5 cruise activities that are no longer allowed on board

Ashley Kosciolek

Everything old is eventually new again, but some former cruise ship activities have little hope of coming back. Whether you're a more experienced passenger with nostalgia or a younger cruiser who appreciates anything vintage, here are five cruise offerings that aren't likely to be resurrected.

Skeet shooting

skeet shooting on cruise ships

Yep, you read that correctly. Until as recently as the 1990s, cruise lines allowed skeet shooting off the backs of their ships. Cruisers would be given actual guns, and members of the crew would fling clay birds into the air for them to shoot.

Leaving aside the safety implications associated with handing firearms to passengers, throwing any foreign objects into the ocean is a practice that's strictly prohibited today.

What I recommend: If you want to practice your sharp-shooter skills, check out the arcade on your ship if it has one, or sign up for a round of laser tag , which is offered on several of Royal Caribbean 's and Norwegian Cruise Line 's newest vessels.

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Topless sunbathing

In the early years of cruising, ships often had designated areas, usually on the uppermost decks, for women to sunbathe topless . These days, as family cruises have become more popular, the practice has been banned on vessels that cater to North Americans.

Because Europeans are generally less puritanical with regard to the human body, a few Europe-based ships — including those in the Costa and Celestyal fleets — still allow passengers with breasts to avoid tan lines by sunbathing sans tops. Virgin Voyages allows it on its ships, too, even though the line carries a largely North American audience.

What I recommend: Either book a sailing with a line that does permit topless tanning, or, to avoid tan lines at all, stick to a covered pool area, which most ships have.

skeet shooting on cruise ships

This one comes with a caveat. Although smoking is no longer permitted in most public areas or on cabin balconies, it is still allowed in at least one or two designated areas on modern cruise ships — cigar lounges, a couple of open-deck areas and often casinos.

Banning cigarettes, cigars and e-cigarettes or vapes in most places on board is as much about safety as it is about protecting the comfort of passengers. Most cruisers don't want a nose full of smoke while they eat their dinner or enjoy a show, but fire is also the biggest threat to cruise ships.

What I recommend: If you're a fan of cigars, make your way to your ship's cigar lounge (if it has one), which is also a great option for pre- or post-dinner drinks. If cigarettes are your preference, determine where you're allowed to light up on board.

Cruises to nowhere

Remember when you were short on time or money and could simply drive to your nearest home port to hop on a brief sailing with no port calls? It wasn't that long ago that "cruises to nowhere" were still in operation, offering excellent options for quick getaways, particularly from destinations that aren't close to foreign ports.

In 2016, the United States government cracked down and began more strictly enforcing the Passenger Vessel Services Act , which requires cruise ships sailing from U.S. ports to call on at least one foreign port before returning to the U.S.

What I recommend: If you have your heart set on a super-short sailing, consider a Florida-based ship that offers quick, back-and-forth, two-, three- or four-night voyages to the Bahamas.

Netless golf-ball driving

skeet shooting on cruise ships

On cruises of yore, sporty passengers were permitted to shag golf balls off the back of the ship and straight into the water. As with skeet shooting, it was wasteful and meant putting quite a bit of rubbish into the sea.

As environmental practices continue to evolve, cruise lines have tried to find more ways to be eco-friendly, including putting the kibosh on free-range golf-ball driving.

What I recommend: If you're a duffer who just can't go a day without practicing your swing, see if your ship has a driving net on one of its top decks. If not, you might find a putting green or miniature golf course that at least will allow you to pick up a club during your cruise. Or, book a cruise to a destination — like Bermuda, the Caribbean or the British Isles — that's known for pristine courses so you can play a round when you're in port.

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Five Things We No Longer See On Cruise Ships

Cruising, like everything in the world, is constantly evolving.  Certain things about cruising however are engrained in the minds of those who experienced them first hand, or even by watching The Love Boat.  To this day for example not a cruise goes by that I don't hear someone, often younger than I, asking if they still have a midnight buffet.  Let's take a quick glimpse at five of the things we just don't see on cruise ships any longer.

beach photo of passengers on NCLSunward II

Skeet Shooting (aka Trap Shooting)

It's not hard to understand why cruise lines don't want to hand loaded shotguns over to random passengers walking away from pool bars, but this wasn't always the case.  For many years, a popular onboard activity was skeet shooting.  This usually took place towards the aft of the ship on a sea day.  Manned by an officer, guests could pay a few dollars and try their hand at shooting clay pigeons out of the air as they sailed over the ocean.  Obviously, when this activity was going on, everyone knew it, as the sounds of shotgun blasts tends to stand out on a serene Caribbean cruise.

skeet shooting on cruise ships

I don't recall seeing this much past the very early 1990's, and have heard people mention environmental concerns as one reason.  While I try to be an eco-conscious person, I really think this may have come down more to lawyers finally realizing that this was actually happening.

Ice Carving Demonstrations

Passengers weren't the only persons on deck wielding potentially dangerous equipment.  Ice carvings, still seen around ships at times, used to be an event to be witnessed.  While the occasional ice carving now happens in the galley, or at least, with little fanfare on deck, this was once an activity that drew big crowds.  Talented chefs would come out, often in the late afternoon, and place large blocks of ice on the pool deck.  Then, in a matter of minutes, they'd dazzle passengers as they turned the boring blocks of ice into unicorns, dolphins, birds, or even cruise line logos using chain-saws and sharp knives.

Ice Carving On The Celebrity Equinox

While it was an impressive display, my guess is that the popularity waned as other activities competed for the attention of passengers.  Additionally, I can't help but think the talented chefs occasionally needed a mulligan, or suffered quite the challenge lugging the carved ice back to the galley for freezing before display at the midnight buffet.  That in mind, as shown in the picture above (taken sometime since 2008), it still occasionally occurs, but isn't the staple of cruising it once was.

The Ocean As Your Driving Range

Not everything flying off the stern of a cruise ship resulted in a loud "boom", as driving golf balls off the deck into the open ocean was a popular activity until the mid-nineties.  Similar to skeet shooting, passengers would pay a few dollars for gold balls and use of a club.  The passenger would then don a safety harness of sorts as a section of railing was removed, allowing a clear path from the deck to the water below.  I never understood this activity, as there was no goal - even a child could manage to get the ball into the ocean, and there was no way to measure distance or accuracy.

skeet shooting on cruise ships

Here, the environmental concern was real, as new studies demonstrated how long the golf balls lasted in our oceans (hint, they're still there from the Love Boat days).  Eventually a company did come along with bio-degradable golf balls, but the cost was high.   Newer and cheaper formulations came about later, but by then the magic of watching one-self waste time and golf balls had passed as ships now feature virtual driving ranges that allow golfers to simulate various courses, and judge their performance.

This gold ball is actually made of lobster shell

Midnight Buffets

As mentioned earlier, it's still not uncommon to hear passengers asking about the midnight buffet.  I remember as a child eagerly awaiting midnight, as I, wide awake, would beg my parents to sleepily drag me to the midnight buffet so I could take in all it had to offer.  This didn't just mean food by the way, but the ambiance too.  An entire area of the ship was often redecorated for the event, where presentation was as important as the feast.  Ice carvings, fondue, intricately carved fruit, hand dipped chocolates - any over the top delight you could think of.  

Midnight buffer in the Colombia Restaurant on the QE2 - beyondships.com

The midnight buffet was a staple of cruising since the early days of ocean liner crossings, so what made it go away?  Ironically, the 24 hour availability of food is largely to blame.  As more ships entertained crowds later into the night, offering pizza and other snacks around the clock, deserts outside of nightclubs, etc, the justification for such a time and labor-intensive feast simply faded.  You do occasionally see similar events on ships these days, but usually just one night out of a cruise, if at all.

Low Ceilings

Number five on our list isn't an event or even something necessarily good, but those of us who cruised prior to the mid 1990's know exactly what I am talking about.  Technology today has really made the sky the limit when it comes to cruise ship construction.  There was a time however when not only were there no surfing simulators and planetariums on ships (imagine that!), but the engineering limits of the vessels were something you could literally feel, just by reaching up.  Ceilings in staterooms and public areas were generally only seven to eight feet high.  This meant that an average size adult could stand up from his or her chair at dinner, reach up, and touch the metallic ceiling panels, lights, sprinklers, etc.

skeet shooting on cruise ships

These days ships have eight story atriums, and public areas generally have ceilings no lower than ten or twelve feet high.  Even our staterooms are taller (believe it or not, our stateroom bathrooms are much larger too - but that's a story for another time).  If we were to visit ships of the past now, I'm sure we'd feel terrifically cramped by the layout, especially the low ceilings, but until twenty or so years ago, this was all we knew.

In Conclusion

We tend to look back on things with great love for the way they used to be.  I'm certainly guilty of this, even when it comes to cruising.  Sure I miss some things, like midnight buffets, but even the uncomfortably low ceilings remind me of amazing and wonderful times that have long passed.  The great news is that the second I step onto a ship now, I immediately fall in love all over again with the experience - and it's the experience of cruising that keeps me going back. It's the new amenities and technologies on today's ships however that allow me to form even greater memories that I'll look back on in another twenty years when we're shocked at how we used to cruise in 2016.

What do you miss (or not) from cruising of the past?  Remembering something important that I've missed?  Have a story to tell?  Let us know below, or reach out on Facebook or Twitter .

View the discussion thread.

skeet shooting on cruise ships

A Cruising Couple

Firearms on A Cruise Ship? Straight Talk on Ships and Guns

by Contractor | Dec 16, 2020 | resources | 0 comments

Gun laws vary by state. And each gun owner carries one for a different reason. This leads to an abundance of laws surrounding when and where you can carry. But what about when you take a cruise vacation?

Most major cruise lines do not allow passengers to bring firearms on board. This prohibition is a safety measure. Taking a gun on a cruise may also violate maritime law as well as the laws in the ports you visit.

In most cases, carrying a gun on a cruise ship is not allowed. In this article, we’ll take a look at the reasons why this is the case. We’ll also take a look at some of the legal ramifications of carrying a gun on a cruise.

Why Do Cruise Lines Ban Firearms?

skeet shooting on cruise ships

As a general point, cruise lines make efforts to ban all kinds of weapons. Of course, firearms are among the weapons about which they are most concerned. Some other weapons that commonly appear on lists of prohibited items include:

  • Pepper spray

The obvious reason for banning weapons is safety. A cruise line cannot assume that every weapon owner will act responsibly. When weapons are present, there is always the potential for accidental injury. As a preventative measure, cruise ships take the simple approach of prohibiting weapons of all forms. In their mind, this contributes to the overall security of their guests.

Firearms are particularly dangerous in this regard. Statistics support this idea. For instance, over a decade, there were more than 6,500 deaths from accidental shootings in the United States. Cruise ships want to avoid liability at all costs. That’s why they are so strict regarding what weapons you can carry onboard.

What About Concealed Carry Permits?

It is safe to assume that you can’t bring a gun on a cruise regardless of what permit you have. There are many different firearm laws in the United States. But cruise ships do not care about these laws. Instead of dealing with the details of each one, they take a blanket approach.

You may not find this to be fair, but it is the case. Depending on where you live, you may be allowed to carry a concealed weapon anywhere you go in your home state. You may even be allowed to open carry.

None of this matters to a cruise ship company. What you might see as a violation of rights, they see as a necessary precaution. So, don’t expect them to make exceptions based on the local laws in your state.

How Cruise Ships Deal with Safety Concerns

One of the primary reasons that people own guns is for protection. With proper training, an individual can defend themselves very effectively with a firearm. This desire for self-preservation often motivates people to carry a weapon everywhere they go.

If you are one of those people, the lack of guns on a cruise might make you feel unsafe. Without your gun, your main line of defense is lost. Thankfully, cruise ships are worried about your protection as well.

Though unlikely, hijackers or pirates may try to take control of a ship. Cruise companies see the risk of this kind of terrorism. In response, many cruise companies place armed security on each of their ships. These trained professionals are ready to defend the passengers on board.

The Consequences of Bringing a Firearm on a Cruise

skeet shooting on cruise ships

Common cruise ship firearm restrictions will disappoint gun enthusiasts. But they are meant to contribute to the safety of all cruise ship passengers. Still, some may reject this idea and try to bring a firearm on a cruise anyway. This is a bad idea for several reasons.

Bringing a gun on a cruise ship is a serious offense. It is an infraction that can come with punishment. This punishment can come from a few different sources. That’s because bringing a firearm on a cruise will likely violate:

  • Cruise ship guidelines

Maritime Law

  • Local port laws

Here’s why sneaking a firearm on a cruise ship is not worth the risk.

Cruise Line Punishments

As you board your cruise, the crew will screen your luggage. In this process, they are looking for any items that might pose a safety risk. They also look for other items that they ban specifically. Comprehensive lists of these items are available on cruise line websites. Some of the most common are:

  • Ammunitions
  • Illegal drugs

You can be confident that weapons will also appear on these lists. Most cruise lines have a zero-tolerance policy for banned items. Since their rules are clearly stated, you are expected to know and follow them before arrival. However, breaking these rules is not likely to have significant legal ramifications.

Instead, the cruise line will usually confiscate any banned items they find. What they do after confiscation is up to them. It will usually depend on the item. Sometimes they will hold the banned item and return it to you after the cruise. Other times they will discard the item and offer no compensation.

The last section covered how cruise lines are likely to treat your items. But these actions are relatively harmless to you compared to legal action. Cruise lines are not law enforcement agencies. So they don’t have the authority to prosecute you. However, there are plenty of domestic and international laws regarding what is legal at sea.

The laws over what you can and cannot do at sea are called Maritime Law.

Maritime Law began as a set of rules created by the United Nations. Now, these laws apply to cruise ships as well as any other ships on the ocean and are the standard for legality on the ocean.

When sailing in international waters, the laws will vary based on your vessel. Generally, the laws in international waters are the same as those in the country where the ship is registered. That means that if the ship you are on is registered in the United States, US federal law will apply.

For cruisers, this technicality won’t matter. The rules of the cruise ship will prevent you from taking a firearm on board. But at least you can know that you may not be in violation of Maritime Law. Of course, as we mentioned, that all depends on where the cruise ship is registered. Odds are Maritime Law will not be leveraged against you. But that does not mean that you are free from all law enforcement.

Local Port Laws

Let’s imagine a scenario where someone manages to get a firearm past cruise security. That person is far from safe in terms of legal action. Along with cruise ship guidelines, each port you visit will have an individual set of laws. Since cruise ships travel between multiple nations, it is difficult to predict the details of those laws.

Some ports may have very stringent laws surrounding firearms. When you are under their jurisdiction, they have full right to use those laws against you. It does not matter if you are a legal gun owner in your home state. The laws of the country you visit will always take precedence.

This is not a hypothetical threat either. Local authorities may detain you, which can lead to formal charges as well.

In 2019, one cruiser found that out first hand. A woman from Wisconsin took a cruise to the Cayman Islands. Once there, authorities found a gun and ammunition in her luggage. That cruiser now faces up to ten years in prison in the Cayman Islands.

This is just one example of a cruiser facing the law after failing to abide by firearm restrictions. It is also strong evidence that trying to bring a gun on a cruise is not a smart decision.

Are There Any Exceptions?

skeet shooting on cruise ships

So far, we have seen that it is essentially a guarantee that you can’t bring a firearm on a cruise. This is not just a violation of cruise rules. It can also be a violation of the law. Those legal consequences are enough to deter most. Yet, still, some wonder if there are any exceptions to these rules. In the following sections, we will look at some situations where people might expect an exception for carrying firearms on cruises.

Law Enforcement

There may be some confusion surrounding law enforcement on cruise ships. Many people assume that those in law enforcement should be allowed to bring their firearms on cruise ships. Since law enforcement officers are trained and have a duty to protect the public, this assumption makes some sense.

To further add to the confusion, there is something called the Law Enforcement Safety Act. This act mainly dictates that current and retired law enforcement officers can carry firearms in any state or US jurisdiction. This act came into existence in 2004. Since then, its provisions have expanded multiple times. While this act grants plenty of freedom for officers to carry weapons, there are many restrictions:

  • The officer must undergo annual firearm training.
  • Retired officers must have left service in good standing.
  • Officers must have no mental health issues.
  • Officers must refrain from abusing alcohol.
  • The act does not allow officers to carry firearms on planes or cruise ships.

At first glance, this act seems to allow law enforcement to carry firearms on cruises. But the details of the act prove otherwise. Under the Law Enforcement Safety Act, officers cannot carry firearms on cruise ships. The same is true for both planes and trains.

Sport Shooting Onboard

skeet shooting on cruise ships

By this point, you know that cruise lines are very strict about firearms. So, you might be shocked to hear this next potential exception.

Although it seems outlandish, skeet shooting was once a popular activity on cruise ships. Cruisers would take aim at clay pigeons that sailed over the ocean. An officer would supervise as people fired shotguns into the open sea. For multiple reasons, this practice is now nonexistent.

The first reason is fairly obvious. Having cruise-goers handling shotguns onboard is a safety hazard. At the time, there was likely minimal screening for those who wanted to take part. This opens the door for plenty of dangerous scenarios.

The other main reason is ecological. Sending countless clay pigeons and rounds of ammunition into the ocean is unsanitary. The practice goes against all we know today about littering and protecting natural habitats. Thankfully, onboard skeet shooting has not been common for a few decades.

Shooting Excursions

Skeet shooting onboard a cruise ship is inconceivable by today’s standards. But what is more reasonable is the idea of a skeet shooting shore excursion. There are many activities to partake in when you visit different ports on your cruise. At times, sport shooting is among them.

These shooting opportunities are not the most common type of excursion. But some cruise lines still offer the chance to fire a gun when you get off the ship. To your benefit, this takes place in a controlled environment. Those running the activity are well trained. They will usually have multiple certifications for safe firearm use.

If you are interested in sport shooting, these excursions will likely catch your eye. You might also see them as a chance to bring your gun on board. But, again, this is not the case.

A skeet shooting shore excursion does not require you to bring your own gun. In fact, they will probably prohibit it. Instead, those running the excursion will provide you with a gun and ammunition. This ensures safety so that all passengers can enjoy a secure shooting experience.

Buying a Firearm at a Port of Call

Here is another situation in which you might think there is an exception to cruise ship firearm rules. However, this one is quite unlikely to happen. Some people use firearms solely as a form of protection. Others, however, take their love of firearms beyond the functional aspect. These gun owners see guns as collector items.

As such, they may find the idea of buying a gun from a foreign country alluring. Though not common, there may be a chance to purchase a firearm or another weapon at a port of call. However, what some consider to be a valuable addition to a gun collection, the cruise ship will see as a liability.

As you return to your ship, you will need to go through security. In this process, the cruise workers may find and confiscate the weapon you purchased. Again, depending on the item, they may store it and give it to you at the end of the cruise. They may also dispose of it.

In some cases, items may go undetected in this security screening. The high volumes of people returning to the ship leave room for error. But even if you get a weapon past cruise security, you will have bigger problems later on. Let’s explore the details of those problems right now.

Bringing a Firearm Through US Customs

skeet shooting on cruise ships

By nature, a cruise will take you outside of the United States. As a result, you will need to pass through US Customs and Border Protection (CBP) upon your return. This is an important step in your travels that officials take very seriously.

Customs is the means by which the United States controls what enters the country. The following items are among those that are restricted in some way or entirely prohibited:

  • Cultural artifacts
  • Drug paraphernalia
  • Food products

Each of these comes with a detailed set of rules. To know what to expect regarding these and more, just visit the CBP online resources . You’ll find some rules to be stringent while others come with only a few restrictions.

The rules surrounding firearms are particularly strict. Let’s go through what you can expect to unfold if you attempt to bring a firearm into the country.

What Happens When You Get Off Your Cruise?

We’ll start with a general description of what it is like to return to the country from a cruise. The process is somewhat more complex than what you might imagine.

You cannot simply step off the ship and call a cab. Instead, you must pass through a multi-layered disembarkation process. Typically, this process is fairly uniform and will include these steps:

  • Closing out all onboard purchases
  • Exiting the ship in groups according to a preset schedule
  • Claiming luggage
  • Going through Customs
  • Connecting to other modes of transportation

You should expect this process to take a few hours. This is partially due to the number of travelers attempting to disembark. It also has to do with the safety and security measures that must be in place. Only after going through this in-depth process can you proceed to travel home. As it relates to firearms, going through customs is the most critical part of this process.

How Customs Treats Firearms

When you go through customs, an officer will ask you if you have anything to declare. This is your opportunity to be forthcoming regarding the items you are transporting. As a high priority item, a firearm is something you should always declare when you reach customs.

Recall the hypothetical earlier in which a cruiser buys a firearm at a port. They may get their firearm past cruise security. But getting through customs is an entirely different challenge.

To bring a firearm into the United States, you need to have a permit from the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms, and Explosives. Considering the cruiser in our hypothetical situation bought their gun at a port of call, it is unlikely they will receive this permit. Additionally, it often takes several months to be granted a permit.

This process will require a background check. It will also require the serial number of the firearms you are transporting. This can be tough to achieve depending on the firearm seller’s legitimacy at your port of call.

What Happens If I Fail to Declare a Firearm?

skeet shooting on cruise ships

As mentioned above, Customs will ask you if you have anything to declare. This implies that the system relies on you to volunteer information. The insidious among us may attempt to skirt this responsibility. But doing so is not only ill-advised. It is completely illegal.

If you fail to declare an item at customs, they may seize that item with no intention of returning it to you. This can include further punishment, as well. For instance, you may have fines levied against you.

Crossing the border in any capacity is a serious endeavor. Be sure to follow all regulations to avoid getting into any legal trouble. For those hoping to bring firearms into the country, be very careful. Seek to transport firearms in full accordance with the law. Follow all orders from Customs officers and remain compliant with the clearly listed rules of the CBP.

Best Way to Transport a Gun

Not all gun enthusiasts are as willing to break the rules as the person in our hypothetical. In fact, the majority of owners respect the important laws surrounding firearms. So, how can a law-abiding person go about bringing a gun into the United States?

The first step is to acquire a permit from the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms, and Explosives. With a long turn around time, you should do this well before your trip. This lead time implies that you are a responsible buyer.

Knowing you will be buying a gun in advance means you probably know a reputable seller in the area you are visiting. This will mean the gun you buy is likely registered and has a serial number. If you are successful in getting a permit, you need to know how to safely transport your new gun once you are back in the country. Here are a few important guidelines:

  • Ensure the firearm is unloaded
  • Put the firearm in a case
  • Lock the firearm in an inaccessible place like a trunk or checked luggage
  • Know the specific laws of the states through which your gun will pass

Following these steps may help you bring a gun home legally. However, before you do this, conduct careful legal research to ensure you know and follow all relevant laws.

Other Banned Items

It is not a surprise that guns are banned on cruise ships when you consider the safety risk. But other banned items might surprise you. Some of these are weapons. Others are items that you might think are relatively harmless.

What is Considered a Weapon on a Cruise Ship?

skeet shooting on cruise ships

The term weapon might have a different meaning to different people. Some might only consider firearms and other obvious items. Other people have a much longer list of what they consider to be dangerous.

Cruise lines fall into the second category. Along with firearms, there are a few other items of which cruise ships are wary. Some of these may seem harmless to you. But to a cruise ship prioritizing safety at all times, these are a risk:

  • Archery equipment
  • CBD and medical marijuana
  • Diving spear guns
  • Scissors longer than four inches

Some of these items seem to be ridiculous additions to the list. But these are not the only strange items you will find banned on cruise ships. Cruise lines set their own safety rules with little regard for what you think is reasonable. To further illustrate this, let’s look at one final item that is often, surprisingly, banned on many cruise ships.

Toy Guns on Cruise Ships

skeet shooting on cruise ships

That’s right, even items that look like guns are not allowed on cruise ships. Although these items are clearly toys meant for children, cruise lines are not willing to take any chances.

In fairness, these days, toy guns can have a highly realistic appearance. This adds to the excitement of playing with them. However, it is this appearance that cruise ships don’t like. Cruise lines are worried that other guests will mistake a toy gun for a real one. Presumably, the issue is that this mistake will lead to fear among the guests. Even water guns are not allowed on many ships for this reason.

The surprising part about this is what appears to be a level of hypocrisy. The same ships that ban toy guns may have a gift shop with toy weapons. The ship has no issue with children playing with the toys they are selling. But they are unwilling to allow children to bring their own toy weapons.

But even if this seems unfair, there is no getting around this rule. Even if the reasoning seems flawed, the cruise line sets the rules.

The answer here is clear. In nearly every scenario, you cannot bring a firearm on a cruise. To do so would be a violation of cruise ship rules. It is a violation of the law in many cases as well.

The same is true for other weapons as well. So, next time you are going on a cruise, don’t bring a firearm. That way, you won’t be breaking any rules. You’ll be reducing the risk of dangerous accidents too.

https://www.usconcealedcarry.com/resources/traveling-with-firearms/cruise-ships/#:~:text=Cruise%20Ship%20Travel-,Cruise%20Ship%20Travel,of%20any%20type%20are%20prohibited .

https://www.thenationalnews.com/uae/lights-out-sonic-boom-devices-and-water-jets-how-cruise-liners-keep-passengers-safe-from-somali-pirates-1.618389

https://www.theactivetimes.com/travel/cruise-ship-banned-items/slide-21

https://help.goccl.com/app/answers/detail/a_id/4090/~/carnival-cruise-line-prohibited-items%2C-exemptions-and-other-considerations

https://www.huffpost.com/entry/firearms-on-the-boat-the-_b_5148704#:~:text=We%20begin%20with%20the%20overarching,of%20the%20Sea%2C%20etc).&text=Thus%20a%20vessel%20flying%20the,ammunition%20to%20go%20with%20it .

https://www.cruisehive.com/things-you-cant-take-on-a-cruise/16610

https://www.usacarry.com/handguns-on-board-boats/

https://www.businessinsider.com/cruise-passenger-faces-up-to-10-years-in-prison-for-gun-possession-2019-4#:~:text=An%20American%20cruise%2Dship%20passenger,were%20found%20in%20her%20luggage

https://thehill.com/opinion/criminal-justice/367234-expanding-the-law-enforcement-officers-safety-act-of-2004-makes#:~:text=To%20enjoy%20the%20benefit%20of,from%20service%20in%20good%20standing.&text=For%20one%2C%20the%20carriage%20of,the%20%E2%80%9Ccommon%20carrier%E2%80%9D%20exemption .

https://www.cruisehabit.com/five-things-we-no-longer-see-cruise-ships

http://www.royalcaribbean.com/shoreExcursions/product/detail/view.do?sourcePage=shorexByPort&ProductCode=ANC4&DestinationCode=

https://www.cbp.gov/travel/us-citizens/know-before-you-go/prohibited-and-restricted-items

https://www.cruisecritic.com/articles.cfm?ID=63

https://www.ezbordercrossing.com/the-inspection-experience/transporting-firearms/bringing-firearms-into-the-u-s/

https://www.hg.org/legal-articles/u-s-customs-failing-to-disclose-items-upon-entry-48386

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Skeet Shooting At Sea: A Thing Of The Past

I remember my first cruise, the excitement of exploring the ship and all the activities it had to offer. One of the activities that caught my eye was skeet shooting, the opportunity to shoot clay targets out of the sky while cruising on the open sea.

However, as I later discovered, skeet shooting at sea is no longer offered on most cruise ships. The decline in popularity of skeet shooting at sea can be attributed to safety and environmental concerns.

Cruise lines have made efforts to replace lead pellets and clay targets with non-toxic steel shot and compacted fish food targets. While skeet shooting on land is still offered as an excursion activity in ports of call, virtual skeet shooting simulator games and other activities such as mini-golf, archery, and laser tag are available on board.

In this article, we will explore the history and popularity of skeet shooting at sea, the environmental concerns that led to its disappearance, and the alternative activities available to passengers.

  • Skeet shooting on cruise ships was popular in the 1920s and had 8 shooting stations on the aft deck, but declined in popularity in the 1980s and was completely dropped in the early 1990s.
  • Safety and environmental concerns led to the replacement of lead pellets and clay targets with non-toxic steel shot and compacted fish food targets, and skeet shooting is no longer offered on most cruise ships.
  • Sustainability efforts are important for cruise ships to minimize their impact on the environment, and travelers should be mindful of activities and their impact.
  • Alternative activities such as mini-golf, archery, and laser tag are available on board, as well as culinary experiences that are mindful of food waste and environmental impact.

History and Popularity

I’ve always been fascinated by the history and popularity of skeet shooting on cruise ships. It originated in the 1920s and became a beloved pastime for many cruisers. The activity had 8 shooting stations arranged in an arch on the aft deck.

However, the activity declined in popularity in the 1980s due to safety and environmental concerns. Efforts were made to replace the lead pellets and clay targets with non-toxic steel shot and compacted fish food targets.

Despite these efforts, cruise lines completely dropped skeet shooting in the early 1990s and replaced it with a virtual skeet shooting game. Today, skeet shooting at sea is a thing of the past, but it’s still available as an excursion activity in ports of call and virtual skeet shooting simulator games are available on some ships.

The evolution of skeet shooting on cruise ships is a testament to the industry’s commitment to ensuring the safety and sustainability of the environment.

Environmental Concerns

It’s important to consider the environmental impact of activities offered on cruise ships, especially with the current crisis facing our planet.

Skeet shooting, once a popular activity on the aft deck of cruise ships, has been dropped due to safety and environmental concerns. The use of lead pellets and clay targets posed a danger to wildlife and ocean ecosystems.

In response, cruise lines made efforts to replace these materials with non-toxic steel shot and compacted fish food targets. However, the impact on wildlife cannot be ignored, and the activity was ultimately replaced by a virtual skeet shooting game.

Cruise ships have a responsibility to implement sustainability efforts and minimize their impact on the environment. Adding waste to the ocean, even in the form of non-toxic materials, cannot be justified given the current environmental crisis.

As travelers, it’s important for us to be mindful of the activities we participate in and their impact on the world around us. While skeet shooting at sea may be a thing of the past, there are still plenty of engaging and entertaining activities offered on board, such as mini-golf, archery, and laser tag, that do not harm the environment.

Alternatives and Excursions

While I’m not exactly eager to sign up for an excursion that involves hitting golf balls off a ship and potentially harming the ocean, I’m excited to explore the other engaging activities offered on board, like mini-golf, archery, and laser tag. These activities provide a fun and safe alternative to activities like skeet shooting that have been discontinued due to environmental concerns. Plus, they offer a chance to compete with fellow passengers and show off your skills.

If you’re still looking for a skeet shooting experience, there are excursion options available in ports of call. However, if you don’t want to leave the ship, virtual simulators are a great option. These games provide a realistic shooting experience without the environmental impact of traditional skeet shooting.

Whether you’re a seasoned shooter or a beginner, these virtual simulators offer a fun and safe way to enjoy the sport while on board a cruise ship.

Other On-Board Activities

I always enjoy exploring the variety of on-board activities available during a cruise, such as mini-golf, archery, and laser tag. These activities provide a break from the typical lounging by the pool or watching shows in the theater. Additionally, they offer a chance to interact with fellow passengers and make new connections. One thing I particularly appreciate about these activities is the opportunity to try something new and challenge myself in a fun and safe environment.

When it comes to food options, the abundance and variety on a cruise can be overwhelming. From fine dining restaurants to buffet-style options, there is something for everyone. However, it is important to be mindful of food waste and considerate of the environmental impact. Despite this, it’s hard not to indulge in the delicious offerings available. On my last cruise, I made it a point to try something new each day, from sushi to exotic fruits. It was a great way to expand my culinary horizons and make the most of the dining experience on board.

What was the reason behind the decline of skeet shooting on cruise ships in the 1980s?

Oh, the 1980s. The decade of big hair, neon colors, and the decline of skeet shooting on cruise ships. Changing attitudes towards safety and the environment were the reasons behind its decline.

Were there any efforts made to make skeet shooting on cruise ships more environmentally friendly?

Efforts were made to make skeet shooting on cruise ships more environmentally friendly, including replacing lead pellets and clay targets with non-toxic steel shot and compacted fish food targets. However, challenges with waste and safety concerns led to its discontinuation.

Are there any cruise lines that still offer skeet shooting on their ships?

I couldn’t find any cruise lines that offer skeet shooting on their ships. Safety concerns and environmental impact led to its replacement with virtual skeet shooting and alternatives like mini-golf and archery.

Are there any other activities that have been discontinued on cruise ships due to environmental concerns?

I’ve discovered that cruise lines have discontinued several activities due to environmental concerns. Alternative activities like mini-golf, archery, and laser tag are available, and sustainability initiatives aim to reduce food waste and minimize ocean pollution.

Are excursions such as skeet shooting offered as part of the cruise package or do they require additional payment?

Want to add some excitement to your cruise? Excursions like skeet shooting may require additional payment. Inclusion in the cruise package varies and should be checked beforehand.

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20 Mind-Blowing Cruise Ship Amenities You Didn't Know Existed (Slideshow)

skeet shooting on cruise ships

4D Entertainment

3D is  so  twentieth century, which is why numerous ships across numerous cruise lines now offer 4D entertainment, where guests can watch 3D  movies  while smells are pumped into the theater, squirts of liquid spatter them, and the seats quiver and shake. This feature can be found aboard  Carnival  (on the Carnival Breeze), Costa (Deliziosa, Diadema, Fascinosa, Favolosa, Serena, and Luminosa), and MSC (Fantasia,  Preziosa , Divina, Magnifica, and Splendida). The visuals include a roller coaster simulation as well as numerous animated adventures for younger guests.

Bumper Cars

As if roller skating, Xbox, ping pong, and basketball don't provide enough in the way of physical fun,  Royal Caribbean 's bi-level SeaPlex (aboard the Quantum of the Seas and Anthem of the Seas) also offers a bumper car arena. Each of the dozen mini-autos are capable of holding two people, and the best part: none of the old school sparks overhead to exacerbate your fire fears — the last thing you'd want to worry about while floating in the middle of the ocean.

Dinner and a Circus Show

Fine dining at sea is impressive. Putting a whole circus show on a ship is fascinating. But combining the two? Unimaginable. This is exactly what the  Norwegian Epic  does with its Cirque Dreams & Dinner experience, which places an entire show of hula-hooping, acrobatics, aerialists, and music in a 265-seat theater where waiters are serving dinner and drinks throughout. Dinner and a show is one thing, but basically being part of the production unfolding onstage is beyond impressive.

For more of the best cruise ships for food, click here.

Escape the Room

Escape rooms are all the rage right now, with folks lining up and paying money for the opportunity to be locked in a room where they need to solve a series of puzzles using elements of the room in order to escape within a set time limit. Puzzle Break was one of the first companies to offer this experience, and it has since brought its activity to the seas on  Royal Caribbean 's MS Anthem of the Seas with "Escape from the Future." This activity is complimentary.

Formula 1 Simulator

Driving a car at 200 mph isn't possible on a cruise ship, but MSC Cruises comes pretty close. The line's Fantasia-class ships (Fantasia, Splendida, Divina, and  Preziosa ) feature a Formula 1 virtual simulator where kids and adults alike can climb into the driver's seat of a replica racer and feel the bumping, bouncing, and banking as they watch the race unfold on the surrounding screens.

Looking for a sure-fire way to beat the heat? The Norwegian Breakaway, Getaway, and Epic ships contain various  ice bars , where the temperature is set to a cool 17 degrees Fahrenheit. It has to be, since the ice block seats, ice-covered bars, and carved-from-ice glasses couldn't survive otherwise. However, so guests don't stick to everything like a scene from  A Christmas Story  or  Dumb & Dumber , the bar provides hooded coats and gloves — although some guests opt to simply (and crazily) drink in their beachwear instead. A $20 entry fee includes two specialty drinks and 45 minutes in the bar. If this seems brief, it won't once you enter the chilly chamber — even the bartenders work in 30 minutes shifts.

For more on ice establishments, click here to read about 13 cool ice hotels and restaurants.

Celebrity Cruises' Lawn Club Grill  isn't just a fancy name, the open-air restaurant is actually surrounded by green, growing grass. Each guest aboard the Silhouette and Reflection also have the option to grill their own food to personalized perfection (or can have it grilled for them, because vacation) or order salads, gourmet build-your-own  flatbreads , and other eats. The surrounding grass is also ideal for bocce, croquet, or picnics — using baskets, food, and drink that can be ordered onboard.

Thinking of picnicking? Check out these nine tips for a perfect outing.

Observation Tower

Looking for the best possible view on a cruise ship?  Royal Caribbean  puts competitors to shame with its Quantum-level ships (MS Quantum of the Seas, MS Anthem of the Seas, and MS Ovation of the Seas [launching in late 2016]), all of which offer an observation pod that extends from a 135-foot crane arm to lift guests (up to 14 at once) 300 feet above sea level and offer 360-degree  views  of the sea, the ship, and the ports of call. The 15-minute "North Star" experience is free, except during sunrise and sunset, when it costs extra. Reservations can be made in advance online.

Looking for the best sunset view while dining? Try one of these 50 restaurants.

Open Bridge

Here's a real treat for those interested in how cruise ships operate mechanically and how the crew plans and controls their movement.  Windstar Cruises  have an "Open Bridge" policy, which allows passengers to visit the bridge at any time and chat with the captain and his officers 24/7. Ask about their duties, ask about the navigational instruments, or even go at night and ask about the constellations above — it's  your  bridge.

Planetarium

Even with hundreds of cruise ships currently in existence, only one offers a planetarium:  Cunard's Queen Mary 2 . The QM2 has a 473-seat theater with a retractable dome that converts the room into a 150-guest planetarium, which was developed in association with  New York's Hayden Planetarium . The shows run four times per day, and the seats are designed to lean back for optimal viewing. The Illuminations theater is located on deck 3, and is also used as a cinema.

Robot Bartenders

Ever feel like your bartender isn't treating you like a human being? On  Royal Caribbean 's Quantum of the Seas and Anthem of the Seas this is expected, as the Bionic Bar watering hole is staffed by  two robot bartenders  who mix, shake, and stir custom drinks from liquor bottles hanging from the ceiling. Unfortunately, the barkeeps won't be able to lend an ear and listen to your troubles, but  you also won't be able to tick them off  with your complicated order either.

Click here for America's 25 best (human) bartenders.

Ropes Course

The new  Norwegian Escape  (launched in the fall of 2015) offers a unique challenge in the form of a ropes course. This top-deck experience involves 99 exhilarating challenges throughout a dizzying construction of beams, platforms, tracks, ladders, and lines. Guests can take a ride on one of five "sky rails" (similar to zip lines; more on that later) or walk one of two six-inch steel planks that extend eight feet over the side of the ship, all while enjoying beautiful views from high atop the 20-deck ship — for free!

Here are 16 things to know about the new Norwegian Escape.

When at sea, cruise ships offer breathtaking views at all times of day, and in all directions. Well, almost all directions. You can look up, you can look all around, but aside from leaning over a railing or balcony (not recommended), you generally can't look directly down. That is, until the  Princess Cruises  introduced the SeaWalk, a 60-foot-long glass-enclosed walkway that extends in an arc over the side of the ship, on its Regal and Royal ships. Not only does this experience allow for pristine panoramic views, but guests can also look down and see the ocean rushing by 128 feet below the walkway. Obviously at sunset the views are even more remarkable.

Click here to read about celebrity chef Curtis Stone's new Princess Cruises restaurant.

Shooting Ranges

Shooting skeet off the back of cruise ships used to be a standard activity, but for some reason, it no longer exists on any line. (Apparently some people decided bringing guns aboard ships was a bad idea, or something.) But the  Royal Princess  has come up with a solution: a virtual shooting range. Using laser technology, guests can now have a computerized mechanism launch the clay pigeons on a screen and fire at them using an electronic gun. Kind of like Nintendo's  Duck Hunt , but a lot more advanced (and with a lot less dog laughter).

Skydiving Simulator

Ever want to try skydiving, but have a fear of heights? As long as you don't also have a fear of cruises, you're in luck: All three of  Royal Caribbean 's Quantum-level ships (MS Quantum of the Seas, MS Anthem of the Seas, and MS Ovation of the Seas [launching in late 2016]) feature RipCord by iFLY, a  skydiving  simulator. Simply suit up in a jumpsuit and hop into the 23-foot-tall vertical wind tunnel, and upward-moving air will lift you up to mimic the feeling of skydiving — while never rising more than 10 or 12 feet off of the ground. This two-minute-long activity is complimentary, and reservations can be made online prior to the cruise.

Looking for another thrill-seeking activity? Check out the 10 craziest things to do in Las Vegas.

Snow Grotto

The heat and steam provided by saunas are said to assist in overall physical health and wellness, but apparently the same philosophy can be applied to the cold. Thus,  Viking Cruises  offers a "Snow Grotto" where the air is chilled below freezing and snowflakes gently fall from the ceiling. After enjoying this frosty retreat, guests can slip over to the  Viking Star 's sauna, thermal pool, hot tub, heated loungers, and therapeutic showers.

Surf Simulator

Similar question to the skydiving simulator: Ever want to try surfing, but have a fear of big waves? (Or  sharks ?)  Royal Caribbean  has you covered on almost all of its ships. On the Freedom, Independence, Liberty, Allure, Oasis, Navigator, Voyager, Anthem, and Quantum of the Seas, guests can grab a board and hang ten on the  FlowRider  — which mimics the surfing experience by continuously pumping water upward at high speeds over a stationary surface. Still hesitant? Try boogie boarding on the FlowRider instead. Either way, don't eat the wave; patrons of the Wipeout Bar will be watching.

Truly Local Beers

If you're anything like me,  my condolences   your beer of choice is usually a local one . But what exactly qualifies as "local" on a cruise ship? For  AIDA Cruises  this is a simple question, because the AIDAblu, AIDAsol, AIDAmar, and AIDAstella all brew their own beer in 265-gallon copper tanks aboard each of the ships. The beers are brewed with seawater (purified and desalinated, of course) and can be enjoyed in one of the onboard beer halls and beer gardens. Guests can even sign up for a brewing workshop and receive a "brewing diploma" after its successful completion.

Click here for a list of the best craft breweries in America.

Water Coaster

Roller coasters  don't exist on cruise ships (yet...), but Disney created a water slide that provides a similar experience. Called the "AquaDuck," the 765-foot-long slide features turns, drops, and g-forces that mimic the feeling of riding a rollercoaster, but with guest riding on a tube instead. The ride even has an uphill portion, where guests are propelled by high-power water jets. Two ships, the Disney Dream and Disney Fantasy, offer this activity, which also provide some great views of the surrounding area as one turn of the slide protrudes 12 feet off the side of the ship and 150 feet above the ocean. The Disney Magic, Norwegian Getaway, Norwegian Breakaway,  MSC Preziosa , and Carnival Sunshine also feature especially notable slides.

Looking for more on Disney? See the 10 best restaurants in Disney World's Magic Kingdom here.

Looking for a mild thrill, but also a way to quickly get across the ship? Well then  Royal Caribbean  (these people again?!) has just the thing: an intra-ship zip line. Guests can strap into a harness nine decks above the top of the ship and zoom across 82 feet of either the Oasis of the Seas or Allure of the Seas in a matter of seconds. As is the case with most Royal Caribbean activities, there is no charge to ride.

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6 Activities on Cruises You Can’t Participate In Anymore

Ben Souza

Cruise lines ended this practice more than 10 years ago and you can no longer throw anything into the ocean.

2. Streamers at sailaway – Common place in the 70’s and 80’s, passengers would throw streamers and confetti over the side of the ship as they celebrated sailaway, waving to their family and friends on the dock. This fun celebration was featured in many episodes of the Love Boat.  Sound like a lot of fun?  It was, but the practice of throwing anything overboard ended many years ago.

3. Hitting golf balls into the ocean – Passengers were once allowed to practice their drives by hitting golf balls off of the ship and into the ocean.  The practice was stopped in 1990 after the International Maritime Organization passed a law outlawing the dumping of plastic waste into the sea.  Golf simulators were added to some ships while a few luxury ships, switched to biodegradable golf balls made of fish food.

The A-Team filmed an episode in 1985 (Season 4, Episode 2) on Carnival Cruise Line’s M.S. Tropicale and in one scene, you can see a passenger hitting golf balls off of the aft of the ship.

4. Smoking in the dining rooms and staterooms – Just a few years ago, passengers were able to not only smoke on their balconies, but also in their staterooms.  Now, all cruise lines have now ended this practice and every stateroom and balcony are smoke-free zones.

balcony on cruise ship

5. Visits from friends and family on embarkation day – Years ago, family and friends of passengers were able to board the ship on embarkation day to not only wish their loved ones a bon voyage, but to also get a taste of the on board experience. Tighter security measures ended this practice over 20 years ago.

However, Princess Cruises launched the “ Bon Voyage Experience ” in 2010 where friends and family can come aboard for up to 4 hours on embarkation day.  The cost is $39 per person and includes a four-course lunch in the dining room, a guided ship tour, and a souvenir photo.  The program is limited to 50 guests on each embarkation day and the cost can be applied towards a future cruise with Princess.

A recent change to the program will allow anyone to take part in this Bon Voyage Experience, even if you’re not affiliated with any booked guest.

6. Skeet shooting – Passengers were once able to practice their skeet shooting off the back of the ship for $1 a shot.  Skeet shooting on cruise ships was stopped a couple decades ago.

Do you remember of these past activities on cruises?  Let us know in the comment section below.

Learn the cruise secrets most people don't know and cruise like a boss. Check out Intelligent Cruiser here for a better cruise vacation. (Sponsored)

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In 1995 I was on the Regent Star and participated in a skeet shooting contest and won 1st place hitting 20 for 20. The 2nd place hit 18 of 20.

Midnight dessert buffets. Saw one own my first cruise, never again. Maybe the mid 90’s?

My Marine outfit used to shoot skeet off the stern of naval ships transporting us from North Carolina to the Caribbean and from Vietnam back to Long Beach.

In addition, I would troll behind the ship with a small weight on the end of my fishing line. I know if I ever got a hookup, there was no way that ship would stop–nor could I pull in a fish, at that speed, so I didn’t bother with lures or hooks. Just a sinker. Since less than 1% of all fishing is actually catching, I was able to enjoy 99% of deep sea fishing, on what was otherwise a rather monotonous Cruise.

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Six things you can no longer do on a cruise

by Ellie Baxter 21 April 2023, 10:40 pm 4 Comments

Couple sat at the front of a boat

The cruising industry has experienced a significant transformation over the past few decades, driven by innovation and technology.

Cruising has a long history that dates all the way back to 1901. The most famous cruise ship, the Titanic , was revolutionary in its time, featuring impressive design elements such as pools, restaurants and onboard activities. Today, modern cruise ships are nearly five times as large as the Titanic . These massive mega-ships are designed to be floating resorts.

As the industry has evolved, traditional cruise ship activities have seen changes in popularity and some have been abandoned altogether. Factors such as changing consumer preferences, evolving regulations and the impact of technology have reshaped the landscape of onboard activities on modern cruise ships.

Here are six abandoned cruise ship activities that were once popular but have now faded into maritime history.

Skeet shooting

skeet shooting on cruise ships

Skeet shooting, also known as trap shooting, was a popular activity on cruise ships in the 1980s and 1990s. This involved guests using a shotgun to shoot at clay pigeons flung into the air by crew members on sea days. It’s not hard to understand why this activity is no longer an option. Not only is having a loaded firearm on a ship a major safety hazard, but throwing foreign objects into the ocean is now strictly forbidden due to environmental regulations and efforts to protect marine life.

Another issue is the noise, can you imagine trying to enjoy a cocktail on the deck with a background of shotgun blasts?

Wooden horse racing

Another favourite cruise activity of the ’80s and ’90s was horse decorating. Wooden horses were used for a gambling derby and passengers could participate by purchasing and decorating their own horse to take part in the race.

Each horse would be given a name and an imaginative backstory, which would be shared with the audience before the race. These humorous biographies added to the fun and excitement of the event.

The derby itself would typically take place in a lounge or on the pool deck, where six horses would compete in a dice betting game. Passengers would place their bets on the horse they thought would win, and then cheer on their chosen horse during the race. The winning horse would receive a cash prize.

Onboard driving range

Can you imagine hitting golf balls off the back of a ship at full power? Well, cruise ship passengers used to have that option. A section of the railing would be removed, and with a bucket of balls and a club, guests could take aim at the ocean from the top deck. Of course, concerns about the environmental impact arose as the golf balls were not biodegradable, and the more eco-friendly options were expensive.

As cruise ship activities evolved and new options emerged, this practice was eventually abandoned. The thrill of hitting golf balls into the ocean was replaced with onboard golf simulators, offering a virtual golfing experience to passengers.

Ice sculpting

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While you may still come across ice sculptures on display during modern cruises, in previous decades, these frozen works of art were much more prevalent and spectacular. Ice sculpture carvings on the pool deck were a highlight, where talented chefs would showcase their master carving skills using massive blocks of ice, creating intricate displays in a matter of minutes to the awe of the crowds.

The ice sculptures were then featured at the popular midnight buffet, adding an extra touch of elegance to the dining experience.

Midnight buffet

Throughout the history of cruise ships, dining has always been a central activity for guests. However, in recent years, the tradition of the midnight buffet has been slowly phased out. Once considered a “cannot be missed” event onboard, midnight buffets were known for their extravagant displays of food, including fondue, ice carvings, chocolate and more.

Most cruise ships now offer multiple dining options with food available nearly 24/7, so the need for a midnight buffet to provide late-night snacks has diminished. Another factor contributing to the decline of the midnight buffet is the concern over waste. These grand events often resulted in significant food waste.

Passenger talent nights

While karaoke remains a popular cruise ship activity, one abandoned cruising tradition is the passenger talent show. In the past, passengers onboard cruise ships had the opportunity to take the stage and showcase their talents to fellow travellers. This could include singing, dancing, magic, comedy or any other skill they wanted to share. The shows would typically have a wide range of talent on display, from mediocre to outstanding.

These days, passenger talent shows are less common. Some cruise ships may host crew talent shows, which are typically more regulated in nature.

Cigar bars and smoking

Cigar bars, once a staple of some cruise ships, have become less common due to changing attitudes towards smoking and increasing restrictions on smoking in public areas. Many modern cruise lines have reduced the size of their onboard cigar bars, or eliminated them altogether to comply with stricter smoking regulations.

Which of these abandoned cruise ship activities would you most like to see make a comeback? Let us know in the comments section below.

Also read: Who enforces the law on cruise ships?

skeet shooting on cruise ships

Written by Ellie Baxter

Writer and editor with interests in travel, health, wellbeing and food. Has knowledge of marketing psychology, social media management and is a keen observer and commentator on issues facing older Australians.

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Has anyone noticed the writers of articles NEVER reply to comments made below them?

I’d have thought it would be courteous to do so & say ‘thank you’ especially when information is found they’ve missed or incorrectly stated, making the above words ‘ travel, has knowledge of & is a keen observer’ under Ellie Baxter’s name make you wonder, in reference to the comment by Tom Tank.

I fail to note and see the difference

A point of accuracy here. The Titanic was not a cruise ship but an ocean liner. The North Atlantic was the block between Europe and America and was alive with these liners. There was a race to have the fastest crossing, The “Blue Riband” was the title the fastest ship carried until it’s speed was surpassed.

Spot on Tom. The liner was a mode of travel not a recreational pursuit – although it would have been a wonderful experience for those lucky enough to sail first class.

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  • What Ever Happened To........???

Skeet shooting

By clopaw , February 9, 2007 in What Ever Happened To........???

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Cool Cruiser

I work with a guy who is an avid hunter, and he mentioned that his wife doesn't hunt but she does shoot clay pigeons. Was that once an activity on cruise ships? If it was, when did it stop?

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The only time I ever did skeet shooting was on my European cruises, both in the Med and the No Sea....however never on any of the US home ported ships. I have to admitt it was fuan.

I have to disagree with the previous post. I have sailed on Norwegian in the Caribbean and they always had skeet shooting. No more of course like the other lines...they all blame pollution...what a crock!

After 9/11, they were afraid to have a shotgun in the hands of a passenger!:cool:

KINGBOBOFTHENORTH

I have to disagree with the previous post. I have sailed on Norwegian in the Caribbean and they always had skeet shooting. No more of course like the other lines...they all blame pollution...what a crock!   Well don't forget that the Society For Prevention of Cruelty to Skeet was pretty active as well!!

chris sea

The last tme I remember skeet shooting, was off the back of a Carnival ship in the early 1990's.

CarobBean

Monarch of the Seas, 9/96...there was a German fellow who hit every single clay pigeon they threw...even called the last one for just above the water! Very impressive! I went 4 for 10, and my wife bested me by one...have had a hard time living that one down!

Too bad they've stopped this activity...always enjoyed the spectacle!

I can understand stopping golf balls into the sea (not really, they could easily be made to decompose) but the clay pigeons and steel shot? Clay may not rot away, but steel hasn't got a chance!

Oh well, there's always Bingo...NOT;)

Skeet shooting was stopped long befor 9/11....it was based on pollution concerns. Sealife would, could, and did eat the clay.....not at all good for them. But I do miss it........was a great way to pass time on days at sea.

I don't doubt what you say but it is a crock! You know and I know that if the cruise lines wanted to have skeet shooting, they could get clay pigeons made of that biodegradable stuff that they make the golf balls from that are environmentally friendly and hit off of the back of cruise ships. What are they going to say next? The lead pellets from the shotgun shells are polluting the environment? Give me a break! I am all for saving the environment but these excuses are insignificant and lame!:cool:

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BearySweet2Cruise

BearySweet2Cruise

I am in favor of skeet shooting.. I enjoy that activity.. can not imagine at sea, but it would be fun.. :)

Although 9/11 was a good enough reason to stop giving loaded guns to inebriated passengers on a moving ship's deck, there is one other reason that really forced skeet shooting to be stopped. Every shotgun shell has a plastic sleeve inside that holds the shot seperately from the powder that propels it. When the gun is fired, that plastic sleeve is propelled into the sea.

Is it a lot of plastic?? No. Very little in fact.

But the US Coast Guard says it is enough plastic to fine the cruise line $5,000 for each piece that enters the water.

With dozens or even hundreds of passengers - many with video cameras - witnessing and recording the illegal activity, it would be very foolish and expensive for the cruise lines to sponsor this behaviour.

The clay pigeons could be made from compressed fish food. A few companies are making golf balls in this manner, allowing cruise lines to once again offer golf ball driving on the aft decks. But it is the plastic sleeve in the shotgun shell that stops the skeet shooting.

Is this ridiculous?? Many - including me - think so.

If you feel strongly about it, you might want to write your congressman.

By the way, my ship had an "oil spill" last year at a remote pacific island. ONE DROP of lubricating oil was mistakenly dropped into the sea by an engineer who was servicing our tender platform. We didn't think it was serious, and didn't report it to the US Coast Guard immediately - especially considering that we were thousands of miles from the USA. The US Government fined us $10,000 for the "spill", and another $5,000 for not reporting it in a timely manner.
I find this hard to believe, but it could be true. its easy to say something with nothing backing it up. But if you post some proof well then thats another story

I don't doubt anything you posted and I guess in a way seems to be a logical explanation.

However, the only problem I have in accepting it is the US Coast Guard and any enforcement of environmental rules by that organization.

If a ship is in International Waters then who made the law about plastic shells falling in the ocean? The United Nations? I don't know if the US Coast Guard has the right to enforce the pollution from plastic shells in international waters based on a US law...I thought their jurisdiction on such matter as pollution and drunk driving ended at the US border (waters) or have they been renamed the "global" coast guard?

Please advise...

This is very accurate. While filling up my ship in the florida keys once a small amount of fuel oil leaked out of an improperly tightend release valve. A staff member from the docks filling my vessel dove on to my ship stopped the small trickle from reaching the edge of the deck. Apparently if the oil reached the water it would have been a $10,000 fine for the company. Not something a boss would have enjoyed.

Also I am not sure where the coast guard could issue a fine for something in international waters, but they can require compliance with certain rules if you intend to dock in a us port. Maybe the shotgun rule is one of them.

gaileeh

I have sailed on Norwegian in the Caribbean and they always had skeet shooting. No more of course like the other lines...they all blame pollution...what a crock!   After 9/11, they were afraid to have a shotgun in the hands of a passenger!:cool:

Well lets all pollute the planet, why not, we won't have to live here much longer...Just let our kids worry about cleaning up the mess. Not only is it a pollution problem, what about looking at it from another persons prospective...most people go on a vacation to relax and unwind. Not to listen to gun fire off the back of the ship. :confused:

For your information skeet shooting just like shuffleboard had been a long-time traditional sport on cruises - so, if you don't like the sound of a shotgun then don't frequent the stern of the ship for a about an hour or so in the afternoon when it traditionally took place.

Your statemen reminds me of a person who buys a house near an airport and then complains about the noise and safety factors and tries to get it shut down.

As far as pollution, give me a break! Do you really think an hour or so of one person shooting at bio-degradable pigeons is going to have an impact on the environment? I don't!

If you are really interested in stopping pollution and saving the planet, take a look at countries like China, Russia and India and see who the major offenders are and whose governments are blind to it for the sake of economic progress. Don't buy products made in those countries.

Do you know that China buys factories and mills in this country that cannot operate due to pollution regulations and ships them to China for use where there are no laws. China loves to buy old US Steel mills.

Did you know that all old ships including ships like the Norway go to India for breaking? The Indians just cut the ships up on a beach and have no rules about polluting the land, ocean or air.

As far as the Russians, only God knows what they are doing over there with there radioactive waste!

Your conern about skeet shooting ruining the environment is funny even though your intentions are good.:cool:

chasetf

Have not seen it since our 1991 cruises. I think it just lost popularity due to the pollution debate.... but probably the real reason was the cost..... Last time I did it, it was $1 a shot in 1991. Probably would be $3-4 a shot nowadays. :eek:

Well lets all pollute the planet, why not, we won't have to live here much longer...Just let our kids worry about cleaning up the mess. :confused:

I don't think driving to the airport, flying to a port, floating around on a hugh diesel fuel driven boheameth, daytripping on polluting buses across pristine island ecosystems while consuming massive amounts of food, beverages and generating large amounts of waste really helps those "non sheet shooters" on the front of the ship have a much smaller "carbon footprint"...unless of course you buy some pre cruise carbon indulgences from Al Gore, Inc. Last I checked, those planes, ships and vehicles don't run on rainbow beams and fairy dust.

Only saying I don't think skeet shooting off the back of a ship is the "inconvenient truth" here!

  • 4 weeks later...

3,000+ Club

The US Coast Guard (and US Navy) has been stopping, boarding, and arresting ships in international waters for many years. We see them all over the Caribbean every week.

When my Bahamas Flagged international cruise ship leaves the port of Miami and goes into international Waters, we open the Casino.

But if a non-American wins more than $1200 in that international casino - in international waters - my international cruise line is required to collect income taxes from that winning non-US citizen and pay that money to the US Internal Revenue Service. The fingers of the US Government reach very far.

  • 3 weeks later...

DeepWaterMariner

DeepWaterMariner

I suppose it is possible that shooting clays from cruise ships was stopped due to environmental reasons but it defies logic...if a regiment of duck hunters can shoot cases of shotgun shells from duck blinds around a small bay without causing an environmental impact it doesn't make sense that a half dozen cruise ship passengers in the middle of the ocean firing 10 shots each would do more damage. I think cost and safety were a bigger factor. It never was a cheap activity, in fact very overpriced compared to shooting clays on dry land. And it's hard to keep some passengers from jumping off of cruise ships these days. We certainly don't want them armed.

  • 1 month later...

My wife and I shot skeet from the stern of the Carnival Jubilee in 1992 on our honeymoon. Was fun.

I went first...hit 5 of the 10, and was pleased thinking that it would impress my new bride. She went next and hit 8 of the 10. There were hundreds of folks crowding the rails applauding her.

Put me in my place real quick...and I've never forgotten that lesson!

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Failure to launch

Recently, I tuned into an old episode of “The Love Boat” and watched passengers having a good time skeet shooting off the back of the Pacific Princess. That got me to wondering: Whatever happened to skeet shooting? Come to think of it, what ever happened to formal night? And cash tips? And the midnight buffet? Some venerable cruise traditions have recently died a natural death, while others, less loved, have gotten the hook. Herewith a look back at some cruise highlights that have come and gone.

No smoking! Oh, never mind In November 1998, Carnival Cruise Lines launched the Paradise, the world’s first completely nonsmoking ship. The ship was designed and built by nonsmokers and smoking on board was verboten; in fact, anyone caught smoking was given the heave-ho at the next port and was slapped with a $250 fine. Fast-forward five years: Now the Paradise has been moved to the West coast, where it sails three- and four-day cruises to Mexico -- smoking permitted.

“With only one ship operating this itinerary, we couldn't limit the vessel to nonsmokers,” says spokesman Vance Gullicksen. While that may be true, industry insiders say the decision to go smoking came down to money. Where there’s smoke, there’s revenue -- specifically, gambling revenue. Turns out nonsmokers don’t drink or gamble as much as their nicotine-addicted shipmates.

The disappearing midnight buffet It used to be a cruise cliché, the gluttons’ favorite meal: the midnight buffet. These days, the midnight buffet is slim pickings, indeed -- if you can find one at all. How come? Cruise lines are just reflecting the tastes of today’s passenger, offering lighter fare and specialty eating events instead of the late-night groaning board. For example, Carnival now offers its “Gala Midnight Buffet” just once on cruises seven days or longer, and Norwegian Cruise Line usually offers one midnight chocolate buffet on its cruises. If you’re a stickler for tradition, try Costa Cruises, which still indulges its passengers with its lavish, over-the-top midnight buffets.

Formal attire? It’s optional Dressing to the nines is a thing of the past as most cruise lines have adopted a more casual approach to cruise attire than the old ball-gown-and-dinner-jacket standard. Yes, cruise lines like Cunard and Silversea Cruises continue to offer plenty of black-tie evenings because that’s what their clientele prefer, but even aboard these swanky ships, a dark suit and tie will do. (If you’re determined to wear a tuxedo, you can rent one aboard most cruise ships.) Elsewhere, dress codes range from Carnival’s mainstream wear-what-you-want dictum to the laid-back-luxury style of Windstar Cruises.

Turn in your shotguns Alas, the days when Captain Stubing and his passengers happily fired away at clay pigeons are long gone.

“We discontinued skeet shooting many years ago for a variety of reasons, including environmental, safety, and the noise impact on the guest cruise experience,” says Carnival’s Gullicksen.

Others say liability issues forced the end of skeet shooting, along with the practice of hitting golf balls off the back deck. “Handing out loaded shotguns on the back deck always made for some fun moments, especially when you had passengers who had never done it before swing around points onto the deck to say, ‘Hey look at me holding a shotgun!’” says Allan E. Jordan, a cruise industry writer and noted ship historian. While skeet is gone, many ships do offer golf simulators or golf nets for passengers who itch to make that long drive.

Cash tips Cruise lines used to hand out envelopes so that passengers could divvy up their tips and distribute them personally to their worthy servers. These days, most cruise lines offer onboard charge programs that let passengers charge tips to their shipboard account, thus eliminating the need to carry cash around. Cashless tipping is especially convenient on big ships where you might not see the same waiter twice. That said, some travelers still prefer to reward good service with a more personal touch -- say, a handshake and an envelope of greenbacks (and most crew members like it, too).

Waste not Cruise lines have come a long way since the bad old days of throwing their garbage overboard. Today’s cruise ships have their own waste and treatment facilities for refuse that includes a separation process for plastics, glass, aluminum, paper and food. Most garbage is offloaded into landfills or recycling facilities in ports where these are available; otherwise it is incinerated or treated and then discharged into the ocean. Most food waste is discharged into the ocean, but strict guidelines call for the food to be processed into pulp particles small enough to fit through a 25-millimeter mesh screen. The pulp is then sent through an underwater discharge port while the ship is moving. Food can only be discharged at sea if the ship is at least 12 miles offshore.

Pajama game It was once an evening tradition for cabin stewards to lay out guests’ pajamas, but passenger complaints led to the demise of this dubious practice.

“It kind of creeped me out because they would go through my stuff to locate my pajamas,” says Linda Coffman, editor of Cruise Diva, a cruise Web site, and author of “Fodor’s Complete Guide to Caribbean Cruises.” Coffman says that despite her best efforts to hide her pajamas from the stewards, they would always find them. On one cruise she came back to her cabin to find her nightgown folded into a shape of a frog. But sensibilities differ, and some cruise lines, like Seabourn, still offer this service (without the frogs).

Spanish-speaking cruise line In October 1993, Carnival Cruises launched Fiesta Marina, a cruise line for Spanish-speaking travelers. Nine months later, Fiesta Marina was gone. According to Allan Jordan, there were several reasons the demise. For one thing, the line’s flagship, formerly Carnival’s Carnivale, was 37 years old and more than a bit worn. For another, many Latinos felt the product was too segregated. This was one ship that just didn’t “habla” to the people.

Tastes change. Modern cruisers like rock-climbing walls, wave pools and ice-skating, but who knows? These “must-have” amenities may be gone tomorrow. Heck, in 10 years we may even be asking ourselves, “Whatever happened to hairy-chest contests?”

Anita Dunham-Potter is a Pittsburgh-based travel journalist specializing in cruise travel. Anita's columns have appeared in major newspapers and many Internet outlets, and she is a contributor to Fodor's "Complete Guide to Caribbean Cruises 2006." 

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Skeet shooting

junetraveler2014

By junetraveler2014 , October 1, 2013 in Celebrity Cruises

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junetraveler2014

Does Celebrity have any ships with skeet shooting anylonger?

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3,000+ Club

Phxazzcruisers

I have not seen it.

neverbeenhere

neverbeenhere

Haven't seen it forever. (15+ years). Still a little pea shooting and shooting the breeze going on.

They did nor even have it in 2005. Sadly, it's not PC.

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A Sixth?

Only cruise I ever saw it on was a Feb 2 1991 Carnival Holiday cruise I was on, my first cruise..

The first Gulf War had just started and things were changing.

20,000+ Club

Skeet shooting was pretty much outlawed on all cruise ships a couple of decades ago due to environmental and safety issues. The clay pigeons were found to harm sealife.

Thank you for a quick reply. On to planning activities for the family:)

DianeCcruiser

DianeCcruiser

We did skeet shooting on our first cruise. Carnival Tropicale in 1990. I hit 2 and my husband won a trophy for hitting the most clay pigeons.

lightning bolt

lightning bolt

They did it on a lot of ships in the 80's. My husband love to do it. That was before they had cabins on the aft of the ship.:D

10,000+ Club

No golf balls hit into the sea as well. Oh! The good old days.

Cramer ruined that?? Fore.

Ever see someone fly a kite while on the ship?

Texed

Maybe we could just shoot the sealife. ;)
Or use waffles as targets.

While I can see the potential safety issues, I have never heard of an environmental concern. :confused:

I can think of few things more inert than a clay pigeon.

Got any more info/links on that bird?

:D :cool: :)

While I can see the potential safety issues, I have never heard of an environmental concern. :confused:   I can think of few things more inert than a clay pigeon.   Got any more info/links on that bird?  

Lead shot in the water and plastic shotcups or wadding floating on it.

Same complaint by some about land based shooting ranges and hunting lands. Lots of switching to metals other than lead.

tteettimes

Pull............

Lead shot in the water and plastic shotcups or wadding floating on it.   Same complaint by some about land based shooting ranges and hunting lands. Lots of switching to metals other than lead.   bosco

They didn't use lead shot away back when I was on Carnival, and the casings dropped to the deck and were quickly gathered by a deck-hand.

The comment was that it was the pigeons that were the issue. Never heard of that.

They didn't use lead shot away back when I was on Carnival, and the casings dropped to the deck and were quickly gathered by a deck-hand.   The comment was that it was the pigeons that were the issue. Never heard of that.  

Non-lead shot was around but not that common 20 years ago. Maybe ships had steel, tungsten or any of the newer materials? I am not sure what they had, however the plastic shot cups (they leave the shotgun with the shot in them) as well as the plastic or some other material that form the wadding (often part of the shot cup) also leaves the barrel behind the shot. These item cannot be retrieved. The empty shotshell does stay behind.

I saw shot shells back in the 70's that were imported from Europe and after a round or two of skeet the range was covered with shredded newspaper.. Need I say these were very inexpensive shells..LOL

As far as the birds, they are just unfired clay or mud... Have no idea if they would cause any harm to the environment.

CPT Trips

This is way more fun, and more environmentally friendly.

This is way more fun, and more environmentally friendly.  

Trolling for orcas.

Yeah, they stopped the skeet shooting along with water ski-ing the wake. Too many water ski-ers were being hit by clay shards. Fishing off your balcony was banned about the same time. :D ;)

I'm just joking folks! - blame it on insomnia and escapism from DH snoring.

Nice photoshopping!!

"Live from...."

That's not photoshop....it's a real picture

http://cruiseradio.net/cruise-ship-entered-the-%E2%80%98guinness-book-of-records%E2%80%99-for-water-skiing/

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IMAGES

  1. My dad skeet shooting off the back of his cruise ship in 1992

    skeet shooting on cruise ships

  2. Skeet Shooting On Cruise Ships: Can You Still Do It? (2024)

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VIDEO

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COMMENTS

  1. Skeet Shooting On Cruise Ships: Can You Still Do It? (2024)

    Skeet shooting was a prevalent activity on cruise lines for decades and it usually took place on the aft deck. A ship officer would be present as a loaded shotgun was provided to paying guests and clay targets were launched over the ocean. This video shows skeet shooting on a Caribbean cruise in 1985…

  2. 5 cruise activities that are no longer allowed on board

    Until as recently as the 1990s, cruise lines allowed skeet shooting off the backs of their ships. Cruisers would be given actual guns, and members of the crew would fling clay birds into the air for them to shoot.

  3. Five Things We No Longer See On Cruise Ships

    For many years, a popular onboard activity was skeet shooting. This usually took place towards the aft of the ship on a sea day. Manned by an officer, guests could pay a few dollars and try their hand at shooting clay pigeons out of the air as they sailed over the ocean.

  4. 5 Things You're Not Likely To Find on Your Next Cruise Ship

    Skeet, or trap, shooting off the stern of the Norwegian Wind in July 1998 (Photo: Aaron Saunders) After being patted down by security upon embarkation and having all carryon items put through...

  5. Skeet Shooting on Carnival Cruise Lines

    October 10, 2008 Much like smoking in public places, skeet shooting lost its appeal and legal standing many, many years ago. Skeet shooting on Carnival Cruise Lines and other cruise lines was, however, a common occurrence back in the 1980s and 1990s — and possibly earlier.

  6. Firearms on A Cruise Ship? Straight Talk on Ships and Guns

    Knives Mace Pepper spray Tear gas The obvious reason for banning weapons is safety. A cruise line cannot assume that every weapon owner will act responsibly. When weapons are present, there is always the potential for accidental injury. As a preventative measure, cruise ships take the simple approach of prohibiting weapons of all forms.

  7. When did they stop skeet shooting on the ships?

    June 20, 2009 Philadelphia area #2 Posted May 29, 2011 When did they stop doing skeet shooting? My DH loved it and was able to hit every target. :D Loralie. In 1979 Skeets were put on the...

  8. 5 Things That Used to Be Legal on Cruise Ships

    Skeet Shooting It's hard to imagine now, but this was not an uncommon sight many years ago. When It Was Legal: You could get in some target practice on the lido deck after brunch. Seriously.

  9. What Happened to Skeet Shooting?

    #1 Posted July 25, 2007 I was wondering, what happened to skeet shooting on cruises? Or do they still do it? On the past 3 Carnival cruises I've taken I did not see skeet shooting listed in...

  10. Skeet Shooting At Sea: A Thing Of The Past

    Skeet shooting on cruise ships was popular in the 1920s and had 8 shooting stations on the aft deck, but declined in popularity in the 1980s and was completely dropped in the early 1990s. Safety and environmental concerns led to the replacement of lead pellets and clay targets with non-toxic steel shot and compacted fish food targets, and skeet ...

  11. 20 Mind-Blowing Cruise Ship Amenities You Didn't Know Existed (Slideshow)

    Shooting skeet off the back of cruise ships used to be a standard activity, but for some reason, it no longer exists on any line. (Apparently some people decided bringing guns aboard ships was a bad idea, or something.) But the Royal Princess has come up with a solution: a virtual shooting range. Using laser technology, guests can now have a ...

  12. 10 abandoned cruise ship activities

    1. Skeet shooting Also known as trap shooting, guests were once able to skeet shoot on a cruise ship. This involved taking a loaded shotgun to the back of a cruise ship and shooting at clay pigeons. This beloved activity was very popular on sea days during cruises back in the 1980s and 1990s.

  13. 6 Activities on Cruises You Can't Participate In Anymore

    Skeet shooting - Passengers were once able to practice their skeet shooting off the back of the ship for $1 a shot. Skeet shooting on cruise ships was stopped a couple decades ago.

  14. Skeet Shooting

    The last time I shot skeet on a ship it was on the Costa Riviera. 1995 to 1998?? Tony. Link to post Share on other sites. paul929207. Posted April 13, 2015. paul929207. 50,000+ Club; ... It may have been on Chandris Cruise line. They had skeet shooting back then. We were both young ladies. I did not do it.

  15. Six things you can no longer do on a cruise

    Here are six abandoned cruise ship activities that were once popular but have now faded into maritime history. Skeet shooting. Skeet shooting, also known as trap shooting, was a popular activity on cruise ships in the 1980s and 1990s. This involved guests using a shotgun to shoot at clay pigeons flung into the air by crew members on sea days.

  16. Anyone remember skeet shooting off the back of a cruise ship?

    Anyone remember skeet shooting off the back of a cruise ship? - Celebrity Cruises - Cruise Critic Community Please Read: COVID-related Discussion By PTC DAWG, June 24, 2020 in Celebrity...

  17. Skeet Shooting????

    Skeet shooting was discontinued because of the appearance of adding to sea pollution. rkacruiser 26.9k

  18. Skeet shooting

    May 14, 2000 From NYC but Resides in Lehigh Valley Pennsylvania #3 Posted February 10, 2007 I have to disagree with the previous post. I have sailed on Norwegian in the Caribbean and they always...

  19. Failure to launch

    "We discontinued skeet shooting many years ago for a variety of reasons, including environmental, safety, and the noise impact on the guest cruise experience," says Carnival's Gullicksen.

  20. Skeet shooting off stern of Ecstasy.wmv

    In 1991 all the cruise ships had skeet shooting onboard. That has been long stopped and replaced with rock climbing. ...more

  21. Vintage photos show how drastically cruise ships have changed during

    The first cruise lines emerged in the 1960s, with Commodore Cruise Line and Norwegian Cruise Line founded in 1966. Cruise lines in these days primarily relied on ferries or old ocean liners. Commodore took over building a half-complete ferry under construction that had been cancelled.

  22. Skeet shooting

    Skeet shooting was pretty much outlawed on all cruise ships a couple of decades ago due to environmental and safety issues. The clay pigeons were found to harm sealife. Yeah, they stopped the skeet shooting along with water ski-ing the wake.

  23. Caribbean Vacation Part 17

    This part of the series shows various activities on the cruise ship's day at sea, including sunbathing and skeet shooting.This is part of a home video series...