Knockdhu Distillery

ancnoc distillery tour

Top ways to experience Knockdhu Distillery and nearby attractions

ancnoc distillery tour

Most Recent: Reviews ordered by most recent publish date in descending order.

Detailed Reviews: Reviews ordered by recency and descriptiveness of user-identified themes such as wait time, length of visit, general tips, and location information.

Simon R

Knockdhu Distillery - All You Need to Know BEFORE You Go (with Photos)

  • (7.23 mi) Hillhead Hideaways
  • (8.52 mi) Station Hotel Portsoy
  • (7.99 mi) New Durn House
  • (9.40 mi) Cullen Bay Hotel
  • (7.22 mi) Castle Hotel Huntly
  • (9.11 mi) Rockpool Cafe
  • (9.10 mi) The Ice Cream Shop
  • (9.05 mi) Lily's Kitchen
  • (7.63 mi) Boogie Woogie
  • (8.52 mi) Portsoy Coffee Shop

Knockdhu Distillery Information

  • Log In Log In Stay logged in Login with facebook Login with Google/YouTube Forgot your password? Register as a new member
  • Information Info
  • Forum Forum
  • Database W-DB
  • Flavour Search
  • My Collection
  • Whisky.com Award
  • Gourmet Award

Knockdhu - AnCnoc

Click for pronunciation

In 1893, John Morrison, bought the land on which Knockdhu was built from the Duke of Fife. Morrison was acting on behalf of the Distiller's Company Limited. Knockdhu was the first distillery that the company constructed themselves.

The small Speyside distillery of Knockdhu has a very impressive range of official bottlings called An Cnoc, despite its relatively small size and production capacity. The distillery has two ranges: one that focuses on the modern bottlings, and one that focuses on the distillery's vintage releases. The modern range includes a 12 year old, 16 year old, 18 year old, 22 year old, 35 year old, a Travel Retail Exclusive, a 2000 and a 1975 bottling. Each of the bottlings has a distinctive flavor and character, which allows them to start as individual entities. The vintage range is rather extensive, and includes bottlings from 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1991, and 1975. Old bottlings with the distillery name on it are extremely seldom.

2014 appeared a new range of peated Whisky, which were named after the different tools used to harvest peat from the mosses.

Independent bottlings from the site are virtually impossible to find, but Adelphi has performed a handful of bottlings, mainly in the early 1990s. These are extremely difficult to track down on the market today. Knockdhu is also used as a core blending component in the Inver House Blends.

The Production

The distillery draws its water from burns on the nearby Knock hill. The production capacity of the distillery stands at 1.5 million liters a year, and very unusually, Knockdhu uses a cast iron worm tub to cool the freshly distilled spirit. The distillery uses six wooden washbacks as part of its production process. 

A overview of the Knockandhu distillery.

The Pot Stills

Knockdhu distillery has only one wash and one spirit still. The wash still has a capacity of 10'350 liters, while the spirit still has a capacity of 9'500 liters. Both stills are unusually tall, with gradually narrowing conical necks. The shape and size of the pot stills allows there to be a high level of reflux in the stills.

The pot stills inside the distillery.

The Maltings

In the past, Knockdhu distillery used to only use unpeated maltings, but today, some of the distillery's malt is peated. The level of peating is mild, measuring at about 20 ppm. Knockdhu doesn't peat all of their maltings – the peated maltings is used specifically to produce spirit which is used as a blending component in the Inver House Blends. The distillery used to use it's own floor maltings, but now sources them from a nearby industrial source in Speyside. When DCL were selecting a site on which to build Knockdhu, they eventually settled on the final choice due to the local areas' excellent peat.

The old mashtun of the distillery.

The Warehouse

Knockdhu Malts are aged in a combination and American Oak and Spanish Sherry casks. The distillery has a series of on-site dunnage warehouses in which the Whisky is aged.

The warehouses of the distillery.

The History

A somking chimney in the backIn 1893, John Morrison, bought the land on which Knockdhu was built from the Duke of Fife. Morrison was acting on behalf of the Distiller's Company Limited. Knockdhu was the first distillery that the company constructed themselves. Gordon & Macbey, architects from Elgin, designed the site. Production launched in the October of 1894, a few years before the great 'Whisky boom' of the end of the nineteenth century, and continued uninterrupted until 1931, when the site was forced to close.

In 1930, one year before Knockdhu closed its doors, the distillery was taken over by Scottish Malt Distillers. In 1931, SMD decided to temporarily shut the distillery down, but then changed its mind, and production re-launched again in 1933.  Knockdhu enjoyed another fifty years of successful production from 1933 to 1983, when the distillery was closed in the big recession. After production was halted for five years, Inver House, marking Knockdhu's involvement in their Blend, bought Knockdhu. Production restarted on the 6th of February 1989. In 1990, the distillery released it's first official bottling, and in 1993, this was followed by another bottling, this time under the name of 'An Cnoc'. Inver House decided to re-name Knockdhu for the purposes of marketing it as a Single Malt, as they believed 'Knockdhu' to sound too similar to 'Knockando', another Speyside Single Malt. In 2001, Inver House was purchased by Pacific Spirits UK, who introduced a new 14 year old bottling in 2004. In 2006, the distillery changed hands one last time, when International Beverage Holdings acquired Pacific Spirits. The distillery has continued to enjoy success as it has moved into the twenty-first century, and hopefully, more official and vintage releases will accompany this.

An old picture of the destillery.

Visitor's Centre

There isn't an official visitor's centre at Knockdhu, but it is possible to take a tour of the facilities, so long as you book in advance. Their official website has the opening hours and relevant contact information. 

Knockdhu Distillery Knock Huntly Aberdeenshire AB54 7LJ Tel: +44 (0)1466-771223 Email:  kennedyl@ remove-this. inverhouse.com  

User Notes about the Distillery

Share your experience with other whisky lovers. Write a note about your trip to the Knockdhu - AnCnoc distillery.

AnCnoc

Copyright © 1994-2020 Whisky .com Media GmbH & Co. KG Am Grundwassersee 4 · DE 82402 Seeshaupt · Germany Legal Notice

Advertising on Whisky .com

  • Legal Notice
  • Privacy Policy

menu

Distillery Lists

Whisky fundementals, social links.

  • Distilleries

anCnoc distillery

Ancnoc whisky, house style.

Since 1994 the single malt whiskies of the Knockdhu distillery have been released as AnCnoc to differentiate from those released from the Knockando Distillery. The malts from the distillery on the border between East Highlands and Speyside are light, fruity and aromatic. The AnCnoc 12 years is their entry level offering.

The Whisky distillery Knockdhu is close to Huntly at the Foot Of Knock Hill, from whence it’s name is derived. Knockdhu is pronounced like “Nockduh” and means “Small Black Hill”. The Single Malt from Knockdhu operates under the name of Ancnoc (proonounced a-NOCK).

How does AnCnoc single malt taste?The AnCnoc malts are fruity and mild with lots of vanilla notes.

How is Knockdhu Whisky produced? The AnCnoc is distilled in only 2 . The annual production of a Wash and a Spirit Still is just under a million. Litres of whisky a year. The water comes from nearby sources at Knock Hill. AnCnoc single malts are placed on the market in the age groups 12, 16 and 21 years. In addition, there are regularly interesting vintage bottlings.

The distillery Knockdhu was the first to be built by Distillers Company Ltd (DCL) in 1893 and a break with their Lowland grain based business. In the first half of the 20th century between 1931 and 1933, as well as during the Second World War, production ceased and the distillery remained closed. In 1983, the operation was re-established. Until 1987, Knockdhu remained with DCL, followed by the takeover by Guinness and thus United Distillers. 1989 saw Knockdhu takenover by Inver House and the resumption of the whisky production. The single malt from Knockdhu has been running since 1994 under the name of AnCnoc but it’s still possible to find bottles under the name Knockdhu across periodic auctions.

anCnoc factsheet

Can i tour ancnoc.

Yes anCnoc distillery is tourable. On Trip Advisor the distillery has been rated as excellent by 0 of tours to date. This gives anCnoc an overall rating of

Latest reviews

«Anglesey Mon

Allt-a-Bhainne»

Knockdhu Distillery

ancnoc distillery tour

Top ways to experience Knockdhu Distillery and nearby attractions

ancnoc distillery tour

Most Recent: Reviews ordered by most recent publish date in descending order.

Detailed Reviews: Reviews ordered by recency and descriptiveness of user-identified themes such as waiting time, length of visit, general tips, and location information.

nwaynesworld

KNOCKDHU DISTILLERY: All You Need to Know BEFORE You Go (with Photos)

  • (7.23 mi) Hillhead Hideaways
  • (8.52 mi) Station Hotel Portsoy
  • (7.99 mi) New Durn House
  • (9.40 mi) Cullen Bay Hotel
  • (7.22 mi) Castle Hotel Huntly
  • (9.11 mi) Rockpool Cafe
  • (9.10 mi) The Ice Cream Shop
  • (9.05 mi) Lily's Kitchen
  • (7.63 mi) Boogie Woogie
  • (8.52 mi) Portsoy Coffee Shop

Words of Whisky

anCnoc 18 Years Old (2019)

' src=

I can’t believe this is the first ever anCnoc I’m reviewing on Words of Whisky. I know I’ve missed a distillery here and there, that’s fine. I’m not a completist. But anCnoc is a seriously good malt—and underrated too! With reviewers like me ignoring anCnoc, it is sure to stay that way. I’m baffling myself here, because I really like their whisky.

The brand anCnoc has been around since the late 1980s or early 1990s. However, the history of the distillery where it’s produced, Knockdhu, goes back much further. In 1877, six of Scotland’s largest grain distillers joined together to form Distillers Company Limited (DCL), the company that would eventually become Diageo well over a century later. Among those grain producers were Carsebridge, Cambus and Port Dundas. Some years after, DCL moved to built a distillery just outside of the village of Knock, not far from Keith. In 1893 the first bricks were layed and in the following year production started at Knockdhu distillery.

Knockdhu distillery

Fast-forward to 1988. Knockdhu has fallen victim to the whisky crisis of the 1980s. It almost joined the ranks of Brora, Port Ellen, Convalmore and the likes, but Inver House swooped in, bought the distillery from DCL and revived it. Promoting it as a single malt was high at the top of the list, but the new owners felt the name sounded to similar to Knockando, a Speyside distillery that already established itself as a whisky brand. To avoid confusion, Knockdhu became anCnoc.

I visited Knockdhu in 2018, and it is one of the best experiences I’ve had at a distillery. I was shown around by the most knowledgeable tour guide I’ve ever met. Any questions she couldn’t answer (and there were barely any) were answered by distillery manager Gordon Bruce after the tour. Outside of the warm welcome and hospitality, Knockdhu is a fascinating distillery with lots of little deviations from the norm, in large part because Bruce is always trying to find ways for Knockdhu to be more eco-friendly. Knockdhu is not far outside of Speyside—give them a visit if you’re ever in the area.

As mentioned before, anCnoc is not a well-known brand. Among their Inver House brothers and sisters, Old Pulteney and Balblair far outshine anCnoc. You can even argue that Speyburn is a more familiar name. Considering the quality coming out of Knockdhu, I’m not sure why that is. I do know that this brand deserves your attention. I’ll be sure to give it mine, starting with the anCnoc 18 Years Old.

anCnoc 18 Years Old (46%, OB, 2019

Nose : Earthy at first, highlighted by a subtle mushroom aroma, but also hints of polished leather, followed by honey-glazed almonds and smoked paprika powder. There’s a touch of banana custard and menthol as well. Taste : Lovely stuff and very well-rounded. There’s a hint of dark caramel, honey and chocolate, accompanied by soft spices. Some dried apricots and dates as well. Impressive. Finish : Notes of charred oak and a whisper of smoke. Medium in length.

A very good whisky that deserves a bigger audience. Go out there and give anCnoc a chance!

Photo: The Whisky Exchange

dornoch distillery 2018 5 years casqueteers whisky show london

Dornoch 2018 Cask #68 & #124 (2023)

fettercairn 18 years scottish oak finish closeup

New Fettercairn 18 Years Finished in Scottish Oak

ben nevis 1995 23 years the whisky jury

Ben Nevis 1995 23 Years (The Whisky Jury)

Tullibardine The Murray 2008 Cask Strength

Tullibardine The Murray 2008 Cask Strength (2021)

Indeed, underrated. Tasted the 24 and it was great. Even the 12 is very good. And at a low price. In my opinion AnCnoc really needs time in the glass. It’s a quest to really find the hidden qualities.

I plan to make it anCnoc more of a priority! 🙂

Leave a Reply Cancel reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

dalmunach 2014 4yo 1301909

Power your creative ideas with pixel-perfect design and cutting-edge technology. Create your beautiful website with Zeen now.

lagavulin 16 years review

Lagavulin 16 Years (2023)

ardnamurchan ad rum cask release berry bros pioneers collective

Ardnamurchan AD/ Rum Cask Release / 2017 Berry Bros & Rudd (2023)

the hearach single malt isle of harris featured

The Hearach Single Malt (2023)

Don't miss out.

Email address

  • Distilleries
  • New releases
  • Reviews & Notes
  • Whisky Top 1000
  • Worst Whisky Top 100
  • 90.37 anCnoc 1975
  • 90.33 Knockdhu 1991 HL
  • 90.00 anCnoc 2006
  • 90.00 anCnoc 1975
  • 89.77 anCnoc 24-year-old
  • Shop & Tour
  • Bottled for
  • Display as:

Build and track your whisky collection, rate and review bottles, check prices, and engage with like-minded enthusiasts. All things whisky since 2007.

Whiskybase B.V.  Zwaanshals 530  3035 KS Rotterdam  The Netherlands  KVK: 60207205 VAT: NL853809112B01

  • Tasting notes
  • Submit a new bottle
  • New arrivals

Marketplace

  • Sell whisky
  • Marketplace help
  • General Terms
  • Members list
  • General terms
  • © 2024 Whiskybase

We use cookies to improve your online experience. By using this site, you consent to this use as described in our Privacy Policy .

Welcome Back

Create an account and indulge yourself in the world of whisky.

  • Access to over 2.4 million ratings and reviews
  • More than 200.000 bottles available from retailers around the world
  • The most trusted source of factual bottle information available

Whiskybase General Terms and Conditions

Introduction

Whiskybase B.V. (“Whiskybase”, “we” or “us”, company details below) offers a whisky enthusiasts online platform that provides its members access to the most comprehensive, transparent and trusted resource of whisky bottles and allows and stimulates its members to contribute information about whisky bottles to the platform (“Service”).

These General Terms and Conditions (“Terms”), as well as our Privacy Statement (“ Privacy Statement ”), apply to your (“you”, “Member”) use of the Service (which includes visits to the Whiskybase websites).

By using our website(s) and registering for the Service, you expressly confirm acknowledgment and acceptance of the Terms and agree to be bound by them.

Our Service, age restrictions

Our Service is an online platform which provides Members with information (e.g. bottle facts, market-indices, market values and prices) on (mostly) whisky and allows Members to add information to the platform. We do not sell, nor does the Service provide any option to buy, any alcoholic products.

Each and every Member must be of legal drinking age in its country of residence to be allowed to use the Service. If no such law exists in a Member’s country of residence, the Member has to be over 21 years old to use the Service. We have the right to ask you to provide proof of your age and/or to provide further identification to prevent underage usage and/or for any other legal or legitimate purpose. By using the Service, and by creating an account you represent, warrant and confirm that you are of legal age.

You acknowledge that the Service is protected by copyrights and database rights. The Service and your account are for your personal use only and may not be shared with any third parties. We grant to registered Members a limited, non-exclusive, non-transferable, non-sublicensable, revocable right to access and use the Service and to view its contents (“License”). Without limiting the foregoing, the License does not include (a) the right to resell or use the Service commercially (unless explicitly allowed under the applicable subscription plan), (b) the right to make the Service publicly available or use for public display, (c) any downloading, duplicating, or copying, collection and use of any contents of the Services, e.g. bottle information, descriptions, ratings, retail and secondary market price observations, values, etc., (d) the right to license, use, sell, archive, reproduce, distribute, modify, perform, publish, create derivative works from, offer for sale, or use of the Service. Further, you shall not circumvent, remove, alter, deactivate, degrade or thwart any of the content protections, decompile, reverse engineer or disassemble the Service and any software related to or used in or by the Service.

Without prejudice to the section Liability below, the Service may be temporarily unavailable during maintenance, updates, etc. We shall make reasonable efforts to inform you of any unavailability due to maintenance or updates.

Member registration and accounts

You must create an account to be able to use our Service where the following personal information is required: username, a valid email address, country of residence and a password. Additional personal information may be provided by you if you wish to do so. Please read our Privacy Statement for more information on our use and processing of your personal information.

You are responsible for all activities through your account. You are responsible for the accuracy of the information you provide to us in relation to your account, and for updating it where necessary. You are not allowed to create multiple accounts. We may terminate or temporarily suspend your account to protect you, ourselves or our partners from (suspected) identity theft or other (suspected) fraudulent (e.g. false, misleading, deceptive) activity. You have the obligation to keep your login credentials confidential. You shall not authorize any others to use or access your account.

Termination

You may terminate your account at any time. If you terminate your account, you will no longer have access to the Service and your Contributions (specified below), if any. We do not provide back-ups of your Contributions. To terminate your account, login to your account, go to the “settings page”, and follow the termination instructions]. If you cancel your subscription, your account will be automatically closed.

We reserve the right to immediately and without prior notice deactivate, suspend and/or terminate your account if you do not abide by the Terms, if you act unlawful, if you do not act or use the Service in good faith, or if you cause any harm whatsoever to the Service, to other Members, to other persons or to us. You shall be notified of the deactivation, suspension, or termination via the email address linked to your account.

Member behavior and Member contributions

We do not allow the sale and/or purchase of products between members through the Service, e.g. through private messages. If you wish to sell or purchase products, please refer to the Whiskybase Market.

Regardless of whether the Service offers the functionality to contribute, you are solely responsible and liable for any content and information that you create, upload, post, publish, link to, duplicate, transmit, record, display or otherwise make available on the Service or to other Members, such as chat messages, text messages, videos, audio, audio recordings, music, pictures, photographs, text and any other information or materials, whether publicly posted or privately transmitted (“Contributions”).

You shall not contribute any discriminatory, racially offensive, abusive, offensive, threatening, intimidating, inaccurate, incomplete, obscene, profane, harassing, or illegal material and/or Contributions, or any other Contributions that infringes, or may infringe, or violates or may violate, any third party’s rights, including intellectual and industrial property rights, rights of privacy and publicity. Further, deliberate or undeliberate manipulation of information on the Service (such as ratings), any activity with the intent to influence such information, value or reviews on products (e.g. bottles, brands, distilleries, bottlers or shops) are not allowed. Contacting Members to sell or buy products or requesting other Members to sell or buy bottles outside our affiliated platform Whiskybase Market is considered a violation of these Terms and will lead to the termination of your account without prejudice to other rights we have under these Terms and applicable law.

You acknowledge, understand and agree that we are not obligated to review, check or monitor any Contributions, but we may do so. Furthermore, we may (without prior notice and without giving reasons) change, delete or alter any Contributions, whether in whole or in part, that in our sole judgment and discretion violates these Terms, is unlawful, is in any way harmful to you, Members, us, the Service or any third parties.

You hereby grant to us (including our parents, affiliates, subsidiaries, (sub)licensees, assignees, successors, authorized third party contractors), the worldwide, perpetual, irrevocable, unlimited in any way, non-exclusive, transferable, free of charge and fully paid-up, right and license to duplicate, copy, reproduce, distribute, publish, display, make available, perform, use, store, record, play, adapt, alter, modify, make derivative works of, or in any other way exploit your Contributions (including any past Contributions you already posted/created on the Service (and any previous version thereof)), through any and all means and media, whether now known or hereafter devised, including but not limited to the internet, websites, print, magazines, books, mobile applications, games, commercials, etc. We have the right to transfer, assign the license granted by you to us, or grant licenses and sublicenses to our licensees, or have and allow them granting sublicenses to licensees to any other parties.

You hereby represent and warrant that you are authorized to make any Contributions, that your Contributions and the use by us will not infringe or violate the rights of any third party. You will defend (at our option), indemnify and hold harmless us and our parents, affiliates, subsidiaries, (sub)licensees, assignees, successors, authorized third party contractors from any and all loss, damage, claim, liability or expense (including reasonable outside legal fees and costs) actually incurred as a result of a third party claim arising out of a breach or alleged breach of your obligations, representations and warranties made herein.

Nothing in the Terms shall exclude or limit our liability for fraudulent misrepresentation or for death or personal injury resulting from gross negligence or willful misconduct by us.

The Service has been prepared by us solely for information purposes to Members and the Service is based on information we consider reliable and we obtain the contents of the Service from a number of different third party sources (including Contributions), but we do not endorse, support, represent, warrant or guarantee the completeness, truthfulness, accuracy, or reliability of the Services and any information therein.

The Service, including any information contained therein, does not constitute any advice (such as but not limited to investment advice, tax advice, financial, economic advice) and is not intended as recommendations (whether personal, in general, or otherwise) to invest in companies, products, services. Any investment and purchase made, or action(s) taken based upon (information in) the Service may and will involve significant risk (such as, but not limited to loss, total loss). Past “performances” (e.g. values, ratings, etc.) of products (e.g. bottles, casks) and companies (e.g. distilleries) listed in the Services are not indicative of, nor are guarantee of future results.

Before making any decision (e.g. purchase, investment) whatsoever based on the Service you should consider obtaining third party professional/expert advice on the matter, and you should consider whether such the decision is suitable and feasible with respect to (inter alia) your financial status and situation, your particular knowledge/experience on the matter (e.g. products, companies) involved.

To the maximum extent permitted by law, we expressly disclaim all warranties and representations with respect to the Services, whether express, implied, statutory or otherwise, including without limitation, any implied warranty of merchantability, fitness for a particular purpose, lack of viruses, accuracy or completeness of responses or results from use of the Services, that the Services will meet specific requirements, that the Services will be available or uninterrupted, secure or free of errors. You acknowledge and agree that the Service is provided on an “as is” and “as available” basis.

Neither Whiskybase nor any of its group companies (including any subsidiary, affiliate or holding company), directors, officers and employees shall in any way be liable or responsible (whether directly, indirectly, consequential) for any costs, claims, damages, liabilities and other expenses, including any consequential loss, suffered by you resulting from your use of the Service.

Miscellaneous

We may, but are not under any obligation, to release new functionalities and tools or other features for the Service every now and then. Any new functionalities, tools and features shall be part of and governed by the Terms from the moment they are launched and/or available. Further, we reserve the right to modify, change, discontinue the Service, add or remove features, update the Service, change its appearance, temporarily and permanently, at any time, in whole or any part thereof.

We may change or update the Terms from time to time. You will be notified of any changes through the Service and/or by email. Your continued use of the Service after any such changes or updates take effect will constitute acknowledgement and (as applicable) acceptance of those changes or updates.

We may sell, license, transfer, assign or in any other way dispose of the Service (including Members) to any third party without any notification to you, e.g. (but without limitation) in connection with any reorganization, restructuring, merger or sale, or other transfer of assets.

If any provision of these Terms is held invalid, the remainder of the Terms shall continue in full force and effect.

If we decide not to exercise or enforce any right or provision of these Terms, such decision shall not constitute a waiver of such right or provision.

No partnership, joint venture, agency, or employment relationship is created as a result of your use of the Service.

Unless mandatory applicable law provides otherwise, your use of and membership to the Service are exclusively governed by Dutch law. We shall first try to settle any dispute over a dram of whisky. Disputes that cannot be settled over multiple drams of whisky shall be solely submitted to the court of Amsterdam, The Netherlands unless mandatory applicable law provides otherwise.

About Whiskybase and contact details

Whiskybase B.V. is the Dutch private limited liability company, having its statutory seat in Rotterdam, The Netherlands and its office at Zwaanshals 530, 3035 KS Rotterdam, The Netherlands. Whiskybase B.V. is registered with the Dutch Chamber of Commerce under no. 52072819.

Any questions, requests and inquiries may be directed at:

[email protected]

Whiskybase B.V. attn. Customer Service Zwaanshals 530 3035 KS Rotterdam

The Netherlands

Version 2.0, July 2022

Don't have an account with us yet? Sign up .

Malt

Whisky reviews with objectivity and transparency

anCnoc 24 Years Old

ancnoc distillery tour

What do you consider to be value in whisky? It is certainly something which seems to be harder and harder to find, with the ever-escalating prices across the board.

L et’s start with a couple of rather extreme examples for illustration purposes. What if I said I could sell you a 30 year old single malt for £100? You would probably be in too much of a rush to get your money out of your pocket that you wouldn’t consider anything else. However, what if that whisky had spent it’s time maturing in a terribly sulphured sherry cask and had an overpowering note of rotten eggs? All of a sudden you wish you could have your £100 back.

What if I offered you a non-age statement single malt from an unnamed distillery for the same price? Not so tempting. However, you then try a sample; it’s been maturing in an absolutely phenomenal cask and is one of the greatest whiskies you have ever tasted. Suddenly you want to buy a bottle.

I use those examples because it shows how quality is always going to be the best barometer as to whether something is worth purchasing. If it’s bad, then nothing can make it good value. The problem is, we don’t often have the luxury of trying before we buy, so we look for certain criteria to decide whether it is worth taking a punt. These factors include the age statement, ABV, whether it has been chill filtered or colour added, the type of casks it has been matured in, which distillery or bottler it is from, and feedback from other people whose opinion we trust.

That is what we have here with anCnoc 24: an educated punt based on the above criteria. A great age statement, un-chill filtered, natural colour, and 46% ABV. I had never tried it before buying this bottle, but I did have the benefit of hearing good reports from those whose opinions I trust, and it seems like a solid purchase at £116 in today’s crazy market. anCnoc 24 ticks all the boxes. You only have to look at the price of similarly aged single malts from other distilleries – some of which are three or four times more expensive – to realise that on paper, anCnoc 24 looks a decent proposition. Mark reviewed it for Malt back in 2017 and loved it.

I must admit that spending £100+ on a bottle of whisky is pretty rare for me. There is so much good whisky to be found in the £30-£70 range that I rarely stray beyond it. Once you start going into three figures, then the whisky has to go some ways to meet your expectations.

This £30-70 range will always have plenty of good options, but the age statements available are getting younger and younger. The excellent Deanston 18 is the oldest single malt at 46%+ that gets into the category, with anCnoc’s 18 year old just a fraction over at RRP. Even 10- or 12-year-old whisky is getting harder to find under £40, with many creeping up to £50 plus. We are seeing more non-age statement whiskies fill the gaps that have been left behind.

With the independent bottlers, we are seeing prices in many cases remain stagnant, but the age statements getting lower and lower as the prices of aged stock increase. The 50cl size is also becoming more and more commonplace as a way of keeping costs per bottle down. I have always pushed back against it, as I don’t wish it to become the norm across the industry. The price per litre often doesn’t add up compared to 70cl bottlings, in my opinion. It’s something we see in many other consumable items such as chocolate, with the prices remaining consistent, but the volume reducing. Only the other day I noticed there are now only 10 cakes in a pack of Jaffa cakes, instead of the usual 12. Scandalous!

We find a lot of what many people call “value” in supermarkets, where in some cases you can pick up an unnamed single malt for less than £20. I have bought them, and I’m sure I will do so again when a new one crops up. You take a punt because the price is so low and pray you find a gem, or at the very least a nice experience.

The problem is that to my palate – which has been spoilt by lots of excellent whiskies – they are often thin, caramel laden, and lacking great flavour. Therefore, they sit on the whisky shelf at home for some time gathering dust. Instead, I reach for something that may have cost me twice as much, but is a far better experience. Was the supermarket whisky “value?” I would argue it wasn’t, despite the low retail price. I would have been much better off saving that money and putting it towards something else.

Many of the releases from new distilleries are challenging what is perceived as value. On the surface, £50 for 3- or 4-year-old whisky can hardly be described as decent value when compared to the more established distillers’ older products for the same price. Often, though, the quality is excellent and begins to justify the price. You have to remember, the costs of building a distillery and laying down stock in decent wood is vast, and there is a clear need to recoup some of those early expenses as quickly as possible to pay those bills. The ones that have produced superb young whisky continue to be popular beyond the first release, and long may that continue. The new breed of distilleries are certainly giving the established – and sometimes we have to say complacent – operations something to think about.

They say we are already in a recession, but if and when it hits hard, and customer budgets reduce, those that have remained fair with their pricing, and provided consistent quality will be the ones reaping the rewards. One such example would be J&A Mitchell, who own Springbank and Kilkerran. Their whiskies are lauded the world over but, despite the fact they could double the RRP’s of many of their whiskies and still sell, they continue to offer fair prices that make the whisky accessible to all that can get their hands on a bottle.

That kind of practice should be applauded, as it is not the case with all companies once the executives smell a larger profit is there to be made. If you had to cap your monthly budget to one bottle from the aforementioned £30-70 category, I would imagine the same dozen or so distilleries or independent bottlers would crop up time and time again as the place people would choose to spend their money. The good times won’t last forever, I’m afraid. These things go around in cycles. Be good to your customers if you want long term success.

Now that I have thoroughly depressed you with that thought, let’s move on to the review! anCnoc 24 is available from Master Of Malt priced at £115.95 and The Whisky Exchange for £116 . As mentioned previously in the article, it is presented at 46% ABV, un-chill filtered, and natural colour.

anCnoc 24 Years Old – Review

Colour : Warm gold.

On the nose : The sherry influence is immediately apparent, with a lovely sharp, sweet, balsamic note the first thing that strikes me, along with prune juice. We have lots of intense, fruity orange peel, overripe banana, and peaches, along with richness from raisin, sultana, honey, muscavado sugar and butter toffee. There is a light spice of cinnamon and clove.

In the mouth : A good oily mouth feel. I really like the sensations on this one. It’s sweet fruit – orange marmalade rather than the peels this time – along with raisins and dates. There’s a warming ginger spice, which has an effervescence that has the effect of reminding me of ginger ale. Then a bitterness comes through in the form of black treacle and leather, but stays in check rather than asserting too much, and subsides to bring back more of the sweet fruits and continuing ginger. We then get some black tea working its way in, with a touch of cream added seconds later. Unusual, but great. In the finish we get some apple peels coming through, with light oak, a tickle of black pepper and double cream.

Conclusions:

It’s fair to say I like this one. From the sharp, sweet nose, to the journey of sensations on the palate, it’s a winner all the way for me. It is matured in a combination of ex-sherry and ex-bourbon casks, and although the sherry certainly does do a lot of the heavy lifting in terms of the flavours and aromas, the bourbon cask influence is still very apparent too. I’d love to know the cask proportions and types in more detail.

As for the value thing… well, I guess we all have to have our own individual opinion of what we feel is worth spending our hard earned money on, and no other person should be able to dictate what you buy. I have been guilty of calling out what I perceive as poor value in the past, and no doubt I will again. You may not even care about the value in some cases. You have the cash and you want the whisky regardless.

We ticked every box with this anCnoc before tasting, and in my opinion, there is a massive tick in the quality box too. It’s hard to argue against this being an excellent value whisky.

Score: 8/10

Photo courtesy of The Whisky Exchange.

Like it? Share it! Spread the whisky love:

  • Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)
  • Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)
  • Click to share on Pinterest (Opens in new window)
  • Click to share on Tumblr (Opens in new window)
  • Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)
  • Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)
  • Click to print (Opens in new window)
  • Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)

' src=

Nice review Andrew. I have the AnCnoc 24 open at the moment. It’s a cracking whisky especially at the price.

I found these few sentences from your review interesting:

“You have to remember, the costs of building a distillery and laying down stock in decent wood is vast, and there is a clear need to recoup some of those early expenses as quickly as possible to pay those bills.”

I don’t know of any other customers that make these sorts of excuses for companies trying to sell them their product other than whisky fans.

If a new Pizza place opened up in town and I found out there Pizzas were 50% more expensive. I’d want to know why? If the answer was there pizzas didn’t justify the extra money but pizza ovens aren’t cheap and they have to get back their investment. My response would be that as a customer that wasn’t my problem. They either priced their pizzas competitively or I’d just buy from somewhere else. Those are the standard rules of commerce. If the whisky is good and they price it competitively it will sell and over time they’ll make back their investment. As whisky fans we seem to make excuses for distilleries seemingly overcharging and I find it strange.

ancnoc distillery tour

Thanks Dan. I shared that same opinion for some time, and it’s a valid one for sure. However, the more I think about the quality we are getting from these new distillers, the more I think about how much they must be spending on high quality wood to mature the whisky in such a short space of time. You may get an older product at the same price from a distillery that has been operating for decades, but how much has it cost them to store that whisky in their warehouse? Not a lot, and they probably haven’t had to spend as much on the casks. As long as the quality is there, I am happy to pay for it more than the age statement….within reason of course. Even I couldn’t bring myself to spend big money on young whisky.

Speaking of newer distilleries I did the distillery tour of your local distillery Aber Falls today. They are doing a second release mid September. This release will be bottled at 40% and priced at less than £30. It will also be sold at Tesco.

I asked the tour guide if they would be doing any more higher abv releases at 46% again in future? She said they had a few releases planned and a fill your own bottle option at the distillery.

So I think I’ll give next month’s release a miss and just pop into the distillery when I’m in North Wales and they’ve got the option to bottle your own.

That’s great info, thanks Dan. I’m not against Aber Falls doing a lower ABV, lower priced supermarket bottling, but I really hope they don’t neglect us whisky fans that want the higher ABV and non-chill filtered etc. The inaugural release I thought was rather good. Perhaps they are following the Penderyn model of providing both options. I hope!

The guide was a little vague about what they will be producing in future. She probably hasn’t been told and just picks up on rumours etc. Or maybe they haven’t fully decided yet She?

She did specifically say that they wouldn’t be following Penderyn as they have too many bottles in their range and it gets confusing.

When I mentioned I like a higher abv as I mentioned she said they’re going to have a fill your own bottle at the distillery. She also said they will be doing some special releases and have some Port casks and also some French red wine casks they’ll be using for some of those.

' src=

Nice review, thanks! I really like AnCnoc 24 and it does represent excellent value in today’s market. I can only think of Glenfarclas as another producer that has a similar age statement in that price range (the GF25 is also a favourite of mine). The reassurances from producers about NAS whiskies when they began to appear on shelves have turned out to be a Trojan horse. They have created a new floor for entry level prices and now most stuff with an age statement is sold at a premium, unfortunately. I’m grateful therefore that Inverhouse didn’t add NAS bottlings as the entry level expressions when they revamped the Balblair and Old Pulteney ranges. However they certainly ‘premiumised’ the older age statements and I was afraid that AnCnoc would shortly follow. To be fair it’s been quiet on that front but for how long?

Thanks bifter. Yes there is always a worry they will raise their prices at some point. If budgets allow, it is certainly worth stocking up sooner rather than later.

There are indeed many distilleries that charge a high premium for the older age statements, and it is a shame, as the cost of holding onto the stock for a few extra years can’t justify that jump in price.

' src=

Hi Andrew, it’s good to see a Welshman on board. I’m from the south but I spent two extremely happy years in Harlech in the early 90’s. (I love North Wales.) I pretty much agree with your message. As for the anCnoc 24 I can obviously agree that it is good value but I have to say I wish it was better for its age. It’s good mature whisky for a great price but it lacks the wow factor I was hoping for. It reminds me of a good old fashioned 16-21 year old. Aaargh, I have no reason to criticise it but I wish it was better and perhaps that is why the distillery have priced it like they have. Cheers. WT

Leave a Reply Cancel reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Post Comment

Currently you have JavaScript disabled. In order to post comments, please make sure JavaScript and Cookies are enabled, and reload the page. Click here for instructions on how to enable JavaScript in your browser.

Ancnoc 2001 bottle & Tube

anCnoc 2001 Vintage

ancnoc 35 year old

anCnoc 35 Years Old

ancnoc blas

anCnoc Blas

Begin typing your search above and press return to search. Press Esc to cancel.

Online Store

  • Latest News
  • Whisky Weekend
  • Instant Expert
  • The Magazine
  • M. Shanken Communications
  • Join the Whisky Advocate Retailer Club
  • Newsletters
  • Advertise With Us

anCnoc: Rethinking the Details Makes a Singular Malt

anCnoc single malt is made at Knockdhu Distillery, one of the quirkiest producers in Scotland.

anCnoc: Rethinking the Details Makes a Singular Malt

August 24, 2021 –––––– Susannah Skiver Barton , , , ,

A rguably the most indecipherable scotch name in a sea of them, anCnoc (pronounced a-NOCK, meaning “the hill;” the distillery's actual name is Knockdhu) makes up for its curious moniker with clean, clear flavor. Knockdhu opened in 1894, though nearly a century passed before its whisky was bottled as a single malt. “The place was a bit unloved,” says distillery manager Gordon Bruce, who since 2006 has been upgrading Knockdhu to make production more efficient and environmentally friendly. Even so, the distillery remains cheerfully old school, with not a single screen or monitor to be found; the most high-tech tool used by staff is a calculator. “The guys are so good” they don't need more advanced technology, Bruce notes.

Bruce's minor but ingenious tweaks surely help, starting with the wort, the sugary liquid created during mashing. It goes through a custom filter, inspired by a cyclone-style vacuum cleaner, to remove even the tiniest particles: the clearer the wort, the cleaner the whisky's flavor. At Knockdhu, the wort ferments in six regular washbacks; after about 45 hours, it gets filled into two large “fermentation vessels,” allowing for a longer fermentation time to create a super estery wash that's distilled into bright fruity spirit, ideal for maturation in bourbon casks.

Only about 20% of Knockdhu's production is destined for anCnoc single malt, with the rest going into blends. The distillery makes peated whiskies as well, which showcase its characteristic restraint and purity with an added smoky dimension. No longer unloved, anCnoc has found its niche.

Discover More Hidden Treasures of Single Malt Scotch

Image Credit:

10 Great Getaways for the Traveling Whisky Lover

Burns night dinner recipes with a modern twist, the worm tub: an old-school method, but not a vanished art.

The Whiskey Reviewer A World of Whiskey, Poured Every Weekday

Ancnoc 12 year old scotch review.

in A , Between $31 to $60 , Scotch Whisky , Whiskey Reviews September 25, 2018 0

By Emma Briones

anCnoc 12 Year Old (Credit: Inver House)

Summer afternoons call for a fresh whisky, and while some may think that a fresh whisky might be simple, it shouldn’t mean that. anCnoc 12 is one of those fresh, yet complex, whiskies that may revive a fatigued person on a hot afternoon.

Tagged with: Review Scotch Single Malt

Leave a Reply Cancel reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Currently you have JavaScript disabled. In order to post comments, please make sure JavaScript and Cookies are enabled, and reload the page. Click here for instructions on how to enable JavaScript in your browser.

To visit our website, you must be of an age at which the purchase and consumption of alcohol is permitted according to the legislation in your country of residence. If there are no laws on this matter then you must be at least 18 years old.

Alcohol abuse is dangerous for your health.

anCnoc encourages you to drink responsibly. www.drinkaware.co.uk

Terms & Conditions

We want to give you the best possible experience whilst viewing our website, and to do this we use cookies. Check out our cookie policy for info on cookies and tracking technologies.

AnCnoc (2) Mash Tun

The traditional methods used to bring anCnoc to life may have stood the test of time, but in keeping with our whisky’s contemporary credentials we continue to embrace innovation and place sustainability at the heart of the production process. Recycling our waste and turning it to the benefit of our local environment ensures a successful marriage of time-honoured craftsmanship and an eco-friendly outlook.

AnCnoc (23) Field

PIONEERING WETLANDS

Within our distillery grounds, we’ve developed a ground-breaking wetlands programme by using the excess waters from the mash house, tun room and spent lees from the spirit still. Instead of sending this away in tankers, we treat it onsite and then use it to support diverse plant and animal life around the distillery, return water to the local burn and remove inefficient vehicle miles. It’s an initiative which underlines our commitment to environmental sustainability and ecological balance.

Pheasant

The Knockdhu Ecology

The wetlands has a surface area of 2000 square metres, is home to almost 21,000 plants comprising numerous species and has attracted a diverse range of wildlife that now call our distillery grounds home. Our scheme has full support from SEPA (the Scottish Environmental Protection Agency), resulting in a carbon reduction of approximately 45 tonnes per annum and has resulted in ten tankers being taken off the road every week.

AnCnoc (5) Washbacks

Every last Drop

As well as supporting local plant and animal life, our water is of course a precious and fundamental ingredient in making whisky, which is why we treasure every drop. All the water that we extract from the springs is now used at least seven times to reduce waste. With water scarcity on the rise, this is an invaluable initiative which ensures that, from supplying the condensers to cleaning the washbacks, not a splash of our whisky’s lifeblood goes unused.

Pagoda roof stained glass window

WINDOW OF OPPORTUNITY

Our commitment to sustainability and innovation is nowhere better illustrated than by the construction of a new dunnage warehouse using recycled traditional granite reclaimed from a warehouse which collapsed during heavy snow falls in 2010. Built by local craftsmen, the warehouse’s finishing touch is a stunning stained glass window depicting the distillery’s pagoda. It lends a timeless yet contemporary focal point to the project.

AnCnoc (29) Warehouse

CONSISTENCY & QUALITY

Of course, the core function of our dunnage warehouses is to mature our wonderful whisky, which is aged in hand-selected American oak ex-bourbon casks and Spanish oak ex-sherry barrels. The reclaimed granite used for our most recently-constructed warehouse plays a key role, with the thick walls helping to maintain a stable temperature and contributing to the whisky's consistency and quality.

12YO FLUX SHOT 1

Current range

anCnoc is a rather curious whisky. You see, this fine single malt is created using traditional production methods. It's just that we use them to make a refreshingly modern whisky.

Be the first to know about all things anCnoc

  • Skip to primary navigation
  • Skip to main content
  • Skip to primary sidebar

The Whiskey Jug

A whiskey blog for whiskey reviews, whiskey cocktails and commentary

anCnoc 12 Single Malt Review

Josh Peters · March 29, 2022 · 2 Comments

  • 3 Pinterest
  • 1 Love This

AnCnoc 12 years is the basic release from the Knockdhu distillery. Founded in 1893 Knockdhu has changed hands several times over the years, but it wasn’t until they were bought by Inver House that bottlings named after the distillery ceased and the name AnCnoc was born.

anCnoc 12 Single Malt Review

In 1993 Inver House changed the bottling names to anCnoc but it wasn’t until 2003, after Inver House was bought by Pacific Spirits, that the AnCnoc 12yo became the baseline official bottling. From that point on various releases have happened and more expensive bottles with bigger age statements have been released along with special editions.

Let’s get to drinkin’!

anCnoc 12 Single Malt – Details and Tasting Notes

Whiskey details.

Style : Single Malt (Scotch) Region : Highlands Distiller : Knockdhu

Mash Bill : 100% Malted Barley Cask : ex-Bourbon Age : 12 Years ABV : 43%

anCnoc 12 Single Malt Price : $55*

Related Whiskey

AnCnoc Flaughter AnCnoc Rutter Glenmorangie The Original 10 Years Glenmorangie 15 Years The Deveron 12 Years

White background tasting shot with the anCnoc 12 Single Malt bottle and a glass of whiskey next to it.

anCnoc 12 Single Malt Tasting Notes

NOSE Graham-like malt, banana, vanilla, honey, dried fruit, cinnamon, light tofffee and vanilla.

Soft, easy and pleasant. Nothin wrong with the aroma.

PALATE Malty, dried fruit, vanilla, cinnamon, nuts and a bit of char and banana chips.

Not a super complex palate, but what’s there is nice and warm.

FINISH Medium -> Fruity and malty slight char

BALANCE, BODY and FEEL Well balanced, medium body, warm light feel.

anCnoc 12 Single Malt – Overall Thoughts and Score

A well done, but fairly standard malt, nothing to get too excited about, but nothing at all to dislike. No off notes, no harshness, but not complex or deep. Just a good, slightly above average, easy drinking malt with a very subtle smoke to it. And I mean s u b t l e.

Sometimes I pick it up, sometimes I don’t. In a way it’s kind of fun to get that smoky surprise now and then, but when I grab something looking for that smoke, I want it to be there so it’s not what I’d call a reliable profile. Though that doesn’t stop the anCnoc 12 from being a great utilitarian whisky.

It’s sippable, it’s mixable, it’s easy to crack open and share with guests when you don’t want to get into the really good stuff… it’s a table whisky. And that’s not a bad thing. We all need a decent table whisky in our cuppboards. And if you’re looking for one, give the anCnoc 12 Single Malt a shot!

SCORE: 3/5 (above average, worth checking out ~ B- | 80-82)

*Disclosure: The bottle for this Scotch review was graciously sent to me by the company without obligation. The views, opinions, and tasting notes are 100% my own.

anCnoc 12 Single Malt Label

anCnoc 12 Single Malt Review $55

User review, more from the whiskey jug.

Malt Nuts: Glen Keith Tasting

Nice review, Josh. The version of anCnoc 12 we get here in Ontario is only 40% abv (insert Ralfy rant about “integrity presentation” here). I agree that we all need a no frills “table whisky”, but my choice for that is usually Aultmore 12 since it’s similar in subtle but pleasant character (honey, flowers, a little nuttiness, subtle smoke sometimes). Aultmore’s advantage (imho) is that it’s 46% abv, NCF, and natural colour. It’s the same price as anCnoc 12 so for me it’s a no-brainer.

Between the two options you laid out, I’d take the Aultmore 12 as well. Cheers Joel!

Save my name, email, and website in this browser for the next time I comment.

ancnoc distillery tour

COMMENTS

  1. Knockdhu Distillery

    Find out where the magic happens at anCnoc by visiting our Knockdhu Distillery in Aberdeenshire. We have daily tours available, Monday to Friday.

  2. anCnoc

    Explore our history Find your perfect pairing Discover a modern twist on traditional whisky with our extensive range at anCnoc. Find out about our highland single malt whisky collection online.

  3. Knockdhu Distillery

    A fantastic afternoon spent exploring this wonderful distillery. The tour combined a great blend of humour and information. It's not some big glossy commercial tour, but the distillery itself it's understated, informative and hugely enjoyable. ... I had family and friends up for a whisky tour and anCnoc was a must see distillery, we arrived ...

  4. Knockdhu distillery

    Coordinates: 57°33′48″N 2°45′33″W AnCnoc Peatheart is one of the most heavily peated whiskies of the Knockdhu distillery. Knockdhu distillery is a whisky distillery situated in Knock, Banffshire and owned by Inver House Distillers Limited . History

  5. Knockdhu

    The small Speyside distillery of Knockdhu has a very impressive range of official bottlings called An Cnoc, despite its relatively small size and production capacity. The distillery has two ranges: one that focuses on the modern bottlings, and one that focuses on the distillery's vintage releases. The modern range includes a 12 year old, 16 ...

  6. anCnoc

    How is Knockdhu Whisky produced? The AnCnoc is distilled in only 2 . The annual production of a Wash and a Spirit Still is just under a million. Litres of whisky a year. The water comes from nearby sources at Knock Hill. AnCnoc single malts are placed on the market in the age groups 12, 16 and 21 years.

  7. KNOCKDHU DISTILLERY: All You Need to Know BEFORE You Go ...

    Top ways to experience Knockdhu Distillery and nearby attractions. Aberdeen's Distillery Discovery Tour. 23. Recommended. Food & Drink. from. £27.00. per adult. Dunrobin Castle and Glenmorangie Distillery - Local Private Tour.

  8. Knockdhu Whisky

    The distillery then reopened in 1933, but closed for the Second World War. During this time the buildings were used to accommodate soldiers from India. Inver House acquired the distillery in 1988 and two years later released the first official bottling. A further three years passed and the first bottling of anCnoc was released.

  9. Highland Whisky Festival

    Knockdhu Distillery, home of anCnoc whisky, showcasing centuries of tradition, process and craft through an exclusive tasting and tour on 28th September 2023.

  10. AnCnoc

    2 Region Highland Production type Single malt Produced at Knockdhu AnCnoc History The Ancnoc brand came into existence just a few short years after Inver House Distillers bought Knockdhu distillery from United Distillers in 1988.

  11. Review: anCnoc 18 Years Old (2019)

    Fast-forward to 1988. Knockdhu has fallen victim to the whisky crisis of the 1980s. It almost joined the ranks of Brora, Port Ellen, Convalmore and the likes, but Inver House swooped in, bought the distillery from DCL and revived it.

  12. Knockdhu

    Knockdhu distillery, founded in 1894 and currently owned by Inver House Distillers Ltd. Located in Speyside, Scotland. ... Shop & Tour Columns: ID; Stated Age ... anCnoc 16-year-old 125th Anniversary of Knockdhu Distillery: 16: 56.3 % Vol. 2019: 85.80: anCnoc 16-year-old : 16:

  13. anCnoc 2002 Vintage & 24 Years Old

    anCnoc 2002 Vintage & 24 Years Old Mark May 22, 2017 Knockdhu Distillery, home of the anCnoc brand, is a charming place. I visited it a couple of weeks ago, whilst in the region for the Spirit of Speyside festival - it's a little off the beaten track, set in some wonderfully gentle countryside.

  14. anCnoc 125th Anniversary releases

    Scotch anCnoc 125th Anniversary releases Dora November 1, 2019 Distillery tours are so much fun… if you like whisky, of course. With a few now under my belt, I feel like I can usually put them into one of two categories. There are the informative ones, which are so good; I'm not so much of a geek, but I try to soak in as much as I can!

  15. anCnoc 24 Years Old

    anCnoc 24 Years Old - Review. Colour: Warm gold. On the nose: The sherry influence is immediately apparent, with a lovely sharp, sweet, balsamic note the first thing that strikes me, along with prune juice. We have lots of intense, fruity orange peel, overripe banana, and peaches, along with richness from raisin, sultana, honey, muscavado ...

  16. anCnoc: Rethinking the Details Makes a Singular Malt

    A rguably the most indecipherable scotch name in a sea of them, anCnoc (pronounced a-NOCK, meaning "the hill;" the distillery's actual name is Knockdhu) makes up for its curious moniker with clean, clear flavor. Knockdhu opened in 1894, though nearly a century passed before its whisky was bottled as a single malt. "The place was a bit unloved," says distillery manager Gordon Bruce, who ...

  17. anCnoc

    LP6562. anCnoc - Highland Single Malt 12 year old Whisky. 70cl | 40%. The Knockdhu Distillery is situated beneath the black knock hill, known to the locals by its Gaelic name anCnoc. This AnCnoc 12 year old Single Malt Whisky is rich, sweet, and gentle, with aromas and flavours of honey, lemon curd, sweet pepper and hi...

  18. AnCnoc 12 Year Review

    Made by Knockdhu distillery, the AnCnoc name was chosen as to not confuse it with the nearby Knockando distillery. But pronunciation aside, the 12 year old constitutes the entry whisky in the core range of this distillery located on the outer edges of Speyside. Owned by Inver House, Knockdhu's core range includes 12 year, 18, and 21 year old ...

  19. Highland Single Malt Scotch Whisky Range

    Explore anCnoc's refreshing range of highland single malt scotch whisky, specially crafted in our Knockdhu Distillery. Browse our full selection online.

  20. AnCnoc 12 Year Old Scotch Review

    Today's pick, anCnoc 12, is the entry-level whisky of the Scotch brand. A statement of intent of the house style, produced under the watchful eye of Gordon Bruce. anCnoc 12 years old has been matured in American oak ex-bourbon barrels for at least 12 years. It is usually bottled at 40% volume (80 proof) without chill filtration (but you might ...

  21. How anCnoc is Created

    CONSISTENCY & QUALITY Of course, the core function of our dunnage warehouses is to mature our wonderful whisky, which is aged in hand-selected American oak ex-bourbon casks and Spanish oak ex-sherry barrels.

  22. anCnoc 12 Single Malt Review

    AnCnoc 12 years is the basic release from the Knockdhu distillery. Founded in 1893 Knockdhu has changed hands several times over the years, but it wasn't until they were bought by Inver House that bottlings named after the distillery ceased and the name AnCnoc was born.