such as food poisoning.

Allergy testing is the only sure way to tell what's causing your symptoms, so your provider may recommend one or both of these tests:

  • Skin prick test. Small amounts of the proteins found in shellfish are pricked into skin on your arm or upper back. You're then watched for an allergic reaction. If you're allergic, you'll develop a raised bump (hive) at the test site on your skin. This typically takes about 15 to 20 minutes. Allergy specialists usually are best equipped to perform allergy skin tests.
  • Blood test. A blood sample is sent to a lab to measure your immune system's response to a specific allergen. This test measures your immune system's response to shellfish proteins by measuring the amount of allergy-causing antibodies in your bloodstream, known as immunoglobulin E (IgE) antibodies.

Medically supervised food challenges can be performed if the diagnosis still isn't clear after allergy testing.

The only sure way to prevent an allergic reaction to shellfish is to avoid shellfish. But despite your best efforts, you may come into contact with shellfish.

If you have a severe allergic reaction to shellfish (anaphylaxis), you'll likely need an emergency injection of epinephrine (adrenaline). If you're at risk of anaphylaxis to shellfish, your health care provider can give you a prescription in advance and explain how and when to give the injection. Regularly check the expiration date on the packaging to make sure it's current.

Carry injectable epinephrine (Auvi-Q, EpiPen, others) with you at all times. Epinephrine is typically given at the first sign of an allergic reaction. A second dose may be needed if symptoms recur. After you use epinephrine, seek emergency medical care, even if you start to feel better.

Preparing for an appointment

You're likely to start by seeing your family health care provider. Or you may be referred directly to an allergy specialist.

What you can do

Prepare for your appointment by making a list of:

  • Symptoms, including any that may seem unrelated to an allergy
  • Family history of allergies and asthma, including specific types of allergies if you know them
  • Medications, vitamins, herbs or other supplements you're taking, and the dosages
  • Questions to ask your health care provider

Questions related to shellfish allergy include:

  • Are my symptoms most likely due to an allergy?
  • Will I need any allergy tests?
  • Should I see an allergist?
  • Do I need to carry epinephrine?
  • Are there brochures or other educational materials I can have? What websites do you recommend?

Don't hesitate to ask other questions, as well.

What to expect from your doctor

Your health care provider may ask you questions, such as:

  • What symptoms are you having? How severe are they?
  • When did you notice your symptoms?
  • Have you reacted to shellfish in the past?
  • What kind of shellfish did you eat?
  • How soon after eating shellfish did your symptoms occur?
  • What other foods did you eat during your meal? Don't forget sauces, beverages and side dishes.
  • Did others who dined with you have similar symptoms?
  • Is there a history of allergy in your family?
  • Do you have other allergies, such as hay fever?
  • Do you have asthma or eczema (atopic dermatitis)?

What you can do in the meantime

Avoid eating or touching any type of shellfish while waiting for your appointment.

©2023 Mayo Foundation for Medical Education and Research (MRMER). All rights reserved.

A small area of swelling with surrounding redness (arrow) is typical of a positive skin prick test for allergy.

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Travelling in Japan with food allergies - Tokyo Forum

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' class=

Afternoon Everyone,

First post on Japan forum.

We are a family of 3 and we're thinking of visiting Japan in maybe October/November. We have travelled around the world in our younger days but now we have to consider our 3 year old daughter.

As with most things in life, its never easy, and the only real concern we have is with food for our daughter. She has several allergies including dairy (she's on a dairy free diet so she has only soya based products), a slight wheat intolerance and more concerning a Peanut Allergy (very severe). I know asian food can contain high levels of peanuts and nuts in general but can the same be said for Japanese food? Would i be difficult feeding her a varied diet and avoiding nuts? Any advice is gratefully received.

On a seperate note, how would a Buddha tattoo be received in Japan on a Western person?

My son, too, has the peanut and general nut allergy. Luckily, outside of desserts and some breads (which I doubt you'll get due to the wheat intollerance) nuts/peanuts are not used much in Japanese cuisine. It's still an issue, but not as much as in other parts of Asia.

You can get soy milk fairly easily, and other soy products are very common. And there's always sushi. It might not sound lie an obvious choice, but from a very young age my son liked sushi (especially anything with crab or shrimp).

The trouble we have is in explaining to people about the allergy (and my wife is Japanese and I speak very well).

Thanks for the suggestion.

Yes, its a tricky decision as its one of those issues where you have to be 100% certain that what your feeding her (and indeed yourself) is safe to eat (ingredient wise).

We'd love to see the sights and sounds but want to relax enough to enjoy it too. I suppose you can never be 100% certain in the western world either - hence the peanut warnings on most food items.

Mmmm. tricky...anyone else have any tips?

Thanks again John W

We stuck to sushi and noodles/chicken/rice or western food such as Italian. You just need to be aware and carry the pen.

We often find airlines are the most casual about serving peanuts to everyone.

travelling to japan with a seafood allergy

You might want to stay away from Italian restaurants if your daughter is allergic to wheat and dairy products. Can she eat buckwheat / soba? Some kids are allergic to those products, too. Just be sure to tell the restaurant what your daughter can and can't eat. There should be something on the menu that would fill her tummy. Fruits are absolutely divine!

Tattoos in general are not favorably looked upon. Most hot springs (onsens), public bath houses, and sports gyms have a "No Tattoo" rule. Be sure to cover it up when coming through immigration/customs. You don't want the extra hassle.

How far beyond peanuts is the allergy? Does it extend to sesame seeds and other nuts?

>> Be sure to cover it up when coming through immigration/customs. You don't want the extra hassle.<<

' class=

Well I agree with the other posters that it's probably easier to find what your daughter can eat than to ask the restaurant to make sure that her allergy is accommodated for. It's a foreign concept to them that one person is different and needs special attention. There's a japanese phrase that loosely translates as "the nail that sticks up, gets nailed back down", there's not really a tolerance for not being like everyone else.

That said, I'm going to post a few words and phrases in Japanese (and Romanji) so that you can print them out and show them to the restaurant when you need to.

Japanese: アレルギー性疾患

English: allergic disease*

Romanji: arerugii seishikkan

pronounced: Ah-ray-ru-ghee say-she-kahn (in "Ghee" the "G" is pronounced as in "garden")

*I chose this one because it's so hard to explain, and I think that if you simply said "allergic" it could mean that she'll sneeze, but allergic disease indicates a strong allergic reaction to something.

Japanese: アレルギー

English: allergic

Romanji: arerugii

pronounced: Ah-ray-ru-ghee (in "Ghee" the "G" is pronounced as in "garden")

Japanese: ピーナツ

english: peanuts

Romanji: piinatsu

pronounced: (almost exactly like english)

Japanese: 麩

english: wheat gluten bread

Romanji: fu

pronounced: Foo but the "oo" is very short.

Japanese: 麦粉

english: Wheat flour

romanji: mugiko

pronounced: Moo-ghee-koh

Japanese: 彼女はピーナツアレルギーだ

english: She's allergic to peanuts

romanji: kanojo ha piinatsu arerugii da

pronounced: Kah-noh-joh wah peanuts ah-ray-ru-ghee dah.

Japanese: 彼女はピーナツと麦粉アレルギーだ

english: She's allergic to wheat flour and peanuts.

romanji: kanojo ha piinatsu to mugiko arerugii da

pronounced: Kah-noh-joh wah peanuts toh moo-ghee-koh ah-ray-ru-ghee dah.

Best wishes on your trip!

*Edit it appears taht my kanji didn't post. If you email me at [email protected] I'll forward you the kanji.

Also, it hasn't been mentioned yet that the reason tattoos are frowned upon (or maybe it's compounded by the fact) that the Yakuza (gang members) are generally the only japanese people who wear tattoos.

It's more of a safety issue for their establishment than anything else. They do realize that foreigners have tattoos for other reasons, but rules are rules, if they let all the foreigners in with tattoos than the Yakuza would have every right to complain that they should be allowed in.

I've read an example where they've bended the rules and allowed a foreigner into an onsen (the day spa in Odaiba) on the condition that he hide his tattoo with washcloths while in the facility. He tried it for a bit, didn't like it, felt insulted and asked for his money back (and they gave it to him).

Thanks to everyone who has helped thus far. I have addressed the tattoo subject on a seperate post - thanks.

To the poster who asked about which nuts - we have been adv ised by a dietician to avoid all nuts due to the age of our daughter (she's coming up to 3). Time will tell if she out grows these but we plan to avoid them as best we can for as long as necessary.

Wheat - she's not really allergic more has a intolerance. Too much and she will have a bad flare up of her ezcema. She can have normal bread etc but we do limit her intake.

Milk is a no go, this causes something called rhinitus (apologies for spelling) This causes cold-like symptoms and causes her ezcema to flair.

Soya milk - the only type of milk she can tolerate, Is this widely available?

As with most kids her age she is very fussy eater, are things like boiled potatoes/jacket potatoes, baked beans etc available to buy or served in restaurants?

Many thanks.

Soy milk is available at the supermarkets. Ask for "Toh-nyuu."

You won't find boiled potatoes or baked beans. French fries are available everywhere. You might find baked potatoes, depending on the restaurant.

Be sure to stop by the Convenience Stores (7-11, Lawson's, Family Mart, etc) and see what's available there. That said, a lot of fast food has mayonnaise. Since you're daughter is can't have dairy, be sure to read the fine print.

worthj1970,

Tattoes might be a casual body decoration in many places, but in Japan, it's still not the mainstream designer decor and many public establishments frown upon them. It's the easiest way to identify a Yakuza person. If you want to go to Disneyland, cover it up. (Disney's Japanese website says "No one will tattoes are allowed." The English website asks that tattoes be covered.)

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travelling to japan with a seafood allergy

IMAGES

  1. Quick Guide: Know And Understand Food Allergies In Japan

    travelling to japan with a seafood allergy

  2. Quick Guide: Know And Understand Food Allergies In Japan

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  3. Food Allergies in Japan: How to Read Japanese Food Labels

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  4. How to say “I’m allergic to seafood” in Japanese?

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  5. Pin on Japan

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  6. How to Live With an Allergy to Seafood: 15 Steps (with Pictures)

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COMMENTS

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    Travelers with food allergies can still experience and enjoy Japan, though certain precautions may have to be taken. (The same goes especially for traveling with a soy allergy.) Labelling in Japan: Japanese food labels The food labeling system in Japan has different requirements and only 7 core allergens are required to be labelled.

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    Japanese Etiquette and the Importance of Providing Advance Notice Advance notice may not be possible if you're grabbing a meal on the fly. But for special meals and ryokans (Japanese-style inns), it's essential that you voice your dietary needs at the time of booking.

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    2022/12/20 08:00. Went to Japan with shellfish and meat allergies. Breakfast would usually be onigiri or bread, Onigiri packs have English labels on them. Lunch or dinner would be sushi, sashimi or veggie curry; dango for snacks. There are still lot of food options even with dietary restrictions.

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    Larger packages are preferable, so do some research first. If you have a food allergy, such as a severe one, it can be difficult for you to travel and experiment with new foods. In Australia, there may be a variety of factors contributing to the high rate of food allergies. One study discovered that 9% of one-year-olds in Australia had an

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    Milk (乳) Peanuts (落花生/ピーナッツ) Shrimp (エビ) Wheat (小麦) In addition to these seven ingredients, MAFF has also created a list of twenty ingredients that they recommend (not require) to be highlighted on product labels. Here is a full list of the 27 allergens (the 7 required allergens are highlighted in red) commonly ...

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  17. Allergic friends travel to japan with me. How can I keep them alive

    30 TwinParatrooper • 6 yr. ago You will need a laminated card you can show to someone. Trust me if you just try and explain they will think you are a picky westerner, seen it plenty of times. Also your friend needs to be responsible and make sure he looks at all the ingredients of dishes before eating out.

  18. Travelling in Japan with a severe allergy to fish and nuts

    Asia Japan Kanto Tokyo Prefecture Tokyo Tokyo Travel Forum Browse all 41,135 Tokyo topics » Travelling in Japan with a severe allergy to fish and nuts Watch this Topic Browse forums All Tokyo Prefecture forums Tokyo forum Fintanmcg London, United... Level Contributor 26 posts Travelling in Japan with a severe allergy to fish and nuts 5 years ago

  19. Tips For Traveling In Japan With A Peanut Allergy

    Dr. Peter Storey recommends that allergy sufferers purchase foreign language travel cards that indicate their allergy status. Eli asks readers what is the best way to travel if you have a peanut allergy. What do I need to know? Send your questions to [email protected]. All of Eli's answers are non-committal, and he does not respond to readers.

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