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Not from the USA? Click here for where to buy in the UK | Canada | Australia | Germany | India .

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Sherwoods have been established for over 70 years, a 3rd generation UK company offering a wealth of knowledge in the supply of telescopes, binoculars and associated accessories. As a specialist independent optics supplier, product knowledge and service is to a very high level. They are therefore able to offer more than just an Internet source for discounted binoculars and telescopes. They offer full mail-order facilities including next day delivery on many of the telescopes and binoculars held from stock from some of the leading brands of optics available in the UK.

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nikon she safari monarch 10x36 binoculars

Nikon 10x36 SHE Safari ATB Binoculars with Travel Bag

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Product No Longer Available

Unfortunately Nikon 10x36 SHE Safari ATB Binoculars with Travel Bag is no longer carried by OpticsForYou.You can also explore other items in the Binoculars yourself to try and find the perfect replacement for you!

Product Info for Nikon 10x36 SHE Safari ATB Binoculars with Travel Bag

Purchase your new Nikon 10x36 SHE Safari ATB Binoculars with Travel Bag from Opticsforyou.com today and you will appreciate the easy checkout process, fantastic customer service, Free Shipping policy and information on easily tracking your order .

The new Nikon 10x36 SHE All Terrain ATB Binoculars are 100% waterproof, fog proof and shockproof Binoculars . Nikon has put fully multicoated lenses on the 10x 36 mm She Binoculars for bright, clear images. These Nikon SHE ATB Binoculars have precision aligned optics for extended viewing. Lightweight, these Nikon Binoculars still pack a punch with good eye relief. The 36mm Nikon ATB Binocular features ultra-rugged, rubber-armored , roof-prism design, extended eye relief and central focus for viewing. Waterproof and fogproof Nikon 36mm MonarchATB Binoculars also feature phase-correction, high reflection mirror-coated prisms, fully multicoated lenses and turn-and-slide rubber eyecups.

Nikon 10x36 She Safari ATB Binoculars 8235:

  • Signature canvas shoulder bag
  • Fully multicoated lenses & phase-correction coated prisms
  • Durable and protective, rubber-armored coating
  • Lightweight, slim design
  • Smooth central focus knob
  • Multi-setting click stop eyecups
  • Precision aligned optics
  • Waterproof/fogproof

Package Contents:

  • Leather binocular strap, shoulder bag, binocular lens covers

Binocular Accessories

Vortex Crossfire HD 1400 Laser Rangefinder, 5x21mm, Green/Black, LRF-CF1400

Related Products to Nikon 10x36 SHE Safari ATB Binoculars with Travel Bag

Nikon Monarch HG 10x30 binocular review

The nikon monarch hg 10x30 is a set of small yet high-powered and fully featured binoculars with super-sharp detail.

Nikon Monarch HG 10x30

Digital Camera World Verdict

Very compact yet powerful premium binoculars with an impressively sturdy magnesium alloy build. If space in your kit bag is an issue but you want binos that will deliver razor sharp clarity and bright viewing at a distance, the Nikon Monarch HG 10x30 comes highly recommended. The only thing we are less keen on is the equally premium price; so do shop around before purchasing.

Good magnification and clarity

Solid build quality

Compact construction

Waterproofed and fog proofed

Compact binos but a big pricetag

Why you can trust Digital Camera World Our expert reviewers spend hours testing and comparing products and services so you can choose the best for you. Find out how we test.

Specifications

Key features, build and handling, performance.

Nikon doesn't just make cameras. It also makes these premium Nikon Monarch HG 10x30 binoculars. Although more associated with cameras in the mind of the paying public, Nikon is unsurprisingly world class when it comes to lens technology. For those seeking a small yet powerful and sturdily constructed pair of premium grade binoculars to stash in a jacket pocket or bag when not in use, its Monarch HG series, from which we’ve selected the 10x30 model here could be said to ‘royally’ suit. A slightly higher priced 10x42 option is also available, alongside 8x30 and 8x42 alternatives.

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As with all binoculars, that ‘10x’ figure refers to the magnification factor provided, while the ‘30’ refers to the size of the objective lens in use – here 30mm. Theoretically, the bigger the lens the wider the field of view and also the brighter the view is. For its decidedly compact size, the Nikon Monarch HG 10x30 could be said to deliver a respectably wide field of view. Indeed Nikon states it matches the performance of its own 42mm model, just in a more compact package.

Magnification: 10x Objective diameter:   30mm Field of view at 1000m: 121 metres /362ft Closest focusing distance: 2 metres/ 6.6ft Eye relief: 15.2mm Weight: 450g Dimensions: 119x126x47mm

Nikon Monarch HG 10x30

Feeling comfortable in the hand and with the requisite non-slip rubberised exterior to prevent any fumbling, in the case of the Nikon Monarch HG 10x30, it’s as much about portability and convenience, as it is a class leading optical performance. Part of the central idea here is that this option apes the performance of Nikon’s Monarch HG 42mm diameter version, but in a smaller format. 

We get the extras here we’d expect to find at this price and when considering a pair of binoculars for outdoor use too – namely a degree of water proofing and fog proofing. Also highlighted here – it’s literally emblazoned on the lens barrel – is Nikon’s Field Flattener Lens System, which it claims, in conjunction with the Monarch HG’s 30mm wide field of view, helps maintain sharpness right to the lens’ periphery. The field of view is therefore said to be a match for its 42mm models. Overall, we were well impressed with the clarity provided.

Focusing is intuitively and ergonomically achieved via a large centrally located wheel, with a dioptric adjustment ring provided on the right eyepiece. It requires the eyepiece to first be extended before this ring can be unlocked and adjusted by hand – which is all well and good in avoiding it accidentally being jogged, when hauling the unit in or out of a jacket pocket or rucksack. Bundled in the box along with the strap is a semi hard carry case for added protection when transporting the device, should it be required.

Nikon Monarch HG 10x30

The Nikon Monarch HG 10x30 offers its users both lens and eyecup covers, the former of which simply hang loose from the lenses when the binos are in use, while the latter are detachable, yet can be threaded through the provided neck strap for added security, so they don’t get accidentally left on a rock or a tree stump when out in the wilds.

Whether you’re viewing with or without spectacles, the length of the eye relief is adjustable here, with an anti clockwise twist of the eyecups extending them outwards. The inter-pupillary distance or spacing is also manually adjustable, with the construction featuring a central folding mechanism in order that we can get the binos to better match up with our own eyes. Focusing when panning is simplicity itself, so we don’t lose sight of our visual quarry.

Nikon Monarch HG 10x30

Despite the compact proportions, the view through the Nikon Monarch HG 10x30 is surprisingly crisp and clear. We couldn’t hope for a sharper resolving power. We compared it with a 10x42 Nikon Prostaff 3S binocular we had to test alongside this, and for us the clarity of the Monarch HG 10x30 edges it. The construction here uses extra low dispersion ‘ED’ glass elements that corrects chromatic aberration that can cause colour fringing – something we occasionally noticed between areas of high contrast when alternatively using the Prostaff 3S. Comfort is provided for users of the Nikon Monarch HG 10x30 by a soft-to-the-touch padded neck strap, while the modest 450g weight won’t cause anyone aching limbs during a stroll through the local woods or walk by the river.

There’s no screw thread on the body for attaching the binoculars to a tripod, should one wish to do so, but fortunately an adapter is available as an optional extra. That said, the weight is so manageable here we could use the binos for prolonged periods without feeling discomfort.

If you’re a wildlife watcher or nature lover who demands ultimate clarity but doesn’t want to lug around a huge pair of binoculars with which to achieve it, the compact, magnesium bodied, fog proofed to 16,000ft Nikon Monarch HG 10x30 comes highly recommended. Sharpness across the frame betters physically larger models, suggesting its multi coated optics, resolving power and Field Flattener Lens System are not to be sniffed at. This Nikon is a veritable pocket rocket for birders, hikers and more.

• Best binoculars •  Best budget binoculars under $100 • The best monoculars in 2021 • Best binocular harness •   The best spotting scopes • The best opera glasses •  The best night vision goggles and binoculars  •   The best telescopes for astrophotography • The best microscopes in 2021 • Best borescopes and inspection cameras • The best portable hides for wildlife photography

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Gavin Stoker

Gavin has over 30 years’ experience of writing about photography and television. He is currently the editor of British Photographic Industry News , and previously served as editor of Which Digital Camera and deputy editor of Total Digital Photography . 

He has also written for a wide range of publications including T3 , BBC Focus , Empire , NME , Radio Times , MacWorld, Computer Active , What Digital Camera and the Rough Guide books.

With his wealth of knowledge, Gavin is well placed to recognize great camera deals and recommend the best products in Digital Camera World’s buying guides. He also writes on a number of specialist subjects including binoculars and monoculars, spotting scopes, microscopes, trail cameras, action cameras, body cameras, filters and cameras straps. 

nikon she safari monarch 10x36 binoculars

nikon she safari monarch 10x36 binoculars

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nikon she safari monarch 10x36 binoculars

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Nikon Monarch M5 10x42 Binocular | Waterproof, fogproof, Rubber-Armored Binocular with ED Glass, Long Eye Relief, Limited Official Nikon USA Model

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Nikon Monarch M5 10x42 Binocular | Waterproof, fogproof, Rubber-Armored Binocular with ED Glass, Long Eye Relief, Limited Official Nikon USA Model

Purchase options and add-ons, about this item.

  • Sophisticated rubber armored exterior design provides shock resistance and a firm comfortable grip
  • Locking diopter control maintains your personal setting
  • Flip-down objective lens covers
  • Nikon’s Legendary ED (Extra-low Dispersion)Glass Lenses
  • Waterproof (up to 1m/3.3ft for 10 minutes) and nitrogen-purged for fog-free performance

Frequently bought together

Nikon Monarch M5 10x42 Binocular | Waterproof, fogproof, Rubber-Armored Binocular with ED Glass, Long Eye Relief, Limited Off

Similar items that may deliver to you quickly

Nikon Monarch M7 10x42 Binocular | Waterproof, fogproof, Rubber-Armored Full-Size Binocular with ED Glass & Wide View, Lockin

Top Brand: Nikon

From the manufacturer, champion of dawn & dusk..

m5

Some of the most exciting moments happen in the magical light of dawn and dusk. Monarch M5 binoculars are built for these moments. Large 42mm objectives with a generous field of view gather more of the scene and more of what you're out there to experience. Adjustable turn-and-slide eyecups with long eye relief make these the most comfortable Monarch binoculars yet. Nikon’s renowned ED glass reduces chromatic aberration while the dielectric high-reflective multilayer prism coatings ensure superior light transmittance; resulting in brighter images and more natural colors. In addition, phase-corrected coatings are also applied to prism surfaces to increase image resolution. The result? Better, more clear and brighter optics to take your adventure to new heights.

Wider view. Easier spotting.

m5

Monarch M5 binoculars deliver a wider field of view than their predecessors. Seeing more detail and viewing more of the scene makes it easier to locate your subject within the binoculars, key when spotting birds and wildlife amid trees and landscapes.

Compact and lightweight.

m5

Starting at just 22.2 ounces (8x42 model), Monarch M5 binoculars are compact and lightweight—ready to travel with you anywhere.

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What's in the box.

  • Binocular, Case, Eyepiece Cap, Objective Cap, Neck Strap

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Honest Review- Nikon Monarch M5 10x42 Binocular | Waterproof

Riziki Omonde

nikon she safari monarch 10x36 binoculars

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Product information, warranty & support, product description.

Some of the most exciting moments happen in the magical light of dawn and dusk. Monarch M5 10x42 binoculars are built for these moments with an ideal balance between 10x magnification and a wide field of view. Adjustable turn-and-slide eyecups with long eye relief make these the most comfortable Monarch binoculars yet. Nikon’s superior ED glass reduces distortion, while dielectric phase-corrected coatings boost contrast and multilayer coatings increase light transmission. The result? Better, more clear and brighter optics to take your adventure to new heights.

Customer reviews

Customer Reviews, including Product Star Ratings help customers to learn more about the product and decide whether it is the right product for them.

To calculate the overall star rating and percentage breakdown by star, we don’t use a simple average. Instead, our system considers things like how recent a review is and if the reviewer bought the item on Amazon. It also analyzed reviews to verify trustworthiness.

Customers say

Customers like the brightness, quality, comfort and image quality of the binoculars. They mention that it's great for birdwatching, wildlife viewing, spotting folks out on the water and perfect for woods and field. They appreciate the brilliant glass and superb sharpness and clarity. Customers are also satisfied with clarity, and value. However, some customers are mixed on weight and focus.

AI-generated from the text of customer reviews

Customers are satisfied with the image quality of the binoculars. They mention that they are amazing, nice, and fantastic. They appreciate the superb sharpness and clarity, and the sleek new finish.

"...Lightweight, comfortable, super clear, the actual design and that the eye pieces also pop out to help your eyes stay the right distance from the lens..." Read more

"...binoculars, but I know microscopes and it’s clear that the optics in these are great . Simple, basic, easy to use...." Read more

" Excellent view , she loves watching the backyard birds with these." Read more

"You also get a soft shelled carry case and a neck strap. Great quality and great visibility best value on the market." Read more

Customers are satisfied with the clarity of the binoculars. They mention that it provides great viewing, with crisp details and vivid colors.

"...Lightweight, comfortable, super clear , the actual design and that the eye pieces also pop out to help your eyes stay the right distance from the lens..." Read more

"...pair of binoculars I bought in 40 years great value for money and super clear " Read more

"The image quality is undeniable. Crisp details , vivid colors, and excellent light transmission make these binoculars a joy to use in bright..." Read more

"...Happy I decided to try them. Clear and bright picture, especially at low light. And more than enough magnification for my hunting." Read more

Customers are satisfied with the quality of the binoculars. They mention that they are great for birdwatching, wildlife viewing, and spotting folks out on the water. They also say that the eyeglass configurations offer a personalized viewing experience, making details much more visible.

"...Simple, basic, easy to use. Perfect for spotting folks out on the water." Read more

"I bought these for deer hunting. They are perfect for woods and field . Highly recommended!" Read more

"...up eyecups cater to various eyeglass configurations, offering a personalized viewing experience ...." Read more

" Great for birdwatching ." Read more

Customers are satisfied with the brightness of the binoculars. They mention that it has fantastic clarity, and is a joy to use in bright conditions. The binos have excellent light transmission, and vivid colors.

"...The quality is night and day above the $40 ones . Crisp focus with twice the light . The eye cup edges are rubberized so you can view with glasses...." Read more

"The image quality is undeniable. Crisp details, vivid colors , and excellent light transmission make these binoculars a joy to use in bright..." Read more

"...Bought these for my wife for xmas. They are two shades brighter and with more magnification at 8x42, than my thousand dollar 8x30 binocs." Read more

"...Happy I decided to try them. Clear and bright picture , especially at low light. And more than enough magnification for my hunting." Read more

Customers find the binoculars to be the best quality for the money. They are happy with the performance and image quality. They also mention that the bins have great visibility and sharpness.

"...Good fit and finish, well worth the money ." Read more

"This is the first pair of binoculars I bought in 40 years great value for money and super clear" Read more

"...Great quality and great visibility best value on the market." Read more

"... Great value ." Read more

Customers find the binocular comfortable to hold and easy to focus. They also appreciate the soft shelled carry case and neck strap.

"...Lightweight, comfortable , super clear, the actual design and that the eye pieces also pop out to help your eyes stay the right distance from the lens..." Read more

"...I found them easy to adjust, the neck strap is comfortable ...." Read more

"Weight is good not too heavy. Comfortable to use . Very good optics." Read more

Customers are mixed about the weight of the binoculars. Some mention that they're fairly light to carry, not big and bulky, and comfortable to use. However, others say that they are heavy and tiring to hold for extended periods.

"... Lightweight , comfortable, super clear, the actual design and that the eye pieces also pop out to help your eyes stay the right distance from the lens..." Read more

"Got these for the lake. They work very well. I like they're not big and bulky. I'm female and find holding them easy." Read more

"... These binoculars are hefty , making them tiring to hold for extended periods. It's not ideal for long hikes or treks...." Read more

" Weight is good not too heavy . Comfortable to use. Very good optics." Read more

Customers have mixed opinions about the focus of the binoculars. Some find it easy to focus and adjust, while others say the out of focus areas behind the focus point can be annoying. The depth of view of the focus is shallow, and the field of view is small.

"...Great gift for family member who is outdoor sportsman. Clarity and easy focus . I use to view birds and animals around property" Read more

"The only complaint is how difficult it is to focus your subject . Good fit and finish, well worth the money." Read more

"I use these for birding. They are extremely easy & quick to focus , comfortable to hold, clear and crisp." Read more

"Better chromatic aberration than Nikon p7. But field of view really small . The eye relief is longer but surprisingly not good with eyeglasses...." Read more

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  • Binoculars & Spotting Scopes

Monarch ATB 8x36 vs SHE ATB vs 8x36

  • Thread starter walternewton
  • Start date Feb 27, 2011

More options

Walternewton, well-known member.

  • Feb 27, 2011

Monarch ATB 8x36 vs Monarch SHE ATB 8x36 Are there differences between these two binoculars besides the color? The specifications on the website seem identical - including all optical measurements, and size/weight to the mm/gram - but given the $150 differential in MSRP (and taking into account the bag and leather strap that comes with the "SHE") surely there must be some difference? If one (say my girlfriend) can get over the color, are the "SHE"'s a good/great value at $130? http://www.nikonhunting.com/products/binoculars/monarch_atb/8x36/7513 http://www.nikonhunting.com/products/binoculars/nikon_she_atb/8x36/8237  

NDhunter

Experienced observer

I am thinking they are both the same. The plum color has a small market, so they are discounting them to sell. I would think that would be a good deal. Jerry  

lilcrazy2

The Nikon SHE ATB 8x36 & 10x36 binos were a marketing venture with Pam Zaitz who owns SHE Safari & SHE Outdoor Apparel, and is one of Nikons hunting pros. Originally when these were introduced they were selling for about $100 more than the regular ATB Monarchs. Looks like Nikon is dumping them at the $129 price.  

  • Feb 28, 2011
walternewton said: Are there differences between these two binoculars besides the color? The specifications on the website seem identical - including all optical measurements, and size/weight to the mm/gram - but given the $150 differential in MSRP (and taking into account the bag and leather strap that comes with the "SHE") surely there must be some difference? If one (say my girlfriend) can get over the color, are the "SHE"'s a good/great value at $130? http://www.nikonhunting.com/products/binoculars/monarch_atb/8x36/7513 http://www.nikonhunting.com/products/binoculars/nikon_she_atb/8x36/8237 Click to expand...
  • I understand this is an old thread, but want to reply anyway

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Nikon Monarch M5 10x42 Binoculars

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£279.00

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  • Stylish and portable
  • Multi-layer coated lenses and prisms
  • Waterproof to1m for 10 minutes
  • Firm grip and rubber armouring
  • Tripod mountable

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Description

Specifications.

Nikon Monarch M5 10x42 are stylish and portable binoculars with a lightweight durable body. Waterproof and comfortable to hold, they are perfect for hobbies such as mountain climbing, hiking camping or birdwatching. Equipped with extra-low dispersion (ED) glass to correct chromatic aberration, the MONARCH M5 delivers a clear view with high resolution. The multilayer coating for all lenses and prisms means the images are brighter and more natural in colour, while the phase correction coating ensures high-contrast results.

A clear view Enjoy the finer details of the outside world by experiencing the binoculars’ incredibly clear image quality. The application of extra-low dispersion (ED) glass corrects the chromatic aberration that causes colour fringing.

Comfort, style and durability The re-designed, stylish body boasts a sophisticated clean form, while also being comfortable to hold, thanks to a firm grip and rubber armouring for shock resistance. Designed with durability in mind, it’s waterproof - up to 1m for 10 minutes - as well as fog-free, making it ideal for your outdoor excursions.

Lightweight The MONARCH M5 is extremely light for this class of binocular. With all models weighing 640g or under, the MONARCH M5 is easy to carry on hikes, mountain climbs and various other outdoor activities.

Bright and natural Fully experience everything nature has to offer thanks to the MONARCH M5’s high optical performance. The binoculars feature fully multi-layer coated lenses and prisms, as well as a Dielectric high-reflective multilayer prism coating to ensure superior transmittance uniformity across the visible range, which results in brighter images and more natural colours. Meanwhile, its phase-correction coating minimises the loss of resolution to deliver high-contrast images.

Comfortable rubber eyecups Enjoy extra comfort with the turn-and-slide rubber eyecups, which make it easy to position your eyes at the correct eye-point. The multi-setting click stops allow users to adjust the eye-relief for a custom fit – providing the full field of view and maximum comfort during extended periods of use.

Tripod mountable The MONARCH M5 is tripod mountable, meaning you can place a tripod mount or a tripod mount adaptor in the middle of the binoculars’ frame. This is particularly useful if you’re planning on using these from a static position for a lengthy period of time, like in a hide, for example.

Dimensions / weight: - Length: 145mm - Width: 129mm - Depth: 54mm - Weight: 640g

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Shooter Files by f.d. walker

Street Photography Tips, Interaction, Travel, Guides

Apr 24 2017

City Street Guides by f.d. walker: A Street Photography Guide to Moscow, Russia

moscow-guide-cover

*A series of guides on shooting Street Photography in cities around the world. Find the best spots to shoot, things to capture, street walks, street tips, safety concerns, and more for cities around the world. I have personally researched, explored and shot Street Photography in every city that I create a guide for. So you can be ready to capture the streets as soon as you step outside with your camera!

At over 12 million people, Moscow is the largest city in Russia and second largest in Europe by population ( Istanbul is #1). An urban, cosmopolitan metropolis with more than enough glitz and glam to cater to the elite, but without losing its fair share of Soviet era roughness around the edges. It can be fast paced, brash, busy, and trendy like other big cities, but it has its blend of West meets Russia atmosphere and beauty that provides plenty of unique interest. The Red Square is as famous as it gets, but there’s so much more to this city, including the most beautiful subway system you’ve ever seen. It would take years to capture all of Moscow, but that means you have an endless amount of areas to discover.

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So here’s a Street Photography guide so you can be ready to capture all that Moscow has to offer before you even arrive!

  • Patriarch’s Pond
  • Old Arbat Street
  • Maroseyka Street
  • Tverskoy Boulevard

Top 5 Street Spots:

1. red square.

The Red Square is the most famous square in not just Russia, but all of Eastern Europe. The name actually doesn’t come from the color of the bricks or communism, but from the name in Russian, Krásnaya, once meaning “beautiful” before its meaning changed to “red.” This large plaza is what you see on the cover of guide books and magazines for Moscow, with St. Basil’s Cathedral being the center piece next to Lenin’s Mausoleum surrounded by the Kremlin Wall. Of course, the Red Square attracts hordes of tourist due to the main attractions, but all that activity around an interesting atmosphere does provide street photo opportunities. It’s also the central square connecting to the city’s major streets, providing a good starting point to explore outward.

nikon she safari monarch 10x36 binoculars

You’ll also find the popular pedestrian only Nikolskaya Street connecting the Red Square to Lubyanka Square. This line of expensive shops includes plenty of activity, while also leading you to another popular square. Filled with history rivaling any city, the Red Square and surrounding areas are the heart and soul of Russia.

nikon she safari monarch 10x36 binoculars

2. Patriarch’s Ponds

Patriarch’s Ponds is one of the most exclusive neighborhoods in Moscow. Despite the name being plural, there’s only one large pond, but it’s worth a visit with your camera. It’s a popular spot for locals and expats to come relax or take a stroll around the pond. You get an interesting mix of young and old too, from young love to “babushkas” feeding pigeons. It’s a very peaceful park atmosphere in one of the nicer areas within the city center, while bringing enough activity for street photography. 

nikon she safari monarch 10x36 binoculars

The pond is shallow and in the winter becomes a popular spot for ice-skating too. The area is also well-known for the location in the famous Russian novel, The Master and Margarita. 

3. Old Arbat (Stary Arbat)

Old Arbat is the most famous pedestrian street in Moscow, and dating back to the 15th century, also one of its oldest. Originally, it was an area of trade, but soon became the most prestigious residential area in Moscow. During the 18th century, Arbat started attracting the city’s scholars and artists, including Alexander Pushkin. Cafes lined the streets and impressive homes filled the neighborhood. Since then, New Arbat street was created as a highway in the area, while Old Arbat was paved for a 1km pedestrian only walkway.

nikon she safari monarch 10x36 binoculars

Due to the historic buildings, famous artists that lived here, and the bohemian atmosphere, Old Arbat has become a big attraction for tourists today. Now, there’s a mix of cafes, restaurants, souvenir shops, street performers, street merchants and other attractions for visitors, and some locals, to come enjoy. It can get really busy here and there’s usually something interesting going on so it’s a good street to come walk with your camera for guaranteed life.

4. Gorky Park

One of the most famous places in Moscow is Gorky Park. The official name is Maxim Gorky’s Central Park of Culture & Leisure, which gives you an idea of what goes on here. When built, it was the first of its kind in the Soviet Union. Divided into two parts, it stretches along Moscow River. One end contains fair rides, foods stands, tennis courts, a sports club, a lake for boat rides, and more. This end brings more active life due to its number of attractions, while the other end is more relaxed, where you’ll find gardens, trees, older buildings, and an outdoor amphitheater.

nikon she safari monarch 10x36 binoculars

Gorky Park attracts mostly locals so it’s a good spot to capture the non-tourist side of Moscow life. Muscovites come here to escape the city and unwind in a picturesque setting. The park remains alive outside of the warmer months too, especially when the lake turns into the city’s largest outdoor skating rink. I’d recommend taking the metro out here to spend at least half a day exploring the massive park’s life with your camera.

5. Maroseyka Street

Maroseyka Street is a popular area not too far from the Red Square. The long, winding street turns into Pokrovka and is lined with restaurants, cafes, bars and places to stay. It’s actually where I like to stay when I’m in Moscow due to its location and solid street photography opportunities itself. You have Kitay-gorod station near and if you keep walking southwest, you’ll get to the Red Square. But if you walk northwest, as it changes to Pokrovka, you can find a long street of activity for photography with its own interesting atmosphere.

nikon she safari monarch 10x36 binoculars

6. Tverskoy Boulevard

Tverskoy Boulevard is the oldest and longest boulevard in Moscow, beginning at the end of Nikitsky Boulevard, and finishing at Pushkin Square, a spot to come for activity itself. The boulevard is made up of two avenues, with pedestrian walkways in-between. You’ll find grass, shrubbery, trees, benches and more walking it’s almost kilometer length. Many people come here to enjoy some relaxation, walk their dog, or just to use it to walk wherever they’re going. Its center location also provides a nice place to walk with your camera near plenty of other spots you’ll want to check out anyway.

Sample Street Walk:

For a full day of Street Photography, covering some of the best spots, you can follow this sample street walk for Moscow:

  • Start your morning walking around the Red Square (1), while exploring the surrounding area, including Nikolskaya Street
  • Then walk northwest to Patriarch’s Ponds (2) and slowly walk the pond and surrounding area with your camera
  • Next, walk east to the Pushkin Monument and stroll down Tverskoy Boulevard (6)
  • Once Tverskoy Boulevard (6) ends, it will turn into Nikitsky Boulevard. Follow this down until you get to the start of Old Arbat Street (3), across from Arbatskaya station
  • After you’re done walking down Old Arbat Street (3) for more street photography, spend some time checking out Moscow’s beautiful metro stations
  • To finish off the day with more street photography, get off the metro near Red Square (1) again, Maroseyka Street (5) or wherever you’re staying for the night.

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3 Things I’ll Remember about Shooting in Moscow:

1. museum metro.

The Moscow metro system was the first underground railway system in the Soviet Union and today includes 203 stations across 340km of routes. The elaborate system has some of the deepest stations in the world too, with escalators that seem to go on forever. None of this is what makes it so special, though. Many of its stations feel like stepping inside a museum, making it without a doubt the most interesting and beautiful metro system I’ve been in.

nikon she safari monarch 10x36 binoculars

When built, Stalin wanted to make the metro stations “palaces for the people” with marble, chandeliers, and grand architecture. The best part is the variety of architecture and styles used, making many of the stations a completely different experience visually. You could easily spend a whole day traveling the stations and there are even tours available for people who wish to do just that. My advice, though, would be just to buy a ticket and hop on and off at different stations, while exploring different lines. The museum-like surrounding mixed with the crowds of characters can make for a great photography experience.

nikon she safari monarch 10x36 binoculars

Since there are so many stations, here are some of my favorites to check out:

  • Novoslobodskaya
  • Mayakovskaya
  • Elektrozavodskaya
  • Komsomolskaya
  • Ploschad Revolyutsii
  • Dostoyevskaya
  • Prospekt Mira

nikon she safari monarch 10x36 binoculars

2. Moscow is Big

It’s no secret that Moscow is a big city, but it can feel even bigger with how spread out much of it is. This is especially true if you compare it to cities outside of Asia. If I compared it to cities in Europe, I’d probably say only Istanbul would warrant more time to really discover the depths of this city. Most only explore around the Red Square and surrounding area, but that is such a small part of the city. Although, that central area does give you plenty to see on its own.

nikon she safari monarch 10x36 binoculars

Fortunately, I had a good friend living in the city to show me around, but it opened up my eyes even more to how much there is to discover in Moscow. It’s a big city with a variety of atmosphere that can take you from “east” to “west” and trendy to rugged depending on where you go. I’d imagine you’d have to live here a while to really know the city.

3. Cosmopolitan Mix of East meets West

Modern skyscrapers mixed with amazing architecture, a world-class metro system with museum-like beauty, trendy fashion and chic clubs, Moscow is a rich mix of Russian culture and history in a more western cosmopolitan package. There is a push to keep the Russian culture, while also pushing forward with a modern metropolis the whole world will envy. This comes with an impressive skyline, that continues to grow, and endless modernities, but with soviet nostalgia and atmosphere mixed in for good measure.

nikon she safari monarch 10x36 binoculars

Mixed in with this grand western cosmopolitan atmosphere, is a strong national pride in Russia. This includes their famous leader, Vladimir Putin. Maybe no other place will you see a country’s leader more often. All over, from the pricey tourist shops to the underground walkway stalls, you’ll find goods with Putin’s likeness covering them. From t-shirts to magnets to Matryoshka dolls. There’s a strong national pride that can be seen around the city, which also extends to their leader. Moscow is many things. It’s East meets West, modernizations meets Soviet era, and a whole lot more.

What To Do For a Street Photography Break?:

Eat at a stolovaya.

Stolovayas are Russian cafeterias that became popular in the Soviet days. You grab a tray and walk down the line of freshly prepared local dishes, and select whatever you want from the chefs. They’re usually inexpensive and a much better value than restaurants, while giving you the opportunity to try from a wide selection of everyday Russian food. They’re also very tasty. I always include some borsch on my tray and go from there. The places themselves are all over Moscow and usually come with Soviet-era aesthetics to complete the experience.

nikon she safari monarch 10x36 binoculars

Street Safety Score: 7

*As always, no place is completely safe! So when I talk about safety, I’m speaking in general comparison to other places. Always take precaution, be smart, observe your surroundings and trust your instincts anywhere you go!

Being the 2nd largest city in Europe with over 12 million people, you’re going to have your dangerous areas, but for the most part, it feels safe walking around. Russia is statistically higher in crime compared to most of Europe, but this generally doesn’t apply to tourists and visitors. Around the Red Square and surrounding city center, you should feel completely safe walking around. Pick pocketing can happen, but no more than other touristic places. I always explore Moscow freely without coming across too much to worry about. It’s a spread out city, though, so of course it matters where you are. Just use basic street smarts, know where you are and Moscow shouldn’t give you a problem. 

nikon she safari monarch 10x36 binoculars

People’s Reaction Score: 7

Moscow is fast paced, big city life, which usually means people aren’t too concerned with you, or your camera. I don’t find people notice or pay much attention to me when I’m out taking photos in Moscow. For the most part, people just go about their day. You shouldn’t get too many looks or concern. But it can depend on the area you are in. The more you stick out, the more you might get noticed with suspicions. I’ve never had any problems in Moscow, or Russia, but just be careful who you’re taking a photo of if you get out of the city center. Other than that, it’s about average for reactions. 

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Street Tips:

Learn the alphabet .

Much of Moscow, including the metro system, doesn’t use english. The Russian alphabet uses letters from the Cyrillic script, which if you aren’t familiar with it and don’t know the sounds, can be hard to decipher the words. This is most important for street names and metro stops when trying to get around. It can save confusion and make it easier getting around if you learn the basic alphabet. At the very least then, you can sound out the words to see which are similar in the english conversion, which can help matching them to maps. When out shooting street photography, getting around is as important as anything. So save yourself some time and frustration by learning the Russian Alphabet.

nikon she safari monarch 10x36 binoculars

Use the metro

While Saint-Petersburg feels very walkable for a city its size, Moscow can feel very spread out, even for its bigger size. Outside of the Red Square area, you can have plenty of walking before getting anywhere very interesting, so you’ll need to take the metro a lot if you really want to explore the city. Maps are deceiving here too, it will always be further than it looks.

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Another reason it’s less walkable than Saint-Petersburg is its completely different set-up. Moscow’s streets are mostly contstructed in rings with narrow, winding streets in-between. This is common with medieval city cities that used to be confined by walls, but you usually don’t have it in a city this massive. Saint-Petersburg has a more grid-like pattern that also uses the canals to help you know your way around. When it comes to navigating on foot in Moscow, it can be more difficult, so bring a map and take the metro when needed. It’s why Moscow’s metro carries more passengers per day than the London and Paris subways combined.

Explore other areas if you have time

Moscow is really big. While most people stay around the Red Square within the Boulevard Ring, there’s so much more to the city. I covered some other spots outside of this circle, but if you really want to see the city, you’ll need time. If you do have time, some other areas I’d check out first are Zamoskvarechye, along some of the south and western Moscow.

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Inspiration:

For some more inspiration, you can look through the Street Photography of Moscow photographer Artem Zhitenev  and check out 33 of my photos taken in Moscow .

Conclusion:

Moscow’s name brings a certain mystique, but once you’re there it might bring a different atmosphere than you expect. It’s big and sprawling, but beautiful in many ways. It can feel like a European capital on a grand scale, but you can definitely find its Russian side in there.

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The urban sprawl of Moscow can be intimidating, but give it enough time and you’ll be rewarded with plenty to discover. All with the world’s best metro system to take you around.

I hope this guide can help you start to experience some of what Moscow contains. So grab your camera and capture all that Moscow has to offer for Street Photography!

If you still have any questions about shooting in Moscow, feel free to comment below or email me!

(I want to make these guides as valuable as possible for all of you so add any ideas on improvements, including addition requests, in the comment section!)

Click Here For More City Street Guides!

(A New Guide Posted Every Other Wednesday)

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Specifications

  • Focusing System Central Focus
  • Magnification 10x
  • Objective Diameter 42mm
  • Angular Field of View (Real) 5.7°
  • Angular Field of View (Apparent) 52.9°
  • FOV at 1000 yds 299 ft.
  • Close Focus Distance 9.8 ft.
  • Exit Pupil 4.2mm
  • Relative Brightness 17.6
  • Eye Relief 17.4mm
  • Size (Length x Width) 6x5.1 in.
  • Weight 24.7 oz. (24.7 g)
  • Phase Coating Yes
  • Waterproof / Fogproof Yes

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Museum Studies Abroad

Popular articles

Moscow Kremlin History 1825

View of the Kremlin and surrounding area from 1825. From The Album of Ancient Views of the Moscow Kremlin , by Ivan Zabelin. Available online from the Yeltsin Library .

The Kremlin: Moscow’s Historical Heart Through the Ages

Published: December 3, 2021

The Moscow Kremlin has long been the main symbol of Moscow and Russia – and for good reason. It was with the Kremlin that city of Moscow officially began and from which it grew. The Prince of Moscow, ruling from the Kremlin and drawing on the growing power of his city, united and conquered the cities and lands around him to create Russia.

While the Kremlin can be seen as something of a constant in Russian history, the Kremlin itself has seen major changes within its walls and to its own status. It has lost and gained buildings. It has changed from the seat of government to an ancillary structure, back to the governmental seat, and finally to a museum complex.

The resource below unites the work of multiple SRAS students writing on Home and Abroad , Challenge Grants , and Online Research Internships to bring you an overarching view of this iconic complex.

The Kremlin Walls

By Hudson Dobbs

The Kremlin was first established in 1156 by Prince Yuri Dolgorukiy. This post-dates the first mention of Moscow, which dates back to 1147, when Prince Dolgorukiy invited Prince Sviatoslav of Chernigov to Moscow to celebrate their alliance.

The actual site of this stronghold has likely been occupied since the second millennium BCE. It likely had fortifications built there as early as the 10th century, by the then-resident Vyatichi, a tribe of Slavic peoples.

Eventually, Prince Dolgorukiy ordered the construction of what would become the Kremlin walls. These first walls were tall and expansive and built out of wood. Although this structure was built for protection, it also served as a symbol for the power and strength of the new city of Moscow.

While the first walls did their job well, they were eventually burnt down by Tatar-Mongol forces and later upgraded to more fire-resistant oak in 1339. As the city grew, the Kremlin also further developed, and with it the popularity of building fortresses in town centers. Cities such as Smolensk, Kazan, Novgorod, and Pskov all constructed a Kremlin of their own. In fact, the word “kremlin” simply means “a fortress within a city.”

Kremlin Moscow History First Kremlin Plan

By the 13th century, the Kremlin housed the political and spiritual power of the state, with residences, workshops, churches, and state buildings all residing within its walls. In the 1360’s, Prince Dmitry Donskoy rebuilt the walls in limestone and a gleaming white Kremlin soon became the iconic image of Moscow. These walls were credited in helping the city defend itself from sieges by Grand Duke Algirdas of Lithuania in the late 1360’s.

The walls and towers that exist today are still another iteration, and were built on the order of Grand Prince Ivan III, also known as Ivan the Great, from 1485 to 1495. Ivan wanted to build something grander and more worthy of being his residence – something that would be comparable to Constantinople in terms of size and importance.

Wanting what would be specifically a “Third Rome,” Ivan invited Italian architects such as Aristotele Fioravanti and Pietro Antonio Solari. Their involvement is why the current fortress closely resembles castles of Northern Italy. Its red brick made the Kremlin unique for the time, as it was the first structure in Russia built from such material.

These brick walls have stood, with minor adjustments, since that time. One noticeable change came in the late 1600s, when Tsar Fyodor Alekseevich ordered the red brick to be whitewashed in limestone, returning it to gleaming white the city had been hitherto known for. Eventually, the whitewash stopped being maintained and was allowed to wear off, a process that was complete by the 1900s.

Kremlin Moscow History Early Image Icon

Grand Kremlin Palace Tour

By Jack Fisher

Formerly the Moscow residence of the Russian tsars, the Grand Kremlin Palace (not to be confused with the State Kremlin Palace) is a complex inside the Kremlin. It now hosts diplomatic meetings and official state ceremonies including presidential inaugurations. It is also designated as a residence of the President of the Russian Federation, but is rarely used for that purpose.

When SRAS gave me the opportunity to take an exclusive tour of this complex, which is an exclusive tour that is normally off-limits to the general public, I had to take it.

This particular tour is different from those that cover the more public areas inside the Kremlin and requires signing up early and submitting your documents for a security check.

Kremlin Moscow History Grand Palace

I met the tour group on a Friday afternoon in Aleksandrovski Sad, which borders the Kremlin walls. From there, we made our way towards the Kremlin grounds entrance. There was a huge line to get into the grounds through a first security checkpoint, but we were able to skip straight to the front of it since we had registered for our tour ahead of time. Once we were through the gate, the crowd thinned out significantly.

As we walked through the Kremlin grounds, we saw other tour groups taking photos of the landscaping, palace, and other historical buildings. Unlike us, they didn’t have the permission of the Russian government to enter the actual palace. When we got to the palace, we walked through the front doors, crossed a second security checkpoint, met our guide, and started the tour.

Our tour guide inside the building was a woman that worked in preservation. She only spoke Russian, so everything was translated for us by an SRAS-hired guide to English. We began on the first floor of the newer section of the palace and saw several ornate living rooms and guest rooms, followed by the empress’s and emperor’s chambers. Unfortunately, we weren’t allowed to see the emperor’s office and bathroom as President Putin had decided to use them as his personal study for the remainder of his time in office.

After the first floor, we headed upstairs to the second. From the outside the palace appeared to have three floors, but in reality the second floor just had massive, vaulted ceilings and two levels of windows. From what I saw, the second floor seemed to be where the fun happened. The first major room we walked into was the Hall of the Order of St. George, built to house major military meetings and balls and today used as a large conference room. There were names of famous military officers and soldiers inscribed on the walls, and the hall looked like it could hold hundreds of guests. Then it was on to the Hall of the Order of St. Vladimir, which was way less cool. It did, however, have the largest chandelier in the palace, for what that’s worth.

Next, we moved into the oldest section of the palace. It was built in the late 1400s and the newer sections of the palace were built out to connect with it. Our guide told us that by the time of the last czars, the older section was used strictly for ceremonial purposes. The walls were covered with paintings of historical rulers and religious figures. It was definitely my favorite room as there seemed to be an aura of timelessness hanging about the place.

Then we went back through the Hall of the Order of St. Vladimir and through another hall to the older bedchamber of the czar and an older, smaller meeting room for the czar and his nobles. This section was markedly different as there was none of the opulence of the newer palace. It had a utilitarian feel due to its practical layout with comfortable but plain looking chairs, reasonably sized paintings, low ceilings and large traditional Russian stoves.

Kremlin Moscow History Grand Palace

Finally, we visited the throne room. It was massive, just like the Hall of the Order of St. George, and had polished stone and gilding everywhere. Unfortunately, it was a reconstruction. Our guide let us know that the soviets had torn it apart when they came to power, creating what looked like a massive classroom to house the first meetings of the Soviet Congress. The Russian government had restored it completely within the past decade. She also let us know that the current heir to the Russian throne is Prince Harry of England, which is an interesting fact I’ve been surprising Brits with lately.

On our way out, we exited through a portrait hall. Most of the portraits were typical Enlightenment and Victorian era paintings with stuffy looking people. However, one painting caught my eye: the portrait of Knyaz Sbyatoclav. The man looked absolutely hardcore (and you can see him below in a photo I took).

In my opinion, it was definitely worth $75. While I wouldn’t go twice, the fact of the matter is that you get to see the inside of a beautiful building and stand in rooms that very powerful people meet in and have met in for hundreds of years – which is an opportunity that few regular people are given. Don’t think that it’s too expensive, because you’ll have the experience and memory with you for the rest of your life.

Kremlin Moscow History Grand Palace

The Kremlin Without a Capital (1712-1918)

By Lee Sullivan

The Kremlin has always been a symbol of Russian power and authority. It is often used interchangeably with the Russian state in journalism and academic literature. This is not surprising considering the Kremlin is situated in the heart of Moscow and has typically housed Russian rulers and their offices – and continues to contain an official residence and office for Russian president Vladimir Putin. However, not all of Russia’s leaders have always called the Moscow fortress home. This article covers the nearly 200 years of Kremlin history when Moscow was not the capital.

Peter the Great moved Russia’s capital from Moscow to St. Petersburg in 1712. Despite the continued crowning of tsars in the Annunciation Cathedral and symbols of power in the Kremlin vaults, Moscow’s role in state life was minimal compared to that of the new capital. This changed when a new stage of construction began under Catherine the Great. Even though St. Petersburg was the new capital, she was crowned in Moscow following ancient tradition. A commission to replace the code of laws from Tsar Alexey Mikhailovich’s time was called in Moscow and its session was held in the Kremlin’s Faceted Palace. This was a sign that under Catherine the Great the state would be ruled from both St. Petersburg and Moscow. Additionally, the Senate was divided into departments under Catherine. Four were in St. Petersburg and two were in the newly commissioned Senate Building, which still stands in the Moscow Kremlin.

Catherine additionally planned a grand reconstruction of the Kremlin interior, one that would have seen most of its buildings demolished, save for the historic cluster of churches, and replaced with modern imperial architecture built with long, straight roads, much like St. Petersburg itself. Demolition was started, including to parts of the original Kremlin walls, when cracks began to appear in one of the cathedral walls due to the resulting disruption of the soil. Because of this, and because of the project’s already enormous cost, it was cancelled, and the original walls re-built.

Kremlin Moscow History Catherine the Great

In September of 1812, French troops occupied Moscow. Napoleon, who led them, planned to occupy the Kremlin as his residence. It is widely thought that in defense against the French, the Moscow mayor ordered fires be set across the city. They raged for days so and were so intense that Napoleon was forced to leave the Kremlin due to the smoke. Upon returning he declared an intention to remain in the Kremlin for winter and ordered additional fortification of the Kremlin walls. However, the French army was weakening due to battle loss and poor supply.

Napoleon ordered his troops to retreat and blow up the Kremlin in the process. Mines were laid but their effectiveness was reduced by rain and prompt Muscovite response. Still, considerable damage was done, including to the Vodozvodnaya Tower, which was completely destroyed.

The Kremlin quickly underwent restoration under Tsar Alexander I and Nicolas I. Despite the war’s considerable drain on state funding, Tsar Alexander I prioritized restoring many parts of the Kremlin including towers, walls, palaces, and cathedrals. He often traveled to Moscow to observe the restoration progress. Many of Russia’s best architects were included in the restoration efforts. Order was progressively restored to the Kremlin and new gardens, now called the Alexander Gardens, were laid out along its exterior. Buildings like the Senate were brought back to their original appearance.

Restoration was completed under Nicholas I, who gave special attention to the restoration of ancient Kremlin churches and other old buildings. He also commissioned the construction of new buildings like the Great Kremlin Palace, after having the old one demolished. The entire imperial family attended the palace blessing during an official ceremony in April 1849. It was constructed and designed with techniques that were ahead of their time – vaulted construction for walls and ceilings, inlaid stone floors, and iron rafters.

Kremlin Moscow History 1850 Cathedral Square

Shortly after the revolution, the Communists restored Moscow as the official capital in 1918 when Moscow was reinstated as Russia’s capital. Construction and restoration were completed by the mid-19 th century. During the Soviet years, the Kremlin housed Soviet leaders and saw the development and then dissolution of the Soviet state. Today the Kremlin stands in Russia’s capital as a unique architectural ensemble.

The Kremlin Under the Soviets

The new Bolshevik government made sweeping changes to the historic Kremlin complex to, as they saw it, better represent the character of the new socialist state.

During the revolution of November 1917, the Kremlin was ransacked, leaving it with broken glass, destroyed icons, and parts of the complex in disrepair. Restoration of the walls and towers began in 1918, but further restoration stalled for lack of funding and because the communists had not yet decided on a plan for their changes to their seat of government.

The first targets were churches and royal symbols. Nuns and monks who had long lived in the Kremlin were removed. Churches had valuables removed and transferred to the new Commissariat of Finances to fund state projects. Many royal treasures and even crown jewels were similarly transferred. The double-headed eagles on the top of the buildings were promptly removed.

Moscow Kremlin History Chudov Monastery 1917

Many buildings were repurposed. Initially, many were converted to housing for Communist functionaries as the revolution and war had depleted Moscow’s housing stock while driving immigration from the countryside to the city. At one point, over two thousand people lived inside the Kremlin. By 1939, however, Kremlin residents consisted of only about three dozen high ranking officials.

Other notable repurposings included turning the Palace of Facets into a canteen with its kitchen inside the Tsarina’s Golden Chamber. The Ivan the Great Bell Tower was turned into a workshop, the Small Nicholas Palace became a worker’s club, and a gym was placed in the Church of St. Catherine. In 1932, the Andrew and Alexander Halls within the palace were gutted to make room for a party congress.

Many of the buildings and statues within the complex were destroyed, often to make way for new construction; only 26 of the original 54 buildings survived the Soviet period. The Chudov Monastery and Ascension Convent were both destroyed to make way for a military academy and eventually the Kremlin Presidium was built on the ground to house the Supreme Soviet, the supreme legislative body of the USSR.

In 1929, the Maly Nikolaevsky Palace, a former royal residence, was replaced by a new administrative building.

In the 1920s, the Russian royals buried in the Archangel Cathedral on the Kremlin’s Cathedral Square were exhumed and autopsied. They and the items in their sarcophagi were turned over to the Kremlin museum. Some valuable artifacts were requisitioned to the state treasury.

Moscow Kremlin History Kazakov Album

In 1935, five stars of rubied glass replaced the double-headed eagles that once topped the Kremlin gate towers.

Throughout WWII, the Kremlin was disguised under mock construction and painted roofs. Despite this, several bombs still fell on the Kremlin grounds, but did not cause major damage.

In 1947, Stalin painted the Kremlin walls red in an unmistakable ode to socialism, a drastic change from the traditional white that the walls had carried for centuries.

In 1955, the Kremlin opened to the public as an open air museum. In that same year, a ban on living in the Kremlin was introduced, lessening any security risk opening it to the public might create.

The last wave of demolitions came in 1958-1961, when the Palace of Congresses, built to house the congresses of Communist Party and cultural events, replaced the Old Amoury and part of the Patriarch’s Palace.

In part due to the outcry from this massive renovation, greater care of the Kremlin grounds began. The official Kremlin museum system was established in 1966, and Elena Gagarin, daughter of Yuri Gagarin, was hired as museum director. Today, that system includes the large armoury, several churches, and items outside of the Kremlin, such as St. Basil’s Cathedral.

The changes made during the Soviet period have left the Kremlin with a striking architectural contrast between traditional, tsarist-era architecture with Soviet-style buildings and the iconic, ancient red walls and remaining cathedrals. Despite the destruction and changes that were carried out, the compound still offers an unforgettable look into Russian and Soviet history that is impossible to get from anywhere else.

The Kremlin Stars

Translated by Caroline Barrow

The following was originally posted to the the Russian 7 website . It has been translated here by SRAS Home and Abroad Translation Scholar Caroline Barrow. Additional edits and updates were applied in 2021.

On October 24, 1935, two long-standing symbols of the Russian monarchy—the two-headed eagles which stood on top of the Kremlin towers, were ordered to be brought down and replaced with five-pointed stars.

Why a five-pointed star became the symbol of the Soviet regime is unknown, but what is known is that Lev Trotsky supported this symbol. Greatly fascinated by the esoteric, he knew that stars and pentagrams have a strong energetic potential and are one of the strongest symbols. The swastika could have easily become the symbol of the new government, since it had a strong following in Russia at the beginning of the twentieth century. Swastikas were displayed on the currency of the temporary government led by Alexander Kerensky, and swastikas were painted on the walls of Empress Alexandra Fedrovna’s Ipatiev House before the royal family was executed there. This swastika trend was stopped almost solely by Trotsky and the Bolsheviks, who opted for the five-pointed star. The history of the twentieth century even showed that stars are stronger than swastikas… Stars shone over the Kremlin, in the place of two-headed eagle.

Kremlin History Moscow Symbolism Star

Erecting the thousand-kilogram stars on the Kremlin towers was not a simple thing to do. The problem was that the needed technology did not exist in 1935. The smallest of the Kremlin Towers, Borovitskaya, rose to 52 meters, and the tallest tower, Troitskaya, reached a height of 72 meters. Throughout the country, there were no tower cranes capable of reaching these heights. However, for Russian engineers, the word “no” did not exist, only the phrase “we must.” Engineers designed and built special cranes that could be installed on the upper deck for each tower. A metal base, called the console, was mounted at the base of each turret window, and on each console the engineers mounted a lifting crane. Thus, the process occurred in several stages: first the two-headed eagles were dismantled, and second, the stars erected.

Each star weighs about one ton. Given the height at which the stars would be placed and the fact that each star has a surface area of 6.3 square meters (potentially excellent for catching the wind), there was a danger that the stars might be blown away along with the top of the towers. So, it was decided to stress test the towers and, it turns out, with good reason: the upper part of each tower and its console was completely destroyed in the process. So, builders reinforced the masonry at the upper levels of the towers, and for the Spasskaya, Troitskaya, and Borovitskaya Tower, metal bracing was added to the base of the tower. The console on Nikolskaya Tower was so damaged that it had to be completely rebuilt.

All the stars were not made identical; four stars differ from one another in their artistic forms. On the Spasskaya Tower star, rays go out from the center. However, on Troitskaya Tower’s star, the rays look like spikes. The star on Borovitskaya Tower is made up of two contours, one inscribed in the other, and, finally, the rays on Nikolskaya Tower’s star have no pattern. In terms of length, the Spasskaya and Nikolskaya Towers were similar, with the distance between the ends of the rays being about 4.5 meters. On Troitskaya and Borovitskaya Towers, the star rays were shorter, and the distance between the ends of the rays was less, measuring 4 and 3.4 meters, respectively.

A star is good, but a spinning star is twice as nice. Moscow is large, its people many, and all must see the Kremlin stars. For the base of each star, special bearings were produced by the First Bearing Plant. These special bearings allow the stars to rotate with the wind even despite their significant weight. Consequently, it is possible to know the direction of the wind given the position of the stars.

Kremlin History Moscow Stars Eagles

Installation of the Kremlin Stars was a true celebration for Muscovites. The stars were not carried under the cover of night to Red Square. The day before the stars were placed on the towers they were put on display in Gorky Park. District and City Secretaries of the Communist Party came together with the ordinary mortals below to see the stars. The stars were lit from the outside to make the Ural stones shine and the rays sparkle. The eagles, taken off the towers, were also displayed to visually demonstrate the dilapidation of the “old” world and the beauty of the “new” world.

The Kremlin stars were not always ruby glass. The first stars, installed in October, 1935, were made from high-alloy stainless steel and red copper. In the center of each star, on both sides, the stars were embedded with precious stones outlining the hammer and sickle emblem. Over the course of a year, the glitter of the gems dimmed. The stars were also found to be too big, not fitting well with the architectural ensemble. In May, 1937, it was decided to install new, illuminated glass ruby stars. Also, they added a star to a fifth tower, the Vodovzvodnaya Tower. The ruby glass was produced at a factory in the city of Konstantinov, according to the method of the Moscovite glassmaker, N. I. Kurochkina. It was necessary to prepare 500 square meters of ruby glass, and for that, a new type was invented—selenium ruby glass. Before that, gold was used to color the glass; selenium was cheaper and produced a deeper color.

The Kremlin stars don’t only rotate, they also light up. In order not to overheat and cause damage, about 600 cubic meters of air is blown through the stars per hour. The stars are not affected by power outages, because they have their own, independent generators.

For the original lighting, the Moscow Electrical Lamp Plant produced the lights for the stars. The stars on Spasskaya, Troitskaya, and Nikolskaya Towers all had 5000-watt bulbs, and the other two operated at 3700 watts. In each star, two parallel filaments were installed. That way, if one burned out, the other filament still shone and a control panel is was notified of the burnout.

To change a bulb, one need not need to climb up to the star. Rather, the bulb comes down on a special rod that runs straight through the bearing. The whole process takes 30-35 minutes. In the stars’ history, the stars stopped shining only twice—once during the war, and another time for the filming of the now-classic movie The Barber of Siberia .

Kremlin History Moscow Stars Construction

Editorial Note: Update 2021. Starting in 2015, the lighting of the Kremlin stars was updated with one star’s lighting system replaced each year. The old incandescent lamps were replaced with modern metal halide lamps. These lamps are approximately four times more energy efficient than the old bulbs and provide a more intense, higher-quality light. Metal halide lamps are often used for sports stadiums and other places where strong, high-quality light is needed.

In preparation for this switch, Employees of the Central Scientific and Restoration Design Workshops (TsNRPM) measured the illumination of each arm of each star separately to make sure that each would still be lit evenly and brightly. They also created models of the stars lit with various methods including LED matrices and optical fiber. In the end, metal halide was determined to be the closest in historical appearance to the existing incandescent lamps.

Within this update, each star was also given its first compressive maintenance since 1946. Damaged panes were replaced, the stars were cleaned inside and out, and the lubricants within the rotation system were replaced with modern fluids.

The State Kremlin Palace

By Benjamin Bradley Mulick

Finished in 1961 after three years of work, the Palace of Congresses, later renamed as the State Kremlin Palace (not to be confused with the Grand Kremlin Palace), opened its doors for the first time for the 22nd Congress of the Communist Party of the Soviet Union, welcoming thousands of party delegates as well as communist leaders from around the world. Today, it is still the Kremlin’s newest building and a multipurpose facility, housing large conventions, cultural displays from around the world and even its own ballet troupe. With these functions giving it continued purpose, the Kremlin’s most modern and out of place building is also one of its most significant.

Kremlin Moscow History Palace

The Kremlin State Palace stands out from the gilded, pastel buildings around it with its hulking angular lines, and large windows divided by tall marble columns. It’s crowned by a glass banquet hall, which was the brainchild of Khrushchev himself.

It features three main halls: The Great Hall, the Small Hall, and the Diplomatic Hall. The Great Hall is the largest, featuring the palace’s main stage and hosting its most important events. With a seating capacity of six thousand, it is where party congresses were held, and where some of Russia’s most prominent cultural programs take place today. The Small Hall hosts smaller musical performances, and by virtue of having removable seating, also hosts dance events, such as the World Cup of Latin American Dance, as held in June of 2021. The Diplomatic Hall provides a smaller and more intimate setting in which to enjoy performances. Last but not least, the Diplomatic Hall often hosts lesser-known artists, often performing genres that do best in closer settings, such as jazz and folk.

The facility also holds many smaller meeting rooms, intended as breakout rooms for conventions, but also used for various purposes today.

The construction of the State Kremlin Palace came with considerable controversy. Not only is it stylistically wildly inconsistent with the rest of the Kremlin’s buildings, one of Russia’s most oldest and most important historical ensembles, but it also resulted in the destruction of several older buildings to make ways for the Palace’s massive presence.

The demolished buildings included the Old Kremlin Armory Building, originally built in 1851 to house the Kremlin’s ceremonial guard and a collection of state documents and treasure. The northern wing of the Patriarchal Chambers was torn down, formerly part of the private quarters of the head of the Russian Orthodox Church.

Because these were officially designated historic buildings, the legality of razing them was questionable and likely would not have taken place had not the decision been made from the office of Khrushchev himself.

Kremlin Moscow History Old Armory

Perhaps the real loss, however, came from underground. The original plans for the palace, before the Second World War, envisioned it as truly massive facility built where Christ the Savior Cathedral now stands. In the Khrushchev era, it was planned to build a smaller but still very large building near MGU, along the river, in what were then the still-developing outskirts of the city. When Khrushchev decided to place it inside the Kremlin, its footprint was again shrunk and it faced restrictions on its height so that the view of the Dormition Cathedral would not be entirely lost.

To make up for this, the bottom part of the building was sunk sixteen meters into the valuable archeological depths of the Kremlin’s soil. The buildings torn down to make room for the Palace were themselves built over much older foundations.

Archeologists were given a short window to explore the former Palace of Natalya Narishkina, the mother of Tsar Peter I, as well the former sites of churches, royal kitchens, workshops, and studios in what was once an economic center based within the historic Kremlin.

Teams of archaeologists were assigned to the area, who, in addition to expected finds, also found a number of secret tunnels. Unfortunately, while the archaeologists did their best to learn and preserve what they could, the limited timeframe allowed by the construction of the State Kremlin Palace meant that the archaeological potential of the site was, in large part, wasted. The tunnels were filled in, the old foundations built over, and the ruins lost to history.

Today, the Palace is perhaps best known as the home of The Kremlin Ballet, which was specifically formed in 1990 under esteemed Russian artist and choreographer Andrey Petrov with the purpose of performing there after the Bolshoi Ballet stopped performing at the palace and returned to the Bolshoi, then under renovations.

While the Kremlin Ballet was created with a strong basis in the classics, they have made more recent contributions to the ballet world with a number of their own classically-inspired modern works, including a ballet adaptation of Mark Twain’s The Adventures of Tom Sawyer .

Kremlin Moscow History Palace Congress 1961

The State Kremlin Palace also hosts the Moscow Classical Ballet, which has been dancing in Moscow since 1966. Demonstrations of this tradition in the upcoming year will include the Moscow Classical Ballet’s dancing reinvention of Romeo and Juliet (which was considered scandalous when it was first performed in 1972), and a performance of Swan Lake , one of Russia’s most important contributions to dance, as performed by the Kremlin Ballet.

Built to hold important political events, the State Kremlin Palace is more a cultural building than a political one. The stage’s relatively short history promises to be subsumed by its promising future. Whatever the next big musical or cultural phenomenon in Russia is, the State Kremlin Palace will be a part of it.

  • Read a review of The Snow Maidan as performed at the State Kremlin Palace on this site.

A Tour of the Moscow Kremlin Today

Tour as reviewed by Helen McHenry, 2019

As part of our SRAS cultural program, we were given the opportunity to take a tour of the Kremlin, a historic complex and symbol of the Russian government. We met our guide outside of Red Square before walking along the Kremlin walls to the visitors’ entrance. She pointed out the swallowtail merlons bordering the wall, a design popular in 15th century Italian-style architecture, before we mounted the battlement. To travel behind the Kremlin walls, we crossed a bridge that used to span the Neglinnaya River but today acts as an archway covering part of the footpath.

Inside the Kremlin is an intriguing mix of old and new – from the 15th century walls to the 20th century block of modernism known as the State Kremlin Palace. Our guide informed us of the controversy over the palace’s design, which stands in such contrast to the more traditional styles surrounding it. The building, built under Khrushchev’s leadership primarily as a government meeting hall, has almost as many floors underground as it does above ground. Although many cried out against the building when it was built, it still stands today, where it is now used mainly to host concerts.

Kremlin Moscow History Tour

A brief walk along a path lined with cannons from the state artillery collection brought us to what appeared to be the mother of all cannons. Indeed, the Tsar Cannon is the largest bombard by caliber ever manufactured and has never been used due to its vast size. Just around the corner lay a similarly large but unused item – the Tsar Bell. Commissioned during the time of Empress Anna, niece of Peter the Great, an almost life-size image of her adorns the bell’s surface.

nikon she safari monarch 10x36 binoculars

We then traveled to Cathedral Square, which, as its name suggests, features a number of beautiful cathedrals. The overcast day did nothing to accentuate the gold domes that capped their many towers, but no amount of gloom could dim their impressive stature – so immense that photographing them from my vantage point proved a challenge. Each cathedral was adorned with more stunning iconography than the last, overwhelming to the point of monotony as we shuffled through the throngs of tourists.

Our next visit was to the State Armoury, a neoclassical building resplendent with the wealth of the tsars. We traipsed through room after room of riches, from icons, dishware, and diplomatic gifts to clothing, carriages, and thrones. What stood out to me the most was the two distinct – and sometimes warring – natures of Russian identity on display at the Armoury, East and West. The contrast was particularly obvious amongst the collections of clothing, weaponry, and thrones. The older pieces hearkened back to the time before the Western pivot of Peter the Great. While these remained just as ornately decorated as their modern counterparts, they were, on the whole, a lot less outlandish than those done in the styles of the West.

The Armoury marked our last stop within the Kremlin, so we traveled across the city center to the Cathedral of Christ the Savior. Although the cathedral is the world’s largest Orthodox church, the current building is not the original. Christ the Saviour was demolished under the reign of Stalin and was only rebuilt in the late 1990s. Since then, the cathedral has gained fame as the site of Pussy Riot’s 2012 performance, which landed three members in jail for “hooliganism.”

Our guide let us explore the church on our own, as the church requires groups to be led by its own guides. Looking forward to lunch, we opted for a quick pass through the cathedral. Had I not been so hungry, I could have spent hours inside, as every surface held intricately-painted religious imagery intermixed with adornments heavily gilded with gold. Photographs were not allowed within the cathedral, reserving this spectacle to be seen first-hand.

The Kremlin in its entirety is a spot I recommend to all visiting Moscow, as four hours within its walls was not enough for our group to even scratch the surface of the wonders within.

Tour as Reviewed by Joseph Ozment, 2016

As part of SRAS’s Russian as a Second Language (RSL) program at Moscow State University, I had the opportunity to attend a guided walking tour of the Kremlin and its museums. We had a professional tour guide provided by SRAS who was very well informed about all aspects of the Kremlin’s sites and always willing to answer questions.

The tour, as offered by SRAS each session, can differ slightly based on availability and timing. We began our day’s tour not at the Kremlin, but at the nearby Cathedral of Christ the Savior, Russia’s largest Orthodox cathedral and one of the largest Christian structures in the world. Note that there are wardrobe requirements for entering the church (men and women both must have their shoulders covered, while men cannot wear shorts and women must wear skirts at least beneath the knee).

Before going inside, we were taken around the massive structure, and given a brief yet informative overview of its history. We learned that, despite the classical style of the building, it is actually only about 20 years old, having been constructed to resemble the church that once stood on the same ground.

Church of the Annunciation in the Moscow Kremlin

During Communist times, the ground on which the Church now stands was a massive swimming pool, having been filled with water after the original Church was destroyed. The plans that the Communists originally had for the site were to construct the headquarters of the Communist Party of the Soviet Union, which would be one of the tallest structures in the world and house the office of the Soviet Union’s premier inside the head of a giant Vladimir Lenin statue adorning the top.

The Cathedral is a truly stunning structure. Comparable only to St. Peter’s Basilica in Rome in my mind, the sheer amount of open air is amazing when one considers how still and tranquil it is on the inside.

We then continued onwards to the Kremlin itself, which was teeming with guided tours from all over the world, just like ours. Seeing other groups from America, but also some from France, Italy, China, and several other European and Asian countries was very interesting, as people tend not to think of Russia as a popular tourist destination. However, tourism here has grown rapidly in recent years, particularly since the ruble lost about half its value on world markets, making Russia a much more affordable location.

Anna informed us of the purposes of all of the first structures we encountered within the Kremlin walls. First of all, though, she made sure that we were aware that the word “Kremlin” does not refer just the center of government in Moscow, but is a general word that means fortress. Most Russian cities and towns of reasonable size and with a medieval history possess a Kremlin.

We saw one of the offices in which President Putin occasionally works, as well as the large, semi-controversial event and concert hall that resides just inside the main entrance to the Kremlin. Despite its modern style that clashes somewhat with the comparatively ancient structures around it, the fact that the building is covered in glass at least ensures that it reflects the beauty and history that abounds within the Kremlin.

After seeing the aptly named Tsar Cannon and Tsar Bell, both of which are two of the largest objects of their kind in the world, and neither of which have been used for their structural purpose in their existence, we moved on to see several of the many churches that stand within the walls of the Kremlin.

Inside the Church of the Annunciation, we were informed of some of the basic components of any Russian Orthodox Church. For starters, every inch of wall is covered in some image or another, from icons of Saints to giant murals that depict judgment day and the people of earth being sent either to heaven or hell. We also learned that the altar in an Orthodox church is given its own room, to which only the priests are allowed entry. The mysticism that is native to Orthodoxy and inherent to its liturgy was embodied in all aspects of these churches.

After our tour of the Kremlin’s outside squares, we were taken on a tour of the Armory Museum, which houses outfits, household items, carriages, armor, weapons, and various sundry items that belonged to the Tsars and Tsarinas of Russia. Anna knowledgeably led us through the various styles worn by different Russian rulers, and explained the significance(s) behind the appearance of what they wore and the carriages in which they rode.

We were in awe of the beautiful jewels that encrusted everything the royals wore and every vessel out of which they drank or off of which they ate, not to mention of the thrones on which they sat. We saw gifts from foreign dignitaries and rulers, and even the museum’s collection of Faberge creations.

All in all, it was a day rich with history and made even more enjoyable by our friendly and incredibly knowledgeable tour guide, Anna. There is hardly a more essential Russian experience to have during your time in Moscow than a guided tour of the Kremlin.

Incidentally, Anna, a guide that SRAS has worked with for years, helps run a guiding collective in Moscow called Bridge to Moscow . They run many private tours and are available for custom tours and travel as well.

Latest Updates

By Josh Wilson

In addition to the changes to how the Kremlin stars are lit and renovations to the Kremlin bells in Spasskaya Tower , for instance, several recent events are of interest.

In the mid-2000s, the Russian Orthodox Church lobbied for the restoration of the Chudov Monetary and the Ascension Convent within the Kremlin walls. The idea was seriously considered and even discussed on television by President Vladimir Putin, although only in the sense of rebuilding them as cultural monuments and part of the museum complex, rather than as working religious institutions. In the end, however, the Kremlin Presidium was simply torn down in 2016 and the area left mostly open with fragments of the old foundations left under glass for viewing. The result is a Kremlin even more dominated by open space and gardens.

Wind has damaged the Kremlin walls on a few occasions. In June 1998, several of the iconic sparrow tail structures on the wall were damaged by strong winds. In April 2018, strong wind damaged the Senate Palace roof. In October 2021, scaffolding being used to restore a section of the inner wall was blown over the top of the wall, also damaging several of the iconic sparrow tail structures. In all cases, the damage was quickly repaired.

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About the authors

Serena-Keenan

Serena Keenan

At the time she wrote for this site, Serena Keenan was a rising junior at Smith College in Northampton, MA. She was majoring in Russian, East European, and Eurasian Studies with a minor in Government and a concentration in Translation Studies. She hoped to study abroad in Moscow during the spring 2022 semester. After college, she hoped to go on to work in nuclear nonproliferation. In her free time, she likes to read and crochet.

Program attended: Online Interships

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Caroline Barrow

Caroline Barrow is a graduate of Texas A&M University with a degree in International Studies and Russian. She loves traveling and hearing people’s stories. Out of the places she’s been able to visit, her favorite was Kiev, Ukraine for its beauty, history, and friendly people. She received a Fulbright English Teaching Assistantship and, at the time she wrote for this site, was spending year teaching English in Kostanay, Kazakhstan. Additionally, she was been named SRAS’s Home and Abroad Translation Scholar for the 2013-2014 cycle. Her contributions included mostly translations of articles and blog posts that will be of interest to students.

Program attended: Home and Abroad Scholar

View all posts by: Caroline Barrow

Lee Sulivan

Lee Sullivan

Lee Sullivan is an undergraduate student at Stetson University. She is currently pursuing a BS in cybersecurity and a BA in Russian, East European, and Eurasian studies. Next semester Lee will be in Vladivostok, Russia – studying the Russian language and participating in the Home and Abroad internship with SRAS. She aspires to pursue a master’s degree upon graduating.

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Benjamin Mulick

Ben Mulick, at the time he wrote for this site, was a fourth year Global Studies major at the University of Wisconsin–Milwaukee.

View all posts by: Benjamin Mulick

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Jack Fischer

Jack Fischer, at the time he wrote for this site, was majoring in Physics with Russian and Economics minors at Iowa State University of Science and Technology in Ames, Iowa. He is studied Russian as a Second Language with SRAS over the summer of 2016 to improve his command of the Russian language. In the future, he’d like to work for himself and run a business, preferably abroad.

Program attended: Challenge Grants

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Joseph Ozment

Joseph Ozment is a fourth-year International Studies and Russian Studies major at Rhodes College in Memphis, TN. He is minoring in music minor and has spent a lot of free time on music projects. He is studying Russian as a Second Language and also working an internship with The Moscow Times. He hopes to increase his Russian skills and cultural awareness so as to use his knowledge of the country and language in a professional setting in the future.

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Helen McHenry

Helen McHenry, at the time she wrote for this site, was a double major in international relations and Russian at the Ohio State University, with minors in Spanish and public policy. She studied with Russian as a Second Language with SRAS at the Higher School of Economics in Moscow in order to advance her proficiency in Russian and appreciation for Russian culture. She hoped to use the knowledge gained during her time abroad to advocate for foreign policy that strengthens relations between East and West in her future career.

View all posts by: Helen McHenry

Julia Brock

Julia Brock

Julie Brock, at the time she wrote for this site, had returned to University of Kentucky to pursue a Global Studies Certificate, with an emphasis on Russia and the travel industry. She earned prior BA and MA degrees in psychology. A few years ago, she traveled to Russia, Estonia, and Finland, and loves the culture and history of these areas. She works at the campus library, and enjoys reading, running 5Ks, and spending time with her dogs. She lived for five years in Minnesota and loved the snow, winter sports, and Museum of Russian Art.

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Hudson Dobbs

Hudson received his BA in Russian Studies with a minor in Corporate Communications from Baylor University. At the time he wrote for this site, he was serving as a Home and Abroad Scholar as part of a Spring, 2022 session of SRAS’s Language and Society program St. Petersburg. While abroad, Hudson will be researching the Russian coffee culture, as well as the evolution of specialty coffee in Russia. His goal is to open his own coffee shop in the US - taking his experiences abroad and applying them to his future business.

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nikon she safari monarch 10x36 binoculars

Nikon Monarch Dream Season ATB 10x36 Waterproof Camo Binoculars 7516

opplanet nikon binoculars durability ruggedness video

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Code: NI-BI-7516

UPC: 018208075164

Product Info for Nikon Monarch Dream Season ATB 10x36 Waterproof Camo Binoculars 7516

In addition to Nikon Monarch Dream Season ATB 10x36mm Waterproof Camo Binoculars 7516 , make sure to check other Binoculars and other Nikon Sport Optics products offered in our store.

Specifications for Nikon Dream-Season ATB 10x36 Binoculars:

Features of monarch atb dream season nikon 10 x 36mm binocular:.

  • 100% Waterproof/Fogproof
  • Ultra rugged, rubber-armored design
  • Phase-correction coated high index prisms
  • Precision aligned optics for extended viewing
  • Extended eye relief and central focus for viewing convenience
  • Fully Multicoated lenses for bright, clear images
  • Click-stop turn-and-slide eyecups for easy usage

Package Contents:

  • Nikon Dream Season ATB 10x36 Monarch Binoculars #7516

Binocular Accessories

Vortex Crossfire HD 1400 Laser Rangefinder, 5x21mm, Green/Black, LRF-CF1400

Related Products to Nikon Monarch Dream Season ATB 10x36 Waterproof Camo Binoculars 7516

Nikon monarch dream season atb 10x36 waterproof camo binoculars 7516 unavailable & discontinued models, list of unorderable models.

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IMAGES

  1. Nikon 10x36 Monarch ATB Binocular (Realtree Camouflage) 7516 B&H

    nikon she safari monarch 10x36 binoculars

  2. Monarch 10x36 ATB

    nikon she safari monarch 10x36 binoculars

  3. Nikon SHE Safari Monarch 10x36 Binoculars (Refurb)

    nikon she safari monarch 10x36 binoculars

  4. Nikon Binoculars Monarch 10x36 D CF WP

    nikon she safari monarch 10x36 binoculars

  5. Nikon She Safari Monarch ATB 10X36 6 Degrees Waterproof Binoculars

    nikon she safari monarch 10x36 binoculars

  6. Nikon Monarch 10x36 DCF Water Proof Binocular

    nikon she safari monarch 10x36 binoculars

VIDEO

  1. NEW Nikon Monarch HG Binoculars

  2. EXOTIC ANIMALS in Bahria Safari

  3. Bushnell Nitro 10x36. Bose reviews whether they really are "The Advanced" binoculars

  4. Nikon Monarch 5 8x42 Binoculars Photo slideshow

  5. Nikon™ Monarch 7 Binoculars with Brad & Mike

  6. Nikon Monarch review copy

COMMENTS

  1. Nikon SHE Safari 10x36 ATB

    SHE Safari 10x36 ATB binoculars provide impeccable magnification for all your outdoor needs. Shop these visionary full-size binoculars from Nikon! FREE 2 DAY DELIVERY ON ORDERS $399+ Previous Next. Skip ... SHE Safari 10x36 ATB. Menu. Overview. Tech Specs. Accessories. Support. i This product has been archived.

  2. Nikon 10x36 SHE Safari ATB Binoculars with Travel Bag 8235

    Product Info for Nikon 10x36 SHE Safari ATB Binoculars with Travel Bag. The new Nikon 10x36 SHE All Terrain ATB Binoculars are 100% waterproof, fog proof and shockproof Binoculars . Nikon Sport Optics has put fully multicoated lenses on the 10x 36 mm She Binoculars for bright, clear images. These Nikon SHE ATB Binoculars have precision aligned ...

  3. Nikon SHE Safari Monarch ATB 10x36 Binoculars Review

    The 10x36 Nikon SHE Safari Monarch Binoculars are O-ring Sealed and therefore fully waterproof. They have also been "nitrogen purged", which means that the air inside the binocular has been replaced with nitrogen gas, this prevents the interior optical surfaces from fogging up due to rapid temperature changes or in areas that have high humidity

  4. NIKON SHE SAFARI MONARCH BINOCULAR w/SHOULDER BAG

    Nikon introduces its first binocular, carrying bag and strap designed from the ground up specifically for the outdoor woman. The mid-sized chocolate 10x36 All Terrain Binocular (ATB) offer women the best of both worlds—trademark Nikon optical performance and attractive SHE styling. Nikon partnered with SHE Outdoor Apparel. An industry leader ...

  5. Where to Buy Nikon 10x36 SHE Safari Monarch ATB binoculars

    I am not sure if the Nikon 10x36 SHE Safari Monarch ATB Binoculars are available from First Light Optics: All Binoculars, Scopes & Accessories at First Light Optics. First Light Optics - Launched in 2006 is the UK's largest astronomy retailer. So whilst FLO specialises in binoculars and telescopes for astronomy, they also stock a massive range ...

  6. Nikon 10x36 SHE Safari ATB Binoculars with Travel Bag

    The Nikon 10x36 SHE Safari ATB Binoculars with Travel Bag is here at Opticsforyou.com and as usual we offer great prices and discounts ! ... Nikon Monarch HG 8x42mm Roof Prism Binoculars $989.95 Nikon Monarch 5 Binocular - 20x56mm $899.95 ...

  7. Nikon She Safari Monarch ATB 10X36 6 Degrees Waterproof Binoculars

    Find many great new & used options and get the best deals for Nikon She Safari Monarch ATB 10X36 6 Degrees Waterproof Binoculars Hunting at the best online prices at eBay! Free shipping for many products!

  8. Nikon Monarch HG 10x30 binocular review

    Performance. Despite the compact proportions, the view through the Nikon Monarch HG 10x30 is surprisingly crisp and clear. We couldn't hope for a sharper resolving power. We compared it with a 10x42 Nikon Prostaff 3S binocular we had to test alongside this, and for us the clarity of the Monarch HG 10x30 edges it.

  9. Nikon Monarch 10x36 Binocular New-In-Box at Roberts Camera

    Since 1957, Roberts has been your premier source for photo, video and imaging gear. Roberts Camera is focused on personal service and getting you the right equipment to accomplish your vision. We are an authorized dealer for top brands and we while we are family owned and operated in Indianapolis, we work with photographers all over the world.

  10. Nikon Monarch 10x36 DCF Binoculars

    Unbeatable. Well made and bright in low light. Solid but not too heavy. Used with Opticron tripod mount. Will last for years. These waterproof, fog-free Nikon binoculars are just the ticket for outdoor use. Bright, beautifully defined images are delivered by superior quality, multilayer coated lenses.

  11. Nikon Monarch M5 10x42 Binocular

    Nikon Monarch M7 10x42 Binocular | Waterproof, fogproof, Rubber-Armored Full-Size Binocular with ED Glass & Wide View, Locking Diopter, Limited Official Nikon USA Model 4.8 out of 5 stars 212 23 offers from $379.95

  12. Nikon 10x36 Monarch ATB All Terrain Binoculars 7514

    Nikon 10x36 Monarch ATB Binoculars 7514 are Binoculars built to handle the real world with superb hunting optics, incredible ruggedness and the optical performance only available from Nikon Sport Optics.Pick up Nikon 10 x 36 Monarch All Terrain Binocular and you'll see why they are America's Binoculars.No matter where big game hunting takes you, and no matter how tough the conditions Nikon ...

  13. Monarch ATB 8x36 vs SHE ATB vs 8x36

    The Nikon SHE ATB 8x36 & 10x36 binos were a marketing venture with Pam Zaitz who owns SHE Safari & SHE Outdoor Apparel, and is one of Nikons hunting pros. Originally when these were introduced they were selling for about $100 more than the regular ATB Monarchs. Looks like Nikon is dumping them at the $129 price.

  14. Buy Nikon Monarch M5 10x42 Binoculars

    Nikon Monarch M5 10x42 are stylish and portable binoculars with a lightweight durable body. Waterproof and comfortable to hold, they are perfect for hobbies such as mountain climbing, hiking camping or birdwatching. Equipped with extra-low dispersion (ED) glass to correct chromatic aberration, the MONARCH M5 delivers a clear view with high ...

  15. City Street Guides by f.d. walker:

    *A series of guides on shooting Street Photography in cities around the world. Find the best spots to shoot, things to capture, street walks, street tips, safety concerns, and more for cities around the world. I have personally researched, explored and shot Street Photography in every city that I create a guide for. So you can be […]

  16. Nikon MONARCH 3 10x42 ATB

    MONARCH 3 10x42 ATB binoculars provide impeccable magnification for all your outdoor needs. Shop these visionary full-size binoculars from Nikon! FREE 2 DAY DELIVERY ON ORDERS $399+ ... Registering your Nikon product allows us to send you (with your permission) important updates, ...

  17. The Kremlin: Moscow's Historical Heart Through the Ages

    The Annunciation Cathedral (Благовещенский Собор) is named after another significant moment in the life of Mary, when she was told by an angel that she would conceive Christ.This church was designed in 1484 by architects from Pskov, then one of Russia's great cities. The Annunciation Cathedral is one of the oldest examples of Russian art and architecture, since the ...

  18. MonArch Moscow Hotel official website of Moscow

    Read more. Accommodation with breakfast. Start your day with a hot, hearty breakfast buffet in a cozy restaurant. Enjoy a rich selection of delicious meals, as well as coffee, tea and juices. Read more. Moscow,Leningrad Avenue,31А, building 1. 8 495 995 00 09. [email protected]. Booking.

  19. Nikon Monarch Dream Season ATB 10x36 Waterproof Camo Binoculars 7516

    Nikon 10x36 Monarch Dream Season ATB Camouflage Binoculars 7516 are built to handle the real world with superb optics, incredible ruggedness and the optical performance only available from Nikon Sport Optics.Pick up Nikon Monarch 10 x 36 Dream Season ATB All Terrain Binoculars and you'll see why they are America's Binoculars.No matter where the hunt takes you, and no matter how tough the ...

  20. Ibls Freight Forwarding

    Moscow - Russia Directory Of Freight Forwarders, Cargo Agents, Shipping Companies, Air - Sea - Land - River - Railroad Transport, Logistics, Brokers Cargo Services.